pdf file download in asp net c# : Edit multiple pdf metadata SDK application API .net html windows sharepoint sustainable_paths3-part118

Funding sources are: 
ARC grants  
Departmental/University funds  
External sources: Melbourne City Council; City of Yarra; Australia Council New media Arts 
Board; Move Records, and The National Library of Australia 
Financial sustainability is an issue for this research community. The need to constantly seek external 
funding via annual grants place pressure on the project and does not allow for staff longevity of 
employment, risking a loss of skills that jeopardize ongoing operations. 
Data Management Processes 
Data Acquisition: Data are provided to the collection by the Designer/Artist/Composer/Curator in a 
variety of formats. There are currently no restrictions on the formats accepted by the collection. 
Contributions undergo a variety of processes to enable the presentation of the integrated work in a web 
ready format. 
IP/Copyright of Data and scholarly output: The IP of the works in the collection remain with the artist 
however they provide the Project with the license use and display the work
75
 
Data Quantities:  The archive is an ongoing and growing collection. Currently the archive consists of 345 
entities with references to 340 published resources; 140 of the works are in multimedia products. The web 
based data constitutes only around 2GB of data. But when all the back ups and data stored on CDs and 
DVDs are included and software etc it would ten times this.  
Data storage and Backup: This project aims to preserve the collection indefinitely. Currently, the web-
based collection is managed using OHRM
76
. The dynamic content (PostgeSQL) with php scripts) and the 
site free-text indexing (htDig) is located on the AUSTEHC server and the static pages are located on the 
Arts Faculty server. Data on AUSTEHC  server is backed up weekly with offsite tape backup. The Arts 
Faculty server also has a tape back up protocol. There are essentially three versions of all of the data that 
is in the OHRM at different levels of preservability with one being proprietary. 
All other digital project data are stored on desk top computers. Back up copies are made when new data 
are contributed to the collection; usually on CD and DVD and kept on site. Administrative records and 
information about the project and the collection is stored in a variety of digital and non-digital formats. 
Some of this data is possibly at risk of loss should staff leave the unit. 
The preservation of core digital data was identified as a top priority for the project. Data that needs 
preserving includes MPEG files, PDF, Quick Time movies, MPEG movies, the OHRM database and 
administrative records. 
Data formats: Data formats and software are a combination of Open Source and Commercial. The 
OHRM, an open source tool from AUSTEHC, is the core management tool for the collection. 
Data are acquired from contributors in a variety of digital and non-digital formats. 
Images: architectural plans, slides, prints, diagrams, sketches, TIFF, JPEG, PDF 
Audio: CD, DAT 
Video: MiniDV, VHS, MPEG, Quicktime movies 
Text: Word, RTF, .txt 
Codes 
The data exist in different versions. To illustrate, a high resolution copy of media may be contributed on 
either a DV tape or a 44.1 kilohertz sound file, but it is published using 128 bits per second MPEG version 
75
Information about the Deed of Licence is available at: http://www.sounddesign.unimelb.edu.au/site/contribute.html
76
Online Heritage Resource Manager, - open source context based resource discovery and access system developed by 
AUSTEHC. More information available at:   http://www.austehc.unimelb.edu.au/ohrm/
31
Edit multiple pdf metadata - add, remove, update PDF metadata in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Allow C# Developers to Read, Add, Edit, Update and Delete PDF Metadata
pdf metadata editor online; view pdf metadata in explorer
Edit multiple pdf metadata - VB.NET PDF metadata library: add, remove, update PDF metadata in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Enable VB.NET Users to Read, Write, Edit, Delete and Update PDF Document Metadata
add metadata to pdf; batch pdf metadata
of this sound file. Both versions are stored and at a later date this can be reassessed. The artist is informed 
and consulted when reformatting of their work is necessary.  
Metadata:  The metadata schema around the collection has been built locally by the project team and 
focuses on describing the relationships between the artwork, the defining of the particular type of work 
and how it relates to other entities within the database. This is incorporated into the context of the OHRM 
interface.  There is also technical documentation about formats and conversions carried out on the files. 
No metadata manual or dictionary has been formalized to date but there are standards that have been 
developed. The National Library has funded the conversion of data to its metadata system. 
Data Access, Authentication, Authorisation and Security:  This is a web based, open access collection 
freely available to the general public. Contributions to the collection are encouraged from all sound 
designers of public space in Australia.  
PHASE TWO CONSULTATION 
This project expressed interest in further consultation to identify and review sustainability issues around 
the long term preservation of the collection and their records.  
This activity has commenced and will 
continue as part of the services provided by Information Services personnel in Information 
Management.
Activities included: 
The Digital Repository Coordinator contacted the NLA to commence processing for regular 
archiving of the Australian Sound Design Project website: 
http://www.sounddesign.unimelb.edu.au/site/index1.html
Publisher’s copyright and disclaimer 
statement was provided and the site is now being archived by Pandora. It is located at: 
http://pandora.nla.gov.au/tep/58565
and will be updated at the end of August 2006.   
3.1.11 
The Kidneyome project  
The Melbourne Kidneyome project forms part of the Physiome Project; a worldwide collaboration of 
loosely connected research teams in New Zealand, Australia, France, the US, the UK and Denmark. The 
Physiome Commission of the International Union of Physiological Sciences, IUPS, provides leadership to 
the Physiome Project through its satellite and central meetings and through the University of Auckland's 
IUPS Physiome Website
77
.   
The focus of this audit was the Melbourne role in the “eResearch Grid Environment of Distributed Kidney 
Models and Resources” project.  This project
78
aims to establish an interactive web interface at the 
international level, to a collection of distributed legacy models at all levels of kidney physiology, with, for 
each curated model: documentation, physiological context, easily interpreted output, a statement of model 
limitations, interactive exploration, and user-customisation of selected parameter values. Interaction with 
the resource will be through a 3D-virtual-kidney graphical user interface (GUI). 
Project team members consulted were:  
Professor Peter Harris, Faculty IT Unit, Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry and Health Sciences, 
Project leader. 
Dr Andrew Lonie, Department of Information Systems, Faculty of Science   
Project Partners/Collaboration: 
Professor Peter Harris - Department of Physiology, University of Melbourne 
Dr Andrew Lonie - Department of Information Systems, University of Melbourne 
77
http://www.physiome.org.nz/
78
Information taken from project proposal: D3 Outline of proposed initiative, provided by project team. 
32
VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
NET empowers VB.NET developers to implement fast and high quality PDF conversions to or from multiple supported images and PDF Hyperlink Edit. PDF Metadata Edit.
pdf xmp metadata viewer; add metadata to pdf file
VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple
Divide PDF file into multiple files by outputting PDF file size. Split Split PDF Document into Multiple PDF Files Demo Code in VB.NET. You
edit multiple pdf metadata; pdf xmp metadata editor
Dr Raj Buyya, Department of Computer Science and Software Engineering, University of 
Melbourne 
Dr S. Randall Thomas, Informatiques, Biologie Intégrative et Systèmes Complexes, Universite 
d'Evry Val d'Essonne, France 
Department Mathematics, Duke University, North Carolina, US 
Department Physiology and Biophysics, SUNY Health Sciences Center, Stonybrook, New York, 
US 
Bioengineering Institute, Auckland University, New Zealand 
Cornell University Medical College, Department of Medicine, New York, US 
Institute of Medical Physiology, University of Copenhagen, Denmark 
VPAC and APAC 
Funding sources are   
ARC grants  
Departmental/University funds  
External grants via the collaboration 
Data Management Processes 
Data Acquisition: The data are currently acquired from within the collaboration. Data generated by 
synchrotron experiments or CT scanners, are integrated with simulated models developed by the 
collaboration and re-used by research partners. Acquisition occurs via the Grid interface (using Globus). 
This grid infrastructure (illustrated
79
below) is being developed as part of the collaboration, and identifies 
how data will be stored, distributed and accessed.  
eResearch
Grid Portal
Grid
Broker
Kidney
Model1
Kidney
Model2
Kidney
Model3
(Medullary urine-
concentration 
model)
(TGF 
Simulation)
(Proximal Tubule 
Simulation)
Quantitative
Kidney database
at Melbourne
Australian Server
Kidney 
Model
Registry
Duke University, 
USA
Evry, France Server
Cornell University,
USA
VO and
Authorization
Service
Experiment
Plan
Result Archival
with meta data
Melbourne Server
Results
Visualisation
on Desktop
Advanced
Visualisation
Facility
VPAC, Melbourne
1
2
3
4
5
6
6
6
7
8
9
Melbourne Grid
Server
eResearch
Grid Portal
Grid
Broker
Kidney
Model1
Kidney
Model2
Kidney
Model3
(Medullary urine-
concentration 
model)
(TGF 
Simulation)
(Proximal Tubule 
Simulation)
Quantitative
Kidney database
at Melbourne
Australian Server
Kidney 
Model
Registry
Duke University, 
USA
Evry, France Server
Cornell University,
USA
VO and
Authorization
Service
Experiment
Plan
Result Archival
with meta data
Melbourne Server
Results
Visualisation
on Desktop
Advanced
Visualisation
Facility
VPAC, Melbourne
1
1
2
2
3
3
4
4
5
5
6
6
6
6
6
6
7
7
8
8
9
9
Melbourne Grid
Server
© 2006 Kidneyome project. 
Grid architecture for coupling 
distributed kidney models. 
IP/Copyright of Data and scholarly output:  The ownership of the data and its IP remains a matter of 
discussion among the international collaboration, particularly as it relates to the larger Physiome 
consortium.  
79
The diagram below was taken from the Project proposal provided by the project team.
33
C# PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in C#.net, ASP.
Free online C#.NET source code for combining multiple PDF pages together in .NET framework. C# Demo Code: Combine and Merge Multiple PDF Files into One in .NET.
adding metadata to pdf; online pdf metadata viewer
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view, annotate, create and convert PDF
RaterEdge HTML5 PDF Editor empower C#.NET users to edit PDF pages with multiple manipulation functionalities in ASP.NET application.
pdf metadata viewer; adding metadata to pdf files
Local processing of data is Melbourne IP as such but the new models are made available to the 
collaboration. It is expected that this is acknowledged and that the IP remains with the creator but 
accessible to other researchers. Raw data are accessed across the collaboration. 
Data Quantities: The amount of data currently held is variable across the collaboration.  
The Melbourne project maintains a small amount of data that is mostly derived/post-processed anatomical 
data (<1MB – text files) but it is projected that this will increase as the project progresses over the next 2-3 
years to around 100GB. 
The raw data are what is important to keep long term and this is currently maintained by other members of 
the collaboration. This is data produced from ‘one-off’ never to be repeated experiments in the 
synchrotron. There is a lot of this data from a single experiment. It is estimated that these holdings will be 
in the vicinity of 500GB by project mid-late stages. 
Data storage and Backup:  This is a collection of national and international significance (for researchers, 
teaching and practitioners in clinical practice) and will continue to grow as the Kidneyome and Physiome 
projects continue to plot and model all body systems. The Quantitative Kidney Database (QKDB
80
) which 
will be mirrored in Australia (as per diagram above) is public access with approximately 1,000 entries in 
the database; this will grow very quickly now. This database also contains references and comments 
relating to scholarly works which are accessible via interrogation of the system
81
. The QKDB is hosted 
and maintained offshore and based at LaMI, Evry University, France
82
Current needs for this project are small but these will grow rapidly as the data continues to grow. Current 
resources are not sufficient for the needs of the project and are in effect the researchers’ departmental 
allocations. Data will need to be housed elsewhere and some of the data could be maintained off line. A 
data centre/storage facility either within the institution or off site would meet the projected needs of the 
group. 
Locally produced data are maintained on the Faculty servers including a back up facility. Despite a 
fundamental confidence that the data are well managed by these departmental processes there are no 
specific records around these processes. General information provided included: 
Data are maintained on the Departmental server (Information Systems-Science). It is assumed that 
this server will be under a standard back up protocol but the researcher was not aware of the 
specifics of this process. There is also an expectation that data are backed up on tape but how 
readily accessible this data would be if needed is unclear. 
Researchers maintain a single CD backup which is created at the time when the file is originally 
created. There is no maintenance or checking of these CDs. 
No information available regarding offsite data backup of the derived data. 
Raw data are mostly generated elsewhere in the collaboration and therefore available via the Grid 
network. This would not be the case for raw data are generated and maintained by the Melbourne 
team. 
It is unclear what the impact of system breakdown would have on project workflow delays and 
turnaround in the case of disaster recovery. 
Data formats:  Open standard formats including locally produced tools and applications by the 
collaboration are used in this project. Most of the data are in simple binary format. MicroCT, CellML
83
(XML based) is used to store and exchange computer-based mathematical models. A variety of open 
source freeware software is used for analysis/post-processing of data, e.g. when rendering data into a 3D 
image for presentation. 
80
http://www.lami.univ-evry.fr/~srthomas/qkdb/index.php
81
Search accessed at: http://www.lami.univ-evry.fr/~srthomas/qkdb/query/query_form.php
82
Le Laboratoire de Méthodes Informatiques (LaMI) – Data Processing Research Centre: http://www.lami.univ-
evry.fr/presentation
83
http://www.cellml.org/
34
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Able to add and insert one or multiple pages to existing adobe PDF document in VB.NET. Add and Insert Multiple PDF Pages to PDF Document Using VB.
search pdf metadata; pdf metadata editor
C# Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images to
Component for combining multiple image formats into one or multiple PDF file in C#.NET. Any piece of area is able to be cropped and pasted to PDF page.
remove pdf metadata; remove metadata from pdf
Metadata: The current project is looking at the development of standardised schemas for classifying 
information (essentially metadata schema) for this community. VPAC is working with the project team on 
the ontology generation and the taxonomy side of this. It is clear from the project’s goals that the areas 
which will be the focus of the taxonomy around the kidney models themselves will include: 
Model documentation 
Physiological context 
Interpreted output 
A statement of model limitations 
Interactive exploration capabilities 
User-
customisation capabilities for selected parameter values. 
The global community has metadata schema around some of the formats used to store and transfer some 
data. CellML includes mathematics and metadata by leveraging existing languages, including MathML 
and RDF. FieldML (XML-based) is also used. The international Physiome collaboration is currently 
working on the ontology for the project looking at the different perspectives of the hierarchy including 
those of the National Library of Medicine, NIH. 
Data Access, Authentication, Authorisation and Security: Distributed data are accessed via the Grid; a 
closed environment only available to researchers within the collaboration. Authentication is via Globus 
protocol. 
The aim is to make the data, particularly the modelling data, widely available for research and 
practitioners in the clinical context 
84
The QKDB is open access with any user capable of submitting a query  to interrogate the database. 
Submitting data into the QKDB requires that the user to be an acknowledged scientist working in kidney 
research or a related field. An authentication process occurs at the website: http://www.lami.univ-
evry.fr/~srthomas/qkdb/login/create_account.php
and is managed in France.  
84
Query form is located at: http://www.lami.univ-evry.fr/~srthomas/qkdb/query/query_form.php
35
VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net
Combine multiple specified PDF pages in into single one file. using RasterEdge.XDoc. PDF; VB.NET Demo code to Combine and Merge Multiple PDF Files into One.
c# read pdf metadata; pdf metadata reader
C# PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file for C#
XDoc.PDF SDK for .NET empowers C# developers to implement fast and high quality PDF conversions to or from multiple supported images C#.NET: Edit PDF Metadata.
read pdf metadata java; endnote pdf metadata
3.2 Researcher Capabilities and Expertise 
The project identified a number of capabilities across the projects audited. 
Structured, collaborative data acquisition processes requiring integration of diverse data – 
AUSTEHC, PARADISEC, MMIM, ICCR-Education   
Grid technologies – Experimental Particle Physics, Dr Raj Buyya (Department of Computer 
Science and Software Engineering)  
Large dataset management - Experimental Particle Physics, Astrophysics 
Digitisation, archiving and preservation of print and multimedia data - PARADISEC and 
AUSTEHC 
HDMS – Cultural collection management tool, locally developed and supported by AUSTEHC   
OHRM - Web publishing tool for cultural collections, locally developed and supported by 
AUSTEHC 
Distributed virtual database/repository framework – MMIM 
Database management – HILDA, MMIM 
Video Analysis Research – particularly with StudioCode software  - ICCR-Education 
It became apparent during the project that there is limited opportunity to access information about the 
research expertise that exists across the university. Much of this exchange of information occurs by 
accident; often at social gathering or via loose networks among colleagues. 
3.3 Sustainability considerations 
3.3.1 
Technology Issues 
Each project has independently chosen its data and metadata formats and handling procedures. 
This has resulted in there being a variety of commercial and open source formats and software 
being used, and consequently, few options for sharing expertise at the technical level. 
The frequent loss, or threatened loss, of technical expertise due to project based funding model 
which does not include sustainability considerations. 
There was an unmet need for access to expertise, information and/or technology solutions raised 
by six of the eleven groups 
3.3.2 
Curation/Archiving Issues 
IP/Copyright of the raw data ownership varied across the groups. The ownership of data infers the onus to 
maintain the data.   
Six groups stated it belonged to the researcher/contributor of the data/item. 
One group stated it belonged to the global collaboration. 
One group stated it belonged to the instrument facility (observatory). 
One group stated it belonged to the research project partners. 
One group stated it belonged jointly to the researcher and the participant/patient. 
One group stated it belonged to the Australian government. 
Metadata:  
There are a variety of locally produced, national and international standards in use. 
The quality of metadata across groups was variable. 
Biomedical groups in particular, have underdeveloped metadata schema/ontology for their data – 
these are mostly under development in collaboration with international bodies. 
36
C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
The following C# codes explain how to split a PDF file into multiple ones by PDF bookmarks or outlines. Split PDF Document into Multiple PDF Files in C#.
preview edit pdf metadata; change pdf metadata creation date
VB.NET PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file
mechanisms, it can be used for multiple PDF to image PDF barcode reading, PDF barcode generation, PDF content extraction and metadata editing if
pdf metadata online; bulk edit pdf metadata
Access: 
Data are accessed in a number of ways across the groups audited. Most have or are developing distributed 
models of data presentation and storage to improve access. One group has data security requirements that 
prohibit electronic transfer of data. 
Research data versions are not stored by all communities. The onus remains with researchers accessing 
data for scholarly work to maintain their own copy of the data version that has been used for their 
analyses. 
Authentication and Authorisation: 
Groups have varying methods for the authorisation of users to access data; ranging from nothing at all 
(public anonymous access) to having requirements undertaking a legally binding contract regarding data 
access, use and storage. 
Three groups have their data accessible via a publicly available website. 
Two groups provided some access to their data via a public website but required authentication to 
access the data itself. 
Six groups had closed collections available only to project partners or researchers on 
application.  
3.3.3 
Data Storage Issues 
Storage needs varied across groups. The current and projected quantities of data varied widely and the 
projected storage requirements over the next ten years for these groups will be in the vicinity of 600+TB 
with the two physics groups requiring the bulk of this resource. All groups are currently doing some data 
management; however documentation of how the data is/should be managed throughout its life cycle tends 
to be poorly assembled. Eight groups identified the need for well managed data storage facilities, 
particularly for their off site back up needs and for long term preservation. Disaster recovery planning is 
mostly ad hoc suggesting a reliance on the faith that backed up data will be accessible and that project 
workflow will not be greatly affected should disaster strike. 
Three projects have their data managed offsite by an external store, two by APAC and one 
offshore;  
Five projects use Faculty servers, and 
Five projects manage their own server for storage (some in addition to using Faculty resources). 
Ten of the eleven groups stated the desire to store and preserve some of their data indefinitely. Eight of 
these projects do not have specific strategies in place for this preservation. 
3.3.4 
Sustainability Risk Factors 
Back up and disaster recovery protocols are not well documented. Four projects appear to be taking some 
levels of risk with their current practice for some aspect of the dataset management, e.g. no managed off 
site back up.  
Four projects identified a concerning lack of financial sustainability with short term project funding 
cycles. 
37
4. Discussion and recommendations  
In addition to the specific findings for each group audited, the project findings also provide information 
about more general sustainability of data management practices. Meeting the needs of the researchers 
interviewed will take resources, and at present much is left to the academic department; often leading to 
either no or limited action or to 'reinventing the wheel' and resulting in a less than efficient institutional 
response to eResearcher needs. 
These findings point to a number of issues that can help to inform an e-research strategy for the university. 
Eight recommendations have been formulated for consideration by key stakeholders. 
4.1 The importance of an institution-wide strategy for eResearch. 
The findings from this project reinforce the work of Professor Geoff Taylor, Ms Linda O’Brien and the 
eResearch Advisory Group, identifying the need for an institution-wide strategy to progress and manage 
eResearch engagement and support. In particular, the findings demonstrate that when it comes to digital 
data management, there is variable capability among our research communities to comply with the 
University’s Policy on the Management of Research Data and Records
85
and the (consultation draft) 
Australian Code for the Responsible Conduct of Research.
86
Data management, including access, 
discovery and storage, must be a fundamental component of such an institution-wide strategy. A broad 
eResearch strategy can also position the University to meet the challenges of the Research Quality and 
Research Accessibility Frameworks
87
Recommendations three to eight below provide some of the essentials for such strategic planning. The 
Research and Research Training Committee (R&RT) would provide the governance for enabling its 
implementation. 
Recommendation 1
: That the University develops a strategy that broadly addresses the 
policy, infrastructure, support and training needs of eResearch. 
Recommendation 2
: That the University’s R&RT Committee consider forming a 
subcommittee to provide governance for enabling eResearch at the university. This 
committee should have broad representation and include Information Services and 
eResearch leaders. 
4.2 A lack of information policies and guidelines 
There is a lack of best practice guidelines and policy statements available to support researchers with their 
data management decision making processes. The lack of shared language and terminology around many 
aspects of data and its management suggests the importance for all policies and guidelines to include clear 
definitions of concepts and terms used.  
Areas of need include: 
Implementation of research record keeping principles and requirements. 
Data management for short term sustainability and long term preservation. 
Metadata standards, principles and systems: 
 Across the discipline divide. 
85
http://www.unimelb.edu.au/records/research.html
86
http://www.research.unimelb.edu.au/hot/current.html#draft
87
http://www.research.unimelb.edu.au/hot/current.html#quality
38
 For raw and processed research data. 
 For web presentations. 
 For other scholarly works. 
Authentication and authorisation standards and systems for access and storage of scholarly IP. 
Recommendation 3 – that Information Services initiate a consultative process for the 
development of appropriate guidelines and, where relevant, policy statements, to 
support researchers with the management of their research data and records. 
4.3 Absence of a coordinated data management infrastructure for research. 
The findings suggest a need for centrally supported flexible data management, authentication and access 
systems. Groups audited were found to be managing their own data and developing their own access and 
presentation systems.  The need was also identified by several groups for managed data storage facilities. 
Groups are supporting a variety of software. Group needs around authentication and access differed; 
requiring a variety of public, local, national and international collaborator access. The need for data 
management capabilities that are internationally interoperable; allowing for local storage and collections 
to federate internationally was highlighted. There will also be a need to promote among the University 
research community our capacity for digital data management. This emphasis on developing and 
marketing ‘platforms for collaboration’ through ICT within and across institutions is a key aspect of the 
National Collaborative Research Infrastructure Strategy (see capability area 16).
88
4.3.1  A case for centrally supported data management, authentication and access systems  
A centrally managed data storage and access facility would provide a secure, backed up and sustainable 
repository for data. This would allow the groups to concentrate on research rather than technology and 
allow for data to be preserved beyond the life of the particular project. It would also encourage more 
standardization as groups would find it easier to choose similar software and standards to other groups 
(group wisdom) leading to a consolidation of expertise. A centrally supported system could also act as a 
base or starting point for those research groups with no existing data infrastructure, reducing the need for 
group level development efforts and leveraging central support and expertise. The institution (campus) has 
been identified as “a logical nexus for the development of cyberinfrastructure … and that it is worth 
considering a holistic view that would promote larger, sharable, campus systems”
89
.  
4.3.2  The need for flexible infrastructure 
Centrally supported infrastructure must accommodate the realities of the global collaborations of many of 
our eResearch communities. An authentication and access capability must allow for public, local, national 
and international collaborator access. Ideally, data management capabilities would be internationally 
interoperable and allow local storage and collections to federate internationally. It is recognised that it may 
not be possible for all research groups to take advantage of a centrally supported system as research 
domains and collaborations may dictate standards and software usage. 
Central services need to concentrate on providing the base technical support of systems and facilities and 
allow users freedom to use these in whatever way they want. Ideally, central service would act as utilities 
where the utility has no interest in what the user does with the service. 
Recommendation 4 – To review ICT infrastructure for research, paying urgent attention 
to data management infrastructure. 
88
See
http://www.dest.gov.au/sectors/research_sector/policies_issues_reviews/key_issues/ncris/platforms_for_collaboration.htm
89
Workshop funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF-US) to consider effective approaches for campus research 
cyberinfrastructure. Workshop report: http://middleware.internet2.edu/crcc/docs/internet2-crcc-report-200607.html
39
4.4 Capabilities needed by eResearchers 
The audit identified expertise used in the conduct of eResearch across a variety of disciplines. The 
findings show that an eResearch consultation service needs to include at a minimum, information and 
access to expertise in: 
Database management 
Middleware development, management and support 
 Data management systems 
 Grid and other distributed systems 
 Authentication and Authorisation management 
XML advice and expertise 
Metadata advice: metadata systems, schema and taxonomy development 
Curation and Preservation advice and support for raw data and scholarly output 
 Business case development advice and support 
 Discipline based advice and support around sustainable data format selection  
 Obsolescence planning – knowing what to keep and why and what to delete 
Recommendation 5
– To establish a structured consultation process for eResearch support 
4.5 Difficulty accessing information about eResearch activity and capability 
This project has identified problems around access to information around eResearch activity, capability 
and support with much information exchange occurring fortuitously. It is recommended that an 
information exchange strategy be established to increase the dissemination of information about support 
for eResearchers. A springboard to this process could be the delivery of an E-Research Expo in December 
2006 to showcase university-wide activity in eResearch.  
Recommendation 6
– To establish an Information Exchange Strategy around eResearch  
Part of the information exchange strategy is a registry of research capability across the university would 
facilitate the dissemination of this information. The feasibility of linking such a registry to the Themis 
Research Management System should also be established; minimizing the need for duplication of data 
entry by our researchers. 
Recommendation 7
– To establish a Registry of e-research expertise 
4.6 Implications for education and training 
The skill set for researchers is evolving and some consideration should be made to identify which of those 
associated with eResearch might be considered part of the essential generic skill set mix for trainee 
researchers, which might be discipline specific, and which might remain in the domain of expert service 
support.  
It is considered that much of the expertise listed in 4.4 are not fundamental to all research disciplines and 
are therefore inappropriate for broad, in-depth education and research training. However, as research 
practices are rapidly adopting information and communications technology (ICT), researchers should be 
made aware of the services and expertise available to them; locally, nationally and globally.  An 
awareness and basic understanding of research data policies, responsibilities, collections, curation, 
preservation, copyright/IP, metadata and standards must be included in a researcher and postgraduate 
induction program and reinforced throughout their candidature. An essential part of such a training 
program would include information about the terminology and underlying principles for managing data 
40
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested