download pdf file from database in asp.net c# : Edit pdf metadata application Library tool html asp.net wpf online FL-Max4%20Instrument%20Manual8-part1461

FluoroMax
®
-4 & FluoroMax
®
-4P with USB v. B (23 Oct 2009) 
Optimizing Data 
5-1 
Note:
Clean  the  sample 
cells  thoroughly  before 
use  to  minimize  back-
ground contributions. 
Warning:
Nitric acid is a dangerous 
substance. When using nitric acid, wear 
safety goggles, face shield, and acid-
resistant gloves. Certain compounds, such 
as glycerol, can form explosive materials 
when mixed with nitric acid. Refer to the 
Materials Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) for 
detailed information on nitric acid. 
Caution:
Soaking the cuvettes for a long period 
causes etching of the cuvette surface, which results in 
light-scattering from the cuvettes. 
5: Optimizing Data 
Spectra can be enhanced by optimization of data-acquisition. This chapter lists some 
methods of optimizing sample preparation, spectrofluorometer setup, and data correc-
tion to get higher-quality data. 
Cuvette preparation 
Empty all contents from 
the cuvettes. 
Fully immerse 
and soak the 
cuvettes for 24 h 
in 50% aqueous 
nitric acid. 
This cleans the cuvettes’ 
inner and outer 
surfaces. 
Rinse 
with 
de-ionized water. 
Clean the cuvettes in the cleaning solution with 
a test-tube brush. 
Use Alconox
®
or equivalent detergent as a cleaning solution. 
Rinse the cuvettes with de-ionized water. 
Soak the cuvettes in concentrated nitric acid. 
Rinse them with de-ionized water before use. 
Edit pdf metadata - add, remove, update PDF metadata in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Allow C# Developers to Read, Add, Edit, Update and Delete PDF Metadata
pdf keywords metadata; remove metadata from pdf online
Edit pdf metadata - VB.NET PDF metadata library: add, remove, update PDF metadata in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Enable VB.NET Users to Read, Write, Edit, Delete and Update PDF Document Metadata
pdf remove metadata; read pdf metadata online
FluoroMax
®
-4 & FluoroMax
®
-4P with USB v. B (23 Oct 2009) 
Optimizing Data 
5-2 
Caution:
Always read the Materials Safety Data Sheet before 
using a sample or reagent. 
Note:
Avoid  thick  coverslips, 
because  the excitation beam 
may  not  hit  the  sample  di-
rectly with a thick coverslip. 
Microscope  coverslips  are 
useful,  except  that  they  are 
not quartz, and do not  trans-
mit UV light. 
Sample preparation 
The typical fluorescence or phosphorescence sample is a solution analyzed in a stan-
dard cuvette. The cuvette itself may contain materials that fluoresce. To prevent interfe-
rence, HORIBA Scientific recommends using non-fluorescing fused-silica cuvettes that 
have been cleaned as described above. 
Small-volume samples 
If only a small sample-volume is available, and the intensity of the fluorescence signal 
is sufficient, dilute the sample and analyze it in a 4-mL cuvette. If fluorescence is weak 
or if trace elements are to be determined, HORIBA Scientific recommends a capillary 
cell such as our 250-μL optional micro-sample capillary cell, which is specifically de-
signed for a small volume. A 1-mL cell (5 mm × 5 mm cross-section) is also available. 
Solid samples 
Solid samples usually are mounted in the 1933 Solid Sample Holder, with the fluores-
cence collected from the front surface of the sample. The mounting method depends on 
the form of the sample. See the section on “Highly opaque samples” for more informa-
tion on sample arrangement in the sample compartment. 
Thin films and cell monolayers on 
coverslips can be placed in the holder 
directly. 
Minerals, crystals, vitamins, paint 
chips, phosphors, and similar samples 
usually are ground into a homogene-
ous powder. The powder is packed 
into the depression of the Solid Sam-
ple Holder (see next page for dia-
gram). For very fine powder, or 
powder that resists packing (and 
therefore falls out when the holder is put into its vertical position), the powder can 
be held in place with a thin quartz coverslip, or blended with potassium bromide for 
better cohesion. 
A single small crystal or odd-shaped solid sample (e.g., contact lens, paper) can be 
mounted with tape along its edges to the Solid Sample Holder. Be sure that the ex-
citation beam directly hits the sample. To keep the excitation beam focused on the 
sample, it may be necessary to remove or change the thickness of the metal spacers 
separating the clip from the block. 
How to C#: Modify Image Metadata (tag)
edit, C#.NET PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C#.NET rotate PDF pages, C#.NET search text in PDF, C#.NET edit PDF bookmark, C#.NET edit PDF metadata, C#.NET
metadata in pdf documents; add metadata to pdf file
C# TIFF: TIFF Metadata Editor, How to Write & Read TIFF Metadata
Tiff ›› C# Tiff: Edit Tiff Metadata. C# TIFF - Edit TIFF Metadata in C#.NET. Allow Users to Read and Edit Metadata Stored in Tiff Image in C#.NET Application.
pdf metadata viewer; read pdf metadata
FluoroMax
®
-4 & FluoroMax
®
-4P with USB v. B (23 Oct 2009) 
Optimizing Data 
5-3 
Dissolved solids 
Solid samples, such as crystals, sometimes 
are dissolved in a solvent and analyzed in 
solution. Solvents, however, may contain 
organic impurities that fluoresce and mask 
the signal of interest. Therefore, use high-
quality, HPLC-grade solvents. If back-
ground fluorescence persists, recrystallize 
the sample to eliminate organic impurities, 
and then dissolve it in an appropriate sol-
vent for analysis. 
Biological samples 
For reproducible results, some samples 
may require additional treatment. For ex-
ample, proteins, cell membranes, and cells in solution need constant stirring to prevent 
settling. Other samples are temperature-sensitive and must be heated or cooled to en-
sure reproducibility in emission signals. 
Solid-
sample 
holder 
Remove or change these metal spacers. 
C# PDF bookmark Library: add, remove, update PDF bookmarks in C#.
|. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› C# PDF: Edit PDF Bookmark. C#.NET PDF SDK - Edit PDF Bookmark and Outline in C#.NET. Empower Your C#
view pdf metadata in explorer; bulk edit pdf metadata
C# PDF Sticky Note Library: add, delete, update PDF note in C#.net
Note. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› C# PDF: Add Sticky Note. C#.NET PDF SDK - Add Sticky Note to PDF Page in C#.NET. Able to change font size in PDF comment box.
remove pdf metadata online; acrobat pdf additional metadata
FluoroMax
®
-4 & FluoroMax
®
-4P with USB v. B (23 Oct 2009) 
Optimizing Data 
5-4 
Note:
The focal point of the excitation beam must be on the sample it-
self. 
Running a scan on a sample 
Precautions with the Solid-
Sample Holder 
Avoid placing the front face of the sample so 
that the excitation beam is reflected directly into 
the emission monochromator. If the sample is 
rotated at 45° from excitation, this may occur, 
increasing interference from stray light. Instead, 
set up the sample with a 30° or 60°-angle to the 
excitation, preventing the excitation beam from 
entering the emission slits. The photograph at 
right illustrates how a 60°-angle to the excita-
tion keeps the incoming excitation light away 
from the emission monochromator’s entrance. 
Use filters in the optical path. 
Stray light from the excitation beam can interfere with the emission from the sample. 
To reduce the deleterious effects of stray light, place a filter that removes excitation 
wavelengths from the emission beam in the emission optical path. Here is an example 
of scans with and with-
out filters on a Fluo-
roMax
®
-4, using an 
unknown white powder 
as the sample. A 347 
nm band-pass filter al-
lows only the desired 
excitation to reach the 
sample, while a long-
pass filter in the emis-
sion side lets only fluo-
rescence, and no stray 
excitation into the de-
tector. Notice how the 
shape of the spectrum 
changes drastically 
when filters are added. 
Excitation monochromator 
Emission monochromator 
Excitation 
Emission 
60° 
C# PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file for C#
C#.NET: Edit PDF Metadata. PDF SDK for .NET allows you to read, add, edit, update, and delete PDF file metadata, like Title, Subject
pdf metadata extract; modify pdf metadata
VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
PDF Metadata Edit. Offer professional PDF document metadata editing APIs, using which VB.NET developers can redact, delete, view and save PDF metadata.
pdf metadata viewer online; embed metadata in pdf
FluoroMax
®
-4 & FluoroMax
®
-4P with USB v. B (23 Oct 2009) 
Optimizing Data 
5-5 
Measuring the G factor 
Include the grating factor, or 
G
factor, whenever polarization measurements are taken. 
The 
factor corrects for variations in polarization wavelength-response for the emis-
sion optics and detectors. A pre-calculated 
G
factor may be used when all other expe-
rimental parameters are constant. In other cases, the system can measure the 
G
factor 
automatically before an experimental run. 
G
factors are incorporated into the Anisotro-
py scan-type: 
In the FluorEssence toolbar, click the Experi-
ment Menu button  . 
The Fluorescence Main Experiment Menu 
appears.  
Click Anisotropy. 
The Experiment Type window appears. 
Choose the type of Anisotro-
py experiment, then click the 
Next >> button. 
The Experiment Setup window opens. To de-
termine polarization at particular excita-
tion/emission wavelength-pairs, choose 
vs Sin-
glePoint
How to C#: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF for .NET
XDoc.PDF for .NET allows C# developers to edit hyperlink of PDF document Various PDF annotation features can be integrated into your C# project, such Metadata.
pdf xmp metadata editor; read pdf metadata java
VB.NET PDF Annotate Library: Draw, edit PDF annotation, markups in
VB.NET PDF - PDF Annotation in VB.NET. Guide to Draw, Add and Edit Various Annotations on PDF File in VB.NET Programming. Annotation Overview.
pdf metadata; online pdf metadata viewer
FluoroMax
®
-4 & FluoroMax
®
-4P with USB v. B (23 Oct 2009) 
Optimizing Data 
5-6 
Note:
For  weak  signals,  enter the G  factor, 
rather  than  measure  it  automatically.  This 
may improve the S/N
Note:
For detailed information on the G factor, see the Polariz-
ers Operation Manual
Click the Detectors icon. 
This shows the parameters related to detectors, including the 
G
factor, in the 
Polarization
area. 
Click the G Factor checkbox to include a G fac-
tor in your measurements. 
Activate the checkbox ONLY if you know the 
G
factor. De-activate the check-
box if you want to measure the 
G
factor. 
Enter a value for the G factor in the field if you 
know and want to use a pre-determined value. 
FluoroMax
®
-4 & FluoroMax
®
-4P with USB v. B (23 Oct 2009) 
Optimizing Data 
5-7 
Improving the signal-to-noise ratio 
Because of various hardware or software conditions, occasionally it is necessary to op-
timize the results of an experiment. 
The quality of acquired data is determined largely by the signal-to-noise ratio (
S
/
N
). 
This is true especially for weakly fluorescing samples with low quantum yields. The 
signal-to-noise ratio can be improved by: 
Using the appropriate integration time, 
Scanning a region several times and averaging the results, 
Changing the bandpass by adjusting the slit widths, and 
Mathematically smoothing the data. 
The sections that follow discuss the alternatives for improving the 
S
/
N
ratio and the ad-
vantages and disadvantages of each. 
FluoroMax
®
-4 & FluoroMax
®
-4P with USB v. B (23 Oct 2009) 
Optimizing Data 
5-8 
Note:
This table is only a 
guide
. The optimum integration time for other 
measurements, such as time-base, polarization, phosphorescence lifetimes, 
and anisotropy, may be different. 
Determining the optimum integration time 
The length of time during which photons are counted and averaged for each data point 
is referred to as the 
integration time
. An unwanted portion of this signal comes from 
noise and dark counts (distortion inherent in the signal detector and its electronics when 
high voltage is applied). By increasing the integration time, the signal is averaged long-
er, resulting in a better 
S
/
N
. This ratio is enhanced by a factor of 
t
1/2
, where 
t
is the mul-
tiplicative increase in integration time. For example, doubling the integration time from 
1 s to 2 s increases the 
S
/
N
by over 40%, as shown below: 
For an integration time of 1 second, 
For an integration time of 2 seconds, 
1
1
/
1/2
1/2
=
=
=
t
S N
1.414
2
/
1/2
1/2
=
=
t
S N
or approximately 42%.
Because 
S
/
N
determines the noise level in a spectrum, use of the appropriate integration 
time is important for high-quality results. 
To discover the appropriate integration time: 
Find the maximum fluorescence intensity by ac-
quiring a preliminary scan, using an integration 
time of 0.1 s and a bandpass of 5 nm. 
From this preliminary scan, note the maximum 
intensity, and select the appropriate integration 
time from the table below. 
Signal intensity (counts per second)  Estimated integration time (seconds) 
1000 to 5000 
2.0 
5001 to 50 000 
1.0 
50 001 to 500 000 
0.1 
500 001 to 4 000 000 
0.05 
Set integration time through Experiment Setup for a specific experiment, or Real Time 
Control to view the effects of different integration times on a spectrum. See the Fluo-
rEssence™ on-line help to learn more about setting the integration time. 
FluoroMax
®
-4 & FluoroMax
®
-4P with USB v. B (23 Oct 2009) 
Optimizing Data 
5-9 
Scanning a sample multiple times 
Scanning a sample more than once, and averaging the scans together, enhances the 
S
/
N
In general, the 
S
/
N
improves by 
n
1/2
, where 
n
is the number of scans. 
To scan a sample multiple times, 
Open the 
Experiment Setup
window. 
Choose the Detectors icon. 
Specify the number of scans, and how to handle 
multiple scans, in the Accumulations field. 
See FluorEssence™ on-line help for detailed instructions regarding the data-entry
fields. 
FluoroMax
®
-4 & FluoroMax
®
-4P with USB v. B (23 Oct 2009) 
Optimizing Data 
5-10 
Using the appropriate wavelength increment 
The increment in a wavelength scan is the spacing, in nm, between adjacent data points. 
The spacing between the data points affects the resolution of the spectrum, and total 
time for acquisition. Consider the required resolution, time needed, and concerns about 
sample photobleaching. Most samples under fluorescence analysis display relatively 
broad-band emissions with a Lorentzian distribution, so they do not require a tiny in-
crement. 
Common increments range from 0.05–10 nm, depending on the sample and slit size. A 
first try might be 0.5–1 nm increment. After acquiring the initial spectrum, examine the 
results. If two adjacent peaks are not resolved (i.e., separated) satisfactorily, reduce the 
increment. If the spectrum is described by an excessive number of data points, increase 
the increment, to save time and lamp exposure. A scan taken, using an increment of 0.1 
nm, with a peak at full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) of 20 nm, should be characte-
rized with a 1-nm increment instead. 
For time-based scans, the increment is the spacing in s or ms between data points. Here, 
the consideration is the necessary time-resolution. The time increment dictates the total 
time per data point and for the scan in general. Set this value to resolve any changes in 
the luminescence of samples as they react or degrade. Time increments often range 
from 0.1–20 s. 
Set increments in the 
Inc
field, under 
Monos
in the Experiment Setup window. 
See the FluorEssence™ on-line help for more information. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested