0100101001100110101100100101001100
1101011010000110011010110010010100
1100110101100100101001100110101100
1001010011001101011001001010011001
1010110010010100110011010110100101
001100110101100100101001100110101
1001001010011001101011001001010011
0011010110010010100110011010110010
0101001100110101101001010011001101
011001001010011001010110010010100
1100110101100100101001100110101100
1001010010100101001100110101100100
1010011001101011010000110011010110
0100101001100110101100100101001100
1101011001001010011001101011001001
0100110011001001010011001101011001
0010100110011010110100001100110101
1001001010011001101011001001010011
0011010110010010100110011010110010
0101001100110101100100101001100110
1011010010100110011010110010010100
1100110101100100101001100110101100
1011001001010010100101001100110101
1001001010011001101011010000110011
0011001101011001001010011001101011
0010010100110011010110010010100110
0110101101001010011001101011001001
0100110011010110010010100110011010
1100100101001100110101100100101001
Freedom
on the Net 2013
a global assessment of internet  
and digital media
www.freedomhouse.org
100100101001100110101101000
0110011
FULL REPORT
Pdf remove metadata - add, remove, update PDF metadata in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Allow C# Developers to Read, Add, Edit, Update and Delete PDF Metadata
pdf metadata viewer online; pdf xmp metadata viewer
Pdf remove metadata - VB.NET PDF metadata library: add, remove, update PDF metadata in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Enable VB.NET Users to Read, Write, Edit, Delete and Update PDF Document Metadata
adding metadata to pdf; remove pdf metadata online
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013 
A Global Assessment of Internet and Digital Media 
Sanja Kelly 
Mai Truong 
Madeline Earp 
Laura Reed 
Adrian Shahbaz 
Ashley Greco-Stoner 
E
DITORS
October 3, 2013
This report was made possible by the generous support of the Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs, the U.S. State Department’s Bureau 
of Democracy, Human Rights and Labor (DRL), and Google. The content of this publication is the sole responsibility of Freedom 
House and does not necessarily represent the views of the Dutch Foreign Ministry, DRL, or Google. 
VB.NET PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in
Insert Image to PDF. Image: Remove Image from PDF Page. Image: Copy, Paste, Cut Image in Page. Link: Edit URL. Bookmark: Edit Bookmark. Metadata: Edit, Delete
remove metadata from pdf; edit multiple pdf metadata
VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
Able to remove a single page from adobe PDF document in VB.NET. Ability to remove consecutive pages from PDF file in VB.NET. Enable
change pdf metadata; acrobat pdf additional metadata
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
C
OUNTRY 
R
EPORTS
T
ABLE OF 
C
ONTENTS
A
CKNOWLEDGMENTS
i
O
VERVIEW
:
D
ESPITE 
P
USHBACK
,
I
NTERNET 
F
REEDOM 
D
ETERIORATES
1
By Sanja Kelly 
K
EY 
I
NTERNET 
C
ONTROLS BY 
C
OUNTRY
14
C
HARTS AND 
G
RAPHS OF 
K
EY 
F
INDINGS
16
Global Scores 
16 
60 Country Score Comparison 
19 
Internet Freedom Map 2013 
20 
Regional Graphs 
21 
Score Changes: Freedom on the Net 2012 vs. 2013 
24 
Internet Freedom vs. Press Freedom 
26 
Internet Freedom vs. Internet Penetration 
27 
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013:
C
OUNTRY 
R
EPORTS
28
Angola 
29 
Argentina 
39 
Armenia 
56 
Australia 
68 
Azerbaijan 
80 
Bahrain 
94 
Bangladesh 
112 
Belarus 
122 
Brazil 
142 
Burma 
157 
Cambodia 
171 
China (PRC) 
181 
Cuba 
215 
Ecuador 
229 
C# PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
console application. Able to remove a single page from PDF document. Ability to remove a range of pages from PDF file. Free trial package
batch edit pdf metadata; read pdf metadata
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
String outputFilePath = Program.RootPath + "\\" Remove.pdf"; // Remove password in the input file and output to a new file. int
view pdf metadata; batch pdf metadata
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
C
OUNTRY 
R
EPORTS
Egypt
242
Estonia
258
Ethiopia
265
France
280
Georgia
294
Germany
302
Hungary
322
Iceland
337
India
345
Indonesia
368
Iran
380
Italy
399
Japan
412
Jordan
425
Kazakhstan
436
Kenya
451
Kyrgyzstan
462
Lebanon
475
Libya
489
Malawi
500
Malaysia
510
Mexico
524
Morocco
541
Nigeria
552
Pakistan
564
Philippines
578
Russia
588
Rwanda
601
Saudi Arabia 
612 
South Africa 
626 
South Korea 
636 
Sri Lanka 
649 
Sudan
663
Syria
679
Thailand
690
Tunisia
707
Turkey
719
Uganda
733
Ukraine
743
United Arab Emirates 
754 
C# PDF bookmark Library: add, remove, update PDF bookmarks in C#.
Ability to remove and delete bookmark and outline from PDF document. Merge and split PDF file with bookmark. Save PDF file with bookmark open.
add metadata to pdf programmatically; view pdf metadata in explorer
C# PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in C#.
Insert Image to PDF. Image: Remove Image from PDF Page. Image: Copy, Paste, Cut Image in Page. Link: Edit URL. Bookmark: Edit Bookmark. Metadata: Edit, Delete
clean pdf metadata; online pdf metadata viewer
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
C
OUNTRY 
R
EPORTS
768 
784 
801
820
839
United Kingdom 
United States 
Uzbekistan
Venezuela
Vietnam
Zimbabwe
850
G
LOSSARY
863
M
ETHODOLOGY
868
C
ONTRIBUTORS
878
A
BOUT 
F
REEDOM 
H
OUSE 
881 
C# TIFF: TIFF Metadata Editor, How to Write & Read TIFF Metadata
You can also update, remove, and add metadata. List<EXIFField> exifMetadata = collection.ExifFields; You can also update, remove, and add metadata.
rename pdf files from metadata; c# read pdf metadata
VB.NET PDF delete text library: delete, remove text from PDF file
projects. Basically, you can use robust APIs to select a PDF page, define the text character position, and remove it from PDF document.
pdf xmp metadata editor; get pdf metadata
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
A
CKNOWLEDGEMENTS
A
CKNOWLEDGMENTS
Completion of the Freedom on the Net publication would not have been possible without the tireless 
efforts of the following individuals.  
As project director, Sanja Kelly oversaw the research, editorial, and administrative operations, 
supported by research analysts Mai Truong, Madeline Earp, Laura Reed, Adrian Shahbaz, and 
senior research assistant Ashley Greco-Stoner. Together, they provided essential research and 
analysis, edited the country reports, conducted field visits in Uganda, Indonesia, Mexico, Jordan, 
and Hungary, and led capacity building workshops abroad. Over 70 external consultants served as 
report authors and advisors, and made an outstanding contribution by producing informed analyses 
of a highly diverse group of countries and complex set of issues.  
Helpful contributions and insights were also made by Daniel Calingaert, executive vice president; 
Arch Puddington, vice president for research; as well as other Freedom House staff in the United 
States and abroad. Freedom House is also grateful to Cristiana Gonzalez and Eleonora Rabinovich 
for their contributions during the Latin America ratings review meeting. 
This publication was made possible by the generous support of the Dutch Ministry of Foreign 
Affairs, U.S. State Department’s Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor (DRL), and 
Google. The content of the publication is the sole responsibility of Freedom House and does not 
necessarily reflect the views of the Dutch Foreign Ministry, DRL, Google, or any other funder.
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
O
VERVIEW
:
D
ESPITE 
P
USHBACK
,
I
NTERNET 
F
REEDOM 
D
ETERIORATES
D
ESPITE 
P
USHBACK
I
NTERNET 
F
REEDOM 
D
ETERIORATES
By Sanja Kelly
1
In June 2013, revelations made by former contractor Edward Snowden about the U.S. 
government’s secret surveillance activities took center stage in the American and international 
media. As part of its antiterrorism effort, the U.S. National Security Agency (NSA) has been 
collecting communications data on Americans and foreigners on a much 
greater scale than previously thought. However, while the world’s 
attention is focused on Snowden and U.S. surveillance—prompting 
important discussions about the legitimacy and legality of such 
measures—disconcerting efforts to both monitor and censor internet 
activity have been taking place in other parts of the world with 
increased frequency and sophistication. In fact, global internet freedom 
has been in decline for the three consecutive years tracked by this 
project, and the threats are becoming more widespread. 
Of particular concern are the proliferation of laws, regulations, and directives to restrict online 
speech; a dramatic increase in arrests of individuals for something they posted online; legal cases 
and intimidation against social-media users; and a rise in surveillance. In authoritarian states, these 
tools are often used to censor and punish users who engage in online speech that is deemed critical 
of the government, royalty, or the dominant religion. In some countries, even blogging about 
environmental pollution, posting a video of a cynical rap song, or tweeting 
about the town mayor’s poor parking could draw the police to a user’s 
door. Although democratic states generally do not target political speech, 
several have sought to implement disproportionate restrictions on content 
they perceive as harmful or illegal, such as pornography, hate speech, and 
pirated media.
Nonetheless, in a number of places around the world, growing efforts by 
civic activists, technology companies, and everyday internet users have 
been able to stall, at least in part, newly proposed restrictions, forcing 
governments to either shelve their plans or modify some of the more problematic aspects of draft 
legislation. In a handful of countries, governments have been increasingly open to engagement with 
civil society, resulting in the passage of laws perceived to protect internet freedom. While such 
Sanja Kelly directs the Freedom on the Net project at Freedom House. 
In some countries, 
even posting a 
video of a cynical 
rap song could 
draw the police to 
a user’s door. 
Global internet 
freedom has been in 
decline for the three 
consecutive years 
tracked by this project. 
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
O
VERVIEW
:
D
ESPITE 
P
USHBACK
,
I
NTERNET 
F
REEDOM 
D
ETERIORATES
positive initiatives are significantly less common than government attempts to control the online 
sphere, the expansion of this movement to protect internet freedom is one of the most important 
developments of the past year.  
To illuminate the nature of evolving threats in the rapidly changing global environment, and to 
identify areas of opportunity for positive change, Freedom House has conducted a comprehensive 
study of internet freedom in 60 countries around the world. This report is the fourth in its series 
and focuses on developments that occurred between May 2012 and April 
2013. The previous edition, covering 47 countries, was published in 
September 2012. Freedom on the Net 2013 assesses a greater variety of 
political systems than its predecessors, while tracing improvements and 
declines in the countries examined in the previous editions. Over 70 
researchers, nearly all based in the countries they analyzed, contributed to 
the project by examining laws and practices relevant to the internet, 
testing the accessibility of select websites, and interviewing a wide range 
of sources. 
Of the 60 countries assessed, 34 have experienced a negative trajectory since May 2012. Further 
policy deterioration was seen in authoritarian states such as Vietnam and Ethiopia, where the 
downgrades reflected new government measures to restrict free speech, new arrests, and harsh 
prison sentences imposed on bloggers for posting articles that were critical of the authorities. 
Pakistan’s downgrade reflected the blocking of thousands of websites and pronounced violence 
against users of information and communication technologies (ICTs). In Venezuela, the decline was 
caused by a substantial increase in censorship surrounding politically sensitive events: the death of 
President Hugo Chávez and the presidential elections that preceded and followed it.  
Deterioration was also observed in a number of democracies, often 
as a result of struggles to balance freedom of expression with 
security. The most significant year-on-year decline was seen in 
India, which suffered from deliberate interruptions of mobile and 
internet service to limit unrest, excessive blocks on content during 
rioting in northeastern states, and an uptick in the filing of criminal 
charges against ordinary users for posts on social-media sites. The 
United States experienced a significant decline as well, in large part 
due to reports of extensive surveillance tied to intelligence 
gathering and counterterrorism. And in Brazil, declines resulted 
from increasing limitations on online content, particularly in the context of the country’s stringent 
electoral laws; cases of intermediary liability; and increasing violence against online journalists. 
At the same time, 16 countries registered a positive trajectory over the past year. In Morocco, 
which was analyzed for the first time in this edition of the report, the government has unblocked 
previously censored websites as part of its post–Arab Spring reform effort, although it still 
frequently punishes those who post controversial information. Burma’s continued improvement 
included significant steps toward the lifting of internet censorship, which may allow the country to 
Of the 60 countries 
assessed, 34 have 
experienced a 
negative trajectory 
since May 2012. 
Deterioration was also 
observed in a number of 
democracies, often as a 
result of struggles to 
balance freedom of 
expression with security. 
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
O
VERVIEW
:
D
ESPITE 
P
USHBACK
,
I
NTERNET 
F
REEDOM 
D
ETERIORATES
shed its history of repression and underdevelopment and create a more progressive media 
environment. Tunisia’s gains are the result of the government’s sustained efforts to open up the 
online sphere following years of repression under former president Zine el-Abidine Ben Ali, and 
institute protections for journalists and bloggers, although there is still much to be done. And in 
several countries like Georgia and Rwanda, improvements stemmed from a decline in the number 
of negative incidents from the previous coverage period. 
Despite the noted improvements, restrictions on internet 
freedom continue to expand across a wide range of 
countries. Over the past year, the global number of 
censored websites has increased, while internet users in 
various countries have been arrested, tortured, and killed 
over the information they posted online. Iran, Cuba, and 
China remain among the most restrictive countries in the 
world when it comes to internet freedom. In Iran, the 
government utilized more advanced methods for blocking 
text messages, filtering content, and preventing the use of 
circumvention tools in advance of the June 2013 election, while one blogger was found dead in 
police custody after being arrested for criticizing the government online. In Cuba, the authorities 
continued to require a special permit for anyone wishing to access the global internet; the permits 
are generally granted to trusted party officials and those working in specific professions. And as in 
previous years, China led the way in expanding and adapting an elaborate technological apparatus 
for systemic internet censorship, while further increasing offline coercion and arrests to deter free 
expression online. 
Based on a close evaluation of each country, this study identifies the 10 most commonly used types 
of internet control, most of which appear to have become more widespread over the past year: 
Blocking and filtering:
Governments around the world are increasingly establishing mechanisms to block what they 
deem to be undesirable information. In many cases, the censorship targets content involving 
child pornography, illegal gambling, copyright infringement, or the incitement of violence. 
However, a growing number of governments are also engaging in deliberate efforts to block 
access to information related to politics, social issues, and human rights. Of the 60 
countries evaluated this year, 29 have used blocking to suppress certain types of political 
and social content. China, Iran, and Saudi Arabia possess some of the most comprehensive 
blocking and filtering capabilities, effectively disabling access to thousands of websites, but 
even some democratic countries like South Korea and India have at times blocked websites 
of a political nature. Jordan and Russia, which previously blocked websites only 
sporadically, are among the countries that have intensified their efforts over the past year. 
Over the past year, the global 
number of censored websites has 
increased, while internet users in 
various countries have been 
arrested, tortured, and killed over 
the information they posted online. 
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
O
VERVIEW
:
D
ESPITE 
P
USHBACK
,
I
NTERNET 
F
REEDOM 
D
ETERIORATES
Cyberattacks against regime critics:  
Some governments and their sympathizers are increasingly using technical attacks to disrupt 
activists’ online networks, eavesdrop on their communications, and cripple their websites. 
Over the past year, such attacks were reported in at least 31 of the countries covered in this 
study. In Venezuela, for example, during the 2012 and 2013 presidential campaigns, the 
websites of popular independent media—Noticiero Digital, Globovisión, and La Patilla—
were repeatedly subject to distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attacks, which increased on 
election days and during the vote count. In countries ranging from Belarus to Vietnam to 
Bahrain, opposition figures and activists are routinely targeted with malicious software that 
is masked as important information about political developments or planned protests. 
When downloaded, the malware can enable attackers to monitor the victims’ keystrokes 
and eavesdrop on their personal communications. Although activists are increasingly aware 
of this practice and have been taking steps to protect themselves, the attacks are becoming 
more sophisticated and harder to detect. 
New laws and arrests for political, religious, or social speech online:  
Instead of merely blocking and filtering information that is deemed undesirable, an 
increasing number of countries are passing new laws that criminalize certain types of 
political, religious, or social speech, either explicitly or through vague wording that can be 
interpreted in such a way. Consequently, more users are being arrested, tried, or 
imprisoned for their posts on social networks, blogs, and websites. In fact, some 
governments may prefer to institute strict punishments for people who post offending 
content rather than actually blocking it, as this allows officials 
to maintain the appearance of a free and open internet while 
imposing a strong incentive for users to practice self-
censorship. Even countries willing to invest in systematic 
filtering often find that criminal penalties remain an important 
deterrent. Turkey, Bangladesh, and Azerbaijan are among the 
countries that have, over the past year, significantly stepped 
up arrests of users for their online activism and posts. 
Paid progovernment commentators manipulate online discussions:  
Already evident in a number of countries assessed in the previous edition of Freedom of the 
Net, the phenomenon of paid progovernment commentators has spread in the past two 
years, appearing in 22 of the 60 countries examined in this study. The purpose of these 
commentators—covertly hired by government officials, often by using public funds—is to 
manipulate online discussions by trying to smear the reputation of government opponents, 
spread propaganda, and defend government policies when the discourse becomes critical. 
China, Bahrain, and Russia have been at the forefront of this practice for several years, but 
countries like Malaysia, Belarus, and Ecuador are increasingly using the same tactics, 
particularly surrounding politically sensitive events such as elections or major street 
protests. 
More users are being 
arrested, prosecuted, or 
imprisoned for their 
posts on social networks, 
blogs, and websites. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested