download pdf file from folder in asp.net c# : Batch pdf metadata editor software control dll windows azure winforms web forms FOTN%202013_Full%20Report_01-part1510

F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
O
VERVIEW
:
D
ESPITE 
P
USHBACK
,
I
NTERNET 
F
REEDOM 
D
ETERIORATES
Physical attacks and murder:  
Governments and powerful nonstate actors are increasingly resorting to physical violence to 
punish those who disseminate critical content, with sometimes fatal consequences. In 26 of 
the 60 countries assessed, at least one blogger or internet user was attacked, beaten, or 
tortured  for  something  posted  online.  In  5  of  those 
countries,  at  least  one  activist  or  citizen  journalist  was 
killed in retribution for information posted online, in most 
cases information that exposed human rights abuses. Syria 
was the most dangerous place for online reporters, with 
approximately  20  killed over  the past  year.  In  Mexico, 
several online journalists were murdered after refusing to 
stop writing exposés about drug trafficking and organized 
crime. In Egypt, several Facebook group administrators were abducted and beaten, while 
citizen journalists were allegedly targeted by the security forces during protests. 
Surveillance:  
Many governments are seeking less visible means to infringe on internet freedom, often by 
increasing their technical capacity or administrative authority to monitor individuals’ online 
behavior or communications. Governments across the spectrum of democratic performance 
have  enhanced  their  surveillance  capabilities  in  recent  years  or  have  announced  their 
intention to do so. Although some interception of communications may be necessary for 
fighting crime or preventing terrorist attacks, surveillance powers are increasingly abused 
for political ends. Governments in nearly two-thirds of 
the countries examined upgraded their technical or legal 
surveillance powers over the past year (see surveillance 
section in “Major Trends” below). It is important to note 
that  increased  surveillance,  particularly  in  authoritarian 
countries where the rule of law is weak, often leads to 
increased self-censorship, as users become hesitant to risk 
repercussions by criticizing the authorities online.  
Takedown requests and forced deletion of content:  
Instead of blocking objectionable websites, many governments opt to contact the content 
hosts or social-media sites and request that the content be “taken down.” While takedown 
notices can be a legitimate means of dealing with illegal content when the right safeguards 
are in place, many governments and private actors are abusing the practice by threatening 
legal action and forcing the removal of material without a proper court order. A more 
nefarious  activity,  which  is  particularly  common  in  authoritarian  countries,  involves 
government officials informally contacting a content producer or host and requesting that 
particular information be deleted. In some cases, individual bloggers or webmasters are 
threatened with various reprisals should they refuse. In Russia and Azerbaijan, for example, 
bloggers have reported deleting comments from their websites after being told that they 
would be fired from their jobs, barred from universities, or detained if they did not comply. 
In 5 countries, at least one 
activist or citizen journalist 
was killed in retribution for 
information posted online. 
Governments across the 
spectrum of democratic 
performance have enhanced 
their surveillance 
capabilities in recent years. 
Batch pdf metadata editor - add, remove, update PDF metadata in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Allow C# Developers to Read, Add, Edit, Update and Delete PDF Metadata
search pdf metadata; edit pdf metadata
Batch pdf metadata editor - VB.NET PDF metadata library: add, remove, update PDF metadata in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Enable VB.NET Users to Read, Write, Edit, Delete and Update PDF Document Metadata
edit pdf metadata acrobat; batch update pdf metadata
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
O
VERVIEW
:
D
ESPITE 
P
USHBACK
,
I
NTERNET 
F
REEDOM 
D
ETERIORATES
Blanket blocking of social media and other ICT platforms:  
Given the increasing role that social media have played in political and social activism, 
particularly after the events of the Arab Spring, some governments have been specifically 
targeting sites like YouTube, Twitter, and Facebook in their censorship campaigns. In 19 of 
the 60 countries examined, the authorities instituted a blanket ban on at least one blogging, 
microblogging, video-sharing, social-networking, or live-streaming platform. However, as 
their  knowledge  and  sophistication  grows,  some  governments  are  beginning  to  move 
toward blocking access to individual pages or profiles on such services or requesting from 
the companies to disable access to the offending content. These dynamics were particularly 
evident surrounding protests that erupted after the anti-Islam video Innocence of Muslims 
appeared on YouTube. Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP) and free messaging services 
such as Skype, Viber, and WhatsApp are also frequently targeted—in some countries due 
to difficulties the authorities face in intercepting such communication tools, and in others 
because the telecommunications industry perceives them as a threat to their own revenue. 
Lebanon, Ethiopia, and Burma are among several countries where the use of VoIP services 
remained prohibited as of May 2013. 
Holding intermediaries liable:  
An increasing number of countries are introducing directives, passing laws, or interpreting 
current  legislation  so  as  to  make  internet  intermediaries—whether  internet  service 
providers (ISPs), site hosting services, webmasters, or forum moderators—legally liable for 
the  content  posted  by  others  through  their  services  and  websites.  As  a  consequence, 
intermediaries in some countries are voluntarily taking down 
or deleting potentially objectionable websites or comments 
to  avoid  legal  liability.  In  the  most  extreme  example, 
intermediary  liability  in  China  has  resulted  in  private 
companies  maintaining  whole  divisions  responsible  for 
monitoring the content of social-media sites, search engines, 
and online forums, deleting tens of millions of messages a 
year  based on  administrators’ interpretation of  both long-
standing  taboos  and  daily  directives  from  the  ruling 
Communist  Party.  In  22  of  the  60  countries  examined, 
intermediaries were held to a disproportionate level of liability, either by laws that clearly 
stipulate such rules  or  by  court decisions with  similar  effects.  In  one  recent example, 
Brazilian authorities issued arrest warrants for two senior Google Brazil executives on the 
grounds that the company failed to remove content that was prohibited under strict laws 
governing electoral campaigns. 
Throttling or shutting down internet and mobile service:  
During particularly contentious events, a few governments have used their control over the 
telecommunications infrastructure to cut off access to the internet or mobile phone service 
in a town, a region, or the entire country. Egypt became the best-known case study in 
Intermediaries in some 
countries are voluntarily 
taking down or deleting 
potentially objectionable 
websites or comments to 
avoid legal liability. 
C# PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in C#.net
Studio .NET project. Powerful .NET control to batch convert PDF documents to tiff format in Visual C# .NET program. Free library are
endnote pdf metadata; pdf keywords metadata
C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
Powerful components for batch converting PDF documents in C#.NET program. Convert PDF to multiple MS Word formats such as .doc and .docx.
pdf metadata online; read pdf metadata java
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
O
VERVIEW
:
D
ESPITE 
P
USHBACK
,
I
NTERNET 
F
REEDOM 
D
ETERIORATES
January 2011, when the authorities shut off the internet for five days as protesters pushed 
for the ouster of longtime president Hosni Mubarak. However, a number of other countries 
have also cut off access to the internet or mobile phone networks. In Syria, several such 
shutdowns occurred over the past year. In Venezuela, the dominant ISP temporarily shut 
off access during the presidential election in 2012, allegedly due to cyberattacks. India and 
China disabled text messaging on mobile phones in particular regions during protests and 
rioting.  In  addition  to  outright  shutdowns,  some  countries  have  used  throttling,  the 
deliberate slowing of connection speeds, to prevent users from uploading videos or viewing 
particular  websites  without difficulty.  Over the  past  year, however, there were  fewer 
instances of internet shutdowns and throttling than in the previous year, most likely because 
countries affected by the Arab Spring in 2011 had moved past the point where such tactics 
would be useful to the authorities. 
Although many different types of internet control have been institutionalized in recent years, three 
particular trends have been at the forefront of increased censorship efforts: increased surveillance, 
new laws that restrict online speech, and arrests of users. Despite these threats, civic activism has 
also  been  on  the  rise,  providing  grounds  for  hope  that  the  future  may  bring  more  positive 
developments.  
Surveillance  grows  considerably  as  countries  upgrade  their 
monitoring technologies 
Starting in June 2013, a series of leaks by former U.S. contractor Edward Snowden revealed that 
the NSA was storing the personal communications metadata of Americans—such as the e-mail 
addresses  or  phone numbers  on each end, and the date and time of the communication—and 
mining them for leads in antiterrorism investigations. Also exposed were details of the PRISM 
program,  through  which,  among  other  things,  the  NSA  monitored  communications  of  non-
Americans via products and services offered by U.S. technology companies. It then came to light 
that several other democratic governments had their own surveillance programs aimed at tracking 
national security threats and cooperating with the NSA. While there is no evidence that the NSA 
surveillance  programs  were  abused  to  suppress  political  speech,  they  have  drawn  strong 
condemnations at home and abroad for their wide-reaching infringements on privacy. Since many 
large technology companies—with millions of users around the world—are based in the United 
States, the NSA was able to collect information on foreigners without having to go through the 
legal channels of the countries in which the targeted users were located. 
M
AJOR 
T
RENDS
C# PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in C#.net, ASP.
NET components for batch combining PDF documents in C#.NET class. Powerful library dlls for mering PDF in both C#.NET WinForms and ASP.NET WebForms.
delete metadata from pdf; remove metadata from pdf file
C# PDF Print Library: Print PDF documents in C#.net, ASP.NET
NET search text in PDF, C#.NET edit PDF bookmark, C#.NET edit PDF metadata, C#.NET Quicken PDF printer library allows C# users to batch print PDF file in
modify pdf metadata; batch pdf metadata editor
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
O
VERVIEW
:
D
ESPITE 
P
USHBACK
,
I
NTERNET 
F
REEDOM 
D
ETERIORATES
Although the U.S. surveillance activities have  taken  the  spotlight in recent months, this  study 
reveals that most countries around the world have enhanced their surveillance powers over the past 
year. In 35 of the 60 countries examined in Freedom on the Net 
2013, the government has either obtained more sophisticated 
technology to conduct surveillance, increased the scope and 
number of people monitored, or passed a new law giving it 
greater monitoring authority. There is a strong suspicion that 
many of the remaining 25 countries’ governments have also 
stepped up their surveillance activities, though some may be 
better than others at covering their tracks. 
While  democratic  countries  have  often  engaged  in  legally 
dubious surveillance methods to combat and uncover terrorism 
threats, officials in many authoritarian countries also monitor 
the  personal  communications  of  their  citizens  for  political 
reasons,  with  the  goal  of  identifying  and  suppressing 
government critics and human rights activists. Such monitoring 
can  have  dire  repercussions  for  the  targeted  individuals, 
including imprisonment, torture, and even death. In Bahrain, Ethiopia, Azerbaijan, and elsewhere, 
activists reported that their e-mail, text messages, or other communications were presented to 
them during interrogations or used as evidence in politicized trials. In many of these countries, the 
state owns the main telecommunications firms and ISPs, and it does not have to produce a warrant 
from an impartial court to initiate surveillance against dissidents. 
Russia has emerged as an important incubator of surveillance technologies and legal practices that 
are  emulated  by  other  former  Soviet  republics.  Russia  itself  has  dramatically  expanded  its 
surveillance  apparatus  in  recent  years,  particularly  following  the  events  of  the  Arab  Spring. 
Moreover, in December 2012, the Russian Supreme Court upheld the legality of the government’s 
hacking into the phone of an opposition activist. The court grounded its decision on the fact that the 
activist had participated in antigovernment rallies, prompting fears that the case would be used as a 
legal basis for even more extensive surveillance against opposition figures in the future. Belarus, 
Uzbekistan, Kyrgyzstan, Kazakhstan, and Ukraine are among the countries that have implemented 
the ICT monitoring system used by the Russians authorities (known by the acronym SORM) and 
have either passed or considered legislation that would further expand their surveillance powers, in 
some cases mimicking the current legislation in Russia. 
Until recently, only a handful of African countries had  the means to 
conduct widespread surveillance. However, this seems to be changing 
rapidly as internet penetration increases and surveillance technologies 
become  more  readily  available.  All  10  of  the  African  countries 
examined in this report have stepped up their online monitoring efforts 
in the past year, either by obtaining new technical capabilities or by 
expanding  the  government’s  legal  authority.  In  Sudan,  the 
government’s  ICT  surveillance  was particularly  pronounced in  2012 
In 35 of the 60 countries 
examined, the government has 
obtained more sophisticated 
surveillance technology, 
increased the scope of people 
monitored, or passed a new law 
giving it greater monitoring 
authority. Growing 
surveillance is also suspected 
in many of the remaining 25 
countries, but they may be 
better at covering their tracks.  
All 10 of the African 
countries examined in 
this report have 
stepped up their online 
monitoring efforts in 
the past year. 
C# Create PDF from Tiff Library to convert tif images to PDF in C#
NET component for batch converting tiff images to PDF documents in C# class. Create PDF from Tiff in both .NET WinForms and ASP.NET application.
pdf metadata editor online; pdf metadata
C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF
PowerPoint. Professional .NET PDF converter control for batch conversion. Export PowerPoint hyperlink to PDF in .NET console application.
metadata in pdf documents; embed metadata in pdf
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
O
VERVIEW
:
D
ESPITE 
P
USHBACK
,
I
NTERNET 
F
REEDOM 
D
ETERIORATES
during a series of street protests, and it became dangerous for activists to use their mobile phones. 
One activist switched off his phone for a few days to avoid arrest while hiding from the authorities. 
When he turned it back on to call his family, officials quickly determined his location and arrested 
him the same day. 
In the Middle East and North Africa, where extralegal surveillance has long been rampant, the 
authorities  continue  to  use  ICT  monitoring  against  regime  opponents.  In  Saudi  Arabia,  the 
government has been proactively recruiting experts to work on intercepting encrypted data from 
mobile applications such as Twitter, Viber, Vine, and WhatsApp. In Egypt, President Mohamed 
Morsi’s advisers reportedly met with the Iranian spy chief in December 2012 to seek assistance in 
building  a  surveillance  apparatus  that  would be  controlled by  the  office  of  the  president  and 
operated  outside  of  traditional  security  structures.  Even  in  postrevolutionary  Libya,  reports 
surfaced in mid-2012 that surveillance tools left over from the Qadhafi era had been restored, 
apparently for use against suspected loyalists of the old regime. 
Perhaps most worrisome is the fact that an increasing number of countries are using malware to 
conduct surveillance when traditional methods are less effective. Opposition activists in the United 
Arab Emirates, Bahrain, Malaysia,  and more than a  dozen other countries were  targeted with 
malware  attacks  over  the  past  year,  giving  the  attackers  remote  access  to  victims’  e-mail, 
keystrokes, and voice communications. While it is difficult to know with a high degree of certainty, 
there are strong suspicions that these activists’ respective governments were behind the attacks. 
Some democratic governments—including in the United States and Germany—have used malware 
to conduct surveillance in criminal investigations, but any such use typically must be approved by a 
court order and narrowly confined to the scope of the investigation. 
Censorship intensifies as countries pass new laws and directives to 
restrict online speech  
Until several years ago, very few countries had laws that specifically dealt with ICTs. As more 
people started to communicate online—particularly via social media, which allow ordinary users to 
share information on a large scale—an increasing number of governments have introduced new 
laws or amended existing statutes to regulate speech and behavior in cyberspace. Since launching 
Freedom on the Net in 2009, Freedom House has observed a proliferation of such legislative activity. 
This trend accelerated over the past year, and since May 2012 
alone, 24 countries have passed new laws or implemented new 
regulations that could restrict free speech online, violate users’ 
privacy, or punish individuals who post certain types of content. 
Many authoritarian countries have used legitimate concerns about 
cybercrime  and  online  identity  theft  to  introduce  new  legal 
measures that criminalize critical political speech. In November 
2012, the government of the United Arab Emirates issued a new 
cybercrime law that provides a sounder legal basis for combatting 
24 countries have passed new 
laws or implemented new 
regulations that could 
restrict free speech online, 
violate users’ privacy, or 
punish individuals who post 
certain types of content. 
C# Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF in C#
Professional .NET PDF converter control for batch conversion. Merge all Excel sheets to one PDF file. Export PDF from Excel with cell border or no border.
edit pdf metadata online; extract pdf metadata
C# Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in C#.
and ASP.NET. Convert both DOC and DOCX formats to PDF files. Professional .NET control for batch conversion in C#.NET class. Easy to
change pdf metadata creation date; add metadata to pdf file
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
O
VERVIEW
:
D
ESPITE 
P
USHBACK
,
I
NTERNET 
F
REEDOM 
D
ETERIORATES
10 
online fraud, money laundering, hacking, and other serious abuses. However, the law also contains 
punishments for offending the state, its rulers, and its symbols, and for insulting Islam and other 
religions. Those found guilty of calling for a change to the ruling system can face a sentence of life 
in prison. In September 2012, Ethiopia’s government passed the Telecom Fraud Offenses law, 
which is supposed to combat cybercrime but also includes provisions that toughen the ban on VoIP, 
require users to register all ICT equipment (including smartphones) and carry registration permits 
with  them,  and  apply  penalties  under  an  antiterrorism  law  to  certain  types  of  electronic 
communications.  Considering  that  free  speech  activists  have  already  been  tried  under  the 
antiterrorism laws for criticism of the regime, the new legislation was met with significant concern. 
Several countries have also passed new laws intended to block information that is perceived as 
“extremist” or harmful to children. While such concerns have led to legitimate policy discussions in 
a wide range of countries, some of the recent legislation is so broadly worded that it can easily be 
misused or turned on political dissidents. For example, the Russian parliament in July 2012 passed 
what is commonly known as the “internet blacklist law,” which allows blocking of any website with 
content that is considered harmful to minors, such as child pornography and information related to 
suicide techniques and illegal drug use. However, the law has also been used occasionally to block 
other websites, such as a blog by an opposition figure (no official reason for blocking was provided) 
or another blog that featured a photo-report on the self-immolation of a Tibetan independence 
activist protesting the visit of the Chinese president (the official reason for blocking was that the 
post promoted suicide). In Kyrgyzstan, a new law allows the government to order web hosting 
services to shut down websites hosted in Kyrgyzstan, or the blocking of any sites hosted outside the 
country, if officials recognize the content as “extremist,” which is very broadly defined. 
In some countries, the authorities have decided to institute stricter regulations specifically aimed at 
online news media. The traditional media in authoritarian states are typically controlled by the 
government, and users often turn to online news outlets for independent information. The tighter 
controls are designed to help rein in this alternative news source. A new law in Jordan requires any 
electronic outlet that publishes domestic or international news, press releases, or comments to 
register with the government; it places conditions on who can be the editor in chief of such outlets; 
and it prohibits foreign investment in news media. The penalties for violations include fines and 
blocking, and in May 2013 the government proceeded to block over 200 websites that failed to 
comply with the new rules. Similarly, in Sri Lanka, online news outlets are now required to obtain 
a license, which can be denied or withdrawn at any time. 
More  users  are  arrested,  and  face  harsher  penalties,  for  posts  on 
social media 
Laws that restrict free speech are increasingly forcing internet users into courts or behind bars. 
Over the past year alone, in 28 of the 60 countries examined, at least one user was arrested or 
imprisoned  for posting certain types of  political, social, or religious content  online. In fact, a 
growing number of governments seem to exert control over the internet not through blocking and 
filtering, but by arresting people after the posts are published online. In addition, courts in some 
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
O
VERVIEW
:
D
ESPITE 
P
USHBACK
,
I
NTERNET 
F
REEDOM 
D
ETERIORATES
11 
countries have allowed higher penalties for online speech than 
for equivalent speech offline, arguably because of the internet’s 
wider reach. 
As  more  people  around  the  world  utilize  social  media  to 
express their opinions and communicate with others, there has 
been a dramatic increase in arrests for posts on sites such as 
Twitter,  Facebook,  and  YouTube.  In  at  least  26  of  the 
examined  countries,  users  were  arrested  for  politically  or 
socially relevant statements on social-media sites. Although political activists are targeted most 
frequently, more and more ordinary, apolitical users have found themselves in legal trouble after 
casually posting their opinions and jokes. Unlike large media companies and professional journalists 
with an understanding of the legal environment, many users of this kind may be unaware that their 
writings could land them in jail. 
Last year in India, for example, at least eleven users were charged under the so-called IT Act for 
posting or “liking” posts on Facebook. In one of the best-known cases, police arrested a woman for 
complaining on Facebook about widespread traffic and service disruptions in her town to mark the 
death of the leader of a right-wing Hindu nationalist party. The woman’s friend, who “liked” the 
comment, was also arrested. The detentions were widely criticized, both on social media and by 
public figures, and the charges were later dropped. In Ethiopia, a student 
was  arrested  and  charged  with  criminal  defamation  after  he  posted  a 
comment on his Facebook page that criticized the “rampant corruption” at 
another local university. 
Users are most often detained and tried for simply criticizing or mocking 
the authorities. At least 10 users were arrested in Bahrain over the past 
year  and  charged  with  “insulting  the  king  on  Twitter,”  and  several 
ultimately received prison sentences ranging from one to four months. In Morocco, an 18-year-old 
student was sentenced to 18 months in prison for “attacking the nation’s sacred values” after he 
allegedly ridiculed the king in a Facebook post, and a 25-year-old activist received an even harsher 
sentence for criticizing the king in a YouTube video. In Vietnam, several bloggers were sentenced 
to between 8 and 13 years in prison on charges that included “defaming state institutions” and 
“misuse of democratic freedoms to attack state interests.” 
In addition to criticism of political leaders, speech that might offend religious sensitivities is landing 
a growing number of users in jail. This is most prevalent in the Middle East, but it has occurred 
elsewhere in the world. In Saudi Arabia, any discussion that questions the official interpretation of 
Islam commonly leads to arrest. Prominent writer Turki al-Hamad was arrested in December 2012 
after tweeting that “we need someone to rectify the doctrine of [the prophet] Muhammad;” he was 
held in detention for five months. In April 2013, a Tunisian court upheld a prison sentence of seven 
and  a  half  years  for  a  man  who  published cartoons depicting  the  prophet Muhammad  on  his 
Facebook page. And earlier this year in Bangladesh, several bloggers were charged with “harming 
religious sentiments” under the country’s ICT Act for openly atheist posts that criticized Islam. The 
In 28 of the 60 countries 
examined, at least one user was 
arrested or imprisoned for 
posting political, social, or 
religious content online. 
A woman in India 
was arrested for 
“liking” a friend’s 
status on Facebook. 
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
O
VERVIEW
:
D
ESPITE 
P
USHBACK
,
I
NTERNET 
F
REEDOM 
D
ETERIORATES
12 
charges carried a prison sentence of up to 10 years, though in August 2013 the law was amended to 
increase the maximum penalty to 14 years. 
Some regimes have also shown very little tolerance for humor that may cast them or the country’s 
religious authorities in a negative light, leading to more arrests and prosecutions. For instance, in 
June 2012, a popular Turkish composer and pianist was charged with offending Muslims with his 
posts on Twitter, including one in which he joked about a call to prayer that lasted only 22 seconds, 
suggesting that the religious authorities  had been in a hurry to  get back to their drinking and 
mistresses. He was charged with inciting hatred and insulting “religious values,” and received a 
suspended sentence of 10 months in prison. In another example, in India, a 25-year-old cartoonist 
was arrested on a charge of sedition—which carries a life sentence—and for violating laws against 
insulting national honor through his online anticorruption cartoons, one of which depicted the 
national parliament as a toilet. He was released on bail after the sedition charge was dropped. 
Growing  activism  stalls  negative  proposals  and  promotes  positive 
change 
Although threats to internet freedom have continued to grow, the study’s findings also reveal a 
significant uptick in citizen activism online. While it has not always produced legislative changes—
in fact, negative developments in the past year vastly outnumber positive developments—there is a 
rising public consciousness about internet freedom and freedom  of expression issues. Citizens’ 
groups are able to more rapidly disseminate information about negative proposals and put pressure 
on the authorities. In addition, ICTs have started to play an important role in advocacy for positive 
change on other policy topics, from corruption to women’s rights, enabling activists and citizens to 
more effectively organize, lobby, and hold their governments accountable. 
This  emergent  online  activism  has  taken  several  forms.  In  11  countries,  negative  laws  were 
deterred as a result of civic mobilization and pressure by activists, lawyers, the business sector, 
reform-minded politicians, and the international community. In the Philippines, after the passage of 
the restrictive Cybercrime Prevention Act, online protests and 
campaigns ran for several months. Individuals blacked out their 
profile pictures on social networks, and 15 petitions were filed 
with  the  Supreme  Court,  which  eventually  put  a  restraining 
order  on  the  law,  deeming  it  inapplicable  in  practice.  In 
Kyrgyzstan, the government proposed a law on protection of 
children—modeled on the similar law in Russia—that activists 
feared would be used as a tool  for internet  censorship,  as  it 
allowed the government to close sites without a court decision. 
The  proposal  sparked public outrage, spurring  local advocacy 
efforts that eventually compelled parliament to postpone the bill 
until it could be amended.  
In  a  select  few  countries,  civic  activists  were  able  to  form  coalitions  and  proactively  lobby 
governments to pass laws that protect internet freedom or amend previously restrictive legislation. 
In 11 countries, negative laws 
were deterred as a result of 
civic mobilization and 
pressure by activists, lawyers, 
the business sector, reform-
minded politicians, and the 
international community. 
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
O
VERVIEW
:
D
ESPITE 
P
USHBACK
,
I
NTERNET 
F
REEDOM 
D
ETERIORATES
13 
In Mexico, for example, following a public campaign by 17 civil society organizations that joined 
forces in early 2013, freedom of access to the internet in now guaranteed in Article 6 of the 
constitution. Although the Mexican government has not introduced any secondary legislation that 
would specify how the new right will be protected in practice, the constitutional amendment is 
seen as a significant victory. In the United Kingdom, the government passed a law to revise the 
Defamation Act, discouraging the practice of “libel tourism” and limiting intermediary liability for 
user-generated content of defamatory nature. Civil society has also been increasingly active on the 
global stage, lobbying for greater transparency and inclusion in advance of the World Conference 
on International Telecommunications (WCIT-12) in Dubai, and in some instances placing pressure 
on their national delegations. 
ICTs have also been an important tool for mobilization on issues other than internet freedom, 
leading to important changes. In Morocco, online activism contributed to a national debate on 
Article 475 of the penal code, which allows rapists to avoid prosecution if they agree to marry their 
victims. Although women’s rights advocates have been lobbying for years to alter this law, the 
necessary momentum was created only after a 16-year-old girl committed suicide, having been 
forced to wed her alleged rapist. Women’s rights activists successfully used social media and online 
news platforms to counter arguments made by state-controlled radio and television outlets, rallying 
popular support for reforms. In January 2013, the government announced plans to revise the article 
in question. In other countries—including many authoritarian states like China, Saudi Arabia, and 
Bahrain—citizen journalists’ exposés of corruption, police abuse, pollution, and land grabs forced 
the authorities to at least acknowledge the problem and in some cases punish the perpetrators. 
In addition to activism by groups, citizens, and other stakeholders, the judiciary has played an 
important role as protector of internet freedom, particularly in more democratic countries where 
the courts operate with a greater degree of independence. Since May 2012, the courts in at least 9 
countries have issued decisions that may have a positive impact on internet freedom. In South 
Korea, the Constitutional Court overturned a notorious law that required all users to register with 
their real names when commenting on large websites. In Italy, a court issued a ruling to clarify that 
blogs cannot be considered illegal “clandestine press” under an outdated law stipulating that anyone 
providing  a news  service  must be a “chartered” journalist.  In  practice  this rule  had led some 
bloggers and internet users to collaborate with registered journalists when publishing online in 
order to protect themselves from legal action. 
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
K
EY 
I
NTERNET 
C
ONTROLS BY 
C
OUNTRY
14 
K
EY 
I
NTERNET 
C
ONTROLS BY 
C
OUNTRY
Country 
(By FOTN 2013 
ranking) 
FOTN 2013 Status 
(F=Free, PF=Partly Free, 
NF=Not Free) 
Social media and/or 
communication apps 
blocked 
Political, social, and/or 
religious content blocked 
Localized or nationwide ICT 
shutdown 
Progovernment 
commentators manipulate 
online discussions 
New law /directive 
increasing censorship or 
punishment passed 
New law /directive incr. 
surveillance or restricting 
anonymity passed 
Blogger/ICT user arrested 
for political or social 
writings 
Blogger/ICT user physically 
attacked or killed (incl. in 
custody) 
Technical attacks against 
government critics and 
human rights orgs 
Iceland 
F
Estonia 
Germany 
USA 
Australia 
France 
Japan 
Hungary 
Italy 
UK 
Philippines 
Georgia 
South Africa 
Argentina 
Kenya 
Ukraine 
Armenia 
Nigeria 
PF 
Brazil 
PF 
South Korea 
PF 
Angola 
PF 
Uganda 
PF 
Kyrgyzstan 
PF 
Ecuador 
PF 
Mexico 
PF 
Indonesia 
PF 
Tunisia 
PF 
Malawi 
PF 
Morocco 
PF 
Malaysia 
PF 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested