F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
B
AHRAIN
government.
88
In addition, the 2002 Telecommunications Law contains penalties for several online 
practices such  as  the  transmission of messages  that are offensive to public policy  or morals.
89
However, sentences can be longer if more severe penalties are called for by the penal code or 
terrorism laws. For instance, under the penal code, any user who “deliberately disseminates a
false 
statement” that may be damaging to national security or public order can be imprisoned for up to 
two years.
90
The  government  has  used  these  vague clauses  to  question  and  prosecute  several 
bloggers and online commentators.  
After the March 2011 crackdown on street protesters, the government conducted a mass arrest 
campaign of online activists and bloggers. More than 20 online activists were arrested and held for 
periods  ranging  from  a  few  days  to  several  months.
91
Arrests  and  prosecutions  continued 
throughout 2012 and early 2013. Collectively, more than 47 months of prison sentences were 
passed on to eight Bahraini users in cases directly related to online posts between May 2012 and 
April 2013. As photos and videos of police brutality continue to emerge online, more measures are 
being taken against citizens who are seen holding cameras (including smart phones) in areas of 
protest. In November 2012, a Saudi blogger said she was told on two separate occasions to delete 
photos of protests and anti-government graffiti she had taken with her smartphone.
92
Bloggers, 
moderators,  and  online  activists  are  systematically  detained  and  prosecuted  by  authorities  for 
expressing views the government regards as controversial. 
One of  Bahrain’s  most prominent  human rights defenders, Nabeel  Rajab,  has  been  subject to 
repeated  arrests  and  interrogations  for  publicly  criticizing  government  figures.  Rajab  is  the 
president of the Bahrain Center for Human Rights, a non-governmental organization that remains 
active despite a 2004 government order to close it.
93
He was first arrested on May 5, 2012 and held 
for  over three  weeks for “insulting a statutory body” in relation to a criticism directed at the 
Ministry of Interior over Twitter.
94
On June 9, 2012, he was arrested again after tweeting about 
the unpopularity of the Prime Minister (also a member of the royal family) in the city of Al-
Muharraq, following the sheikh’s visit there.
95
A group of citizens from the city promptly sued 
Rajab for libel in a show of obedience to the royal family. On June 28, 2012, he was convicted of 
88
 Press and Publications Law of 2002 of the Kingdom of Bahrain (No.47 of 2002). A copy can be found at: 
http://www.legalaffairs.gov.bh/viewhtm.aspx?ID=L4702 or http://www.iaa.bh/policiesPressrules.aspx.
89
 Telecommunications Law of the Kingdom of Bahrain, http://www.tra.org.bh/en/pdf/Telecom_Law_final.pdf.  
90
 Bahrain Penal code, 1976, article 168, http://bahrainrights.hopto.org/BCHR/wp‐content/uploads/2010/12/Bahrain‐Penal‐
Code.doc.  
91
 List of arrested Bahraini journalists: 
https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/ccc?key=0ApabTTYHrcWDdFZocWpBRlp6ell6RkNWeGh5YXAtUFE#gid=0, accessed via 
bahrainrights.org.    
92
 Rana Jarbou, “A thousand weapons,” Rana Jarbou, November 15, 2012, http://ranajarbou.blogspot.com/2012/11/a‐
thousand‐weapons.html.  
93
 “About BCHR,” Bahrain Center for Human Rights, http://www.bahrainrights.org/en/about.  
94
 “Nabeel Rajab granted bail but not released,” Bahrain Center for Human Rights, May 19, 2012, 
http://www.bahrainrights.org/en/node/5256.  
95
 Addressing the Prime Minister, Rajab tweeted: “Khalifa:  Leave the al‐Muharraq alley ways, their sheikhs and their elderly, 
everyone knows that you have no popularity there; and if it was not for their need for money they would not have come out to 
welcome you ‐ when will you bow out?” “Bahrain: Call for ‘immediate release’ of activist Nabeel Rajab, jailed for tweet,” 
Amnesty International, July 11, 2012, https://www.amnesty.org.uk/news_details.asp?NewsID=20223 and  
105
Pdf metadata editor - add, remove, update PDF metadata in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Allow C# Developers to Read, Add, Edit, Update and Delete PDF Metadata
add metadata to pdf programmatically; read pdf metadata
Pdf metadata editor - VB.NET PDF metadata library: add, remove, update PDF metadata in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Enable VB.NET Users to Read, Write, Edit, Delete and Update PDF Document Metadata
acrobat pdf additional metadata; rename pdf files from metadata
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
B
AHRAIN
charges related to his first arrest and ordered to pay a fine of 300 Bahraini dinars ($800).
96
Shortly 
after he was released on bail, he was re-arrested on July 9, 2012 after a court sentenced him to 
three months imprisonment for the Al-Muharraq incident. The court of appeals later acquitted 
Rajab, although he had already served most of his sentence.
97
However, he is currently serving a 
two-year sentence for “calling for illegal gatherings over social networks.”
98
Rajab, who tweets 
under  the  name  ‘@NabeelRajab,’  was  ranked  the  “most  connected”  Twitter  user  in  Bahrain 
according to a survey, with over 150,000 followers at the time of his arrest in May 2012.
99
He 
continues  to  issue  calls  to  protest  over  Twitter,  even  from  prison.
100
By  May  2013,  Rajab’s 
followers had reached 206,075 and the tweet that led to his arrest had been retweeted at least 
2,000 times.
101
In another case, a 19-year-old blogger was sentenced to two years imprisonment for reportedly 
posting abusive comments about the Prophet Mohamed’s wife Aisha on a Bahraini online forum in 
June 2012.
102
That month another blogger, Mohamed Hasan, was interrogated by police authorities 
for “writing for websites and newspapers without a license, protesting, and tweeting,”
103
although 
there is no law in Bahrain that requires a license for blogging. A few days earlier, one of his tweets 
had appeared on the Al-Jazeera television show ‘The Stream.’
104
No further legal action has yet 
been taken against Hasan. 
In August 2012, the 21-year-old blogger Shaheen Al-Junaid was summoned by police authorities 
for tweeting about an attack by members of the royal family on a Bahraini citizen who worked for 
their cousin. The employee was beaten after he refused the royal family members entry onto their 
cousin’s premises, which his employer had instructed him to do following a dispute between the 
family members.
105
The summons was later cancelled.
106
Four Twitter users were arrested and had their electronic devices confiscated after their houses 
were  raided  on  the  night  of  October  16,  2012.  Abdullah  Alhashemi,  Salman  Darwish,  Ali 
96
 “BAHRAIN: Arrest of Mr. Nabeel Rajab,” fidh, July 22, 2012, http://www.fidh.org/BAHRAIN‐Arrest‐of‐Mr‐Nabeel‐Rajab.  
97
 Sara Yasin, “Bahrain activist acquitted of Twitter charges but remains in prison,” Index on Censorship, 
http://www.indexoncensorship.org/2012/08/bahraini‐activist‐acquitted‐of‐twitter‐charges‐but‐remains‐in‐prison/ 
98
 “Updates: Bahrain, emboldened by international silence, sentences Nabeel Rajab to 3 years imprisonment,” Bahrain Center 
for Human Rights, August 20, 2012, http://www.bahrainrights.org/en/node/5387.  
99
 “How the Middle East Tweets: Bahrain’s Most Connected,” Wamda, December 3, 2012, 
http://www.wamda.com/2012/12/how‐the‐middle‐east‐tweets‐bahrain‐s‐most‐connected‐report.  
100
 “Bitter protests in Bahrain,” Movements.org, January 28, 2013, http://www.movements.org/blog/entry/bitter‐protests‐in‐
bahrain/.  
101
 “Khalifa: Leave the al‐Muharraq alley ways, their shaikhs and their elderly, everyone knows that you have no popularity 
there; and if it was not for their need for money they would not have come out to welcome you ‐ When will you bow out?” 
https://twitter.com/nabeelrajab/status/208853736494350336.  
102
 “Bahrain blogger charged with blaspheming Islam,” Bahrain Freedom Index, 2012, accessed September 4, 2013, 
http://bahrainindex.tumblr.com/post/25638178036/bahrain‐blogger‐charged‐with‐blaspheming‐islam
103
 See https://twitter.com/safybh/status/210005542406598657 (@safybh)  
104
 “Bahrain blogger @safybh interrogated about his ‘goodnight tweets’,” Bahrain Freedom Index, 2012, accessed September 4, 
2013, http://bahrainindex.tumblr.com/post/25638691193/bahraini‐blogger‐safybh‐interrogated‐about‐his.  
105
 “Investigation with Shaheen Junaid for ‘victory’ marginal offended by members of the ruling family,” Manama Voice, August 
11, 2012, http://manamavoice.com/news‐news_read‐10274‐0.html.  
106
 “Cancel call to expose the assault on a citizen by the King’s cousins,” [in Arabic] Bahrain Mirror, December 8, 2012, 
http://www.bahrainmirror.com/article.php?id=5434&cid=73.  
106
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view, annotate, create and convert PDF
An advanced PDF editor enable C# users to edit PDF text, image and pages in Visual Studio .NET project. Use HTML5 PDF Editor to Edit PDF Document in ASP.NET.
remove pdf metadata online; embed metadata in pdf
C# TIFF: TIFF Metadata Editor, How to Write & Read TIFF Metadata
C# TIFF - Edit TIFF Metadata in C#.NET. Allow Users to Read and Edit Metadata Stored in Tiff Image in C#.NET Application. How to Get TIFF XMP Metadata in C#.NET.
pdf metadata online; get pdf metadata
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
B
AHRAIN
Mohamed  Watheqi,  and  Ali  Alhayki,  who  are  not  known  public  figures,  were  charged  with 
“insulting the king of Bahrain over Twitter.” In November 2012, they received sentences ranging 
from one to six months.
107
At least one of the men has revealed that he was coerced into making a 
forced confession.
108
On  December  11,  2012,  a  fifth  Twitter  user  received  a  four-month  sentence  for  the  same 
charge.
109
According to activists, the identities of these anonymous users were discovered using a 
technique known as “spear phishing,” in which surveillance software was secretly embedded in 
seemingly  innocent private messages to the users, enabling the hackers  to remotely access the 
victims’ computers.
110
One of those arrested was a progovernment Twitter user who had criticized 
the king for not being harsh enough in punishing protestors.
111
Another wave of arrests took place on March 11 and 12, 2013, when six users, including one 
lawyer and one minor, were detained over charges of defaming the king over social media.
112
None 
of the users had a large base of followers; instead, it seemed that the authorities selected them in 
order to instill fear locally without provoking criticism from the international community.  
After months of living in hiding, award-winning photographer Ahmed Humaidan was arrested by 
15 undercover policemen on December 29, 2012. Humaidan was accused of participating in an 
attack on a police station in the district of Sitra,
113
though it is believed that his arrest is in fact due 
to him photographing protests.
114
Following his arrest, Humaidan was interrogated, blindfolded for 
two days, and placed in solitary confinement for a week
115
at the General Directorate of Criminal 
Investigation while being denied access to a lawyer.
116
He was subject to psychological torture and 
made to believe that a bomb had been placed in his hand that would imminently detonate if he did 
not produce a confession.
117
Humaidan has been one of many photographers documenting the 
107
 “Bahrain: Twitter users sentenced to prison as authorities seek to extend their crack‐down on social media websites,” 
Bahrain Center for Human Rights, November 8, 2012, http://www.bahrainrights.org/en/node/5507.  
108
 See http://twitter.com/freedomprayers/status/261928988274991104.  
109
 “4 months in prison accused of insulting the king via Twitter” [in Arabic], Al Wasat, December 12, 2012, 
http://www.alwasatnews.com/3749/news/read/722589/1.html.  
110
 “Bahrain: How the identities of the tweeps were tracked,” Bahrain Freedom Index (Tumblr), accessed December 2012, 
http://bahrainindex.tumblr.com/post/35839544837/bahrain‐how‐the‐identities‐of‐the‐tweeps‐were‐tracked.  
111
 See https://twitter.com/freedomprayers/status/258927207286722560 and 
https://twitter.com/jehadabdulla/status/257445077457190912.  
112
 The detainees include 17‐year‐old Ali Faisal Al‐Shufa, 33‐year‐old Hassan Abdali Isa, 26‐year‐old Mohsen Abdali Isa, 36‐year‐
old Ammar Makki Mohammed Al‐Aali, 34‐year‐old Mahmood Abdul‐Majeed Abdulla Al‐Jamri, and 25‐year‐old Mahdi Ebrahim 
Al‐Basri. See “Bahrain: The Authorities Celebrate the World Day against Cyber‐censorship by Arresting 6 Twitter Users,” Bahrain 
Youth Society For Human Rights, March 12, 2013, http://byshr.org/?p=1324.  
113
 “Public Prosecution / Statement,” Bahrain News Agency, January 5, 2013, http://www.bna.bh/portal/en/news/540555.  
114
 “Bahrain arrests photographer who documented dissent,” Committee to Project Journalists, January 9, 2013, 
http://www.cpj.org/2013/01/bahrain‐arrest‐photographer‐who‐documented‐dissent.php.  
115
 See https://twitter.com/BHRS2001/status/287932501744304128.  
116
 See https://twitter.com/BHRS2001/status/287924826797125634.  
117
 “Fake bomb in the hands of photographer Humaidan in order to extract confessions” [in Arabic], Bahrain Mirror, January 12, 
2013, http://www.bahrainmirror.com/article.php?id=7363&cid=73.  
107
VB.NET PDF- HTML5 PDF Viewer for VB.NET Project
ASP.NET PDF Viewer; VB.NET: ASP.NET PDF Editor; VB.NET to PDF. Image: Remove Image from PDF Page. Image Link: Edit URL. Bookmark: Edit Bookmark. Metadata: Edit, Delete
change pdf metadata creation date; search pdf metadata
C# PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file for C#
HTML5 PDF Editor enable users to edit PDF text, image, page, password and so on. C#.NET: WPF PDF Viewer & Editor. C#.NET: Edit PDF Metadata.
preview edit pdf metadata; pdf xmp metadata editor
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
B
AHRAIN
protests  through  social  media  websites  such  as  Flickr  and  Instagram.
118
He  was  reportedly 
sentenced to three years in prison on June 18, 2013.
119
The  Bahraini  authorities  are  remarkably  responsive  when  enforcing  the  country’s  tight  online 
restrictions. Human rights activist Said Yousif Al-Muhafdha (@SaidYousif) was arrested only 23 
minutes after a photo of a protester’s shotgun injury was posted on his Twitter account. The photo 
identified the injury as having taken place that same day in Manama, though in reality it was taken 
several days earlier.
120
Al-Muhafdha was indeed monitoring a protest in Manama prior to his arrest, 
tweeting media and information about attacks on the demonstrators by the police; however, he has 
denied publishing that particular picture. He was charged under Article 168 of the Penal Code with 
“willfully disseminating false news” that “resulted in protests and riots that disrupted security and 
order on the same day.”
121
He was detained for one month before being released on bail, pending a 
trial. On March 11, 2013 the court acquitted him of the charges, stating there was “no proof of [a] 
connection between the riots and the picture he had posted.”
122
However, the public prosecution 
has  appealed  against  the  acquittal and a  second trial will start  on  July 1,  2013,  in which Al-
Muhafdha could face a prison sentence.
123
In January 2013, the higher court of cassation upheld a series of harsh sentences originally passed by 
a military court in June 2011, in which two bloggers were charged with possessing links to a 
terrorist  organization  aiming  to  overthrow  the  government.
124
They  were  also  accused  of 
disseminating false news and inciting protests against the government. The two users, Abduljalil al-
Singace and Ali Abdulemam, had already been detained for six months between September 2010 
and February 2011. According to their own court testimonies
125
and media interviews, both were 
also subject to torture while held.
126
Al-Singace, a prominent human rights defender, has been held 
in detention since March 17, 2011 and his blog has been blocked since February 2009.
127
He was 
sentenced to life imprisonment for “plotting to topple” the government in late 2011 and remains in 
prison.
128
He was not allowed to testify before the court until his appeal, when he revealed that he 
118
 See: http://instagram.com/ahmedhumaidan/http://www.flickr.com/photos/86494560@N05, and 
http://500px.com/AhmedHumaidan 
119
 See https://twitter.com/FreedomPrayers/status/349607068916924416.  
120
 “Bahrain: Light speed investigation leads to arrest of a tweep 23 minutes after sending his criminal tweet!” Manama 
(Blogspot), December 22, 2012, http://manamacoac.blogspot.com/2012/12/bahrain‐light‐speed‐investigation‐leads.html.  
121
 “Bahrain: Charges Against Rights Defender Raise Concerns,” Human Rights Watch, January 3, 2012, 
http://www.hrw.org/news/2013/01/03/bahrain‐charges‐against‐rights‐defender‐raise‐concerns.  
122
 “Activist cleared of Twitter post,” Gulf Daily News, March 12, 2013, http://www.gulf‐daily‐
news.com/NewsDetails.aspx?storyid=349145.  
123
 “'Public Prosecution' appeals against the acquittal of AlMuhafdha in the ‘false news broadcast’ “ , Alwasat news, April 13, 
2013, http://www.alwasatnews.com/3871/news/read/763690/1.html 
124
 “Detained blogger Abduljalil Al‐Singace on hunger strike,” Reporters Without Borders, September 6, 2011, 
http://en.rsf.org/bahrain‐one‐blogger‐sentenced‐to‐life‐22‐06‐2011,40507.html. 
125
 “Terrorist network first hearing – Trial 
Testimonies – 28
th
 October, 2010,” Bahrain Center for Human Rights, October 29, 2010, 
http://bahrainrights.hopto.org/en/node/3540.  
125
 “Terrorist network first hearing – Trial Testimonies – 28
th
 October, 2010,” Bahrain Center for Human Rights, October 29, 
2010, http://bahrainrights.hopto.org/en/node/3540.  
126
 Ali Abdulemam describes the way he was tortured (minute 09:37), “People & Power – Bahrain: Fighting for change,” Al 
Jazeera English, March 9, 2011, http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IZdyiK‐Z5Do
127
 http://www.bahrainrights.org/en/node/2752. Alsingace’s blog is http://alsingace.katib.org.  
128
 “Bahrain upholds lengthy prison terms for journalists,” Committee to Protect Journalists, September 28, 2011, 
http://cpj.org/2011/09/bahrain‐1.php.  
108
C# TIFF: TIFF Editor SDK to Read & Manipulate TIFF File Using C#.
1. Extract text from Tiff file. 2. Render text to text, PDF, or Word file. Tiff Metadata Editing in C#. Our .NET Tiff SDK supports editing Tiff file metadata.
read pdf metadata online; edit pdf metadata acrobat
How to C#: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF for .NET
XDoc.PDF for .NET supports editing PDF document metadata, like Title, Subject, Author, Creator, Producer, Keywords, Created Date, and Last Modified Date.
edit pdf metadata; pdf xmp metadata
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
B
AHRAIN
had been subject to torture.
129
Ali Abdulemam, the owner of Bahrain’s most popular online forum, 
Bahrainonline.org, had been in hiding since March 17, 2011 during which time he was sentenced 
(in absentia) to 15 years of prison.
130
However, he suddenly re-emerged in May 2013, having 
escaped Bahrain to the United Kingdom through Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, and Iraq.
131
Five policemen were put on trial for the death of the online journalist and moderator of the Al-Dair 
online forum, Zakaryia Al-Ashiri,  who died from  torture  while in  police  custody on April 9, 
2011.
132
However, after a lengthy trial that lasted from January 2012 until March 2013, the court 
acquitted all of those accused, furthering the widely held belief that members of Bahrain’s security 
apparatus enjoy impunity for crimes against protestors.
133
Students and employees have received disciplinary action for comments they have communicated 
via private text messages and social media. In May 2012, a student of the University of Bahrain was 
suspended for a semester after writing ‘phrases that insult His Majesty the King’ on her mobile 
phone and sending them to her colleagues. She was reported to the university management by one 
of the recipients of her message.
134
Given that users can be prosecuted for being identified with an offending post or text, many users 
are concerned about restrictions on using ICT tools anonymously. The TRA requires users to 
obtain licenses to use Wi-Fi and WiMAX connections,
135
and the government prohibits the sale or 
use of unregistered (anonymous) prepaid mobile phones. The country’s cybercafes are also subject 
to increasing surveillance. Oversight of their operations is coordinated by a commission consisting 
of members from four ministries, who work to ensure strict compliance with rules that prohibit 
access for minors and require that all computer terminals are fully visible to observers.
136
Since March 2009, the TRA has mandated that all telecommunications companies must keep a 
record of customers’ phone calls, e-mails, and website visits for up to three years. The companies 
are also obliged to provide the security services access to subscriber data upon request.
137
Since the 
application of “National Safety Status” (emergency law) in March 2011, citizens have been forced to 
129
 The full testimony of Dr Abduljalil AlSingace before the higher court of appeal on 29 May 2012 (Arabic) 
http://bahrainrights.hopto.org/BCHR/wp‐content/uploads/2012/06/AJ.docx.   
131
 Peter Beaumont, “Bahrain Online founder Ali Abdulemam breaks silence after escape to UK,” The Guardian, May 10, 2013, 
http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2013/may/10/bahrain‐online‐ali‐abdulemam‐escape.  
131
 Peter Beaumont, “Bahrain Online founder Ali Abdulemam breaks silence after escape to UK,” The Guardian, May 10, 2013, 
http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2013/may/10/bahrain‐online‐ali‐abdulemam‐escape.  
132
 “Zakariya Rashid Hassan al‐Ashiri,” Committee to Protect Journalists, April 9, 2011, http://cpj.org/killed/2011/zakariya‐
rashid‐hassan‐al‐ashiri.php.  
133
 “After a year‐long show trial: no one is found guilty for killing blogger under torture in police custody,” Bahrain Center for 
Human Rights, March 13, 2013, http://www.bahrainrights.org/en/node/5673.  
134
 Brian Dooley, “Bahrain Student Suspended for Phone Message,” Human Rights First, June 4, 2012, 
http://www.humanrightsfirst.org/2012/06/04/bahrain‐student‐suspended‐for‐phone‐message/.  
135
 Geoffrey Bew, “Technology Bill Rapped,” Gulf Daily News, July 20, 2006, http://www.gulf‐daily‐
news.com/NewsDetails.aspx?storyid=149891
136
 Reporters Without Borders, “Countries Under Surveillance: Bahrain.” 
137
 “‘Big Brother’ Move Rapped,” Geoffrey Bew, Gulf Daily News, March 25, 2009, http://www.gulf‐daily‐
news.com/NewsDetails.aspx?storyid=246587.  
109
C# PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net
Comments, forms and multimedia. Document and metadata. All object data. Detect and merge image fragments. Flatten visible layers. C#.NET DLLs: Compress PDF Document
remove pdf metadata; c# read pdf metadata
C# PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in C#.net
Convert PDF to HTML. |. C#.NET PDF SDK - Convert PDF to HTML in C#.NET. How to Use C# .NET XDoc.PDF SDK to Convert PDF to HTML Webpage in C# .NET Program.
edit pdf metadata online; view pdf metadata
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
B
AHRAIN
allow security personnel to search their mobile phones at checkpoints. Recent instances of this 
behaviour continue to be documented on YouTube.
138
In May 2011, new units were created within the IAA to monitor social media and foreign news 
websites. According to the IAA’s director of publishing, the initiative aims to “further help project 
the kingdom’s achievements and respond to false information that some channels broadcast.”
139
Although Bahraini cyberspace is highly monitored, no actions have been taken against the dozens of 
progovernment users who continue to spread online threats against activists.
140
Some of these users 
have  publically  defamed  citizens  by  using  social  media to  identify the  faces of protestors  and 
circulate lists of “traitors.”
141
It is common for users tied to the opposition movement to receive 
these types of extralegal attacks in a bid to disrupt their activities.  
In July 2012, researchers discovered malicious software concealed in seemingly innocent emails 
sent to Bahraini activists in April and May 2012. The surveillance software, named “FinFisher,” is 
developed by the Munich-based Gamma International GmbH and distributed by its U.K. affiliate, 
Gamma Group. One aspect of the software, “FinSpy,” can remotely and secretly take control of a 
computer,  taking  screen  shots,  intercepting  Voice-over-Internet-Protocol  (VoIP)  calls,  and 
transmitting a record of every keystroke.
142
The company has denied that it has sold its products to 
the Bahraini government, claiming that the version of FinSpy deployed on activists was “old” and for 
demonstration purposes only. However, evidence compiled by internet watch groups shows that a 
newer version of  the FinSpy  software is  also in  use in  Bahrain, suggesting the government  is 
receiving paid updates from the company.
143
Since 2010, evidence has also emerged surrounding 
the use of spy gear maintained by Nokia Siemens Networks (NSN) and its divested unit, Trovicor 
GmbH, to monitor and record phone calls and text messages.
144
Cyberattacks against both opposition and progovernment  pages, as  well  as other websites,  are 
common in Bahrain. For example, in June 2012 a Facebook news page that belongs to opposition 
138
 See video: http://bahrainindex.tumblr.com/post/39738010314/policeman‐checking‐the‐private‐mobile‐content‐of‐a.  
139
 Andy Sambridge, “Bahrain sets up new units to monitor media output,” Arabian Business, May 18, 2011, 
http://www.arabianbusiness.com/bahrain‐sets‐up‐new‐units‐monitor‐media‐output‐400867.html?parentID=401071
140
 “Bahrain: Death threats against Messrs. Mohammed Al‐Maskati, Nabeel Rajab and Yousef Al‐Mahafdha,” World 
Organization Against Torture, December 7, 2011, http://www.omct.org/human‐rights‐defenders/urgent‐
interventions/bahrain/2011/12/d21549/
141
 See https://twitter.com/Jalad_Almajoos/status/292638655217020929. For a well‐documented account of the defamation of 
opposition activists, please refer to Mahmoud Cherif Bassiouni et al., “Report of the Bahrain Independent Commission of 
Inquiry,” Bahrain Independent Commission of Inquiry (BICI), November 23, 2011, paragraph 1597, 
http://files.bici.org.bh/BICIreportEN.pdf
142
 Vernon Silver, “Cyber Attacks on Activists Traced to FinFisher Spyware of Gamma,” Bloomberg, July 25, 2012, 
http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2012‐07‐25/cyber‐attacks‐on‐activists‐traced‐to‐finfisher‐spyware‐of‐gamma.html and 
“From Bahrain With Love: FinFisher’s Spy Kit Exposed,” CitizenLab, July 25, 2012, http://citizenlab.org/2012/07/from‐bahrain‐
with‐love‐finfishers‐spy‐kit‐exposed/.  
143
 “You Only Click Twice: FinFisher’s Global Proliferation,” CitizenLab, May 13, 2013, https://citizenlab.org/2013/03/you‐only‐
click‐twice‐finfishers‐global‐proliferation‐2/.  
144
 Vernon Silver and Ben Elgin, “Torture in Bahrain Becomes Routine With Help From Nokia Siemens,” Bloomberg, August 22, 
2011, http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2011‐08‐22/torture‐in‐bahrain‐becomes‐routine‐with‐help‐from‐nokia‐siemens‐
networking.html.  
110
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
B
AHRAIN
activists  was  taken  over  by  a  progovernment  group.
145
Similarly,  a  progovernment  website, 
b4bh.com, was hacked in August 2012 for the second time by opposition activists.
146
Government-
associated websites are frequently targeted with distributed denial of service (DDoS) attacks, with 
the most recent instance occurring on May 17, 2012 following the arrest of activist Nabeel Rajab. 
The main perpetrator of such attacks has been the group “Anonymous,” which launched “Operation 
Bahrain” through a press release published on February 17, 2011.
147
145
 See Bahrainforums.com, June 8, 2012, https://bahrainforums.com/vb/%E5%E4%C7‐
%C7%E1%C8%CD%D1%ED%E4/978431.htm .  
146 “Opponenets of Bahrain infiltrate locations belonging to the government,” [in Arabic], Jurnaljazira.com, August 11, 2012, 
http://www.jurnaljazira.com/news.php?action=view&id=4834
147
 “Anonymous hits Bahrain after arrest of human rights activist Nabeel Rajab,” Examiner, May 5, 2012, 
http://www.examiner.com/article/anonymous‐hits‐bahrain‐after‐arrest‐of‐human‐rights‐activist‐nabeel‐rajab
111
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
B
ANGLADESH
B
ANGLADESH
 Secularist blogger Ahmed Rajib Haider was murdered after calling for and promoting
protests against a convicted Islamist war criminal online (see V
IOLATIONS OF 
U
SER
R
IGHTS
).
 Police charged four bloggers with harming religious sentiment under the ICT Act
2006 (see V
IOLATIONS OF 
U
SER 
R
IGHTS
).
 Regulators blocked YouTube for nine months after the anti-Islamic “Innocence of
Muslims”  video  sparked  widespread  criticism  in  September  2012;  not  all  ISPs
complied (see L
IMITS ON 
C
ONTENT
).
2012 
2013 
I
NTERNET 
F
REEDOM 
S
TATUS
N
/
A
P
ARTLY 
F
REE
Obstacles to Access (0-25) 
n/a  13 
Limits on Content (0-35) 
n/a  12 
Violations of User Rights (0-40) 
n/a  24 
Total (0-100) 
n/a 
49 
*0=most free, 100=least free
e
P
OPULATION
: 153 
million
I
NTERNET 
P
ENETRATION 
2012: 6 
percent
S
OCIAL 
M
EDIA
/ICT
A
PPS 
B
LOCKED
Yes
P
OLITICAL
/S
OCIAL 
C
ONTENT 
B
LOCKED
Yes
B
LOGGERS
/ICT
U
SERS 
A
RRESTED
Yes
P
RESS 
F
REEDOM 
2013
S
TATUS
Partly Free
K
EY 
D
EVELOPMENTS
:
M
AY 
2012
A
PRIL 
2013 
112
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
B
ANGLADESH
As an  emerging economy, Bangladesh has recognized  information communication  technologies 
(ICTs)  as  core  tools  for  development.  Even  with  new  media  still  a  comparatively  recent 
phenomenon, however, officials have sought to control and censor online content—particularly as 
the internet took center stage in major social and political events in 2012 and 2013. 
Since opening up the country‘s electronic media to the private sector in the early 1990s, the 
government has, at least officially, encouraged open internet access and communication. The ruling 
Bangladesh Awami League under Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina is working towards a “knowledge 
based networked society” under the “Digital Bangladesh by 2021” program launched in 2009.
1
The 
program seeks to integrate internet access with development efforts in national priority areas, such 
as education, healthcare, and agriculture. Private commercial stakeholders have also helped in the 
proliferation of net usage. Bangladesh further benefits from a vibrant—though often partisan—
print and audio-visual media industry, but traditional journalists face physical threats and regulatory 
constraints that are increasingly being replicated online.  
Religious sentiments and ICTs were both subject to manipulation, which led to major violations to 
internet freedom during the coverage period of this report. Authorities seemed ill-prepared at both 
policy and regulatory levels for the turbulent political developments and used a combination of 
punitive laws and ad hoc directives to curb expression on the internet, even while failing to offer 
adequate  protection  to individuals and websites  under  threat for their online activities.  Police 
arrested four bloggers on the charge of harming religious sentiment, and regulators shut down their 
blogs without a court order. YouTube was inaccessible for nine months after the government 
blocked it in response to anti-Islamic content posted in 2012.  
In October 2012, journalists traced attacks targeting Buddhist neighborhoods in the southeastern 
district of Ramu to a Buddhist’s Facebook profile apparently altered to display anti-Islamic images 
and  incite  local  Muslims  to  retaliate;  it’s  not  clear  who  was  responsible  for  the  alleged 
manipulation.
2
In  February  2013,  domestic  tensions  escalated  when  a  war  crimes  tribunal 
sentenced Abdul Quader Mollah, leader of the country’s largest political Islamic party Jamaat-e-
Islami, to life imprisonment for crimes committed during the country’s 1971 war of independence 
with Pakistan, including mass murder and rape.
3
Some thought the sentence was lenient, and tens 
of thousands of protesters gathered around the Shahbag intersection in the capital, Dhaka, for more 
than two months. Traditional social, cultural, and pro-independence political forces later joined 
and strengthened the non-violent demonstration, causing some observers to compare it to the 2011 
protests in Egypt’s Tahrir Square.
4
The Shahbag Movement, as it became known, was facilitated by 
1
 “Digital Bangladesh Strategy Paper, 2010,” Access to Information Program, Prime Minister’s Office, The People’s Republic of 
Bangladesh, http://www.a2i.pmo.gov.bd/tempdoc/spdbb.pdf.       
2
 “A Devil’s Design,” The Daily Star, October 14, 2012, http://bit.ly/1eQ4GBn.  
3
 Tamima Anam, “Shahbag Protesters Versus the Butcher of Mirpur,” The Guardian, February 13, 2013,  
http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2013/feb/13/shahbag‐protest‐bangladesh‐quader‐mollah.  
4
 Saurabh Shukla, “Shahbag Square Cheers for Change: Dhaka's Young Protesters Demand Ban on Extremism and Death for War 
Criminals,” Daily Mail, February 28, 2013, http://dailym.ai/18e9tHR.  
I
NTRODUCTION
113
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
B
ANGLADESH
blogs,  Facebook,  and  Twitter,  a  convincing  display  of  the  power  of  ICTs  to  mobilize  and 
disseminate  information.
5
Its  opponents  certainly  thought  so:  Mollah’s  supporters  rallied  in 
response against a conspiracy by “atheist bloggers.”
6
On February 11, a pro-Jamaat-e-Islami blog 
identified blogger Ahmed Rajib Haider as a Shahbag ringleader; armed assailants attacked and killed 
Rajib outside his home four days later. These were troubling developments for a country still 
striving to become a part of the connected global community. 
The  International  Telecommunication  Union  reported  internet  penetration  in  Bangladesh  at  6 
percent in 2012.
7
Government estimates were closer to 20 percent.
8
Over 90 percent of users 
access the internet through GPRS/CDMA services, which local regulators classify as narrowband. 
The remainder subscribe to fixed lines, either through a traditional Internet Service Provider (ISPs) 
or via one of two WiMax operators.
9
The government has established 4,501 Information Centers all over Bangladesh, with the goal of 
ensuring  cost-effective  internet  access  and  related  e-services  for  the  base  of  the  pyramid 
population.
10
No specific study has been done yet to analyze the user breakdown between urban 
and rural population.  
Mobile  penetration was  at 64  percent  in 2012, with  connections provided  by six  operators.
11
Grameen Phone, owned by Telenor, is the market leader with 42 percent of the total customer 
base, followed by Orascom’s Banglalink with 26 percent, and Robi, under the Axiata company, 
with 21 percent. The remaining three—Airtel, Citycell, and the state-owned Teletalk—have a 
total  customer  base  of  10  percent.
12
Right  now,  Teletalk  is  the  only  entity  offering  mobile 
broadband  to  its  comparatively  small  user  base.  Other  operators  offer  2G  services,  as  the 
government is yet to provide licenses for 3G/4G operations. 
While ICT usage is increasing fast, Bangladesh is lagging behind globally. The World Economic 
Forum’s 2013 global IT  report ranked Bangladesh  114  out of  144 countries worldwide,  with 
infrastructure  and  the  regulatory  environment  scoring  poorly,  though  overall  communication 
5
 The movement’s demands were diverse, including the death sentence for the war crimes conviction, and banning the 
Bangladesh Jamaat‐e‐Islami party from politics. See, “Shahbag Grand Rally Demands Hanging to War Criminals, Banning Jamaat 
(Updated),” The Independent (Dhaka), February 8, 2013, http://bit.ly/18zoSTZ.  
6
 Al Jazeera, “Bangladesh Opposition Protests turn Deadly,” February 22, 2013, http://aje.me/XF7s1z.  
7
 International Telecommunication Union, “Percentage of Individuals Using the Internet, 2000‐2012,” 
http://www.itu.int/en/ITU‐D/Statistics/Pages/stat/default.aspx.  
8
 Association of Mobile Telecom Operators of Bangladesh, “Telecom and ICT: Key Enablers for Economic Development,” 
presentation, March 25, 2013, www.amtob.org.bd.  
9
 Faheem Hussain, “License Renewal of Mobile Phone Services: What a Country Should Not Do (A Case Study of Bangladesh),” 
Telecommunication Policy Research Conference, George Mason University, VA, USA, September 21‐23, 2012, 
http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=2032127.   
10
 Faheem Hussain, “ICT Sector Performance Review for Bangladesh,” LIRNEasia, 2011. Abstract available:  
http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=2013707
11
 International Telecommunication Union, “Mobile‐cellular Telephone Subscriptions, 2000‐2012.” 
12
 Bangladesh Telecommunication Regulatory Commission, accessed March, 2013, http://www.btrc.gov.bd/
O
BSTACLES TO 
A
CCESS
114
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested