download pdf file from folder in asp.net c# : Edit multiple pdf metadata Library control class asp.net azure wpf ajax FOTN%202013_Full%20Report_014-part1515

F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
B
ELARUS
While  the  right  to  information  and  freedom  of  expression  are  guaranteed  by  the  Belarusian 
constitution, they remain severely restricted and violated in practice. Formally, there are no laws 
ascribing criminal penalties or civil liability specifically for online activities, but since 2007 the 
government  has  employed  a  series  of  repressive  laws—mainly  defamation  laws—that  target 
traditional media to stifle critical voices online. The 2008 Law on Media identified online news 
outlets as “mass media.” According to this law, the Council of Ministers was supposed to further 
specify criteria for defining which websites belong to the category of “mass media,” as well as the 
procedures for their registration.
67
To date this clarification has not taken place. Therefore, at the 
moment, online news outlets are not obliged to obtain state registration as mass media.  
In  October  2011,  the  government  introduced,  and  the  parliament  approved,  an  “anti-
revolutionary” package of amendments to laws regulating civic organizations and political parties, as 
well as to the criminal code. These amendments—which apply to internet-based media outlets—
further criminalize protest actions, make receiving foreign funding a criminal offense, and extend 
the authority of the KGB. Under the amendments, the KGB is now freed from the oversight of 
other state bodies and has powers previously granted only during a state of emergency, including 
the right to enter the homes and offices of any citizen at any time without a court order.
68
While the repression of media practitioners and civic activists decreased in 2012, the persecution 
became more targeted. According to the Viasna Human Rights Center, there were 233 cases of 
politically-motivated  administrative  persecution  (arrests,  detentions,  and  fines)  documented  in 
2012,  including  104  arrests  for  terms  ranging  from  1  to  15  days.
69
In  2012,  the  Belarusian 
Association  of  Journalists  registered  approximately  60  cases  of  detentions  of  journalists, 
independent press distributors, and members of social networks by representatives of different law-
enforcement bodies. Detained media practitioners were usually released within 2-3 hours. There 
were, however, cases in which media workers were taken to court and sentenced to fines and 
terms of imprisonment (up to 15 days) under administrative law. In 2012, at least 13 journalists 
were officially warned by public prosecution offices for cooperating with foreign media without 
valid press credentials.
70
In  the  past  year,  each  of  the  major cases  of  criminal  prosecution  against  media  practitioners 
concerned internet  publications. The most prominent case  concerned the outspoken journalist 
Andrzej Poczobut, who in the last three years has been repeatedly detained, fined, and placed 
under  administrative  arrest.  In  2011,  he  was  convicted  and  received  a  three-year  suspended 
sentence for insulting the president of Belarus in a series of articles posted online, including on the 
websites of the Polish daily Gazeta Wyborcza and Belaruspartisan.org, as well as on his LiveJournal 
blog. In June 2012, Poczobut was detained again for slandering the president in articles written on 
67
 Law of the Republic of Belarus No. 427 of July 17, 2008, “On Mass Media,” available in Russian at 
http://www.mininform.gov.by/documentation. 
68
 “Belarus has adopted ‘anti‐revolutionary’ amendments to the legislation,” Human Rights House, October 20, 2011, 
http://humanrightshouse.org/Articles/17082.html.   
69
 “Адміністратыўны перасьлед” [Administrative persecution], Viasna Human Rights Center, accessed on May 12, 2013, 
http://spring96.org/persecution/?DateFrom=2012‐01‐01&DateTo=2012‐12‐31&ArrestFrom=1&ArrestTo=15&Page=0.  
70
 Mass Media in Belarus – 2012: A Brief Review and Analysis, Belarusian Association of Journalists, February 11, 2013, 
http://baj.by/en/monitoring/85
135
Edit multiple pdf metadata - add, remove, update PDF metadata in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Allow C# Developers to Read, Add, Edit, Update and Delete PDF Metadata
add metadata to pdf file; pdf keywords metadata
Edit multiple pdf metadata - VB.NET PDF metadata library: add, remove, update PDF metadata in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Enable VB.NET Users to Read, Write, Edit, Delete and Update PDF Document Metadata
remove metadata from pdf file; remove metadata from pdf online
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
B
ELARUS
the opposition websites Charter97.org and Belaruspartisan.org.
71
During the politically-motivated 
investigation into his writings, Poczobut could not leave his city of residence. If convicted, he 
would have faced up to seven years in prison.
72
On March 15, 2013, the Investigative Committee 
closed the case against Mr. Poczobut, having found no legitimate evidence of the alleged crime.
73
On July 4, 2012, as part of a publicity stunt carried out by the foreign advertising agency Studio 
Total, two Swedish pilots flew across the Belarusian border in a small plane and dropped hundreds 
of teddy bears with messages in support of solidarity and freedom of speech. On July 13, Anton 
Surapin, a 20-year-old journalism student who posted the first photos of the teddy bears on his 
website  Belarusian News  Photos,  was arrested  and  spent  over  a  month  in  a  KGB  prison  for 
allegedly  “assisting foreign citizens  in illegally crossing the Belarusian border.”  On  August 17, 
Surapin was released, but the charges against him have not been lifted.
74
Amnesty International 
included Surapin’s case in its top 10 most absurd and unjust arrests of 2012.
75
Additionally, when 
Surapin’s independent media colleagues launched a solidarity campaign on his behalf that involved 
posting photographs of individuals holding messages of support, two individuals were arrested and 
fined for “unsanctioned picketing in the form of photography.”
76
On August 17, the journalist and civic activist Mikalay Petrushenka was criminally charged with 
defaming  an  Orsha  public  official  in  an  article  published on  the Vitebsk-based  Nash-dom.info 
website. The criminal proceedings were dropped on October 17, 2012. 
In December, the prosecutor’s office issued a warning to a democratic activist from Rahachou 
concerning his articles published on a local independent website. The prosecutor claimed that the 
activist’s  posts  contained  inaccurate  information  about  the  political  and  economic  situation  in 
Belarus, thus violating several articles of the criminal code regarding “insulting and discrediting the 
Republic of Belarus.”
77
In  January 2013, three human rights defenders from Hrodna were convicted and fined for an 
unauthorized demonstration. The case was based on a photo posted on the website of the Viasna 
71
 “Official information: Poczobut accused of libel against the president,” Belarusian Association of Journalists, June 22, 2012, 
http://baj.by/en/node/12746.  
72
 “Poczobut’s case extended till December 2012,” Belarusian Association of Journalists, November 21, 2012, 
http://baj.by/en/node/18464; “Additional linguistic expertise in Poczobut’s case,” Belarusian Association of Journalists, 
November 29, 2012, http://baj.by/en/node/18590.   
73
 “Poczobut’s case closed,” Belarusian Association of Journalists, March 15, 2013, http://baj.by/en/node/20026
74
 “Freelancer Anton Surapin taken to questioning,” Belarusian Association of Journalists, July 13, 2012, 
http://baj.by/en/node/1299; “KGB brings charges over teddy bear drop,” Belarusian Association of Journalists, August 7, 2012, 
http://baj.by/en/node/13098; “Anton Surapin is free,” Belarusian Association of Journalists, August 17, 2012, 
http://baj.by/en/node/13607.  
75
 “10 absurd and unjust arrests of 2012,” Amnesty International, December 26, 2012, http://blog.amnestyusa.org/music‐and‐
the‐arts/10‐absurd‐and‐unjust‐arrests‐of‐2012.  
76
 “Darashkevich and Kozik fined 3 million Br each for unlawful picket,” Belarusian Association of Journalists, August 9, 2012, 
http://baj.by/en/node/13383.  
77
 “Rachahou activist receives a warning over contributing to independent website,” Belarusian Association of Journalists, 
December 29, 2012, http://baj.by/en/node/18996.  
136
VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
NET empowers VB.NET developers to implement fast and high quality PDF conversions to or from multiple supported images and PDF Hyperlink Edit. PDF Metadata Edit.
pdf metadata reader; pdf metadata viewer online
VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple
Divide PDF file into multiple files by outputting PDF file size. Split Split PDF Document into Multiple PDF Files Demo Code in VB.NET. You
batch edit pdf metadata; remove pdf metadata
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
B
ELARUS
Human Rights Center, which showed them holding the portrait of political prisoner Ales Bialiatski 
and a copy of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.
78
In  September  2012,  the  Belarusian  government  lifted  a  travel  ban  that  had  been  placed  on 
journalists, civic activists, and opposition politicians. Beginning in March 2012, a significant but 
unknown number of individuals, including practitioners working within online media, were banned 
from traveling abroad.
79
This violation of freedom of movement was allegedly a reaction to the 
extension of the European Union’s visa ban list of Belarusian officials involved in the 2010-2011 
repression. After  removing  the  ban  in  September,  the Citizenship  and  Migration  Department 
explained it away as a software glitch.
80
While the authorities have long used petty charges to prosecute civic activists and independent 
reporters, this technique was increasingly applied against online activists in 2012-2013. Charges of 
“petty hooliganism” (Article 17.1 of the administrative code) were used to detain and arrest a 
number of online activists.
81
For example, on May 7, 2013, in two separate court hearings, the 
blogger Dzmitry Halko and journalist Aliaksandr Yarashevich were found guilty of alleged petty 
hooliganism and disobeying the police (Article 23.4) and were sentenced to 10 and 12 days of 
arrest, respectively. Both were detained the night before near the Akrestina detention center in 
Minsk, where civil activists, politicians, and other journalists had gathered to meet those arrested 
during the April 26 Chernobyl March.
82
For Yarashevich, this was the second arrest in a fortnight. 
On April 26, he and journalist Henadz Barbarych were detained for allegedly disobeying the police. 
On  April  29,  the  Soviet  district  court  of  Minsk  sentenced  the  journalists  to  three  days  of 
administrative detention (which they had almost served by the end of the trial) in spite of obvious 
contradictions and blatant discrepancies in the testimonies of policemen.
83
Individuals are required to present their passports and register when they buy a SIM card and obtain 
 mobile  phone  number.  All  telecommunication  operators  are  obliged  to  install  real-time 
surveillance  hardware, which makes it possible to monitor all types of transmitted information 
(voice, mobile text message and internet traffic) as well as obtain other types of related data (such 
as user history, account balance, and other details) without judicial or other independent oversight. 
Mobile  phone  companies  are  required  to  turn  over  personal  data  of  their  customers  at  the 
government’s request.  
78
“Hrodna: Human rights defenders get fined 4.5 million rubles for a photo on the web,” Spring96.org, January 8, 2013, 
http://spring96.org/en/news/60388.  
79
 For Belarusian Association of Journalists’ reaction to the restriction on journalists’ travel, see http://baj.by/en/node/11459
80
 Mass Media in Belarus – 2012: A Brief Review and Analysis, Belarusian Association of Journalists, February 11, 2013, 
http://baj.by/en/monitoring/85
81
 “Belarus: Pulling the Plug,” Index on Censorship, p. 10‐11, http://www.indexoncensorship.org/wp‐
content/uploads/2013/01/IDX_Belarus_ENG_WebRes.pdf.  
82
 “Journalists Sentenced to 10 and 12 Day Arrest,” Belarusian Association of Journalists, May 7, 2013, 
http://baj.by/en/node/20780.  
83
 “A protest of BAJ against arbitrary detentions of journalists,” Belarusian Association of Journalists, May 8, 2013, 
http://baj.by/en/node/20790
137
C# PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in C#.net, ASP.
Free online C#.NET source code for combining multiple PDF pages together in .NET framework. C# Demo Code: Combine and Merge Multiple PDF Files into One in .NET.
extract pdf metadata; edit multiple pdf metadata
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view, annotate, create and convert PDF
RaterEdge HTML5 PDF Editor empower C#.NET users to edit PDF pages with multiple manipulation functionalities in ASP.NET application.
c# read pdf metadata; pdf metadata viewer
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
B
ELARUS
Since  2010,  the  Belarusian  government  has  allocated  resources  for  online  surveillance 
technologies.
84
In  2012,  there  were  reports  of  Western  firms  supplying  telecommunications 
hardware and software that would allow the state to expand its surveillance of citizens. A report by 
Index  on Censorship  states  that the Swedish  telecom  companies TeliaSonera and  Ericsson  are 
possible purveyors of this type of equipment, working through Turkish and Austrian firms that are 
part-owners of Belarusian mobile telephone companies. The report also noted that the German 
police had trained their Belarusian colleagues to use software that could track communications in 
social networks.
85
Russian surveillance technologies are also employed in Belarus. In March 2010, Belarus acquired 
the SORM (“system for operational-investigative activities”) surveillance system, and has reportedly 
also purchased other Russian surveillance software that is designed to allow for monitoring of social 
networks.
86
Decree  No.  60  requires  ISPs  to  maintain  records  of  the  traffic  of  all  internet  protocol  (IP) 
addresses, including those at home and at work, for one year. As a result, the state can request 
information about any citizen’s use of the internet. As of 2007, internet cafes are obliged to keep a 
year-long history of the domain names accessed by users and inform law enforcement bodies of 
suspected legal violations.
87
In December 2012, the Council of Ministers abolished the requirement 
that the customers of internet cafes must present their passports. Instead, cybercafe employees are 
required to  take  pictures  of  or  film  visitors.
88
This  regulation,  “On  personal identification of 
internet cafe users,” came into legal force on January 28, 2013.
89
Restaurants, cafes, hotels, and 
other entities are obliged to register users before providing them with wireless access, whether free 
of charge or paid.
90
On July 17, police searched the apartment of the editor of the local independent website Orsha.eu. 
The editor’s computer and memory cards were confiscated on suspicion that the website contained 
a link to another website with pornographic content. The equipment was returned five months 
later  without  any  explanation.
91
In  August,  a  correspondent  of  another  independent  regional 
84
 Мероприятия по реализации Национальной программы ускоренного развития услуг в сфере информационно‐
коммуникационных технологий на 2011–2015 годы [Measures on implementation of the National program of accelerated 
development of information and communication technologies for 2011‐2015], http://www.mpt.gov.by/File/Natpr/pril1.pdf
85
 “Belarus: Pulling the Plug,” Index on Censorship, p. 16‐17, http://www.indexoncensorship.org/wp‐
content/uploads/2013/01/IDX_Belarus_ENG_WebRes.pdf
86
 Andrei Soldatov and Irina Borogan, “Russia’s Surveillance State,” World Policy Institute, Fall 2013, 
http://www.worldpolicy.org/journal/fall2013/Russia‐surveillance.  
87
  “Совет Министров Республики Беларусь Положения о порядке работы компьютерных клубов и Интернет‐кафе” 
[Council of Ministers of the Republic of Belarus. Regulations on computer clubs and internet cafe functioning], Pravo.by, April 
29, 2010, http://pravo.by/webnpa/text.asp?start=1&RN=C20700175
88
 Alyaksey Areshka, “Authorities scrap passport requirement for Internet cafes’ visitors,” Belapan, December 27, 2012, 
http://en.belapan.com/archive/2012/12/27/en_27122104b
89
 “Passport identification in cyber cafes to become obsolete?”, Belarusian Association of Journalists, January 29, 2013, 
http://baj.by/en/node/19310
90
 Including the user’s name, surname, type of ID, ID number, and name of the state body which issued the ID, as per  
Article 6 of the Regulation on computer clubs and internet café functioning, 
http://pravo.by/main.aspx?guid=3871&p0=C20700175&p2={NRPA}. 
91
 “Equipment given back after 5 months’ check‐up,” Belarusian Association of Journalists, November 29, 2012, 
http://baj.by/en/node/18627.  
138
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Able to add and insert one or multiple pages to existing adobe PDF document in VB.NET. Add and Insert Multiple PDF Pages to PDF Document Using VB.
add metadata to pdf; remove metadata from pdf acrobat
C# Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images to
Component for combining multiple image formats into one or multiple PDF file in C#.NET. Any piece of area is able to be cropped and pasted to PDF page.
rename pdf files from metadata; pdf metadata
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
B
ELARUS
website  was  summoned  to the  prosecutor’s  office and questioned  about  an  article  by  a  local 
opposition leader, which called for a boycott of the 2012 parliamentary elections and was published 
on Westki.info. The prosecutor threatened the journalist with administrative responsibility for the 
article, despite the fact that it was authored by another person.
92
Instances of extralegal intimidation and harassment for online activities continued to take place in 
2012-2013. In April 2012, a girlfriend of one of the leaders of the “Revolution Through Social 
Networks”  internet  group,  which  organized  the  2011  “silent  protests,”  was  taken  from  her 
apartment by plainclothes police officers, interrogated  for eight  hours, threatened with death, 
forced to record a video slandering her boyfriend Viachaslaw Dziyanau and herself, and was tried 
and fined for “hooliganism.” While leaving the country after the process, she was body-searched 
and her laptop and other electronic devices were confiscated at the border.
93
On May 8, 2012, a 
customer was kicked out of an internet cafe in Minsk, insulted, and beaten up by the police for 
reading the Charter 97 website.
94
In  2012, the  authorities  continued  to harass  active  users  of  opposition  communities on  social 
networks. On August 30, the KGB raided the apartments and detained the administrators of the 
“We Are Sick of Lukashenka” online community, one of the largest on VKontakte. Created on the 
eve of the 2010 presidential election, the group numbered 37,000 users, mainly 15 to 25 years old, 
by August 2012. On the same day, the apartments of the administrators of a second community 
were also raided. Known as “Only ShOS,” which stands for “Wish He would Die,” this community 
had  15,000  members. The  young  activists  were  interrogated  for  four  hours,  threatened,  and 
beaten.  Two  were  incarcerated for five  to seven days  for  “hooliganism,” while the rest were 
released. Simultaneously, hackers gained access to both online communities and removed their 
content.
95
 Nevertheless,  the  moderators  created  a  backup  VKontakte  group,  which  already 
numbers more than 4,000 users. 
On February 17, 2013, two Belarusian students on their way back from Warsaw, where they 
participated in a meeting dedicated to the “Day of Belarusian Wikipedia,” were detained in Brest. 
The students were questioned and their personal belongings were inspected. The students were 
released several hours later.
96
92
 “Кастуся Шыталя распытвалі ў пракуратуры пра публікацыю, у якой згадваўся байкот,” [Kastus Shytal interrogated by the 
prosecutor office about the publication mentioning boycott], Wetski.info, August 13, 2012, 
http://westki.info/artykuly/13588/kastusya‐shytalya‐raspytvali‐u‐prakuratury‐pra‐publikacyyu‐u‐yakoy‐zgadvausya‐baykot.  
93
 “Лавышак: Мяне пагражалі вывезці ў лес і растраляць,” [Lavyshak: “I was threatened to be taken to the forest and shot 
there”], Svaboda.org,  May 4, 2013, http://www.svaboda.org/content/article/24569492.html; "The police threatened to take 
me to the woods and shoot", http://udf.by/english/main‐story/59240‐the‐police‐threatened‐to‐take‐me‐to‐the‐woods‐and‐
shoot‐photo.html. 
94
 “Милиция избила витебчанина за просмотр сайта Хартии 97,” [Police beat a Vitebsk customer k for reading the Charter 97 
website], Charter97.org, accessed on February 2, 2013, http://charter97.org/ru/news/2012/5/8/51879/pf
95
 Iryna Lewshyna, “Two young men linked to opposition online communities get jail terms,” Belapan, August 31, 2013, 
http://en.belapan.com/archive/2012/08/31/571400_571404. 
96
 “Затрыманых студэнтаў‐вікіпедыстаў адпусьцілі” [Detained students ‐ “wikipedists” were released], Svaboda.org,  February 
17, 2013, http://www.svaboda.org/content/article/24904651.html.   
139
VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net
Combine multiple specified PDF pages in into single one file. using RasterEdge.XDoc. PDF; VB.NET Demo code to Combine and Merge Multiple PDF Files into One.
pdf metadata editor; bulk edit pdf metadata
C# PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file for C#
XDoc.PDF SDK for .NET empowers C# developers to implement fast and high quality PDF conversions to or from multiple supported images C#.NET: Edit PDF Metadata.
remove pdf metadata online; edit pdf metadata
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
B
ELARUS
One observer suggests that the August crackdowns were related to appeals for a public boycott of 
the September 2012 parliamentary elections, which the government considered to be both illegal 
and a threat to its legitimacy. First embraced by some opposition political parties, the calls for a 
boycott were taken up and advocated for by some internet communities.
97
Dunja Mijatovic, the 
OSCE Representative on Freedom of the Media, condemned the persecution and noted that they 
“show continued efforts to muzzle dissenting voices and clamp down on freedom of expression 
online."
98
Instances of technical attacks against the websites of independent media and civil society groups 
have continued to grow. Trojans are often used to spy on opposition activists and the independent 
media. In April, Iryna Khalip, a prominent Belarusian journalist and correspondent for the Russian 
newspaper Novaya Gazeta, received an infected file from an unknown user via Skype. The file posed 
as a photo of a document with a list of questions to be discussed during an urgent government 
meeting concerning the fate of her then imprisoned husband, former presidential candidate Andrei 
Sannikov. This Trojan, sent by an unknown user, was investigated by independent experts and 
found to have successfully infected 14 other computers, most of which belonged to Belarusian 
opposition politicians and civic activists.
99
 similar  tactic  was  used  against  the  independent  trade  union  of  the  Belarusian  Radio  and 
Electronics Workers (REP). After the Skype and e-mail accounts of its leaders were hijacked with 
Trojan software, the hackers pretended to be REP representatives and contacted the union’s Danish 
partners in an attempt to obtain financial information regarding joint projects. This attack coincided 
with the confiscation of a laptop of a REP activist, Andrej Strizhak, by border control officers, and 
with verbal attacks against REP by state officials.
100
From July through August 2012, the website of “Platform,” an organization defending the rights of 
prisoners, experienced repeated distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attacks. On August 7, 2012, 
the site was inaccessible for six hours. On the same day, the deputy director of the organization was 
detained near her house for  allegedly “using bad  language” in  public.
101
On August 31, 2012, 
unknown persons hacked the blog of the prominent opposition politician Viktar Ivashkevich on the 
popular news website Belaruspartisan.org. A text insulting Iryna Khalip was posted on the blog on 
behalf of Ivashkevich.
102
97
 Vadzim Smok,“Internet Activism Under Siege in Belarus,” Belarus Digest, September 11, 2012, 
http://belarusdigest.com/story/internet‐activism‐under‐siege‐belarus‐11112.  
98
 Tanya Korovenkova, “OSCE media freedom representative concerned about crackdown on online dissent in Belarus,” 
September 4, 2012, http://en.belapan.com/archive/2012/09/04/en_15260904H.  
99
 “Хартыя выкрыла чарговы траян спецслужбаў,” [Charter unveiled another Trojan spread by intelligence], NN.by, April 25, 
2012, http://nn.by/?c=ar&i=72400. 
100
 “Скайп и почтовый ящик профсоюза РЭП взломали,” [Skype and email account of REP trade union hacked], Praca‐by.info, 
August 7, 2013, http://www.praca‐by.info/cont/art.php?&sn_nid=4805&sn_cat=1.  
101
 “Сайт “”Плятформы” зноў спрабавалі ўзламаць,” [“Platforma” website was attacked again], Svaboda.org, August 7, 2012, 
http://www.svaboda.org/content/article/24669047.html
102
 Iryna Lewshyna, “Two young men linked to opposition online communities get jail terms,” Belapan, August 31, 2013, 
http://en.belapan.com/archive/2012/08/31/571400_571404. 
140
C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
The following C# codes explain how to split a PDF file into multiple ones by PDF bookmarks or outlines. Split PDF Document into Multiple PDF Files in C#.
clean pdf metadata; pdf metadata online
VB.NET PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file
mechanisms, it can be used for multiple PDF to image PDF barcode reading, PDF barcode generation, PDF content extraction and metadata editing if
search pdf metadata; change pdf metadata
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
B
ELARUS
On April 2, 2013, the website of the Mogilev branch of the Viasna Human Rights Center was 
hacked and a fake article, containing threats by a human rights defender against an independent 
journalist, was posted.
103
On April 23–26, 2013, four independent websites were hacked. On 
April 23, the Charter 97 website experienced a DDoS attack and ceased to function for an hour. 
The attacker  was not identified, but Charter 97 attributed the attack to the Belarusian special 
services.
104
On the morning of April 25, Belaruspartisan.org was attacked and a threatening letter 
from anonymous hackers was posted on the site.
105
In the evening of that same day, the Viasna 
Human Rights Center website was hacked. Several publications posted on the site were distorted 
after attackers gained unauthorized access. The attack affected all three language versions of the 
site.
106
On April 26, the website of the Belarusian Association of Journalists also experienced a 
DDoS attack, which started half an hour after an article was published titled, “Why independent 
websites are being hacked.”
107
Belarusian criminal law prohibits these types of “technical violence.” Specifically, Article 351 of the 
Criminal  Code,  covering  “computer  sabotage,”  stipulates  that  the  premeditated  destruction, 
blocking, or disabling of computer information, programs, or equipment is punishable by fines, 
professional sanctions, and up to five years in prison.
108
A special department at the Ministry of 
Internal Affairs is tasked with investigating such crimes. In reality, a number of the attacks on the 
independent  websites  and  personal  accounts  of  democratic  activists  have  been  linked  to  the 
authorities.  The  government  has  stated  its  intention  to  accede  to  the  Council  of  Europe’s 
Convention on  Cybercrime, but  it  has  made  no  move  to  sign  on  to the  Convention  for  the 
Protection of Individuals with regard to Automatic Processing of Personal Data.
109
103
 “Праваабаронцы выступілі з заявай наконт узлому сайта магілёўскай ‘Вясны’”[Human rights defenders made a 
statement in connection with the hacker’s attack on Mogilev “Viasna” website], Belarusian Association of Journalists, April 4, 
2013, http://baj.by/be/node/20342.  
104
 “Charter 97 under attack,” Charter 97, April 23, 2013, http://charter97.org/en/news/2013/4/23/68349
105
 “Belaruspartizan website cracked,” Belarusian Association of Journalists, April 25, 2013, http://baj.by/en/node/20617.  
106
 “Viasna’s website resumes work after hacker attack,” Viasna, April 26, 2013, http://spring96.org/en/news/62869.  
107
 “Сайт БАЖ подвергся хакерской атаке” [BAJ’s website experienced hacker’s attack], Gazetby.com, April 26, 2013, 
http://gazetaby.com/cont/art.php?sn_nid=56172.  
108
 “«Белтелеком»: Возможно, независимые сайты блокировали другие организации” [Beltelecom: Independent websites 
could be blocked by other organizations], Charter 97, January 10, 2008, http://www.charter97.org/ru/news/2008/1/10/2905
109
 Council of Europe, “Convention for the Protection of Individuals with regard to Automatic Processing of Personal Data,” 1 
January 1981, http://conventions.coe.int/Treaty/Commun/QueVoulezVous.asp?NT=108&CL=ENG.  
141
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
B
RAZIL
B
RAZIL
 Brazil’s Electoral Law, which prohibits online media and traditional broadcasters from
focusing on candidates for three months prior to an election, took center stage ahead of
the October 2012 municipal elections, resulting in increased takedown notices and
prosecutions of users found in violation of the law (see L
IMITS ON CONTENT
).
 High-profile cases of intermediary liability—including criminal charges against Google
executives—attracted  international  attention  in  2012  and  2013  (see  L
IMITS  ON
CONTENT
).
 Retaliatory violence and intimidation of online journalists and bloggers increased in late
2012 and early 2013. Eduardo Carvalho, owner and editor of the Ultima Hora News
website, was murdered in November 2012 in connection with his online work (see
V
IOLATIONS OF 
U
SER 
R
IGHTS
).
 Brazil’s cybercrime  law went into  effect and its reconfigured  Azeredo Bill,  which
establishes a framework for judicial takedown notices, was approved in April 2013 (see
V
IOLATIONS OF 
U
SER 
R
IGHTS
).
2012 
2013 
I
NTERNET 
F
REEDOM 
S
TATUS
F
REE
P
ARTLY 
F
REE
Obstacles to Access (0-25) 
Limits on Content (0-35) 
Violations of User Rights (0-40) 
14 
17 
Total (0-100) 
27 
32 
*0=most free, 100=least free
K
EY 
D
EVELOPMENTS
:
M
AY 
2012
A
PRIL 
2013 
P
OPULATION
194.3 million
I
NTERNET 
P
ENETRATION 
2012: 
50 percent
S
OCIAL 
M
EDIA
/ICT
A
PPS 
B
LOCKED
No
P
OLITICAL
/S
OCIAL 
C
ONTENT 
B
LOCKED
:
No
B
LOGGERS
/ICT
U
SERS 
A
RRESTED
Yes
P
RESS 
F
REEDOM 
2013
S
TATUS
Partly Free
142
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
B
RAZIL
Brazil, which was first connected to the internet in 1990, has made significant gains in expanding 
internet access and mobile phone usage in recent years, offering tax incentives to the purveyors of 
information  and  communication  technologies  (ICTs)  for  continued  investment  in  Brazilian 
infrastructure, and providing public access points (LAN houses) to citizens in order to facilitate 
internet connectivity.
1
Despite such notable progress in increasing ICT availability, particularly via 
mobile technologies—4G services were introduced to Brazil in late April 2013—Brazil still faces 
challenges  in  its  quest  to  reach  internet  penetration  rates  commensurate  with  the  country’s 
economic wealth. 
According to the International Telecommunication Union (ITU), Brazil’s internet penetration rate 
falls below the average enjoyed by North American and European countries, as does the number of 
Brazilian households with computers. Among the primary reasons for these deficiencies are faulty 
infrastructure, social inequality, and poor education. In order to combat such issues, the federal 
government has executed several national policies over recent years, resulting in an increase in 
social network activity and internet-mediated civic participation.
2
There  is  no  evidence  of  the  Brazilian  government  employing  technical  methods  to  filter  or 
otherwise  limit  access  to  online  content;  however,  it  does  frequently  issue  content  removal 
requests to Google, Twitter, and other social media companies. Such requests increased in 2012 
ahead of Brazil’s municipal elections, with approximately 235 court orders and 3 executive requests 
imploring Google to remove content that violated the electoral law.
3
The law’s prohibition of any 
content that ridicules or could offend a candidate directly impacted freedom of online expression 
and  played  a pivotal role  in two highly publicized cases of intermediary  liability  extending to 
Google executives. Law 9.054 prohibits online and traditional media from publishing stories about 
candidates for three months prior to elections. It also bans candidates from advertising on the 
internet for the same period of time unless they are contenders for the office of president.
4
Additional challenges to online expression in 2012 and 2013 came from civil defamation suits, 
increasing violence against bloggers and online journalists, and legal action by the judiciary and 
government officials. The penalties for such charges extend to content removal and fines. Brazil has 
1
 Robert Hobbes Zakon, “Hobbes’ Internet Timeline v8.2,” Zakon Group LLC, accessed August 11, 2010, 
http://www.zakon.org/robert/internet/timeline/; Tadao Takahashi, ed., Sociedade da Informação no Brasil: Livro Verde 
[Information Society in Brazil: Green Book] (Brasilia: Ministry of Science and Technology, September 2000), 
http://www.mct.gov.br/index.php/content/view/18878.html; National Education and Research Network (RNP), “Mapa do 
Backbone” [Map of Backbone], accessed August 11, 2010, http://www.rnp.br/backbone/index.php
2
 Cetic.br, Communication Technologies, pg. 236, February 15, 2013, http://www.nic.br/english/activities/ceticbr.htm . 
3
 Sarah Laskow, “Google vs. Brazil: Why Brazil Heads Google’s List of Takedown Requests,” April 29, 2013, Columbia Journalism 
Review, http://www.cjr.org/cloud_control/brazilian_takedown_requests.php?page=all&print=true
4
 http://www.article19.org/data/files/pdfs/press/brazil‐proposed‐electoral‐law‐restricts‐internet‐freedom.pdf; See also: Article 
19, Press Release: Brazil: Proposed Electoral Law Restricts Internet Freedom, September 14, 2009, 
http://www.article19.org/data/files/pdfs/press/brazil‐proposed‐electoral‐law‐restricts‐internet‐freedom.pdf, and Gabriel 
Elizondo, “Brazilian Elections No Joke – Literally,” August 25 2010, AlJazeera, 
http://blogs.aljazeera.com/blog/americas/brazilian‐elections‐no‐joke‐literally
I
NTRODUCTION
143
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
B
RAZIL
also witnessed an ongoing trend in which private litigants and official bodies sue internet service 
providers  (ISPs)  and  ask  for  takedown  notices  to  be  sent  to  blogging  and  social-networking 
platforms. As Brazil rises to the level of other leading global economies and comes closer to a 
networked society, issues such as cybercrime  and distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attacks, 
access  to  public  information,  election  campaigning  on  the  internet,  and  intellectual  property 
protection are increasingly in the spotlight. 
Although 2012 was witness to positive legislation regarding cybercrimes, the right to information, 
and open governmental action plans, frustration has surrounded Brazil’s Marco  Civil Bill, also 
known as the “Civil Rights Framework for the Internet,” introduced to Congress in August 2011. 
Congressional  vote  on  this  policy—which  aims  to  guarantee access  to the  internet, safeguard 
freedom  of  speech  and  communication,  protect  privacy  and  personal  data,  and  preserve  net 
neutrality, among other provisions—was postponed five times during 2012. As of May 2013, a 
vote had not yet occurred.
5
The main barrier to passage of the Marco Civil Bill has been Brazil’s 
telecom lobby, which objects to some of the provisions regarding net neutrality.  
Although development of information and communication technologies (ICTs) has increased in 
recent years, Brazil still lags behind many developing countries in terms of relative proportion of 
citizens  with  internet  access.
6
 Widespread  adoption  of  household  internet  services  has  been 
hindered by high costs, low quality, and regional infrastructural disparity. Despite these challenges, 
a number of government initiatives predicated on increasing national internet penetration have 
begun to bear fruit. The country’s mobile sector is thriving, and Brazilians are increasingly turning 
to smartphones to connect to the internet. As of mid-2013, Brazil was home to the largest mobile 
phone market in Latin America.
7
Internet  penetration  varies  greatly  among  different  geographical  regions  in  Brazil  due  to 
inconsistent infrastructure; access also varies from urban to rural areas. In 2012, Brazil’s aggregate 
penetration rate was 50 percent.
8
The latest figures from the Brazilian Internet Steering Committee 
portray disparate figures in urban versus rural areas: household penetration was measured at 43 
percent  in  urban  zones,  compared  to  10  percent  in  rural  areas.  Internet  access  is  also  less 
widespread in urban areas in the Northeast (22 percent penetration) than in the Southeast (49 
5
 Murilo Roncolato, “Marco Civil é Adiado Pela Quinta Vez” [Marco Civil is Postponed for the Fifth Time] Link (blog), February 
15, 2013, http://blogs.estadao.com.br/link/marco‐civil‐e‐adiado‐pela‐quinta‐vez/
6
 International Telecommunication Union (ITU), “Percentage of Individuals Using the Internet,” 2011, http://www.itu.int/ITU‐
D/ICTEYE/Indicators/Indicators.aspx#; and “Fixed (wired) Broadband Subscriptions,” 
http://www.itu.int/ITUD/icteye/Reporting/ShowReportFrame.aspx?ReportName=/WTI/InformationTechnologyPublic&ReportF
ormat=HTML4.0&RP_intYear=2011&RP_intLanguageID=1&RP_bitLiveData=False
7
 Sergio Spagnuolo, “Brazil Launches 4G Wireless Service with Few Smartphone Options,” Reuters, April 17, 2013, 
http://www.reuters.com/article/2013/04/17/brazil‐telecom‐smartphones‐idUSL2N0D32ON20130417
8
 International Telecommunication Union (ITU), Statistics: Percentage of Individuals Using the Internet, 2000‐2012, ITU, June 17, 
2013, http://www.itu.int/en/ITU‐D/Statistics/Documents/statistics/2013/Individuals_Internet_2000‐2012.xls
O
BSTACLES TO 
A
CCESS
144
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested