download pdf file from folder in asp.net c# : Batch update pdf metadata SDK Library service wpf asp.net html dnn FOTN%202013_Full%20Report_017-part1518

F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
B
URMA
which is also looking into handsets produced by Huawei and ZTE, is ongoing.
45
The investigation 
overshadowed the reforms in the telecommunications sector, but also signaled a possible turning 
point. Many  observers expressed  hopes of fairer  pricing  and  a lifting  of  the VoIP  ban  in the 
aftermath of the minister’s removal.
46
In a reminder that the military still has an overwhelming 
influence in government, however, Thein Sein tapped Myat Hein, commander-in-chief of the air 
force, to replace him in February 2013.
47
On August 20, 2012, the government  lifted  the  systematic  state censorship of  traditional  and 
electronic  media prior to  publication that  had been  in  place  for  nearly  five decades. Political 
content appeared to be almost universally available, and even social content, such as pornography, 
was not blocked in mid-2013. Troublingly, however, draft legislation maintains that may even 
intensify limits on content outlined in existing laws. What’s more, the transformation had some 
unforeseen effects,  as  simmering distrust between Burma’s ethnic groups  found expression on 
social  media,  and  particularly  targeted  the  Rohingya,  whom  commentators  of  all  stripes 
characterized as “dogs, thieves, terrorists and various expletives.”
48
Though other online activism 
was more positive, the role of ICTs in fermenting violence that affected over a hundred thousand 
people—and sent ripples through sympathetic Muslim communities across Asia—cast a shadow 
over the newly open internet landscape.  
For years, the Burmese government had systematically restricted access to political content online, 
but in September 2011 they lifted blocks on foreign news sources and major exile media sites; the 
latter  had  long  been  on  the  regime’s  blacklist  for  their  critical  reporting.
49
The  websites  of 
international human rights groups were also unblocked. In tests conducted by OpenNet Initiative 
on YTP in August 2012, only 5 out of 541 URLs categorized as political content were blocked. 
When  Freedom  House  conducted  its  own  tests  in  December,  almost  all  previously  banned 
websites,  including  those  five, were  accessible.
50
By  mid-2013,  even  sites  hosting  previously-
filtered social content about pornography or drugs, were no longer blocked. 
45
 “Ex‐Minister Under House Arrest,” Radio Free Asia, January 23, 2013, http://www.rfa.org/english/news/burma/phone‐
01232013152301.html
46
 Telephone interviews with a senior Ministry of Information and Telecommunications official and a key telecommunications 
investor, January 2013. See also, “Expectation on Better Telecoms Service Grows as Minister Resigns” (in Burmese), 7Days 
News, January 17, 2013, http://www.7daynewsjournal.com/article/9403
47
 Nyein Nyein, “Former Generals to Run Burma’s Telecoms, Border Affairs Ministries,” Irrawaddy, February 14, 2013, 
http://www.irrawaddy.org/archives/26820.  
48
 “Internet Unshackled, Burmese Aim Venom at Ethnic Minority,” New York Times, June 16, 2012, 
http://www.nytimes.com/2012/06/16/world/asia/new‐freedom‐in‐myanmar‐lets‐burmese‐air‐venom‐toward‐rohingya‐
muslim‐group.html?_r=0
49
 The Associated Press, “Myanmar Authorities Unblock Some Banned Websites,” Yahoo News, September 16, 2011, 
http://news.yahoo.com/myanmar‐authorities‐unblock‐banned‐websites‐050311492.html; Qichen Zhang, “Burma's 
Government Unblocks Foreign Websites Including YouTube,” OpenNet Initiative, September 20, 2011, 
http://opennet.net/blog/2011/09/burmas‐government‐unblocks‐foreign‐websites‐including‐youtube
50
 One of the URLs listed as blocked by ONI, http://www.niknayman‐niknayman.co.cc, was not found in or outside Burma. 
L
IMITS ON 
C
ONTENT
165
Batch update pdf metadata - add, remove, update PDF metadata in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Allow C# Developers to Read, Add, Edit, Update and Delete PDF Metadata
view pdf metadata in explorer; edit multiple pdf metadata
Batch update pdf metadata - VB.NET PDF metadata library: add, remove, update PDF metadata in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Enable VB.NET Users to Read, Write, Edit, Delete and Update PDF Document Metadata
clean pdf metadata; read pdf metadata java
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
B
URMA
Despite these notable positive developments, the impact of the new opening has been tempered by 
an atmosphere of uncertainty. In particular, harsh laws governing content remain in effect pending 
the passage of replacements to repeal them, which some observers say could be even stricter. The 
draft telecommunications bill that will regulate service providers also contains content restrictions, 
at least in early drafts, according to news reports. A report published in November 2012 noted that 
one of the law’s new articles appeared to ban social media use entirely, though whether that was 
the intent or how it might be implemented is not known.
51
Human Rights Watch reported that a 
draft it reviewed includes ill-defined bans on “indecent” and “undesirable” content that are open to 
abuse.
52
Journalists also objected to another draft law governing the print media for introducing the 
kind  of  censorship  familiar  from its  repressive predecessor, including bans  on criticism  of the 
constitution;  the  implications  for  online  news  outlets  remain  unclear.
53
Civil  society  groups 
objected to both drafts, and their passage was consequently delayed beyond the coverage period of 
this report. Observers noted that although government consultations with different stakeholders 
regarding the law were far from perfect, they were better than in the past.   
Threats remain effective tools to force intermediaries to delete content; however, the extent of this 
practice and  its  impact  on the information  environment as a whole is  hard to  measure.  Self-
censorship  remains  common  online,  though  topics  considered  off-limits  have  changed.  In 
particular, internet users have been reluctant to raise human rights abuses committed in the past 
under the junta, for fear of jeopardizing the political opening. Objective coverage of the Rohingya, 
let alone defense of the persecuted minority, has become taboo, and news outlets that continue to 
provide it are accused of anti-Burmese bias.
54
As limits on content are lifting, ministries and political groups have used ICTs to challenge the 
opposition, rather than blocking them. Several ministries, including the Ministry of Information, 
have their own websites and blogs. Other blogs, such as Myanmar Express and OppositEye, were more 
manipulative, launching smear campaigns against the opposition and Aung San Suu Kyi.   
As in 2011, social media tools gained prominence in 2012 and 2013, including Facebook, Twitter, 
Friendfinder, Netlog, and Google+. Facebook is the most popular, since many users developed the 
habit of using the platform to share information, initiate collective action on social and political 
issues, or follow exile media outlets when website blocking was still pervasive. Although no precise 
statistics are available on the number of Facebook users in Burma, one expert estimated that 80 
percent of the country’s internet users had a Facebook account in 2011.
55
For some users frustrated 
at the challenge of navigating between sites on poor connections, Facebook is the sole source of 
online news.  
51
 “Myanmar Bans Social Media Use Under Telecoms Bill,” Eleven Media News, November 12, 2012, 
http://elevenmyanmar.com/politics/1280‐myanmar‐bans‐social‐media‐use‐under‐telecoms‐bill
52
 Human Rights Watch, “Reforming Telecommunications in Burma,” 
53
 Committee to Protect Journalists, “Draft Media Law a Step Backward for Burma,” news alert, March 1, 2013, 
http://www.cpj.org/2013/03/draft‐media‐law‐a‐step‐backward‐for‐burma.php
54
 Asia Sentinel, “Burma’s Irresponsible New Media,” Irrawaddy, July 11, 2013, http://www.irrawaddy.org/archives/8862
55
 Based on an estimated 500,000 internet users in Burma. Tun Tun, “Facebook’s Mini‐Revolution in Burma,” Mizzima, August 
17, 2011, http://www.mizzima.com/edop/features/5786‐facebooks‐mini‐revolution‐in‐burma.html.  
166
VB.NET Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF
Extract Field Data. Data: Auto Fill-in Field Data. Field: Insert, Delete, Update Field. Professional .NET PDF converter component for batch conversion.
pdf metadata editor online; pdf xmp metadata
VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.
Data. Data: Auto Fill-in Field Data. Field: Insert, Delete, Update Field. Best and free VB.NET PDF to jpeg converter SDK for NET components to batch convert adobe
google search pdf metadata; metadata in pdf documents
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
B
URMA
Unfortunately, hate groups and manipulative photos and messages are also common on Facebook, 
and  Burmese  internet  users  spread  racially-charged  comments  across  social  media  platforms 
throughout  the  coverage  period.
56
Several  promoted  violence,  including  a  self-designated 
“beheading gang” that targeted Muslims on Facebook, which the platform later removed from the 
site.
57
The hatred expressed online and in government statements in the media proved mutually 
reinforcing.
58
In 2012, religious riots  broke out in western Arakan  state  sparked by  state  and 
private media reports that treated the rape and murder of a local woman as a racially-motivated 
crime,
59
and  contrasted  the  Arakan  Buddhist  victim  with  her  allegedly  Muslim  attackers.
60
Propaganda photos and posts from both sides of the conflict circulated on the internet.
61
A senior 
official from the president’s office framed the issue as a matter of national security on his personal 
Facebook page and urged people to rally behind the armed forces.
62
Since the riots took place in a 
remote area challenging for journalists to reach, these Facebook updates were disproportionately 
influential  in  media  reports.
63
The  anti-Rohingya  rhetoric  sparked  counter-protests  overseas, 
including one coordinated by hacktivist group Anonymous, which sent 24,000 messages per hour 
with the hashtag #RohingyaNOW one day in March 2013.
64
Other online activism was more positive. In 2012, villagers, Buddhist monks, and citizen journalists 
united on Facebook to mobilize against a copper mine in the central Letpaudaung hills, run by the 
military-owned conglomerate Union of Myanmar Economic Holdings Limited and China’s Wanbao 
Mining  Limited,  a  subsidiary  of  the  arms  manufacturer  NORINCO.  Initially,  politicians  and 
traditional  media  largely  ignored  the  protesters,  who  called  for  a  halt  to  the  project  citing 
environmental, social and health concerns. However, on November 29, 2012, riot police raided six 
protest camps at the mine, detained several dozen protesters, and injured at least 100 Buddhist 
monks and villagers, many of whom incurred severe burns. Activists used Facebook extensively to 
post photos and information about the crackdown, triggering an outcry from the media and the 
political  opposition.  Recognition,  however,  was  the  only  substantive  outcome  of  the  action. 
President Thein Sein appointed Aung San Suu Kyi to chair an Investigation Commission. However, 
the Commission recommended that the mining project go ahead in March 2013.
65
56
 Sait Latt, “Intolerance, Islam and the Internet in Burma today,” New Mandala, June 10, 2012, 
http://asiapacific.anu.edu.au/newmandala/2012/06/10/intolerance‐islam‐and‐the‐internet‐in‐burma‐today/
57
 Min Zin, “Why Sectarian Conflict in Burma is Bad for Democracy,” Transitions (blog), Foreign Policy, June 13, 2012, 
http://transitions.foreignpolicy.com/posts/2012/06/13/winners_and_losers_from_the_conflict_in_arakan
58
 New Light of Myanmar, a state newspaper, printed a government statement that included the racial epithet kalar, a 
derogatory term for foreigners of Indian appearance, when referring to the Muslim victims of mob violence. It corrected the 
reference to “Islamic residents” the following day, but did not apologize. See, Hanna Hindstrom, “State Media Issues Correction 
After  Publishing  Racial  Slur,”  Democratic  Voice  of  Burma,  June  6,  2012,  http://www.dvb.no/news/state‐media‐issues‐
correction‐after‐publishing‐racial‐slur/22328
59
 “Burma’s Irresponsible Media,” Irrawaddy, July 11, 2012, http://www.irrawaddy.org/archives/8862
60
 On June 3, 10 Muslims were killed in the same region in apparent retaliation for the murder of the Buddhist girl. 
61
 “Media Freedom Still Murky in Myanmar Despite Progress,” Global Voices, February 21, 2013, 
http://globalvoicesonline.org/2013/02/21/myanmar‐media‐freedom‐still‐under‐threat/
62
 Min Zin, “Why Sectarian Conflict in Burma is Bad for Democracy.” 
63
 Hmuu Zaw’s Facebook page, accessed on August 2013, https://www.facebook.com/hmuu.zaw
64
 “Anonymous Taught Twitter About the Rohingya Genocide,” Vice, March 26, 2013, http://www.vice.com/read/anonymous‐
taught‐twitter‐about‐the‐rohingya‐genocide.  
65
 Kyaw Phyo Tha, “Wanbao Welcomes Inquiry Commission’s Verdict,” Irrawaddy, March 13, 2013, 
http://www.irrawaddy.org/archives/29255.  
167
VB.NET PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in vb.
NET control to batch convert PDF documents to Tiff format in Visual Basic. Qualified Tiff files are exported with high resolution in VB.NET.
pdf metadata; remove metadata from pdf file
VB.NET PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in vb.
project. Professional .NET library supports batch conversion in VB.NET. .NET control to export Word from multiple PDF files in VB.
pdf metadata online; edit pdf metadata acrobat
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
B
URMA
Besides  employing  online  tools  for  social  and  political  mobilization,  users  have  organized 
gatherings, with government permission, to share general ICT-related knowledge. In January 2013, 
Burma’s fourth BarCamp—a user-generated conference about technology and the internet—was 
held in Rangoon with over 6,000 participants.
66
BarCamp meetings were also held in cities like 
Mandalay and Bassein.  
Given  Burma’s  appalling  history  of  violating  user  rights,  late  2012  and  early  2013  were 
comparatively neutral periods as citizens awaited the results of sluggish legislative reforms. Users 
remain at risk of prosecution and imprisonment under the repressive laws enacted by the junta, and 
in  a  troubling  May  2013  analysis,  Human  Rights  Watch  noted  that  an  early  draft  of  the 
telecommunications law retained the Electronic Transactions Law’s repressive section 33 without 
change.  Bloggers  are  not  immune  from  legal  threats,  and  a  parliamentary  committee  wasted 
valuable time and  resources  trying to  identify  an anonymous blogger  who had criticized their 
conflict with a constitutional court. Yet no new arrests were reported, and the only ICT-related 
imprisonments on record involve former officials accused of leaking secrets.    
The current constitution, drafted by the military-led government and approved in a flawed 2008 
referendum, does not guarantee internet freedom. It simply states that every citizen may exercise 
the right to “express and publish their convictions and opinions,” but only if these are “not contrary 
to the laws enacted for Union [of Myanmar] security, prevalence of law and order, community 
peace and tranquility or public order and morality.”
67
Three other laws govern ICTs: the 1996 
Computer  Science  Development  Law,  the  2002  Wide  Area  Network  Order,  and  the  2004 
Electronic Transactions Law (ETL).
68
Of the three, the ETL is the most notorious and frequently 
used. Under section 33, internet users face prison terms of 7 to 15 years and possible fines for “any 
act  detrimental  to”  state  security,  law  and  order,  community  peace  and  tranquility,  national 
solidarity, the national economy, or national culture—including “receiving or sending” related 
information.
69
In 2011, state-run media warned that the ETL could apply to defamatory statements 
made on Facebook.
70
Draft laws to reform this legislative framework were expected to pass in 2013,
71
but their status at 
the end of the coverage period remained unclear. Traditional media censorship was still authorized 
in theory by the Printers and Publishers Registration Act of 1962, even though the board that 
66
 “BurmaCamp Rangoon: Over 6,000 Participants” (in Burmese), Myanmar Times, January 23, 2013, 
http://myanmar.mmtimes.com/index.php/technology/3334‐2013‐01‐23‐10‐37‐23.html
67
 “Constitution of the Republic of the Union of Myanmar (2008) – English,” available Online Burma/Myanmar Library, 
http://www.burmalibrary.org/show.php?cat=1140
68
 “List of Burma/Myanmar laws 1988‐2004 (by date),” available Online Burma/Myanmar Library, 
http://www.burmalibrary.org/show.php?cat=1729
69
 “Electronic Transactions Law, State Peace and Development Council Law No. 5/2004,” available United Nations Public 
Administration Network, http://unpan1.un.org/intradoc/groups/public/documents/un‐dpadm/unpan041197.pdf
70
 Francis Wade, “Prison Threat for Facebook ‘Defamers’,” Democratic Voice of Burma, August 3, 2011, 
http://www.dvb.no/news/prison‐threat‐for‐facebook‐‘defamers’/16865. 
71
 Interview with a senior government advisor, January 2013.  
V
IOLATIONS OF 
U
SER 
R
IGHTS
168
VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net
Batch merge PDF documents in Visual Basic .NET class program. Merge two or several separate PDF files together and into one PDF document in VB.NET.
endnote pdf metadata; add metadata to pdf file
C# PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in C#.net
Studio .NET project. Powerful .NET control to batch convert PDF documents to tiff format in Visual C# .NET program. Free library are
online pdf metadata viewer; remove metadata from pdf
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
B
URMA
enforced it was dismantled. Though new legislation that would repeal this law was passed in the 
lower house of parliament in July 2013, it stalled in the upper house. Critics point out it retains 
vaguely worded content controls and potentially punitive licensing for news outlets,
72
even though 
many  lawmakers  believed  these  had  been  removed  following  consultations  with  journalists.
73
Similarly,  the  draft  telecommunications  law,  which  corresponds  most  closely  to  the  ETL, 
reproduced that law’s repressive section 33 verbatim, according to a review of one draft by Human 
Rights Watch.
74
Officials told Human Rights Watch that many repressive measures were missing 
from a subsequent draft, but this has not been made public.
75
While potential penalties for ICT use still exist, no arrests were reported during the coverage 
period. At least three former military or government officials remain imprisoned after they were 
sentenced in early 2010 for leaking sensitive information about junta activities to overseas groups 
via the internet.
76
Dozens of political prisoners formerly jailed for electronic activities remain free 
since  they  were released  en masse in  2011. In  general, however, these  releases  came  with  a 
condition  that  reoffenders  will  receive  a  new  sentence  in  addition  to  previously  unfinished 
sentences.  
Although limits on content have loosened, content producers continue to face legal investigations 
for publishing online. Two print newspapers with websites, the Voice Weekly and Modern Journey, 
were sued for libel in 2012 for reports they said were in the public interest.
77
In another notorious 
example, a member of the military-backed ruling party urged parliament to uncover the identity of 
pseudonymous blogger, “Dr. Seik Phwar,” following a January 14, 2013 post titled, “Is Parliament 
Above The Law?”
78
The article questioned parliament’s decision to amend a law governing a nine-
member, presidentially-appointed constitutional tribunal with power to overrule the government. 
The amendment, which Thein Sein adopted on January 22 under pressure from parliamentarians, 
gives them the right to challenge the tribunal’s rulings, even though its authority is outlined in 
article 324 of the 2008 constitution.
79
On February 8, a 17-member parliamentary committee was 
established to uncover the blogger’s identity, though when it announced its findings in July it did 
72
 Simon Roughneen, “Burma’s Press Council Threatens Resignation Over Media Rules,” July 18, 2013, 
http://www.irrawaddy.org/archives/39522
73
 “Bad News: New Freedoms Under Threat,” Economist, August 17, 2013, http://www.economist.com/news/asia/21583700‐
new‐freedoms‐under‐threat‐bad‐news
74
 Human Rights Watch, “Reforming Telecommunications in Burma,” 
75
 In August 2013, outside the coverage period of this report, a state news report said a bill amending the ETL submitted to 
parliament proposed more lenient sentences. 
76
 In January 2010, a former military officer and a foreign affairs official were sentenced to death, and another foreign affairs 
official was sentenced to 15 years in prison, for leaking information and photographs about military tunnels and a general’s trip 
to North Korea. Interview with Bo Kyi, cofounder of the Association for Assisting Political Prisoners (Burma), July 2012. The 
executions have not been carried out.  
77
 “Burmese Editor and Publisher Charged with Libel,” BBC, September 20, 2012, http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world‐asia‐
19659294; Phanida, “Gov’t Construction Engineer Sues Modern Journal,” Mizzima, March 7, 2012, 
http://www.mizzima.com/news/inside‐burma/6721‐govt‐construction‐engineer‐sues‐modern‐journal.html
78
 Oliver Spencer, “Myanmar: Dr Seik's Famous Blog Post being Investigated by Parliament (in English),” Article 19, February 13, 
2013, http://www.article19.org/join‐the‐debate.php/91/view/; Saw Zin Nyi, “Naypyitaw Investigates the Mysterious Case of 
‘Dr. Seik Phwar,’” Mizzima, March 5, 2013, 
http://www.mizzima.com/news/inside‐burma/9003‐naypyitaw‐investigates‐the‐mysterious‐case‐of‐dr‐seik‐phwar.html.  
79
 “Burmese MPs Force Out Constitutional Court Judges,” BBC, September 6, 2012, http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world‐asia‐
19498968.  
169
C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
Powerful components for batch converting PDF documents in C#.NET program. Convert PDF to multiple MS Word formats such as .doc and .docx.
analyze pdf metadata; change pdf metadata creation date
C# PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in C#.net, ASP.
NET components for batch combining PDF documents in C#.NET class. Powerful library dlls for mering PDF in both C#.NET WinForms and ASP.NET WebForms.
modify pdf metadata; change pdf metadata
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
B
URMA
not appear to have succeeded.
80
The case was further complicated by the blogger’s unclear political 
affiliation, since Seik Phwar had criticized both Aung San Suu Kyi and Thein Sein alike since 2011, 
and many observers believe he is influenced by anti-reformist military hardliners. Some  of his 
articles were reproduced in the journal Smart News, which is published by the information ministry.   
How the new environment might transform state surveillance, which has historically been pervasive 
and politicized, is not known. Experts interviewed for this report said there are no funds or interest 
in developing nationwide technical surveillance at present, though activists are still monitored.  
The junta is believed to have carried out cyberattacks against opposition websites in the past. These 
attacks increased in February 2013 when many journalists and academics, including the author of 
this  report,  received  Google’s  notification  of  state-sponsored  attempts  to  infiltrate  personal 
accounts on its e-mail service, Gmail;
81
officials denied responsibility.
82
Some recipients speculated 
the attackers had military support.
83
80
 “Parliamentary Commission Fails to Expose Defamatory Blogger,” Eleven Media News, July 2, 2013, 
http://elevenmyanmar.com/national/2656‐parliamentary‐commission‐fails‐to‐expose‐defamatory‐blogger
81
 Thomas Fuller, “E‐Mails of Reporters in Myanmar Are Hacked,” New York Times, January 10, 2013, 
http://www.nytimes.com/2013/02/11/world/asia/journalists‐e‐mail‐accounts‐targeted‐in‐myanmar.html?_r=3&; Shawn 
Crispin, “As Censorship Wanes, Cyberattacks Rise in Burma,” CPJ Internet Channel, February 11, 2013, 
http://www.cpj.org/internet/2013/02/as‐censorship‐wanes‐cyberattacks‐rise‐in‐burma.php.  
82
 The Associated Press, “Myanmar Denies Hacking Journalist Email Accounts,” February 11, 2013, 
http://bigstory.ap.org/article/myanmar‐denies‐hacking‐journalist‐email‐accounts
83
 IT experts and journalists interviewed in 2012 and 2013 noted that those who previously received ICT trainings in Russia and 
other countries could still be playing a role in launching cyberattacks against opposition websites and journalists.
170
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
C
AMBODIA
C
AMBODIA
 In May 2012, the government announced it was in the process of drafting Cambodia’s
first  ever  cybercrime  law,  which  netizens  fear  could  extend  traditional  media
restrictions online (see V
IOLATIONS OF 
U
SER 
R
IGHTS
).
 At least three antigovernment blogs remain inaccessible on most ISPs, after an apparent
government  ban  in  2011,  implemented  without  transparency,  (see  L
IMITS  ON
C
ONTENT
).
 In November 2012, the government told internet cafés near Phnom Penh schools to
relocate  or  close,  threatening  access  throughout  the  capital 
(see  O
BSTACLES  TO
A
CCESS
).
2012 
2013 
I
NTERNET 
F
REEDOM 
S
TATUS
N
/
A
P
ARTLY 
F
REE
Obstacles to Access (0-25) 
n/a  14 
Limits on Content (0-35) 
n/a  15 
Violations of User Rights (0-40) 
n/a  18 
Total (0-100) 
n/a 
47 
*0=most free, 100=least free
K
EY 
D
EVELOPMENTS
:
M
AY 
2012
A
PRIL 
2013 
P
OPULATION
15 million
I
NTERNET 
P
ENETRATION 
2012: 
5 percent
S
OCIAL 
M
EDIA
/ICT
A
PPS 
B
LOCKED
No
P
OLITICAL
/S
OCIAL 
C
ONTENT 
B
LOCKED
No
B
LOGGERS
/ICT
U
SERS 
A
RRESTED
No
P
RESS 
F
REEDOM 
2013
S
TATUS
Not Free
171
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
C
AMBODIA
New  media  and  increased  internet  access  are  transforming  the  information  environment  in 
Cambodia,  where press freedom is traditionally  curtailed. Through the use  of new media and 
digital tools, young activists of both genders are able to disseminate views on important social and 
political issues, including the country’s besieged environmental resources.  Social media websites 
are quickly becoming an integral tool for sharing information and opinion.  
The Royal Government of Cambodia,
1
led by Prime Minister Hun Sen since 1998, restricts access 
to sexually explicit content but has yet to systematically censor online political discourse, leading 
some observers to hope Cambodia is entering an era of “digital democracy.”
2
Yet  the  tide  may  be  turning.  Authorities  have  begun  to  interfere  with  information  and 
communications technology (ICT) access, blocking at least three blogs hosted overseas on multiple 
ISPs  for  content  that  criticized  the  government  since  2011.  In  2012,  government  ministries 
threatened  to  shutter  internet  cafes  too  near  schools—citing  moral  concerns—and  instituted 
surveillance of cafe premises and cell phone subscribers as a security measure that could foretell the 
emphasis of the country’s first cybercrime law, which the government began drafting in May 2012.   
Online  activists  continued  to  raise  public  awareness  around  a  number  of  causes  such  as  the 
imprisonment of veteran journalist Mam Sonando, who was sentenced to 20 years imprisonment 
after documenting land seizures in 2012, then released on probation in 2013. Yet the very success 
of such campaigns may be spurring the leadership’s efforts to curb internet freedom in the same 
way they do traditional media.    
The International Telecommunication Union reported internet penetration in Cambodia at just 5 
percent  in  2012.
3
Other  estimates  are  higher:  Cambodia’s  Ministry  of  Posts  and 
Telecommunications  (MPTC)  reported  2.7  million  Internet  users  in  March  2013,  around  18 
percent of the population of around 15 million.
4
The absence of an extensive landline network has historically restricted internet penetration, since 
the fixed landlines that broadband internet services depend on are often unavailable in rural areas. 
Wireless broadband, which emerged in 2006, has helped bridge the digital divide between rural 
and urban internet users. 
1
 Cambodia is a constitutional monarchy. King Norodom Sihamoni succeeded his father as head of state in 2004.  
2
 Sopheap Chak, “Digital Democracy Emerging in Cambodia,” UPI Asia Online, November 11, 2009, http://bit.ly/1fyzWq3.  
3
 International Telecommunication Union, “Percentage of Individuals Using the Internet, 2000‐2012,” http://bit.ly/14IIykM .  
4
 Suy Heimkhemra, “Cheap Data, Better Tech Putting More Cambodians Online,” Voice of America, March 25, 2013, 
http://www.voanews.com/content/cheap‐data‐better‐tech‐putting‐more‐cambodians‐online/1628531.html. The consulting 
firm “We Are Social” put penetration at 16 percent in a late 2012 report. See, Simon Kemp, “Social Digital and Mobile in 
Cambodia,” We Are Social (blog), November 7, 2012, http://wearesocial.net/blog/2012/11/social‐digital‐mobile‐cambodia/
I
NTRODUCTION
O
BSTACLES TO 
A
CCESS
172
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
C
AMBODIA
There  are  at  least 24  internet service providers (ISPs)  operating  in the Cambodian market—
government accounts cite as many as 27
5
—and they offer competitive rates for high-speed internet, 
at around $12 a month.
6
Affordable smart phones, tablets and other devices have also contributed 
to the rise in the number of Cambodian internet and mobile users. About 98 percent of internet 
users today have mobile access, either via satellite networks or Wi-Fi connections, according to the 
MPTC. However, insufficient  electricity  supplies often  result  in nationwide  blackouts—which 
impose constraints on computer and internet use.  
Mobile phone users surpassed the number using fixed landlines surprisingly early in Cambodia, and 
have gained in popularity since 2000, even at the bottom of the economic pyramid, due to their 
affordability.
7
As of September 2012, mobile penetration was at 131 percent, because some people 
own more than one device.
8
The figures are the outcome of intense competition among 10 mobile 
service providers, who offer free SIM cards, affordable handsets and bonuses in their efforts to 
secure more market share. In April 2013, the MPTC attempted to pass a resolution banning all 
providers from offering these bonuses, apparently to protect companies with links to officials from 
losing out to their competitors, but backed down after a public outcry.
9
Thanks to these low prices, mobile phones have become indispensable in Cambodia, preferred over 
traditional communications including landlines and the postal service. With poor transportation 
infrastructure and electricity coverage, mobile phones offer the most convenient access to a range 
of services including radio, music and video, and increasingly web access. Beyond that, mobile 
phones have had a great impact on mobilization and collective actions. In the run-up to the 2007 
and  2013  elections,  political  parties  used  short-message  service  (SMS)  text  messaging  as  the 
cheapest and most effective way of spreading their message, while election monitoring groups also 
used SMS to gather data. With technical support from the Cambodian NGO Open Institute and the 
International  Foundation  for  Electoral  Systems,  the  Cambodian  National  Election  Committee 
(NEC) launched a voice-based information service to provide pre-recorded details for voters, free 
of charge, in advance of the National Assembly election scheduled in July 2013.
10
Language  is  another  obstacle  to  access,  since  few  online  applications  are  coded  in  Khmer. 
Technology companies and ICT experts have made a significant investment to improve Cambodia’s 
infrastructure, including the development of Khmer language applications. The Khmer Unicode 
font become widely available after the government recognized it as a standard in 2010.
11
After five 
5
 O.U. Phannarith, Head of CamCERT and Permanent Member of Cybercrime Law, Working Group of National ICT Development 
Authority, “Cambodia Effort in Fighting Cybercime in the Absence of Law,” slideshow presented at the Asia Pacific Regional 
Mock Court, Jakarta, Indonesia, September 18‐19, 2012. 
6
 “Cheap Data, Better Tech Putting More Cambodians Online,” VOA News, March 25, 2013, http://bit.ly/109eoTm .  
7
 Sopheap Chak, “Mobile Technology gives Cambodians a Voice,” UPI Asia Online, 23 April 2010, http://bit.ly/a6vs0S.  
8
 International Telecommunication Union, “Mobile‐Cellular Telephone Subscriptions, 2000‐2012.” 
9
 Kaing Menghun and Joshua Wilwohl, “Ban on Generous Mobile Top‐Up Offers Lifted,” Cambodia Daily, May 7, 2013, 
http://www.cambodiadaily.com/archive/ban‐on‐generous‐mobile‐top‐up‐offers‐lifted‐22713/. See also,  Menghun and 
Wilwohl, “Mobile Bonuses Axed after Firm Complaint,” Cambodia Daily, May 2, 2013, http://bit.ly/16zRyyd
10
 Open Institute, “IVR‐based Information for the 2013 National Assembly Election Available,” 18 March 2013, 
http://www.open.org.kh/en/node/528
11
 Sebastian Strangio and Khouth Sophak Chakrya, “Unicode opens door for Khmer computing,” May 2, 2008, 
http://www.phnompenhpost.com/special‐reports/unicode‐opens‐door‐khmer‐computing.  
173
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
C
AMBODIA
years of collaboration by software developers, the release of Google’s Khmer translation feature is 
anticipated  by  the  end  of  2013.
12
In  addition,  developers  Sous  Samak  and  Kim  Sokphearum 
launched their own Automatic English-Khmer Translation System in March.
13
With these efforts, it 
is hoped that Khmer speaking netizens will be able to read non-Khmer content and vice versa, 
connecting Cambodian netizens to a wider audience.  
The  government  welcomes  and  supports  such  technology  and  infrastructure  developments. 
However, despite public claims to support freedom of expression by Information Minister Khieu 
Kanharith and others,
14
officials have taken steps to interfere in internet access. In early 2010 the 
government planned to introduce a state-run exchange to control all local ISPs with the declared 
aim of strengthening  internet security  against  pornography, theft  and cybercrime.
15
This  plan, 
however, has been postponed due to popular opposition—even from inside the government.
16
There  is  no  independent  regulatory  body  overseeing  the  digital  landscape  in  Cambodia,  and 
controls  are  implemented  through  ad  hoc  internal  circulars.
17
In  early  November  2012,  a 
government circular called for the relocation of all internet cafés within a 500-meter radius of 
schools and educational institutions in the capital, Phnom Penh.
18
The circular cited young people’s 
growing addiction  to “all  kinds  of  [internet] games”  which  it categorized as illegal  along  with 
terrorism, economic crime, and pornography.
19
Penalties for violating the circular include forced 
closure, the confiscation of equipment, and arrest, though it did not specify potential sentences. 
The rules would affect almost every cybercafe in the city, threatening internet access for those with 
no personal computer, according to a map-based visualization produced by the non-profit web 
portal Urban Voice Cambodia, which puts nearly every building in the capital within 500 meters of 
one school or another.
20
Internet users worry this indicates the kind of heavy-handed regulation 
that might feature in an upcoming cyberlaw, which the government announced it would draft in 
May 2012. So far, though, the circular has yet to be implemented.  
At  least  three  popular  Cambodian  blogs  hosted  overseas  were  blocked  for  perceived 
antigovernment content in 2011, and most users within the Kingdom are still unable to access them 
12
 Arne Mauser, “Google Translate now Supports Khmer,” Official Google Translate Blog, April 18, 2013, http://bit.ly/18efRin.  
13
 Prak Chanseyha, “Two Young Cambodian Women Develop an Automatic Translation System” [In Khmer], March 26, 2013, 
http://news.sabay.com.kh/articles/391769
14
 “Minister: Democracy Exists Without Opposition Newspapers,” Cambodia Herald, May 3, 2013, http://bit.ly/18zuUnz.  
15
 Sopheap Chak, “Cambodia's Great Internet Firewall?” Global Voices Online, March 2, 2010, http://bit.ly/brP14M .  
16
 Brooke Lewis and Sam Rith, “Ministers Differ on Internet Controls,” Phnom Penh Post, February 26, 2010, 
http://www.phnompenhpost.com/index.php/2010022632744/National‐news/ministers‐differ‐on‐internet‐controls.html
17
 A Circular is a measure endorsed by a Minister or the Prime Minister and is used to explain a point of law or to provide 
guidance with regards to a point of law.  It is advisory in nature, and does not have binding legal force, though it can include 
penalties for non‐compliance.    
18
 LICADHO, “New Circular Aims to Shut Down Internet Cafes in Cambodia,” press release, December 13, 2012, 
http://www.licadho‐cambodia.org/pressrelease.php?perm=298
19
 Cambodian Center for Human Rights, “Cambodian Government Seeks to Shut Down Internet Cafés in Phnom Penh Thereby 
Posing a Threat to Internet Freedoms,” briefing note, December 14, 2012, http://bit.ly/17cObuG.  
20
 Urban Voice Cambodia, “Save the Internet Cafes Campaign,” March 15, 2013, http://bit.ly/1bR8pxp.  
L
IMITS ON 
C
ONTENT
174
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested