download pdf file from folder in asp.net c# : Search pdf metadata SDK control service wpf web page .net dnn FOTN%202013_Full%20Report_023-part1525

F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
C
UBA
more that 1,600, including sites such as Retazos and Convivencia.
58
Independent websites hosted 
outside the country, such as La Polemica Digital, Havana Times, and Estado de Sats, provide the few 
who are able to access the net with a much richer and more robust selection of news sources and 
perspectives than those available from state-run media. Regional radio stations, magazines, and 
official newspapers are also creating online versions, though these are state-run and do not accept 
contributions  from  independent  journalists.  Some  of  these  official  sites  recently  installed 
commentary tools that foster discussion and allow readers to provide feedback, albeit censored. 
In  recent years, blogger Yoani Sánchez has  become the most visible figure in an independent 
movement that uses new media to report on conditions that violate basic freedoms. As of March 
2013, Sánchez’s followers on Twitter totaled over 455,280, though only 26 percent were from 
within  Cuba.
59
Sánchez  and  other  online  writers—including  Claudia  Cadelo,  Miriam  Celaya, 
Orlando  Luis Pardo,  Reinaldo  Escobar,  Laritza Diversent, and  Luis  Felipe  Rojas—have  come 
together on the Voces Cubanas blogging platform to portray a reality that official media ignores. 
Despite the government’s open disapproval—in 2011, the daughter of President Raúl Castro’s, 
Mariela, publicly referred to the bloggers as “despicable parasites”
60
—the movement has garnered 
broad support throughout society. In order to further promote freedom of expression, Sánchez has 
begun hosting Twitter workshops in her home, a bold move that has resulted in a crop of over 100 
new Twitter users in Cuba.  
Young people are increasingly using Twitter and mobile phones to document repression and voice 
their opinions. In a world where internet access is highly restricted, tweeting directly by SMS or a 
“Speak-to-Tweet” platform offers an alternate avenue for communicating with the outside world. 
The Speak-to-Tweet platform “Háblalo Sin Miedo” (Speak without Fear) enables Cuban residents to 
call a phone number in the United States and record anonymous messages describing government 
abuses or other grievances. The messages are automatically converted into posts shared via Twitter 
and YouTube.
61
At a cost of US $1.10 per tweet, Háblalo Sin Miedo is expensive; nonetheless, it is 
proving effective in allowing activists to denounce repressive acts and human rights violations.
62
Although the government has caught on to the phenomenon, establishing a Twitter presence of its 
own and blocking two phone numbers that ensure the operation of the “Speak-to-Tweet” platform 
in October and December 2012, new numbers have since been established.
63
58
 “Blogs Cubanos – Top Alexia Cuba,” Blogs Cubanos (blog), January 19, 2013, 
http://blogscubanos.wordpress.com/2013/01/19/blogs‐cubanos/
59
 Yoani Sanchez’s Twitter page, accessed March 22, 2013, https://twitter.com/#!/yoanisanchez/; See also: Nelson Acosta and 
Esteban Israel, “Cuba Unblocks Access to Controversial Blog,” Reuters, February 8, 2011, 
http://ca.reuters.com/article/topNews/idCATRE7175YG20110208; Monica Medel, “Bloggers Celebrate as Cuba Unblocks Their 
Sites,” Journalism in the Americas (blog), http://knightcenter.utexas.edu/blog/bloggers‐celebrate‐cuba‐unblocks‐their‐sites.   
60
 Jeff Franks, “Castro Daughter, Dissident Blogger Clash on Twitter,” Reuters, November 8, 2011, 
http://www.reuters.com/article/2011/11/09/us‐cuba‐twitter‐castro‐idUSTRE7A806Y20111109
61
 Háblalo Sin Miedo, “Acerca de” [About us], accessed August, 13, 2012, http://www.hablalosinmiedo.com/p/como‐
funciona.html
62
Tracey Eaton, “Cuban Dissident Blogger Yoani Sanchez Tours the United States,” Florida Center for Investigative Reporting, 
March 20, 2013,  http://fcir.org/2013/03/20/cuban‐dissident‐blogger‐yoani‐sanchez‐tours‐the‐united‐states/
63
Juan O. Tamayo, “Regimen Cubano Bloquea Llamadas de Denuncia,” El Nuevo Herald online, December 7, 2012, 
http://www.elnuevoherald.com/2012/12/07/1359290/regimen‐cubano‐bloquea‐llamadas.html
225
Search pdf metadata - add, remove, update PDF metadata in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Allow C# Developers to Read, Add, Edit, Update and Delete PDF Metadata
get pdf metadata; change pdf metadata creation date
Search pdf metadata - VB.NET PDF metadata library: add, remove, update PDF metadata in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Enable VB.NET Users to Read, Write, Edit, Delete and Update PDF Document Metadata
pdf xmp metadata viewer; pdf keywords metadata
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
C
UBA
Cuban legal structure is not favorable to internet freedom. Surveillance is widespread and dissident 
bloggers are subject to punishments ranging from fines and searches to confiscation of equipment 
and detentions. The constitution explicitly subordinates freedom of speech to the objectives of a 
socialist society, and freedom of cultural expression is guaranteed only if such expression is not 
contrary to the Revolution.
64
The penal code and Law 88, known as the “Clamp Law,” set penalties ranging from a few months 
to  20  years in  prison  for any  activity  considered  a  “potential  risk,”  “disturbing  the  peace,”  a 
“precriminal danger to society,” “counterrevolutionary,” or “against the national independence or 
economy.”
65
In  1996, the government  passed Decree-Law 209, which states that  the  internet 
cannot be used “in violation of Cuban society’s moral principles or the country’s laws,” and that e-
mail messages must not “jeopardize national security.”
66
In 2007, a network security measure, 
Resolution  127,  banned  the  use  of  public  data-transmission  networks  for  the  spreading  of 
information that is against the social interest, norms of good behavior, the integrity of people, or 
national security. The decree requires access providers to install controls that enable them to detect 
and prevent the proscribed activities, and to report them to the relevant authorities. Furthermore, 
access to internet in Cuba generally requires identification with photo ID, rendering anonymity 
nearly impossible. 
Resolution 56/1999 provides that all materials intended for publication or dissemination on the 
internet must first be approved by the National Registry of Serial Publications. Resolution 92/2003 
prohibits e-mail and other ICT service providers from granting access to individuals who are not 
approved  by  the government,  and  requires  that  they  enable  only  domestic  chat services,  not 
international ones.  Entities  that violate  these  regulations  can be  penalized with suspension  or 
revocation of their authorization to provide access. 
Despite constitutional provisions that protect various forms of communication and portions of the 
penal code that establish penalties for the violation of the secrecy of communications, the privacy of 
users is frequently violated. Tools of content surveillance are likewise pervasive. Under Resolution 
17/2008, ISPs are required to register and retain the addresses of all traffic for at least one year.
67
The government routes most connections through proxy servers and is able to obtain all user names 
and passwords through special monitoring software Avila Link, which is installed at most ETECSA 
and public access points. In addition, delivery of e-mail messages is consistently delayed, and it is 
not unusual for a message to arrive without its attachments. 
64
 Article 53, available at http://www.cubanet.org/ref/dis/const_92_e.htm, accessed July 23, 2010; See also:
 
Article 39, d), 
available at http://www.cubanet.org/ref/dis/const_92_e.htm, accessed July 23, 2010. 
65
 Committee to Protect Journalists, “International Guarantees and Cuban Law,” March 1, 2008, http://bit.ly/1hbJO4p.  
66
 Reporters Without Borders, “Going Online in Cuba: Internet under Surveillance,” 
http://www.rsf.org/IMG/pdf/rapport_gb_md_1.pdf.  
67
 “Internet en Cuba: Reglamento para Los Proveedores de Servicos de Acceso a Internet” [Internet in Cuba: Regulations for 
Internet Service Providers], CubanosUsa.com, December 18, 2008, http://bit.ly/19NNMfx.  
V
IOLATIONS OF 
U
SER 
R
IGHTS
226
C# PDF Text Search Library: search text inside PDF file in C#.net
|. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› C# PDF: Search PDF Text. Support search PDF file with various search options, like whole word, ignore case, match string, etc.
endnote pdf metadata; remove metadata from pdf online
VB.NET PDF Text Search Library: search text inside PDF file in vb.
XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Search PDF Text. VB.NET PDF - Search and Find PDF Text in VB.NET. Allow to search defined PDF file page or the whole document.
pdf remove metadata; pdf metadata viewer
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
C
UBA
Under Raúl Castro, the Cuban government appears to have shifted its repressive tactics from long-
term imprisonment of bloggers to extralegal detentions, intimidation, and harassment.
68
In 2005 
and 2007, two correspondents for Cubanet were charged with “precriminal social danger” and 
“subversive propaganda,” and were sentenced to prison terms ranging from four to seven years. 
Both were released as part of a broader pardon of prisoners in December 2011. Bloggers are still 
routinely summoned for questioning, reprimanded, and detained, however, and late 2012 ushered 
in a resurgence of detentions.
69
On November 7, authorities arrested numerous civil rights activists, including Yoani Sánchez and at 
least 12 others. Among those detained were Laritza Diversent, an attorney who runs the blog 
Jurisconsulto de Cuba, and Antonio Rodiles, curator of Estado de Sats. Diversent and many others were 
released shortly after detention, but Rodiles was held in police custody for over three weeks.  
Authorities gave no statement concerning the reason for his release, but Twitter users speculate 
that it may have been related to the hunger strike he began shortly after his arrest.
70
As it is very 
difficult to distinguish between independent blogging and political activism in Cuba, it is impossible 
to accurately pinpoint which offence triggered the detentions.  
Examples of arrests and intimidation of independent journalists and bloggers in Cuba are not hard 
to find. Calixto Martínez, a prisoner of conscience and journalist for online news site Hablemos Press, 
was arrested for allegedly disrespecting the Castro administration. In accordance with Cuban law, 
which  permits detainments of up to six months  without charge, no formal charges were filed 
against Martínez, who was held in solitary confinement in response to a hunger strike he began after 
his September 2012 imprisonment.
71
He has since been released. Independent journalist Héctor 
Julio  Cedeño  Negrin,  detained  while  photographing  police  harassment  of  taxi  drivers,  was 
imprisoned for 12 days before being placed under house arrest.
72
In March 2012, during the Pope’s visit to Cuba, dozens of bloggers were placed under house arrest 
or detained and held throughout the Pope’s three-day stay, after which they were released.
73
On 
December 9, 2012, on the eve of International Human Rights Day, some 44 members of the 
nonviolent opposition group Ladies in White were publicly beaten and arrested, reportedly without 
68
 Committee to Protect Journalists (CPJ), After the Black Spring, Cuba’s New Repression, July 6, 2011, 
http://www.cpj.org/reports/2011/07/after‐the‐black‐spring‐cubas‐new‐repression.php
69
 Daisy Valera, “This Cuban Woman and Her Online Indiscipline,” Havana Times online, March 11, 2012, 
http://www.havanatimes.org/?p=64077; Steven L. Taylor, “Cuba vs. the Bloggers,” PoliBlog, December 6, 2008, 
http://www.poliblogger.com/index.php?s=cuba+bloggers; Marc Cooper, “Cuba’s Blogger Crackdown,” Mother Jones, 
December 8, 2008, http://www.motherjones.com/politics/2008/12/cubas‐blogger‐crackdown.  
70
 Biddle, Ellery Roberts “Cuba: Democracy Advocate Rodiles Released; Blogger Diversent Remains Detained,” 5 December 
2012, http://bit.ly/11Qsook.  
71
 Amnesty International Press Release, “Cuban Journalist Named Prisoner of Conscience,”Amnesty.org, January 30, 2013, 
http://www.amnesty.org/en/for‐media/press‐releases/cuban‐journalist‐named‐prisoner‐conscience‐2013‐01‐30; Amnesty 
International Press Release, “Prisoner of Conscience on Hunger Strike,”Amnesty.org, March 14, 2013, 
http://www.amnesty.org/en/library/asset/AMR25/002/2013/en/f2ef351c‐54ab‐43cb‐a99e‐
0c39b3e9adab/amr250022013en.html 
72
 Cuba Democracia y Vida,  “Cuban Independent Journlaist Hector Cedeno Negrin Arrested for Doing His Job,” February 8, 
2013, http://www.cubademocraciayvida.org/web/article.asp?artID=20125 
73
 Hispanically Speaking News online, “Silenced During Papal Visit, Cuban Bloggers, Dissidents Speak Out” (VIDEO), 
http://bit.ly/18zX2H0.  
227
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
edit, C#.NET PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C#.NET rotate PDF pages, C#.NET search text in PDF, C#.NET edit PDF bookmark, C#.NET edit PDF metadata, C#.NET
online pdf metadata viewer; pdf metadata extract
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
Embedded print settings. Embedded search index. Document and metadata. All object data. VB.NET Demo Code to Optimize An Exist PDF File in Visual C#.NET Project.
edit pdf metadata; batch pdf metadata editor
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
C
UBA
any sort of provocation.
74
Although these beatings were related to activism rather than online 
content, such abuse stands as a warning to the wider community of oppositionists.  
In late 2012 and early 2013, online activity continued to be cause for repression. In December 
2012, blogger and writer Ángel Santiesteban Prats received a five-year jail sentence on trumped-up 
charges of “home violation” and “injuries” at the end of a summary trial.
75
The winner of major 
literary prizes, Santiesteban was arrested in connection with his political views several times prior 
to the trial. Such harassment increased after Santiesteban’s creation of the blog “The children no 
one wanted,” in which he criticized the government. In January 2013, 25 year old blogger Daisy 
Valera was fired from her post as a nuclear chemist after searching the internet for information on 
Cuba and posting comments critical of the government on the Havana Times platform.
76
Despite the abuses suffered by dissidents, 2013 brought a notable loosening of travel restrictions. 
As part of immigration reform, bloggers previously denied exit visas, including Yoani Sánchez, 
Orlando Luis Pardo, and Eliecer Ávila, were allowed to travel abroad. In early 2013, Sánchez, who 
was finally permitted to leave Cuba after having been denied an exit visa 21 times in the past five 
years, began an 80-city, 12-country tour, with the aim of brining awareness to Cuba’s active civil 
society and blogosphere.
77
Her speeches have since received international attention. 
74
 John Suarez, “Dozens of Ladies in White and Other Activists Beaten and Arrested Leaving Santa Rita Church Today,” Cuban 
Exile Quarter (blog), Blogspot, December 9, 2012, http://cubanexilequarter.blogspot.com/2012/12/dozens‐of‐ladies‐in‐white‐
and‐other.html  
75
Mary Jo Porter and Heffner Chun, site managers,  “Angel Santiesteban,” Translating Cuba: English Translation of Cuban 
Bloggers, April 23, 2013, http://translatingcuba.com/category/authors/angelsantiesteban; See also: Angel Santiesteban, “Prison 
Diary VI: Inside View of the Trial,” Translating Cuba: English Translation of Cuban Bloggers, March 28, 2013, 
http://translatingcuba.com/prison‐diary‐vi‐the‐inside‐view‐of‐the‐trial‐angel‐santiesteban/
76
 Daisy Valera, “Unemployed at 25 in Cuba,” Havana Times, January 6, 2013, http://www.havanatimes.org/?p=85460 
77
Monika Fabian,  “Cuban Dissident Yoani Sanchez on the Power of the Hashtag,” ABC News/Univision Online, March 18, 2013, 
http://abcnews.go.com/ABC_Univision/News/cuban‐dissident‐yoani‐sanchez‐embarks‐world‐tour/story?id=18749528 
228
VB.NET PDF - View PDF with WPF PDF Viewer for VB.NET
edit, C#.NET PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C#.NET rotate PDF pages, C#.NET search text in PDF, C#.NET edit PDF bookmark, C#.NET edit PDF metadata, C#.NET
adding metadata to pdf files; modify pdf metadata
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document in C#.NET
edit, C#.NET PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C#.NET rotate PDF pages, C#.NET search text in PDF, C#.NET edit PDF bookmark, C#.NET edit PDF metadata, C#.NET
add metadata to pdf file; add metadata to pdf
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
E
CUADOR
E
CUADOR
 The Organic Law on Communications—proposed during the coverage period and later
approved—tasks website owners with “ultimate responsibility” for all content. This
law,  combined  with  government  pressure,  resulted  in  the  removal  of  the  reader
comments sections from two prominent news sites (see L
IMITS ON 
C
ONTENT
).
 A new telecommunications act issued in July 2012 established the right to privacy and
security  for  ICT  users,  while  also  authorizing  the  National  Telecommunications
Council  to  track  IP  addresses  without  judicial  order  (see  V
IOLATIONS  OF 
U
SER
R
IGHTS
).
 Reports of advanced surveillance technology in Ecuador were confirmed by Speech
Technology  Center,  a  Russian  tech  company,  in  December  2012.  The  company
revealed  that it had completed the installation  of a biometric identification  system
capable  of  generating and  storing both “voiceprints”  and  facial  recognition  data in
Ecuador (see V
IOLATIONS OF 
U
SER 
R
IGHTS
).
 In August 2012, Ecuador extended diplomatic asylum to WikiLeaks founder Julian
Assange, a decision that attracted worldwide attention in part because it appeared to
contradict the administration’s attitude toward free speech and media freedom (see
V
IOLATIONS OF 
U
SER 
R
IGHTS
).
2012 
2013 
I
NTERNET 
F
REEDOM 
S
TATUS
N
/
A
P
ARTLY 
F
REE
Obstacles to Access (0-25) 
n/a  10 
Limits on Content (0-35) 
n/a  11 
Violations of User Rights (0-40) 
n/a  16 
Total (0-100) 
n/a 
37 
*0=most free, 100=least free
K
EY 
D
EVELOPMENTS
:
M
AY 
2012
A
PRIL 
2013 
P
OPULATION
14.8 million
I
NTERNET 
P
ENETRATION 
2012: 
45 percent
S
OCIAL 
M
EDIA
/ICT
A
PPS 
B
LOCKED
No
P
OLITICAL
/S
OCIAL 
C
ONTENT 
B
LOCKED
No
B
LOGGERS
/ICT
U
SERS 
A
RRESTED
No
P
RESS 
F
REEDOM 
2013
S
TATUS
Not Free
229
C# PDF delete text Library: delete, remove text from PDF file in
Description: Delete specified string text that match the search option from PDF file. Parameters: Name, Description, Valid Value. matchString,
edit multiple pdf metadata; remove metadata from pdf acrobat
C# PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net
Embedded print settings. Embedded search index. Bookmarks. Document and metadata. All object data. Flatten visible layers. C#.NET DLLs: Compress PDF Document.
pdf xmp metadata editor; change pdf metadata
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
E
CUADOR
In June 2013, Ecuador’s Organic Law on Communications was passed. The law, which human rights 
organizations fear will stifle critical voices in the media, utilizes vague wording, arbitrary sanctions, 
and the threat of civil and criminal penalties in an effort to halt the spread of information that 
discredits public officials, even when such information is supported with evidence.
1
The law also 
provides for the creation of a new media regulator led by a presidential appointee to prohibit the 
dissemination  of  “unbalanced”  information  and  bans  non-degreed  journalists  from  publishing, 
effectively outlawing investigative reporting and citizen journalism. 
Ecuador,  which  has  historically  lagged  behind  other  Latin  American  nations  in  terms  of 
technological growth, has witnessed substantial improvement in internet penetration over the past 
two years. Despite recent progress, however, Ecuador still faces challenges related to information 
and communication technology (ICT) development. These include: market penetration, especially 
in rural areas; high consumer costs; poor quality of ISP service; and high taxes on mobile phones, 
particularly those with internet access. While the government has begun a campaign to increase 
internet access across the country, opening a number of public internet access centers known as 
Infocentros in  remote regions, to  date there have  been  no measures predicated on improving 
quality of service or lowering access rates. 
Although Ecuador’s ICT landscape is in need of further expansion and upgrade, its current capacity 
facilitates use of social media platforms such as Facebook and Twitter, and also supports a lively 
blogging community. Social media are used for conversations on a wide variety of topics, including 
daily  news,  sports,  entertainment,  personal  interest,  and  politics.  During  the  February  2013 
elections  for  president  and  National  Assembly,  the  internet  provided  a  real-time  forum  for 
candidates to launch proposals, solicit votes, discuss issues, and increase the scope of their publicity 
campaigns.  
While President Correa’s re-election has facilitated continued economic stability via social welfare 
programs and other initiatives, media freedom advocates are fearful that the proposed Organic Law 
on Communications will exacerbate the restrictions he has already placed on the press. Over the 
past few years, newspapers and other traditional media have had serious confrontations with the 
government  often  resulting in  lawsuits  filed  against  major  media  outlets  at  the  behest  of  the 
president.  Critics have  expressed concern  that  President Correa’s new term  will  result in  an 
1
 Gina Yauri, “Ecuador Passes Controversial Communications Law,” Global Voices Online, June 19, 2013, 
http://globalvoicesonline.org/2013/06/19/ecuador‐passes‐controversial‐communications‐law/
I
NTRODUCTION
E
DITOR
N
OTE ON 
R
ECENT 
D
EVELOPMENTS
230
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
E
CUADOR
expanded executive, a less independent judiciary, and continued attacks on the media and political 
opposition at the hands of the government.
2
In August 2012, Ecuador extended diplomatic asylum to WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange, who 
had been staying at the Ecuadorian Embassy in London since June and, as of May 2013, had not yet 
left the building for fear of arrest and extradition. Correa’s offer of asylum allows the Ecuadorian 
president to temper his administration’s history of media violations by portraying his government as 
a defender of free speech.
3
By the end of 2012, internet penetration in Ecuador had reached an all-time high of 35 percent,
4
although some sources within the country cite penetration rates as high as 55 percent.
5
This surge 
was largely the result of government efforts to increase connectivity nationwide in keeping with the 
November 2011 “Digital Strategy 2.0 Ecuador” plan, which set goals for increased internet access 
and enhanced technology that included the extension of internet connectivity to 50 percent of 
households by 2015.
6
Developments have largely been on track with projected deadlines, with 
Infocentros—community centers that offer free internet access and technological training—among 
the most successful initiatives.
7
Internet cafes are also becoming increasingly common, providing an 
alternative means of access for Ecuadorians, most of who use the internet for educational purposes, 
communication, and obtaining information.
8
Three groups of fiber-optic cable run through Ecuador, offering connectivity to 23 of the country’s 
24 provinces: (1) from the north through Colombia towards the Andean region, (2) from the coast 
in the province of Guayas, and (3) from the south through the province of El Oro.
9
Ecuador is 
home to 22 internet service providers (ISPs), most of which offer internet service via these points 
of connection without activation fees. Of Ecuador’s ISPs, ETAPA and GroupTvCable hold the 
2
 William Neuman, “President Correa Handily WinsRe‐Election in Ecuador,” The New York Times, February 17, 2013, 
http://www.nytimes.com/2013/02/18/world/americas/rafael‐correa‐wins‐re‐election‐in‐ecuador.html?_r=0
3
 Irene Cassell, “Julian Assange will be Granted Asylum, Says Official,” The Guardian, August 14, 2012, 
http://www.theguardian.com/world/2012/aug/14/julian‐assange‐asylum‐ecuador‐wikileaks
4
 International Telecommunication Union (ITU), Statistics: Percentage of Individuals Using the Internet, 2000‐2012, ITU, June 17, 
2013, http://www.itu.int/en/ITU‐D/Statistics/Documents/statistics/2013/Individuals_Internet_2000‐2012.xls
5
 Diario Hoy, “El Acceso a Internet en el País Sobrepaso el 54% de la Población durante 2012,” [Access to Internet in the Country 
Exceeded 54 Percent of the Population during 2012], Diario Hoy, January 1, 2013, http://www.hoy.com.ec/noticias‐ecuador/el‐
acceso‐a‐internet‐en‐el‐pais‐sobrepaso‐el‐54‐de‐la‐poblacion‐durante‐2012‐570287.html. 
6
 Roberta Prescott, “In New Digital Plan, Ecuador Aims for Internet Access to Half of all Households by 2015,” RCR Wireless, 
November 16, 2011, http://www.rcrwireless.com/americas/20111116/networks/in‐new‐digital‐plan‐ecuador‐aims‐for‐
internet‐access‐to‐half‐of‐all‐households‐by‐2015/
7
 MINTEL, Infocentros, MINTEL, Republica del Ecuador, coverage through 2012, 
http://www.infocentros.gob.ec/infocentros/index.php?option=com_content&view=category&layout=blog&id=38&Itemid=56
8
 Ecuador Travel Guide, Communications, accessed August 8, 2013, http://www.ecuador‐travel‐
guide.org/services/Communications.htm
9
 Roberta Prescott, “Ecuador Announces US $8.2M Investment in Fiber Optics, RCR Wireless, August 2, 2011, 
http://www.rcrwireless.com/americas/20110802/networks/ecuador‐announces‐us‐8‐2m‐investment‐in‐fiber‐optics/; Specific 
information regarding cables provided by interview with Carlos Correa Loyola, March 2013. 
O
BSTACLES TO 
A
CCESS
231
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
E
CUADOR
greatest  percentage  of  market  share.
10
Under  a  provision  prioritizing  essential  technology, 
computers,  which range  from  approximately $800 to$1000, are tax-free when imported from 
other countries. As compared to an average wage of $318 per month, however, computers are not 
easily affordable.
11
For those fortunate enough to own computers, there are multiple subscription 
options,  ranging  from  dial-up  pay-per-minute  plans  to  cable  and  radio  modems  and  satellite 
connections.
12
Broadband (commonly used in urban zones) and satellite connections (often used in 
rural areas) have become increasingly popular in recent years, eclipsing dial-up plans.  
According to industry estimates, between 33 and 66 percent of internet users have broadband 
speeds between 2 to 3Mbps, at a cost of $20 to $25 per month.
13
In May 2012, Superintendent of 
Telecommunications Fabian Brito indicated that the overall average speed of an internet connection 
in Ecuador is 128Kbps, although speeds are lower in rural areas. While the price of access is 
consistent  in  both  rural  and  urban  settings,  representatives  from  the  government’s  office  of 
telecommunications predict a significant decrease in subscription prices across the board along with 
an attendant increase in connection speed in coming years.
14
In 2011, mobile penetration in Ecuador was measured at 47 percent, a significant increase from 
2010 figures, which came in at 24 percent. Regional variations still persist, however, with the 
lowest number  of subscribers, 30 percent, found in the Andean highlands of Bolivar, and the 
greatest number, 55 percent, found in the province of Pichincha, which counts Ecuador’s capital, 
Quito, among its cities. Mobile phone subscriptions vary greatly among income level, with 54 
percent of those above the poverty line enjoying active subscriptions as compared to 28 percent of 
those below the poverty line. Of those with mobile phones, only 8 percent have smartphones, 36 
percent of which are concentrated in the provinces of Guayas, El Oro, and Azuay. Those with post-
graduate degrees are most likely to own smartphones.
15
Ecuador is home to three mobile service providers: one state-run operator, CNT, and two private 
providers,  Claro  (CONECEL)  and  Movistar  (OTECEL).  The  total  number  of  active  cellular 
accounts  exceeds 14  million,  distributed  as  follows: Claro  leads  the  pack  with  69 percent of 
subscribers, followed by Movistar with 29 percent, and finally, state-run CNT, with almost 2 
10
 El Tiempo, “Internet Aumentara Velocidad” [Internet Speed will Increase], May 17, 2012, 
http://www.eltiempo.com.ec/noticias‐cuenca/96903‐internet‐aumentara‐velocidad/
11
 El Diario, “Correa Anuncia que el Sueldo Básico Aumenta a $318”[Correa Announces that the Base Salary is Increasing to 
$318], December 22, 2012, http://www.eldiario.ec/noticias‐manabi‐ecuador/250696‐correa‐anuncia‐que‐el‐sueldo‐basico‐
aumenta‐a‐318/
12
 Tempest Telecom, Coverage Guide: Ecuador – Dialup Internet Access, accessed August 8, 2013, 
http://www.tempestcom.com/guide/guide.aspx?Id=60&view=1
13
CNT, National Corporation of Telecommunications, Products and Services, CNT, 2012, 
http://www.cnt.gob.ec/cntwebregistro/04_cntglobal/productos_detalle.php?txtCodiSegm=1&txtCodiLine=4&txtCodiProd=34&
txtCodiTipoMovi=0#valDes
14
 El Tiempo, “Internet Aumentara Velocidad” [Internet Speed will Increase], May 17, 2012, 
http://www.eltiempo.com.ec/noticias‐cuenca/96903‐internet‐aumentara‐velocidad/
15
 INEC, National Center for Statistics and Censuses, “Reporte Anual de Estadisticas sobre Tecnologias de la Information y 
Comunicaciones (TICs) 2011” [Annual Report of Statistics about Information and Communications Technologies (ICTs) 2011], 
http://www.inec.gob.ec/sitio_tics/presentacion.pdf
232
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
E
CUADOR
percent  of  subscribers.
16
While  some  data  packages  include  internet  access,  Movistar’s  full 
navigation package imposes certain limitations on the applications subscribers may use.
17
Movistar 
states that it retains the right to restrict access to certain sites without prior warning, should the 
sites generate content that could “affect the proper functioning of its system.” Such vague language 
leaves the rationale behind the restriction of certain websites rather opaque, although it appears to 
be a policy related to security concerns rather than one driven by censorship.
18
   
Despite their popularity, the Ecuadorian government classifies mobile phones as luxury items. In 
addition to being excluded from the tax exemption extended to computers, a June 2012 ruling 
(No. 67) issued  by the Committee  on Foreign Trade (COMEX)
19
also imposes quotas on the 
importation  of  mobile  telephones.
20
According  to  the  edict,  the  limitation  is  predicated  on 
preventing further environmental degradation resulting from residual cell phone waste.  
Social networks are not widely used in Ecuador. A national survey revealed that as of 2011, only 3 
percent of Ecuadorians utilized such platforms, most of whom were concentrated in coastal, urban 
areas  and  held  university  degrees.
21
The  Ecuadorian  blogosphere  has  largely  followed  in  the 
footsteps of conventional media, witnessing a slight decrease in the quantity of voices represented 
in recent years while still supporting discussion on a wide array of issues, including politics, sports, 
and  daily  news.  Isolated  communities  in  rural  areas  have  less  of  a  presence  online  due  to 
connectivity issues, and therefore less representation in terms of advocating for matters such as 
water rights and indigenous land issues, leading to potential marginalization in online communities.  
In recent years, the Ministry of Telecommunications (MINTEL) has initiated a handful of projects 
predicated on increasing digital literacy and general internet access. To that end, Infocentros have 
been installed in 377 (48 percent) of Ecuador’s 810 rural parishes, with a projection of 100 percent 
by 2014.
22
As mentioned above, Infocentros provide free access to computers, telephones, and the 
16
 SUPERTEL, “Operadoras Reportaron 17.133.539 Líneas Activas de Telefonía Móvil Prestadas a Través de Terminales de 
Usuario”[Operators Report 17,133,539 Active Mobile Telephone Lines Provided to Users], Superintendencia de 
Telecomunicaciones, February 20, 2013, 
http://www.supertel.gob.ec/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=1182%3Aoperadoras‐reportaron‐17133539‐
lineas‐activas‐de‐telefonia‐movil‐prestadas‐a‐traves‐de‐terminales‐de‐usuario&catid=44%3Aprincipales&Itemid=344
17
 Movistar, “Aplicaciones Restringidas ‐ Plan Full Navegación” [Restricted Applications – “Full Navigation” Plan], Movistar 
Mobile Phone Company, http://movistar.com.ec/pdf/Aplicaciones_restringidas_IM_Full_Navegacion.pdf
18
 Movistar, Aplicaciones Restringidas Plan Full Navegacion” [Restricted Applications in Full Navigation Plan], Movistar, accessed 
August 1, 2013, http://movistar.com.ec/pdf/Aplicaciones_restringidas_IM_Full_Navegacion.pdf. 
19
 COMEX, “Resolución Nº67 del Comité de Comercio Exterior” [Legal Ruling # 67 of the Committee for External Business 
Relations], June 11, 2012, http://www.produccion.gob.ec/wp‐content/uploads/downloads/2012/09/RESOLUCION‐67.pdf 
20
 La Hora Nacional, “Restricciones de Comercio Limitarán Acceso a Internet” [Trade Restrictions will Limit Access to the 
Internet], June 26, 2012, http://www.lahora.com.ec/index.php/noticias/show/1101351932#.UTONqahgbME
21
 Carlos Correa Loyola, “Aprobacion de la Ley de Comunicación en Ecuador y su impacto en Internet” [Approval of the 
Communications Law in Ecuador and its Impact on the Internet], Bitacora de Calu (blog), June 17, 2013, 
http://calu.me/bitacora/2013/06/17/aprobacion‐de‐la‐ley‐de‐comunicacion‐en‐ecuador‐y‐su‐impacto‐en‐internet.html; See 
also: INEC, National Center for Statistics and Censuses, “Reporte Anual de Estadisticas sobre Tecnologias de la Information y 
Comunicaciones (TICs) 2011” [Annual Report of Statistics about Information and Communications Technologies (ICTs) 2011], 
http://www.inec.gob.ec/sitio_tics/presentacion.pdf
22
 MINTEL, Infocentros – Sobre, MINTEL, Republica del Ecuador, coverage extended through 2012, 
http://www.infocentros.gob.ec/infocentros/index.php?option=com_content&view=category&layout=blog&id=38&Itemid=56
233
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
E
CUADOR
internet, and  also offer ICT training.
23
During 2012,  teams from the National  Plan of Digital 
Recruitment (PLANADI) utilized Infocentros to train a reported 34,500 people to be technical 
managers.
24
To  date,  445,000  visitors  have  accessed  the  internet  from  such  centers  in  rural 
districts. The project appears to be meeting its goals of expanding demand for the internet to rural 
areas, as well as increasing the percentage of the population that enjoys digital literacy.  
In rural areas, cybercafes, which generally provide internet access at a rate of $1 per hour, are often 
relied  upon.  Such  establishments  face  the  same  requirements  as  other  businesses,  including 
registering  with  the  government.  In  order to  utilize the  services provided  by  cybercafes, the 
national  secretary  of  telecommunications,  SENATEL,  requires  that  users  register  with  the 
following: full name, phone number, passport number, voting certificate number, email address, 
and home address. Users must also agree to terms that stipulate that all information entered into 
the  database  during  use  falls  under  the  jurisdiction  of  SENATEL  and  the  superintendent  of 
telecommunications,  SUPERTEL.  If  a  user  infringes  on  the  terms  and  criminal  charges  are 
applicable to the transgression, the user will be prosecuted under Ecuador’s penal code.
25
Ecuador’s  backbone  is  not  highly  centralized.  There  have  been  no  reported  incidents  of  the 
government placing restrictions on applications from new companies in the ICT sector, however 
high registration costs and administrative hurdles can make it difficult to begin operating a new 
telecommunications business. New ISPs and mobile companies often face fees as high as $100,000 
as well as legal obstacles, each of which can complicate their attempts to enter the market.
26
Private 
ISPs sometimes engage in bandwidth throttling (the intentional slowing down of internet service) 
to specific sites when excessive amounts of bandwidth are being consumed. It appears as though 
Ecuadorian ISPs utilize this strategy for traffic management rather than for censorship, however 
they are not transparent about such restrictions and there are likewise no laws to protect against 
preferential treatment of certain sites in times of high traffic. 
Ecuador’s  state  regulatory  agency  is  called  the  National  Telecommunications  Council 
(CONATEL).
27
It is part of the Telecommunications Ministry, the head of which is nominated by 
the president and  also serves as the  head of CONATEL,  a process which demonstrates  close 
alignment with  the  executive  body.
28
In July 2012, CONATEL issued the Telecommunication 
Service Subscribers and Added Value Regulation Act.
29
Internet subscribers have taken issue with 
23
 MINTEL, Infocentros – Sobre, MINTEL, Republica del Ecuador, coverage extended through 2012, 
http://www.infocentros.gob.ec/infocentros/index.php?option=com_content&view=category&layout=blog&id=38&Itemid=56
24
 Alvaro Layedra, MINTEL, reported via Twitter account @alayedra, Twitter, January 2013, https://twitter.com/alayedra
25
 SENATEL, Registro de Cibercafes On Line [Registration of Cybercafes Online], Republica del Ecuador, accessed August 6, 2013, 
http://www.regulaciontelecomunicaciones.gob.ec/registro‐de‐cibercafes/. 
26
 AEPROVI, general information available at: http://www.aeprovi.org.ec
27
 El Universo, “Presidente del CNE: Hay que regular a las redes sociales y a eso vamos” [President of CNE: We have Regular 
Social Networks], El Universo, October 18, 2012, http://www.eluniverso.com/2012/10/18/1/1355/presidente‐cne‐hay‐regular‐
redes‐sociales‐eso‐ vamos.html  
28
 SENATEL, “CONATEL ‐ Consejo Nacional de Telecominicaciones” [CONATEL – National Telecommunications Council], accessed 
August 5, 2013 http://www.regulaciontelecomunicaciones.gob.ec/conatel/. 
29
 Carlos Correa Loyola, “Carta Impresa a Domingo Paredes, Presidente del CNE, sobre Intención de Regular las Redes Sociales” 
[Printed Letter to Domingo Paredes, President of CNE, about the Intention to Regulate Social Networks], Bitácora de Calú 
(blog), October 18, 2012, http://calu.me/bitacora/2012/10/18/carta‐impresa‐a‐ domingo‐paredes‐presidente‐del‐cne‐sobre‐
intencion‐de‐regular‐las‐redes‐sociales.html
234
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested