F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
E
CUADOR
some of the act’s main provisions, namely: discretionary exemption relating to use of infrastructure 
against state security (Article 24.9) and the granting of authority to CONATEL to request users’ IP 
addresses without court order (Article 29.9).
30
There have been no widespread instances of blocking or filtering of websites or blogs in Ecuador, 
but there has often been restraint of political and government-related content both in print and, 
increasingly, online. Attempts to censor statements made in times of heightened political sensitivity 
have been witnessed, as have alleged instances of censorship via the overly broad application of 
copyright protection principles to content critical of the government. The population is able to 
access  diverse  sources  of  national  and  international  information,  however,  anti-government 
commentary has been subject to governmental repercussions in recent years.  
While access  to blogs  and social  media  platforms such  as  Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube  is 
generally free and open in Ecuador, during the February 2013 presidential elections, the National 
Electoral Council (CNE) announced that it would begin making efforts to police social networks, 
though the mechanism by which such censorship would occur are unclear. This attempt led to 
online mobilization and protests by web users, which resulted in a guarantee from CNE not to 
regulate citizens’ personal expression or opinions on social networks.
31
Another contentious case involves the trial of the Luluconto 10, a group of young social protestors 
suspected  of  planting  pamphleteering  bombs—mini  explosions  designed  to  distribute  political 
pamphlets in crowded areas. Among the 10 activists who were arrested are a lawyer, a dentist, an 
engineer, a young mother, and a law student—all of whom were imprisoned on the day of their 
arrest and held  without charges for four months. After  they were finally brought to  trial on 
terrorism charges, the group’s defense lawyers were banned from reporting on the case through 
social networks.
32
The order came on the heels of growing social mobilization advocating for a free 
and  fair  trial,  much  of  which  was  carried  out  online,  illustrating  the  impact  of  social  media 
networks even in a country in which only a small minority of citizens have such accounts.
33
 
The  Ecuadorian  government  has  periodically  sought  to  block  critical  content  on  grounds  of 
copyright infringement. A controversial 2012 documentary about President Correa was subject to 
such treatment when clips of the film were posted on YouTube and Vimeo. The videos were 
removed after Spanish anti-piracy firm Ares Rights filed a copyright infringement lawsuit on behalf 
of Ecuador’s state-run TV channel, claiming that the documentary included unauthorized images of 
30
 El Comercio, “Jueces Ordenan que Juicio del Caso Luluncoto no se Transmita por Redes Sociales” [Judges Ordered that Case 
of Luluncoto is not to be Transmitted by Social Networks], January 23, 2013, http://www.elcomercio.com/seguridad/Jueces‐
ordenan‐Luluncoto‐transmita‐ sociales_0_852514906.html
31
 Website of CONATEL (National Telecommunications Council), http://www.conatel.gob.ec/
32
 CONATEL, “Resolución TEL‐477‐16‐CONATEL‐2012”, [Resolution TEL‐477‐16‐CONATEL‐2012], July 11, 2012, available here: 
http://www.regulaciontelecomunicaciones.gob.ec/
33
 Manuela Picq, “Criminalizing Social Protests,” Al Jazeera, February 14, 2013, 
http://www.aljazeera.com/indepth/opinion/2013/02/20132128651511241.html
L
IMITS ON 
C
ONTENT
235
Pdf xmp metadata - add, remove, update PDF metadata in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Allow C# Developers to Read, Add, Edit, Update and Delete PDF Metadata
read pdf metadata; read pdf metadata online
Pdf xmp metadata - VB.NET PDF metadata library: add, remove, update PDF metadata in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Enable VB.NET Users to Read, Write, Edit, Delete and Update PDF Document Metadata
remove pdf metadata; read pdf metadata java
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
E
CUADOR
the president.
34
Distribution  of  the documentary has been riddled  with  problems  both  within 
Ecuador and abroad ever since. After interviewing the filmmaker, Santiago Villa, on an Ecuadorian 
radio  show,  host  Andres  Carrion  was  forced  to  shut  down  his  radio  program.
35
When  Villa 
attempted to broadcast the documentary on American TV channel American TeVe, he was asked to 
make changes to the film’s content, allegedly due to fears of legal reprisal. The documentary is now 
available only on the Russian website
smotri.
36 
The Ecuadorian government has occasionally been accused of manipulating digital media via the use 
of  progovernment  commentators  employed  to  counter  opposition  voices.  In  February  2012, 
Fernando Balda, a former member of President Correa’s socialist Alianza PAIS political party, 
blogged about government “troll centers” dedicated to defending the president and slandering the 
opposition on social media. Balda describes a digital “army” tasked with such work, which, he says, 
is  comprised  of  workers  with  pseudonymous  Facebook  and  Twitter  accounts.  Although 
Communications Secretary Fernando Alvarado refuted Balda’s claims,
37
reporters at El Comercio 
echoed such accusations in March 2012. Citing Balda’s statements as well as complaints made to the 
NGO Fundamedios, El Comercio claims that an investigation into tax records revealed that a number 
of accounts associated with inflammatory comments about journalists were in fact not registered to 
real people but appear to exist solely to slander journalists on social media platforms.
38
Over the 
years, reports have also surfaced of intense government pressure on media outlets to silence critical 
opinions during elections and at other times of heightened political interest.
39
Although formal rules governing online activity have only been discussed in recent years, self-
censorship has long been encouraged by the ramifications associated with the publication of critical 
comments. In January 2013, for example, President Correa (@MashiRafael) called for the National 
Secretary of Intelligence (SENAIN) to investigate two Twitter users who had published disparaging 
comments about him, an announcement which sent a warning to others not to post comments 
critical of the president.
40
In recent years, the Ecuadorian state has issued complaints and filed court 
34
 Mike Masnick, “Spanish Anti‐Piracy Firm Ares Rights History of Censorship by Copyright for Ecuador and Argentina,” 
Techdirt.com, June 28, 2013, http://www.techdirt.com/articles/20130628/17335823665/spanish‐anti‐piracy‐firm‐ares‐rights‐
appears‐to‐specialize‐censorship‐copyright‐latin‐american‐countries‐like‐ecuador.shtml
35
Human Rights Ecuador, “Journalist Andres Carrion Forced to Leave Radio After Interview with Author of Correa 
Documentary,” Human Rights Ecuador, December 6, 2012,  http://www.humanrightsecuador.org/2012/12/06/journalist‐
andres‐carrion‐forced‐to‐leave‐the‐radio‐after‐interview‐to‐author‐of‐correa‐documentary/. 
36
 Silvia Higuera, “YouTube, Vimeo Remove Documentary on Rafael Correa for Alleged Copyright Infringement,” Knight Center 
for Journalism in the Americas, December 19, 2012, https://knightcenter.utexas.edu/blog/00‐12416‐youtube‐vimeo‐remove‐
documentary‐rafael‐correa‐alleged‐copyright‐infringement
37
 El Universo, “Dirigente de SP Revela Supuesto ‘Ejercito’ de Cuentas Falsa en Ecuador” [SP Reveals Alleged ‘Army’ of Fake 
Accounts in Ecuador], February 28, 2012, http://www.eluniverso.com/2012/02/28/1/1355/dirigente‐sp‐revela‐supuesto‐
ejercito‐cuentas‐falsas‐ecuador.html; Maca Lara‐Dillon, “Inedito: Gobierno de Ecuador Habria Montado un ‘Troll Center’” 
[Unpublished: Government of Ecuador has Set Up a Troll Center], Pulso Social, March 1, 2012, 
http://pulsosocial.com/2012/03/01/inedito‐gobierno‐de‐ecuador‐habria‐montado‐un‐troll‐center/
38
 El Comercio, “El Supuesto ‘Troll Center’ Tuvo en su Mora a El Comercio” [The Alleged ‘Troll Center’ Seen at El Comercio], El 
Comercio, January 3, 2012, http://www.elcomercio.com/politica/supuesto‐troll‐center‐mira‐COMERCIO_0_655734472.html
39
 Milton Ramirez, “Ecuador: The Departure of a Television Anchor, Global Voices Online, April 25, 2009, 
http://globalvoicesonline.org/2009/04/25/ecuador‐the‐departure‐of‐a‐television‐anchor/; See also: Ecuador Sin Censura, 
http://ecuadorsincensura.blogspot.com/2009/04/cero‐independencia.html
40
 Ecuador Times, “Rafael Correa Asked the SENAIN to Investigate Twitter Accounts,” Ecuador Times, January 25, 2013, 
http://www.ecuadortimes.net/2013/01/25/rafael‐correa‐asked‐the‐senain‐to‐investigate‐twitter‐accounts/
236
C# TIFF: TIFF Metadata Editor, How to Write & Read TIFF Metadata
How to Get TIFF XMP Metadata in C#.NET. Use this C# sample code to get Tiff image Xmp metadata for string. // Load your target Tiff docuemnt.
batch edit pdf metadata; remove metadata from pdf
DocImage SDK for .NET: Document Imaging Features
a metadata viewer application Enable users to add metadata in the form of EXIF, IPTC, XMP, or COM Type 6 (OJPEG) encoding Image only PDF encoding support.
remove metadata from pdf online; pdf metadata viewer online
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
E
CUADOR
proceedings against certain mainstream media outlets that maintain a digital presence via websites 
or social networks, including El Comercio and La Hora. Critics allege that reporters and journalists 
associated with the digital branches of these publications have exemplified a marked shift in tone, 
resorting to pro-government expression following state seizures of printing press equipment and 
supplies, as well as threats of legal action for online posts.
41
After receiving criticism from the government, news site La Hora indefinitely suspended the reader 
comments section on its website. Such action was taken in order to avoid “publishing offensive 
comments” that might violate a clause in Ecuador’s proposed communications law (since approved) 
that imposes “ultimate responsibility” on publishers for any content that “threatens the honor or 
name  of  a  good  person”—a  clause  which  extends  to  the  reader  commentary  section  of  a 
newspaper’s website.
42
Despite La Hora’s efforts, one month later, the newspaper found itself at 
the center of a governmental dispute over content. The newspaper was forced by court order to 
publish an apology to the government, both on its website and in print, for having published a story 
based on data from an independent monitoring center that claimed the government had spent $71 
million on propaganda.
43
Print and digital news outlet El Comercio faced similar pressure related to its readers’ comments; 
like La Hora, the comments section was ultimately disabled, although in this instance the catalyst 
was a letter from President Correa. In July 2012, the president accused El Comercio of censoring 
progovernment  commentary  and  allowing  only  inflammatory,  anti-Correa  rhetoric  from 
commentators to be posted on its website. The newspaper subsequently apologized to Correa, 
stating that it  was an  “error [on  the part of the newspaper] not to have filtered  the offensive 
comments to the president.”
44
At the president’s request, the comments section has since been shut 
down completely. 
In Ecuador, social networks have been utilized to coordinate meetings held in real life to organize, 
protest,  or propose actions. To date,  there  have been no official  governmental constraints on 
internet-mediated  mobilization;  however,  the  impact  of  such  movements  has  been  limited. 
Warnings from the president stating that the act of protesting will be interpreted as “an attempt to 
destabilize  the  government” have undoubtedly  discouraged  some  from  participating  in  protest 
movements.
45
41
 The Telegraph, “Ecuador President Wins Libel Case Against Newspaper,” July 21, 2011, The Telegraph, 
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/southamerica/ecuador/8651676/Ecuador‐president‐wins‐libel‐case‐against‐
newspaper.html
42
 Silvia Higuera, “Government of Ecuador asks Paper to ‘Filter’ Reader Comments,” Knight Center for Journalism in the 
Americas, January 30, 2013, https://knightcenter.utexas.edu/blog/00‐12744‐government‐ecuador‐asks‐paper‐“filter”‐reader‐
comments
43
 El Diario, “Diario La Hora Publica Sus Disculpaspara el Gobierno,” El Diario, November 14, 2012, 
http://www.eldiario.ec/noticias‐manabi‐ecuador/247818‐diario‐la‐hora‐publica‐sus‐disculpas‐para‐el‐gobierno/; See also: Silvia 
Higuera, “Ecuadorian Newspaper Complies with Court Order, Apologizes to Government,” Knight Center for Journalism in the 
Americas, November 16, 2012, https://knightcenter.utexas.edu/blog/00‐12104‐ecuadorian‐newspaper‐complies‐court‐order‐
apologizes‐government
44
 El Comercio, “Correa Da Su Version del Desfile Olimpico” [Correa Gives His Version of the Olympic Parade], July 28, 2012, 
http://www.elcomercio.ec/politica/Rafael‐Correa‐da‐version‐desfile‐Olimpico‐juegos‐olimpicos_0_745125557.html
45
 Carlos Andres Vera, “Protesta Tuitera: #El8ALasCalles” [Twitter Protest: #El8ALasCalles], Polificcion (blog), March 6, 2012, 
http://polificcion.wordpress.com/2012/03/06/protesta‐tuitera‐el8alascalles/
237
XDoc.Tiff for .NET, Comprehensive .NET Tiff Imaging Features
types, including EXIF tags, IIM (IPTC), XMP data, and to read, write, delete, and update Tiff file metadata. Render and output text to text, PDF, or Word file.
metadata in pdf documents; pdf metadata online
C# Raster - Raster Conversion & Rendering in C#.NET
RasterEdge XImage.Raster conversion toolkit for C#.NET supports image conversion between various images, like Jpeg, Png, Bmp, Xmp and Gif, .NET Graphics
add metadata to pdf; adding metadata to pdf files
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
E
CUADOR
Ecuador’s media freedom standards continue to be contradictory, balancing positive provisions 
such  as  universal  access  to  ICTs  with  concerning  developments  relating  to  user  privacy  and 
manipulation of the press. While President Correa has had a hand in influencing some of the media 
via a direct line to reporters, he has also made a show of purportedly supporting free speech 
without condition, going so far as to grant diplomatic asylum to WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange 
much to the chagrin of some members of the international community.
46
The incongruity of the 
president’s strategy points to a dual desire to limit domestic media while simultaneously asserting a 
world image as a supporter of free speech. Ecuador’s new communications law, however, is poised 
to overshadow the nation’s foreign policy.  
While  the  Organic  Law  on  Communication  does  contain  some  positive  provisions,  such  as 
recognizing the right to communication, it also contains numerous articles of concern for advocates 
of online expression. One rule greatly compromises user anonymity by forcing media companies to 
collect and store user information.
47
Another vaguely worded article prohibits “media lynching,” 
which appears to extend to any accusation of corruption or investigation of a public official—even 
those that  are supported  with evidence. Websites are  also  subject to “ultimate  responsibility,” 
which  makes them  liable  for  all  hosted content. A new body with oversight authority,  to be 
appointed by the executive, has also been described in vague language, which may leave the door 
open to arbitrary actions against bloggers, journalists, and users of social media.
48
Article 16.2 of Ecuador’s constitution guarantees “universal access to information technologies and 
communication.
49
Article  384  similarly  confers  the  ability  to  exercise  one’s  right  to 
communication, information, and freedom of expression. However, a discretionary loophole in 
Resolution TEL-477-16-CONATEL-2012 grants ISPs a wide margin for the implementation of 
“actions  they  deem  necessary  to  the  proper  administration  of  the  service  network,”  and  by 
extension, threatens net neutrality.
50
In  July  2012,  Ecuador’s  Ministry  of  Telecommunications  issued  a  resolution  (The 
Telecommunication Service Subscribers and Added Value Regulation Act) establishing a framework 
for ICT user rights and ISPs. Among its provisions are articles stating that telecommunications is 
considered a “strategic sector” by the Ecuadorian government, and that the state is tasked with the 
46
 El Telégrafo, “Ecuador Concede Asilo Diplomático a Julian Assange” [Ecuador Grants Diplomatic Asylum to Julian Assange], 
August 16, 2012, http://www.telegrafo.com.ec/actualidad/item/ecuador‐concede‐asilo‐diplomatico‐a‐julian‐assange.html
47
 Analia Levin, “Mechanisms of Censorship in Ecuador’s Communication Law,” Global Voices Online, July 22, 2013, 
http://advocacy.globalvoicesonline.org/2013/07/22/mechanisms‐of‐censorship‐in‐ecuadors‐communications‐law/
48
 Alejandro Martinez, Ecuador’s Controversial Communications Law in 8 Points,” Knight Center for Journalism in the Americas, 
June 20, 2013, https://knightcenter.utexas.edu/blog/00‐14071‐8‐highlights‐understand‐ecuador’s‐controversial‐
communications‐law
49
 MINTEL, “Autoridades del MINTEL se reunieron con usuarios digitales” [MINTEL Authorities Met with Digital Users], 
Ministerio de Telecomunicaciones y Sociedad de la Información, August 13, 2012, 
http://www.telecomunicaciones.gob.ec/autoridades‐del‐mintel‐se‐reunieron‐con‐usuarios‐digitales‐2/
50
 See Article 15.6 of CONATEL’s Telecommunication Service Subscribers and Added Value Regulation Act: 
http://www.elcomercio.com/seguridad/Jueces‐ordenan‐Luluncoto‐transmita‐ sociales_0_852514906.html. 
V
IOLATIONS OF 
U
SER 
R
IGHTS
238
C# Raster - Image Process in C#.NET
Image Access and Modify. Image Information. Metadata(tag) Edit. Color VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word process various images, like Jpeg, Png, Bmp, Xmp
online pdf metadata viewer; pdf xmp metadata
.NET JPEG 2000 SDK | Encode & Decode JPEG 2000 Images
Able to customize compression ratios (0 - 100); Support metadata encoding and decoding, including IPTC, XMP, XML Box, UUID Boxes, etc.
extract pdf metadata; remove metadata from pdf
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
E
CUADOR
“administration,  regulation,  control  and  management”  of  such  technologies,  while  also  being 
responsible for ensuring that the public has access to ICTs. Article 14 further establishes a state 
guarantee  of  privacy  and  security  for  users,  prohibiting  third  party  interception  of 
communications.
51
Despite  such  positive  provisions,  however,  Article  29.9  of  the  same  act 
authorizes CONATEL to track IP addresses from ISP customers without judicial order.
52
There are no specific laws criminalizing online content, however, standard defamation laws apply 
to content posted online, and are sometimes invoked by the government.
53
While lawsuits have 
been filed against digital news sites for comments critical of the current administration, detentions 
of regular ICT users are not as common. Calls for investigations into Twitter users who post 
content  critical  of  the  government,  have,  however,  been  levied  by  governmental  authorities, 
including  President Correa,  a  form  of  legal  intimidation that  stands  to  result in  greater  self-
censorship online.
54
The only recent arrest related to internet activity concerned an activist who 
created a fake identity on the government site “Dato Seguro” and posed as the president, allegedly 
with the aim of  revealing  to the public that state information and systems are not  sufficiently 
secure.  Paul  Moreno,  the  man  responsible  for  illustrating  the  ease  of  breaching  state  digital 
security, was arrested in Riobamba in November 2012 under accusations of identity theft.
55
No 
details are available regarding the investigation of Moreno, however, his supporters were very 
active  on  social  networks after  he was  detained  (see, for  example, tweets under  the hashtag 
#LiberenAPaulCoyote), a factor that appears to have influenced the judiciary. Moreno was released 
four days after his arrest following his publication of a public letter of apology.
56
Although he was 
never  brought  to  trial  Moreno  commented  that  during  his  detention,  there  were  no  acts  of 
intimidation and due legal process was followed.
57
 
Anonymous communication is not prohibited in Ecuador, nor are there restrictions against citizens 
who  choose  to  maintain  encrypted  communications  or  use  security  tools.  While  the  state 
guarantees privacy of communications, identification and registration are required to purchase a 
new cell phone, a regulation which has come into the spotlight following allegations of widespread 
secret state surveillance.  
51
 See Article 14 of CONATEL’s Telecommunication Service Subscribers and Added Value Regulation Act: 
http://www.elcomercio.com/seguridad/Jueces‐ordenan‐Luluncoto‐transmita‐ sociales_0_852514906.html. 
52
 Carlos Correa Loyola, “Carta Impresa a Domingo Paredes, Presidente del CNE, sobre Intención de Regular las Redes Sociales” 
[Printed Letter to Domingo Paredes, President of CNE, about the Intention to Regulate Social Networks], Bitácora de Calú 
(blog), October 18, 2012, http://bit.ly/18l0dBH 
53
 Asamblea Nacional de Ecuador, “Constitución del Ecuador” [Constitution of Ecuador], Asamblea Nacional de Ecuador, 
October 20, 2008, http://www.asambleanacional.gob.ec/documentos/constitucion_de_bolsillo.pdf
54
 Ecuador Times, “Rafael Correa Asked the SENAIN to Investigate Twitter Accounts,” Ecuador Times, January 25, 2013, 
http://www.ecuadortimes.net/2013/01/25/rafael‐correa‐asked‐the‐senain‐to‐investigate‐twitter‐accounts/
55
 Paul Moreno, Viajes [Travel] (Blog), http://paulcoyote.tumblr.com/; Paul Moreno, Twitter page, @paulcoyote; See also: Paul 
Moreno, “www.DatoSeguro.gob.ec No es Seguro” [www.DatoSeguro.gob.ec is Not Safe], Ecualug, November 26, 2012, 
http://www.ecualug.org/?q=20121126/blog/paulcoyote/wwwdatosegurogobec_no_es_seguro
56
 DINARDAP , “Boletín de Prensa de DINARDAP” [DINDARP Press Bulletin], El Comercio, November 30, 2012, 
http://www.elcomercio.com/%20politica/Boletin‐prensa‐DINARDAP_ECMFIL20121130_0003.pdfEl Universo, “Bloguero 
Detenido por Usar Datos del Presidente Correa en Sistema Dato Seguro” [Blogger Detained for Using Data of Presiden in System 
Data Insurance], El Universo, November 30, 2012, http://m.eluniverso.com/2012/11/30/1/1355/detiene‐tuitero‐advirtio‐
posibles‐fallas‐sistema‐dato‐seguro.html
57
 Paul Moreno, Letter Detailing Arrest and Detention, Calu (blog), December 1, 2012, http://calu.me/sandbox/cartapaul.jpg
239
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
E
CUADOR
In December 2012, Russian tech company Speech Technology Center revealed that it had been 
contracted to provide Ecuador with a nationwide “biometric identification platform” capable of 
facial and voice recognition. The controversial database of “voiceprints” and facial features created 
by the country allegedly stores information only on known or suspected criminals or “persons of 
interest.”
58
Although the government claims not to listen to phone calls for “political purposes,” 
human rights advocates have cautioned that the technology holds the potential for abuse and could 
be used to track down political dissidents, advocates, or investigative journalists.
59
Instances of verbal and physical harassment against journalists appear to be on the raise. In fact, 
verbal  threats  often come from the president, who uses his  weekly  sabatina (report) to  insult 
journalists and others who have displeased him. The president, who has referred to journalists as 
“assassins with ink
60
” has also filed—and won—court proceedings against print journalists who have 
made critical comments about him or about presidential orders that resulted in the harming of 
civilians. In one landmark case from 2011, newspaper El Universal was charged $40 million in 
damages for publishing a critical article. Emilio Palacio, author of the column, and the directors of 
the newspaper were all sentenced to three years in prison. Palacio’s sentence was overturned in 
August 2012, but he and his family were already in the process of applying for political asylum in 
the United States which was granted the following month.
61
Recent years have also been witness to two murders—one of a photojournalist, and one of an 
online reporter. In August 2012, Orlando Gomez Leon, a Quito based journalist from Colombia 
who writes for a Colombian weekly newspaper and also serves as an internal editor at print and 
digital newspaper La Hora, was the target of intimidation and violence. After contributing to an 
article  discussing  Ecuador’s  free  speech  issues  and  its  contradictory  extension  of  asylum  to 
WikiLeaks creator Julian Assange, Gomez began receiving threats. Later in the day, he was attacked 
by two assailants with a steel bar but managed to drive away unharmed. Given the nature of the 
threats he received, which included a warning to “stop saying bad things about Ecuador,” the attack 
appears to be connected directly to Gomez’s journalism.
62
In April 2013, Fausto Valdivieso, a public relations consultant and journalist of nearly 30 years who 
wrote widely on social networks and reported for a small online TV station, was murdered after 
numerous threats and a previous attempt on his life a day earlier. Although a link to his journalistic 
work has not been proven, his murder occurred while he was investigating issues related to the 
58
 Ryan Gallagher, “Ecuador Implements ‘World’s First’ Countrywide Facial‐ and Voice‐Recognition System,” Slate, December 
12, 2012, http://slate.me/T9E6WV.  
59
 Rosie Gray and Adrian Carrasquillo, “Ecuador Defends Domestic Surveillance,” Buzzfeed, June 27, 2013, 
http://www.buzzfeed.com/rosiegray/ecuador‐defends‐domestic‐surveillance
60
 Summer Harlow, “Ecuador President Blasts New Media during Speech at Columba University in New York,” Knight Center for 
Journalism in the Americas, Septemeber 28, 2011, https://knightcenter.utexas.edu/blog/ecuador‐president‐blasts‐news‐media‐
during‐speech‐columbia‐university‐new‐york
61
 Human Rights Ecuador, “Caso El Universal,” accessed August 7, 2013, http://www.humanrightsecuador.org/casos‐
destacados/caso‐el‐universo/?lang=es See also: Emilio Palacio, “Mi Vida en 830 Palabras,” Emilio Palacio en Internet (blog), 
September 2011‐August 2012, https://sites.google.com/site/emiliopalacioeninternet2/home/trayectoria‐de‐Emilio‐Palacio
62
 Reporters Without Borders, “Colombian Journalist Threatened, Attacked with Steel Bar,” Reporters Without Borders, August 
22, 2012, http://en.rsf.org/ecuador‐colombian‐journalist‐threatened‐22‐08‐2012,43257.html
240
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
E
CUADOR
government. Accordingly, his work has been suspected as one possible motive in the killing.
63
The 
suspects, currently in custody, are reputed to be members of a criminal drug-trafficking ring.
64
Cyberattacks in Ecuador are generally sporadic rather than systematic, although they appear to be 
on the rise. These assaults include modifications to webpages (defacements), phishing, the spread of 
malware,  and  DDoS  attacks.  The  websites  of  independent  human  rights  organizations  have 
occasionally  been  subject  to  disabling  attacks  and  unexplained  disruptions,  and  although  their 
administrators suspect government involvement, no party has yet taken responsibility. In February 
2013, the Twitter accounts of human rights organization Fundamedios (Andean Foundation for 
Media Observation and Study) and the online activism site Polificcion were suspended without 
explanation.
65 
Following a press conference held by Fundamedios which detailed the dangers of 
arbitrary suspension, the organization’s Twitter account was reinstated in March, 2013.
66
In January 2013, immediately following the publication of an article alleging that President Correa 
had two offshore bank accounts in Switzerland, website BananaLeaks.co was the target of disabling 
cyberattacks. Although administrators were able to get the site back up and running one day later, 
BananaLeaks says its site was “immediately sabotaged by the Ecuadorian government with DDoS 
attacks.”
67
Independent media outlets have not been the only targets of such attacks, however. In 
August 2012, “hacktivist” group Anonymous hacked into 45 websites belonging to the Ecuadorian 
government in protest of Article 29 of CONATEL’s July 2012 resolution allowing government 
agencies to  request  users’ IP  addresses.
68
Operation #OpInternetSurkishka wreaked utter  and 
widespread havoc on governmental websites for two days.
69
63
 For more on Valdivieso’s writings, see: YouTube, Patuchobalcon, last updated August 2011, 
http://www.youtube.com/user/patuchobalcon. 
64
 Diario Extra, “Fausto Valdiviezo ‘Conocia’ a Sus Presuntos Asesinos” [Fausto Valdiviezo ‘Knew’ his Alleged Murderers], Diario 
Extra, June 3, 2013, http://www.diario‐extra.com/ediciones/2013/06/03/cronica/fausto‐valdiviezo‐conocia‐a‐sus‐presuntos‐
asesinos/; See also: Reporters Without Borders, “Journalist Slain in Guayaquil, a Day after Escaping Earlier Murder Attempt,” 
Reporters Without Borders, April 12, 2013, http://en.rsf.org/ecuador‐journalist‐slain‐in‐guayaquil‐a‐12‐04‐2013,44372.html
65
 La República, “Correa Pide a Inteligencia que Investigue a Dos Tuiteros” [Correa Calls on Intelligence to Investigate Two 
Tweeters], La República, January 24, 2012, www.larepublica.ec/blog/politica/2013/01/24/correa‐pide‐a‐la‐senain‐que‐
investigue‐a‐dos‐tuiteros/; See also: Carlos Andres Vera, “Sobre la Suspensión de mi Cuenta Twitter”, [About the Suspension of 
my Twitter Account], PoliFiccion (blog), March 4, 2013, http://polificcion.wordpress.com/2013/03/04/sobre‐la‐suspension‐de‐
mi‐cuenta‐twitter/
66
 Fundamedios, “Twitter Suspende Cuenta de Organización Ecuatoriana” [Twitter Suspends Account of Ecuadorian 
Organization], IFEX, February 26, 2012, http://www.ifex.org/ecuador/2013/02/26/fundamedios_cuenta_twitter/es/
67
 Fundamedios, “Website Hacked by Ecuadorian Government After Story on President,” Fundamedios/IFEX, February 14, 2013, 
http://www.ifex.org/ecuador/2013/02/14/bananaleaks_sabotage/
68
 Europa Press, “Anonymous Hackea 45 ‘Webs’ de Gobierno Ecuatoriano” [Anonymous Hack ‘45’ Webs of the Ecuadorian 
Government] Europa Press, August 11, 2012, http://www.europapress.es/latam/ecuador/noticia‐ecuador‐anonymous‐hackea‐
45‐webs‐gobierno‐ecuatoriano‐20120811063017.html
69
  Storify, “#OpInternetSurkishka en Ecuador” [#OpInternetSurkishka in Ecuador], Digital Users of Storify EC, August 2012, 
http://storify.com/ecuadorinternet/opinternetsurkishka
241
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
E
GYPT
E
GYPT
Authorities repeatedly throttled mobile internet service in the areas around political 
protests, preventing activists from communicating through social networks and VoIP 
services (see O
BSTACLES TO 
A
CCESS
). 
Courts  ordered  the  temporary  blocking  of  YouTube  and  permanent  blocking  of 
pornography sites, though the decisions have not been implemented (see L
IMITS ON 
C
ONTENT
). 
An unprecedented number of liberal bloggers and online activists have been prosecuted 
by  special  courts  for  insulting  the  president.  Several  users  were  also  charged  for 
insulting religion over social networks (see V
IOLATIONS OF 
U
SER 
R
IGHTS
). 
Administrators  of  antigovernment  and  anti-Muslim  Brotherhood  Facebook  groups 
were targeted in cases of extralegal abductions and killings (see V
IOLATIONS OF 
U
SER 
R
IGHTS
). 
Senior  Muslim  Brotherhood  officials  working  in  the  office  of  President  Morsi 
reportedly met with an Iranian spy chief in December 2012 to seek assistance in the 
development  of  new  surveillance  capabilities  outside  of  the  traditional  military-
controlled structure (see V
IOLATIONS OF 
U
SER 
R
IGHTS
). 
2012 
2013 
I
NTERNET 
F
REEDOM 
S
TATUS
P
ARTLY 
F
REE
P
ARTLY 
F
REE
Obstacles to Access (0-25) 
14 
15 
Limits on Content (0-35) 
12 
12 
Violations of User Rights (0-40) 
33 
33 
Total (0-100) 
59 
60 
* 0=most free, 100=least free 
P
OPULATION
82.3 million
I
NTERNET 
P
ENETRATION 
2012: 
44 percent
S
OCIAL 
M
EDIA
/ICT
A
PPS 
B
LOCKED
No
P
OLITICAL
/S
OCIAL 
C
ONTENT 
B
LOCKED
No
B
LOGGERS
/ICT
U
SERS 
A
RRESTED
Yes
P
RESS 
F
REEDOM 
2013
S
TATUS
Not Free
K
EY 
D
EVELOPMENTS
:
M
AY 
2012
A
PRIL 
2013 
242
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
E
GYPT
This report covers events between May 1, 2012 and April 30, 2013. On July 3, 2013, President 
Mohamed Morsi was removed from power by General Abdul Fatah al-Sisi, the Defense Minister and 
head of the armed forces. Millions of Egyptians had taken to the streets since June 30 in a protest 
coordinated by a grassroots campaign known as Tamarod, the Arabic word for “rebel.” Tamarod, which 
is supported by the Egyptian Movement for Change, threatened widespread civil disobedience if Morsi 
did not resign by July 2. More significantly, the army issued a 48-hour ultimatum to the country’s 
political groups to “meet the demands of the people” and threatened to intervene if the political crisis 
was not solved. When Morsi refused to back down, the army took him under detention and appointed 
the head of Egypt’s highest court, Adly Mansour, as interim president. Together with religious and 
secular opposition leaders, General al-Sisi set out a roadmap for the drafting of a new constitution as 
well as the holding of parliamentary and presidential elections. Supporters of Morsi remained camped 
out in two large protest sites until August 14, when security forces raided the camps, killing hundreds 
in the process. Senior Muslim Brotherhood figures were taken under arrest and a temporary state of 
emergency was declared.   
Since the internet was introduced in the country in 1993, the Egyptian government has invested in 
information and communications technology (ICT) infrastructure as part of its strategy to boost the 
economy and create jobs. Until 2008, authorities showed a relaxed attitude toward internet use 
and did not censor websites or use high-end technologies to monitor discussions. However, with 
the rise of online campaigns to expose government fraud, document acts of police brutality, and 
call for large-scale protests, the government began to change its stance. Between 2008 and 2011, 
state police admitted to engaging in surveillance, online censorship, and cyberattacks – especially 
against sites related to the Muslim Brotherhood and other opposition movements.
1
The significant role of ICTs in the 2011 protests that toppled the 30-year regime of President Hosni 
Mubarak led some to label the event as the Facebook
2
or Twitter revolution.
3
After the Supreme 
Council of Armed Forces (SCAF) took control of the government, the  military administration 
maintained  many  of  its  predecessor’s  tactics  by  keeping  mobile  phones,  social  media,  and 
opposition  activists  under  vigorous  surveillance.  Even  as  several  activists  and  bloggers  were 
intimidated, beaten, or tried in military courts for “insulting the military power” or “disturbing 
social  peace,”  social  networks  continued  to  grow  as  a  democratizing  tool.  Online,  Egyptians 
launched debates about the fate of their emerging democracy and exerted pressure on SCAF to end 
1
 Galal Amin, Whatever happened to the Egyptian Revolution, Cairo: Al Shorook, 2013. 
2
 Abigail Hauslohner, “Is Egypt About to Have a Facebook Revolution,” Time, January 24, 2011, 
http://www.nbcnews.com/technology/jon‐stewart‐questions‐egypts‐twitter‐revolution‐125446.  
3
 Helen A.S. Popkin, “Jon Stewart questions Egypt’s ‘Twitter revolution’,” NBC News, January 28, 2011, 
http://www.nbcnews.com/technology/jon‐stewart‐questions‐egypts‐twitter‐revolution‐125446.  
I
NTRODUCTION
E
DITOR
N
OTE ON 
R
ECENT 
D
EVELOPMENTS
243
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
E
GYPT
decades under emergency rule. On May 31, 2012, the state of emergency was finally lifted
4
and 
one month later, power was officially handed over to a civilian government in a controversial 
election that pitted a former Mubarak official with an Islamist candidate.
5
After the election of President Mohammed Morsi, a candidate from the Muslim Brotherhood’s 
Freedom and Justice Party, Egypt has failed to make any gains in internet freedom. The passage of a 
new constitution did not allay concerns over threats to free speech and a record number of citizens 
were prosecuted for insulting the president. The rise of Islamist forces has also contributed to an 
increase  in  online  blasphemy  cases  being  tried  in  Egyptian  courts,  resulting  in  several  users 
receiving jail sentences. Countless other web activists and social media users have been harassed and 
detained. Police authorities and Muslim Brotherhood thugs engaged in extralegal violence against 
liberal activists and revolutionary youths who voice dissent online. Finally, distrust between the 
military and the Muslim Brotherhood led the latter to seek Iranian assistance in the development of 
parallel security and intelligence arms outside of the existing military-controlled structure. Despite 
these obstacles, online journalists and commentators have continued their dynamic role, pushing 
the  boundaries  of  free  speech  and  protesting  against  the  undemocratic  actions  of  the  civilian 
president.  
The development of Egypt’s ICT sector has been a strategic priority since 1999, when former 
president Mubarak created the Ministry of Communications and Information Technology (MCIT) 
to lead Egypt’s transition into the information age.
6
Since then, ICT use has increased rapidly, with 
internet penetration growing from 16 percent in 2007 to 44.1 percent in 2012.
Mobile internet, 
either using smartphones or USB modems, accounts for roughly 44 percent of all internet use, with 
ADSL use at around 38 percent. Egypt’s mobile phone penetration rate was 113.2 percent in the 
first quarter of 2013, amounting to over 94 million mobile subscriptions.
8
Although these figures are promising, there are a number of obstacles hindering access to ICTs, 
including an adult literacy rate of only 72 percent,
9
poor telecommunications infrastructure in rural 
areas and urban slums, and flagging economic conditions. Moreover, ICTs and online culture are 
often viewed with suspicion and women’s access to technology has become a growing concern after 
4
 “Egypt state of emergency lifted after 31 years,” BBC News, May 31 2012, http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world‐middle‐east‐
18283635.  
5
 Osman El Sharnoubi, “Egypt’s President Morsi in power: A timeline (Part I),” AhramOnline, June 28 2013, 
http://english.ahram.org.eg/News/74427.aspx.  
6
 “Historical Perspective,” Ministry of Information and Communication Technologies, Accessed April 16, 2013, 
http://www.mcit.gov.eg/TeleCommunications/Historical_Prespective.   
7
 “Percentage of Individuals Using the Internet” and “Mobile‐cellular subscriptions,” International Telecommunications Union, 
accessed July 23 2013, http://www.itu.int/en/ITU‐D/Statistics/Pages/stat/default.aspx.  
8
 Ministry of Information and Communication Technologies, “Information and Communications Technology Indicators” March 
2013, available at http://mcit.gov.eg/Indicators/indicators.aspx, accessed July 23 2013. 
9
 United Nations Development Program, “Egypt, Country Profile: Human Development Indicators,” accessed July 23, 2013, 
http://hdrstats.undp.org/en/countries/profiles/EGY.html.  
O
BSTACLES TO 
A
CCESS
244
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested