download pdf file from folder in asp.net c# : Adding metadata to pdf software application cloud windows html azure class FOTN%202013_Full%20Report_028-part1530

F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
E
THIOPIA
Ethiopian journalists work for both domestic print media and overseas online outlets as this could 
draw repercussions, and many bloggers publish anonymously to avoid reprisals.
61
Over the past two years, Facebook has become one of the most popular mediums through which 
Ethiopians share and consume information, with the country’s Facebook penetration exceeding its 
rate of internet penetration due to increasing access via mobile phones.
62
Social media websites 
have also become significant platforms for political deliberation and social justice campaigns. For 
example, in November 2012 a group of young Ethiopian bloggers and activists based in Addis 
Ababa launched a Facebook and Twitter campaign to demand that the government respect the 
fundamental freedoms enshrined in the Ethiopian Constitution,
63
though the campaign ultimately 
fell on deaf ears. Overall, many civil society groups based in the country are wary of mobilizing 
against the government, and calls for protest come mostly from the Ethiopian diaspora rather than 
from local activists who fear the government’s tendency toward violent crackdowns against protest 
movements.  
During  the  coverage  period,  the  Ethiopian  government’s  already  limited  space  for  online 
expression continued to deteriorate alongside its poor treatment of journalists. In 2012, repression 
against bloggers and ICT users increased, with several arrests and at least one prosecution reported. 
The Telecom Fraud Offences law enacted in September 2012 toughened the ban on advanced 
internet applications and established criminal liability for certain types of content communicated 
electronically.  Furthermore,  monitoring  of  online  activity  and  interception  of  digital 
communications intensified, with the deployment of FinFisher surveillance technology against users 
confirmed in early 2013. 
Constitutional  provisions  guarantee  freedom  of  expression  and  media  freedom  in  Ethiopia.
64
Nevertheless, in  recent  years the  government has adopted problematic laws  that restrict free 
expression.
65
For one, the 2008 Mass Media and Freedom of Information Proclamation includes a 
clause that permits only Ethiopian nationals to establish mass media outlets. The media law also 
prescribes crippling fines, licensing restrictions for establishing a media outlet, and powers allowing 
the government to impound periodical publications.
66
61
 Lemma, “Disconnected Ethiopian Netizens.”    
62
 Lemma, “Disconnected Ethiopian Netizens.”    
63
 Endalk, “Movement to ‘Respect the Constitution’ in Ethiopia,” Global Voices, November 11, 2012, 
http://globalvoicesonline.org/2012/12/11/movement‐to‐respect‐the‐constitution‐in‐ethiopia/.  
64
 “Constitution of the Federal Democratic Republic of Ethiopia, Article 29,” Parliament of the Federal Democratic Republic of 
Ethiopia, accessed August 24, 2010, http://www.ethiopar.net/
65
 Human Rights Watch, Analysis of Ethiopia’s Draft Anti‐Terrorism Law (New York: Human Rights Watch, 2009), 
http://www.hrw.org/en/news/2009/06/30/analysis‐ethiopia‐s‐draft‐anti‐terrorism‐law.  
66
 “Freedom of the Mass Media and Access to Information Proclamation No. 590/2008,” Federal Negarit Gazeta No. 64, 
December 4, 2008. 
V
IOLATIONS OF 
U
SER 
R
IGHTS
275
Adding metadata to pdf - add, remove, update PDF metadata in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Allow C# Developers to Read, Add, Edit, Update and Delete PDF Metadata
adding metadata to pdf files; add metadata to pdf programmatically
Adding metadata to pdf - VB.NET PDF metadata library: add, remove, update PDF metadata in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Enable VB.NET Users to Read, Write, Edit, Delete and Update PDF Document Metadata
remove metadata from pdf online; read pdf metadata java
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
E
THIOPIA
In 2012, specific legal restrictions on ICT use and provision were enacted with the passage of the 
Telecom Fraud Offences law in September,
67
which revised a 2002 law that had placed bans on 
certain  advanced  communication  applications,  such  as  Voice  over  Internet  Protocol  (VoIP)—
including Skype and Google Voice—call back services, and internet-based fax services.
68
Under 
the new law, the penalties under the preexisting ban were toughened, increasing the fine and 
maximum prison sentence from five to eight years for offending service providers and penalizing 
users with three months to two years in prison.
69
The government first instituted the ban on VoIP 
in 2002 after it gained popularity as a less expensive means of communication and began draining 
revenue from the traditional telephone business belonging to the state-owned Ethio Telecom.
70
Despite the restriction on paper, many cybercafés still offer the banned service with no reports of 
repercussions to date.  
The new law also added the requirement for all individuals to register their telecommunications 
equipment—including smart phones—with the government, which security officials enforce by 
confiscating ICT equipment when a registration permit cannot be furnished at security checkpoints. 
Most  alarmingly,  the  Telecom  Fraud  Offences  law  extended  the  2009  Anti-Terrorism 
Proclamation and 2004 Criminal Code to electronic communications.
71
Under the anti-terrorism 
legislation, the publication of a statement that is understood as a direct or indirect encouragement 
of  terrorism,  broadly  defined,  is  punishable  with  up to  20  years in  prison.
72
Meanwhile, the 
criminal code holds any “author, originator or publisher” criminally liable for content allegedly 
linked to offenses such as treason, espionage, or incitement, which carries with it the penalty of up 
to life imprisonment or death.
73
The criminal code also penalizes the publication of a “false rumor” 
with up to three years in prison.
74
In July 2012, the criminal code was applied to digital communication under the Telecom Fraud 
Offences law for the first time when Ethiopian Muslim Jemal Kedir was found guilty on charges of 
spreading  false  rumors  and  fomenting  hatred  through  text  messages.  Comprised  of  various 
statements protesting against police mistreatment of the Muslim community, the text messages 
were used as evidence against Kedir in court, leading to a one-year prison sentence.
75
67
 “A Proclamation on Telecom Fraud Offence,” Federal Negarit Gazeta No. 61, September 4, 2012, 
http://www.abyssinialaw.com/uploads/761.pdf
68
 Ethiopian Telecommunication Agency, “Telecommunication Proclamation No. 281/2002, Article 2(11) and 2(12),” July 2, 
2002, accessed July 25, 2012, http://www.eta.gov.et/Scan/Telecom%20Proc%20281_2002%20(amendment)%20NG.pdf. As an 
amendment to article 24 of the Proclamation, the Sub‐Article (3) specifically states, “The use or provision of voice 
communication or fax services through the internet are prohibited” (page 1782).   
69
 “A Proclamation on Telecom Fraud Offence.”   
70
 Groum Abate, “Internet Cafes Start Registering Users,” Capital, December 25, 2006, 
http://www.capitalethiopia.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=259:internet‐cafes‐start‐registering‐users‐
&catid=12:local‐news&Itemid=4.  
71
 Article 19, “Ethiopia: Proclamation on Telecom Fraud Offences.”. 
72
 “Anti‐Terrorism Proclamation No. 652/2009,” Federal Negarit Gazeta No. 57, August 28, 2009. 
73
 International Labour Organization, “The Criminal Code of the Federal Democratic Republic of Ethiopia, Proclamation No. 
414/2004, Article 44,” http://www.ilo.org/dyn/natlex/docs/ELECTRONIC/70993/75092/F1429731028/ETH70993.pdf
74
 “The Criminal Code of the Federal Democratic Republic of Ethiopia.”  
75
 “Ethiopian Man Jailed for One Year for Inciting Public Disorder Using Text Messages,” Sodere, October 1, 2012, 
http://sodere.com/profiles/blogs/ethiopian‐man‐jailed‐for‐one‐year‐for‐inciting‐public‐disorder.  
276
VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
adding password, digital signatures and redaction feature. Various of PDF text and images processing features for VB.NET project. Multiple metadata types of PDF
change pdf metadata; remove pdf metadata
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Support adding PDF page number. Offer PDF page break inserting function. DLLs for Adding Page into PDF Document in VB.NET Class. Add necessary references:
batch pdf metadata; embed metadata in pdf
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
E
THIOPIA
Also in July 2012, the well-known dissident blogger Eskinder Nega was found guilty under the 
anti-terrorism law and sentenced to 18 years in prison for his alleged links to a terrorist group.
76
Such trumped-up charges were based on an online column Nega had published that criticized the 
government’s use of the Anti-Terrorism Proclamation to silence political dissent and called for 
greater political freedom in Ethiopia, which led to his arrest in September 2011.
77
Nega appealed 
the verdict at the Federal Supreme Court in early 2013,
78
but his 18-year sentence was upheld on 
May 2, 2013 amid global observance of World Press Freedom Day.
79
In  another  incident  in  April  2013,  a  student  at  the  Addis  Ababa  University’s  Information 
Technology Department was  arrested  and  charged  with criminal  defamation  for  his  Facebook 
activity. The 21-year-old, Manyazewal Eshetu, was detained from his home in Addis Ababa after he 
had posted a comment on his Facebook page that criticized the “rampant corruption” of another 
local university in Arba Minch town, where he was transported after his arrest. At the end of the 
coverage period, he remained in prison and had not been prosecuted.
80
Given the high degree of online repression in Ethiopia, some political commentators use proxy 
servers and anonymizing tools to hide their identities when publishing online and to circumvent 
filtering, though the ability to communicate anonymously has become more difficult in the past 
year. As discussed above, the Tor Network anonymizing tool was blocked in May 2012, confirming 
that the government has deployed deep-packet inspection technology, and Google searches of the 
term “proxy” mysteriously yield no results (see “Limits on Content”).  
Anonymity is further compromised by SIM card registration requirements, which involve the need 
for  consumers  to  provide  their full names, addresses, and government-issued identification 
numbers upon the purchase of a mobile phone. Internet subscribers are also required to register 
their personal details, including their home address, with the government. In early 2013, an insider 
leaked worrying details of potential government efforts to draft legislation that seeks to mandate 
real-name registration for all internet use in Ethiopia.
81
Government  surveillance  of  online  and  mobile  phone  communications  is  a  major  concern  in 
Ethiopia,  and  evidence  is  emerging  regarding  the  scale  of  such  practices.  Increasing  Chinese 
investment in Ethiopia’s telecommunications sector over the past few years has led to reports of the 
government  using  Chinese  technology  to  monitor  phone  lines  and  various  types  of  online 
76
 Nega is also the 2011 recipient of the PEN/Barbara Goldsmith Freedom to Write Award. Sarah Hoffman, “That Bravest and 
Most Admirable of Writers: PEN Salutes Eskinder Nega,” PEN American Center (blog), April 13, 2012, 
http://www.pen.org/blog/?p=11198. See also, Markos Lemma, “Ethiopia: Online Reactions to Prison Sentence for Dissident 
Blogger,” Global Voices, July 15, 2012, http://globalvoicesonline.org/2012/07/15/ethiopia‐online‐reactions‐to‐prison‐sentence‐
for‐dissident‐blogger/.  
77
 Endalk, “Ethiopia: Freedom of Expression in Jeopardy,” Global Voices, February 3, 2012, 
http://advocacy.globalvoicesonline.org/2012/02/03/ethiopia‐freedom‐of‐expression‐in‐jeopardy/
78
 “Ethiopia Delays Appeal of Jailed Blogger,” Africa Review, December 19, 2012, http://www.africareview.com/News/Ethiopia‐
delays‐appeal‐of‐jailed‐blogger/‐/979180/1647624/‐/mm610r/‐/index.html.  
79
 “Eskinder Nega’s 18‐Year Sentence Upheld,” PEN America Blog, May 13, 2013, http://worldvoices.pen.org/rapid‐
action/2013/05/14/eskinder‐negas‐18‐year‐sentence‐upheld‐four‐other‐journalists‐remain 
80
 “Student Arrested for Facebook Post,” Addis Journal, April 3, 2013, http://arefe.wordpress.com/2013/04/03/student‐
arrested‐for‐facebook‐post/.  
81
 Interview conducted by  Freedom House consultant.. 
277
C# PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file for C#
Multiple metadata types of PDF file can be easily added and processed in C#.NET Class. Capable of adding PDF file navigation features to your C# program.
preview edit pdf metadata; metadata in pdf documents
C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
Supports adding text to PDF in preview without adobe reader installed in ASP.NET. Powerful .NET PDF edit control allows modify existing scanned PDF text.
remove pdf metadata online; acrobat pdf additional metadata
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
E
THIOPIA
communication.
82
Fears of direct  assistance from China were  affirmed in June 2012 when the 
Ethiopian government openly held an “Internet Management” media workshop with support from 
the Chinese Communist Party,
83
and spearheaded by a professor from the Chinese Leadership 
Academy.
84
According to an official government press release, the main purpose of the workshop 
was  to learn about China’s  experience  regarding  “mass media capacity building,”  “mass media 
institution management,” and “internet management.”  
In August 2012, Ethiopia was reported to be among a group of 10 countries that possesses the 
commercial spyware toolkit FinFisher,
85
a device that can secretly monitor computers by turning 
on webcams, record everything a user types with a key logger, and intercept Skype calls. A leaked 
document  confirmed  that  the  UK-based  company,  Gamma  International,  had  provided  Ethio 
Telecom with the FinFisher surveillance toolkit at some point between April and July 2012.
86
In 
addition, research conducted by Citizen Lab in March 2013 worryingly found evidence of an Ethio 
Telecom-initiated FinSpy campaign launched against users that employed pictures of the opposition 
group, Ginbot 7, as bait.
87
The Information Network Security Agency (INSA)—which is involved 
in surveillance as well as content blocking
88
—has also reportedly tested tools that can enable its 
officials to mask their identities to acquire personal information such as usernames and passwords, 
according to internal sources working in the industry.
89
In  a  series  of  trials of  journalists and bloggers  throughout  2012 and  early  2013,  government 
prosecutors have presented e-mails and phone calls intercepted from journalists as evidence.
90
For 
example, on January 8, 2013 the Ethiopian Court of Cassation rejected an appeal for acquittal filed 
by the award-winning journalist Reeyot Alemu, citing the e-mails she had received from opposition 
discussion groups as justification.
91
Reports and photos she had sent to the U.S.-based opposition 
news site, Ethiopian Review, were also used against her. Alemu was imprisoned in June 2011 on a 
slew of charges under the anti-terrorism law and sentenced to 14 years’ imprisonment in January 
82
 Helen Epstein, “Cruel Ethiopia,” New York Review of Books, May 13, 2010, 
http://www.nybooks.com/articles/archives/2010/may/13/cruel‐ethiopia/.  
83
 Ethiopian Peoples’ Revolutionary Democratic Front “Workshop Conducted,” , press release, June 3, 2012, 
http://www.eprdf.org.et/web/guest/news/‐/asset_publisher/c0F7/content/3‐june‐2012‐26‐2004
84
 Patrick Roanhouse, “Ethiopian Government Outlaws VOIP, 15‐year Prison Sentences Possible,” Betanews, June 15, 2012, 
http://betanews.com/2012/06/15/ethiopian‐government‐outlaws‐voip‐15‐year‐prison‐sentences‐possible/.  
85
 Fahmida Y. Rashid, “FinFisher ‘Lawful Interception’ Spyware Found in Ten Countries, Including the U.S.,” Security Week, 
August 8, 2012, http://www.securityweek.com/finfisher‐lawful‐interception‐spyware‐found‐ten‐countries‐including‐us.  
86
 The document was seen by Freedom House consultant. Morgan Marquis‐Boire et al., “You Only Click Twice: FinFisher’s Global 
Proliferation,” Citizen Lab (University of Toronto), March 13, 2013, https://citizenlab.org/2013/03/you‐only‐click‐twice‐
finfishers‐global‐proliferation‐2/
87
 Marquis‐Boire, “You Only Click Twice.” . 
88
 “Mission Statement,” Information Network Security Agency of Ethiopia, accessed June 2, 2010, 
http://www.insa.gov.et/INSA/faces/welcomeJSF.jsp.  
89
 Interview with individuals working in the technology and security sector in Ethiopia, who requested to remain anonymous, 
January 2012. 
90
  Committee to Protect Journalists, “Ethiopian Blogger, Journalists Convicted of Terrorism,” January 19, 2012, 
http://cpj.org/2012/01/three‐journalists‐convicted‐on‐terrorism‐charges‐i.php
91
 “Cassation Bench Rejects Reeyot’s Final Plea,” Walta Info, January 8, 2012, 
http://www.waltainfo.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=6944:cassation‐bench‐rejects‐reeyots‐final‐
plea&catid=52:national‐news&Itemid=291.  
278
VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb
VB.NET PDF - Insert Text to PDF Document in VB.NET. Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program.
pdf xmp metadata viewer; edit multiple pdf metadata
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
application? To help you solve this technical problem, we provide this C#.NET PDF image adding control, XDoc.PDF for .NET. Similar
view pdf metadata in explorer; search pdf metadata
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
E
THIOPIA
2012. An appeal court reduced her sentence to five years in August 2012; however, because the 
Court of Cassation is the last resort for legal appeals, no further recourse is available for acquittal.
92
While the government’s stronghold over the Ethiopian ICT sector enables it to proactively monitor 
users, its access to user activity and information is less direct at cybercafes. For a period following 
the 2005 elections, cybercafe owners were required to keep a register of their clients, but this has 
not been enforced since mid-2010. Nevertheless, there are strong suspicions that cybercafes are 
required to  install  software  to monitor  user  activity,  which arose  after  a  few  incidents were 
reported of the authorities arresting users at internet cafes in 2011. The arrests were followed by 
government warnings that “visiting anti-peace websites using proxy servers is a crime.”
93
To date, cyberattacks and other forms of technical violence have not been a serious problem in 
Ethiopia, partly due to the limited number of users, though the tide may be turning. In March 
2013, the independent activist, Abrah Desta, reported via Twitter that his Facebook page was 
disabled for  an  unknown reason, which some  observers speculated was the result of criminal 
hacking.
94
Harassment and intimidation of bloggers and online journalists have also increased over 
the past couple of years. For example, independent bloggers have reported  instances of being 
summoned  by  the  authorities  to  receive  warnings  against  discussing  certain  topics  online. 
Fortunately, there have been no instances of violence against users to date.  
92
 Committee to Protect Journalists, “Ethiopian Judge Rejects Reeyot Alemu’s Final Appeal,” January 8, 2013, 
http://www.cpj.org/2013/01/ethiopian‐judge‐rejects‐reeyot‐alemus‐final‐appeal.php.  
93
 “TPLF Regime Arresting Internet Café Users in Addis Ababa,” Ethiopian Review, August 12, 2011, 
http://www.ethiopianreview.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=2&t=30136
94
 Abraha Desta, Twitter Post,  March 20, 2013, 12:34am, https://twitter.com/AbrahaDesta/status/314278873334419456.  
279
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
By using reliable APIs, C# programmers are capable of adding and inserting (empty) PDF page or pages from various file formats, such as PDF, Tiff, Word, Excel
add metadata to pdf; pdf metadata
C# PDF Annotate Library: Draw, edit PDF annotation, markups in C#.
Provide users with examples for adding text box to PDF and edit font size and color in text box field in C#.NET program. C#.NET: Draw Markups on PDF File.
pdf xmp metadata; bulk edit pdf metadata
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
F
RANCE
F
RANCE
 Takedown requests received by Google have more than doubled over the past year,
mainly over defamatory content (see L
IMITS ON 
C
ONTENT
).
 Controversial clauses within the HADOPI, LOPPSI 2, and LCEN laws provoked the
ire  of  internet  advocates  in  the  country,  mainly  over  fears  of  disproportionate
punishments  for  copyright  violators,  overreaching  administrative  censorship,  and
threats to privacy (see L
IMITS ON 
C
ONTENT 
and
V
IOLATIONS OF 
U
SER 
R
IGHTS
).
 French  intelligence  agents  attempted  to  coerce  a  volunteer  Wikipedia  editor  into
deleting an entry on a French military installation, threatening him with arrest and
prosecution if he failed to comply (see V
IOLATIONS OF 
U
SER 
R
IGHTS
).
2012 
2013 
I
NTERNET 
F
REEDOM 
S
TATUS
N
/
A
F
REE
Obstacles to Access (0-25) 
n/a 
Limits on Content (0-35) 
n/a 
Violations of User Rights (0-40) 
n/a  12 
Total (0-100) 
n/a 
20 
*0=most free, 100=least free
e
P
OPULATION
63.6 million
I
NTERNET 
P
ENETRATION 
2012: 
83 percent
S
OCIAL 
M
EDIA
/ICT
A
PPS 
B
LOCKED
No
P
OLITICAL
/S
OCIAL 
C
ONTENT 
B
LOCKED
No
B
LOGGERS
/ICT
U
SERS 
A
RRESTED
No
P
RESS 
F
REEDOM 
2013
S
TATUS
Free
K
EY 
D
EVELOPMENTS
:
M
AY 
2012
A
PRIL 
2013 
280
VB.NET PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for vb.net, ASP.NET
page modifying page, you will find detailed guidance on creating, loading, merge and splitting PDF pages and Files, adding a page into PDF document, deleting
edit pdf metadata acrobat; online pdf metadata viewer
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
Able to perform PDF file password adding, deleting and changing in Visual Studio .NET project use C# source code in .NET class. Allow
pdf metadata extract; remove metadata from pdf acrobat
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
F
RANCE
This report covers events between May 1, 2012 and April 30, 2013. On May 13, 2013, the 
government released a report on French cultural policy in the digital era drafted by the former media 
executive  Pierre  Lescure.  Most  significantly,  the  report  has  led  to  the  abolishment  of  internet 
suspensions for users who are found guilty of violating copyright law.
1
Additional proposals, including 
the reduction of user fines from €1,500 to €60 ($2,000 to $80) and the transferring of many 
competencies away from the High Authority for the Distribution of Works and the Protection of Rights 
on the Internet (HADOPI), were approved by the Minister for Culture and Communications.
2
In addition, in June 2013, French daily newspaper Le Monde released new information concerning the 
existence of a secret surveillance program operated by the Directorate-General for External Security 
(DGSE),
3
a French intelligence agency.
4
The DGSE program allegedly collects and stores metadata 
related to e-mails, phone calls, text messages, and online activity on servers based in central Paris and 
does  not  come  under  a  legal  framework,  unlike  the  highly-regulated  program  of  the  Central 
Directorate of Interior Intelligence (DCRI). Given that this surveillance has been operational during 
the period covered by this report, Freedom House has decided to include it in this edition of Freedom on 
the Net (see Violations of User Rights). 
France has a highly developed telecommunications infrastructure and a history of innovation in 
information  and  communications  technologies  (ICTs).
5
Starting  in  the  1970s,  France  began 
developing Teletex and Videotex technologies, leading to the introduction of the widely popular 
Videotex service Minitel in 1982, which was accessible through telephone lines. In many ways, 
Minitel predicted applications of the modern internet, such as travel reservations, online retail, 
mail, chat, and news. At its peak, Minitel had around nine million users, and hundreds of thousands 
continued to use the service, even after the World Wide Web was introduced in 1994. It was not 
until June 2012 that the Minitel service was discontinued, primarily due to the growth of the 
internet industry.
6
France’s current ICT market is open, highly competitive, and has benefitted 
from the privatization of the state-owned company France Telecom.  
1
 Liberation, “Aurelie Filippetti announces the end of the Hadopi suspension”, May 20, 2013, Accessed July 05, 2013, 
http://www.liberation.fr/medias/2013/05/20/hadopi‐aurelie‐filippetti‐decrete‐la‐fin‐de‐la‐coupure_904306.  
2
 Guerric Poncet, “Vidéo. Rapport Lescure: la Hadopi est morte, vive la Hadopi! [Lescure Report: Hadopi is dead, long live 
Hadopi!],” LePoint.fr, May 15, 2013, http://www.lepoint.fr/chroniqueurs‐du‐point/guerric‐poncet/rapport‐lescure‐l‐hadopi‐est‐
morte‐vive‐l‐hadopi‐13‐05‐2013‐1666125_506.php.  
3
 Direction Générale de la Sécurité Extérieure, http://www.defense.gouv.fr/english/dgse.  
4
 “France ‘has vast data surveillance’ – Le Monde report,” BBC News, July 4, 2013, http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world‐europe‐
23178284.  
5
 Jonathan Gregson, “French infrastructure takes some beating,” Wall Street Journal, July 5, 2010, accessed April 23, 2013, 
http://online.wsj.com/ad/article/france‐infrastructure.  
6
 John Lichfield, “How France fell out of love with Minitel,” The Independent, June 9, 2012, 
http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/europe/how‐france‐fell‐out‐of‐love‐with‐minitel‐7831816.html.  
I
NTRODUCTION
E
DITOR
N
OTE ON 
R
ECENT 
D
EVELOPMENTS
281
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
F
RANCE
While France has traditionally maintained a relatively open and accessible internet, several actions 
on the part of successive administrations have raised concerns from internet freedom groups and 
free speech activists. Hate speech, defamation, copyright, and privacy are highly contentious issues 
relevant to French cyberspace. On several occasions over the past years, politicians have proposed 
highly restrictive measures, such as the imprisonment of frequent visitors to extremist websites and 
the mandatory registration of online news editors. Most recently, a government minister suggested 
that the state could seek to prosecute Twitter for allowing the hate speech to be posted on the site. 
A bill was also drafted that would ban the online sale of goods below market prices, thereby hurting 
e-commerce in a bid to protect brick and mortar shops.
7
At the European Union level, the Anti-
Counterfeiting Trade Agreement (ACTA) was rejected by members of the European Parliament in 
July  2012  in  a  move  that  was  celebrated  by  internet  freedom  groups.  While  no  users  were 
sentenced to prison terms over the past year, French intelligence agents threatened a Wikipedia 
volunteer to delete a post that allegedly raised national security concerns. Nonetheless, the French 
government only blocks non-political content such as child pornography and hate speech, and a high 
percentage of French citizens have taken up online tools to receive their news, engage in social 
networking, and organize demonstrations. 
In a positive development, the most controversial provision of the French anti-piracy law, referred 
to as the “HADOPI law” after the agency tasked with its implementation, was abolished in July 
2013 and replaced with a series of automatic fines for the offenders. The law had been criticized by 
various civil society  organizations and  international bodies for its “three strikes”  provision that 
required internet service providers (ISPs) to disconnect users from the internet for a period of two 
to twelve months when found to repeatedly engage in piracy. Nonetheless, doubts remain over the 
government’s policy to instigate legal proceedings against users for copyright infringement.  
Since 2009, the French government has been committed to providing widespread access to high-
speed broadband and has promised to achieve universal coverage by 2025.
8
As a part of this plan, in 
February 2013 Alcatel-Lucent and Orange (France Telecom) announced the deployment of the 
world’s most powerful broadband infrastructure, an optical-link, 400 Gbps line between Paris and 
Lyon.
9
France had an internet penetration rate of 83 percent at the end of 2012, up from 66 
percent in 2007.
10
Fixed broadband use has also increased during this time, from 25.5 percent to 
37.8 percent.
11
Regionally, internet use ranges from 84.4 percent in the Paris area to 65 percent in 
7
 Guillaume Champeau, “Sell cheaper on the web soon to be forbidden” (translated), April 05 2013, Accessed April 19 2013, 
http://www.numerama.com/magazine/25593‐vendre‐ses‐produits‐moins‐cher‐sur‐internet‐bientot‐interdit.html.  
8
 Jonathan Gregson, “French infrastructure takes some beating,” Wall Street Journal, July 5, 2010, accessed April 23, 2013, 
http://online.wsj.com/ad/article/france‐infrastructure.  
9
 Bernhard Warner, “Alcatel‐Lucent Unveils World's Most Powerful Broadband Infrastructure,” Business Week, February 15, 
2013, accessed April 23, 2013, http://www.businessweek.com/articles/2013‐02‐15/alcatel‐lucent‐unveils‐worlds‐most‐
powerful‐broadband‐infrastructure.  
10
 “Percentage of Individuals Using the Internet – 2000‐2012,” International Telecommunication Union, accessed June 29, 2013, 
http://www.itu.int/en/ITU‐D/Statistics/Pages/stat/default.aspx
11
 “Fixed (wired) broadband subscriptions,” 2000‐2012,” International Telecommunication Union, accessed June 29, 2013, 
http://www.itu.int/en/ITU‐D/Statistics/Pages/stat/default.aspx.  
O
BSTACLES TO 
A
CCESS
282
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
F
RANCE
the northwest of France.
12
Most at-home users have access to broadband connections, while the 
remaining households are connected either through dial-up or satellite services, usually due to their 
rural locations.
13
Nonetheless, some 9.5 million people did not use the internet in 2012, either due 
to obstacles to access, or simply out of personal choice.
14
As French statisticians do not record 
information related to race, there is no government data relating to internet use according to 
ethnicity.
15
On a positive note, there is little or no gender gap when it comes to internet access.
16
The average monthly cost of broadband internet access in France is approximately €33 ($45), for 
both ADSL
17
and fiber-optic connections.
18
Considering the average monthly income is €2,410 
($3,257),
19
this makes internet access fairly affordable for a large percentage of the population.
20
Companies such as Free Telecom also offer cheap internet access and mobile contracts through 
combination deals.  
There  were  70.9  million  mobile contracts  in  use in  France  as of  March  2013, representing  a 
penetration rate of 108.2 percent.
21
Over 23 million people use their mobile devices to access the 
internet,
22
mostly  in  addition  to  a  household  connection.
23
The internet  backbone  consists  of 
several interconnected networks run by ISPs and shared through peering or transit agreements. As 
such, there is no central internet backbone and internet service providers (ISPs) are not required to 
lease bandwidth from a monopoly holder. 
There are no significant hurdles to prevent diverse business entities from providing access to digital 
technologies  in  France.  The  main  ISPs  are  Orange,  Free,  SFR,  Bouygues  Telecom,  and 
Numericable, with around 40 smaller private and non-profit ISPs. Apart from Numericable, these 
12
 Frantz Grenier, “Internet in the Different Regions of France” (translated), March 21, 2013, accessed April 19 2013, 
http://www.journaldunet.com/ebusiness/le‐net/nombre‐d‐internautes‐en‐france‐par‐region.shtml
13
 Ariase, “ADSL and Broadband Access in France” (translated), accessed April 19, 2013, http://www.ariase.com/fr/haut‐
debit/index.html
14
 Nil Sanyas, “the unplugged” (translated), September 12 2012, Accessed April 14 2013, 
http://www.pcinpact.com/news/73774‐la‐france‐compte‐95‐millions‐deconnectes‐et‐17‐million‐assument.htm.  
15
 Patrick Simon, “The Choice of Ignorance: The Debate on Ethnic and Racial Statistics in France,”  French Politics, Culture & 
Society, Vol. 26, No. 1, Spring 2008, accessed April 23, 2013, 
http://www.academia.edu/573214/The_choice_of_ignorance._The_debate_on_ethnic_and_racial_statistics_in_France.  
16
 “France,” New Media Trend Watch, accessed April 23, 2013, http://www.newmediatrendwatch.com/markets‐by‐country/10‐
europe/52‐france?start=1.  
17
 Ariase, “Comparatifs (Comparatives)”, accessed April 23, 2013, http://www.ariase.com/fr/comparatifs/adsl.html.  
18
 Ariase, “Comparatifs (Comparatives)”, accessed April 23, 2013, http://www.ariase.com/fr/comparatifs/fibre‐optique.html.  
19
 Le Parisien, “Medium monthly income reaches 2410 euros” (translated), March 13 2013, Accessed April 13 2013, 
http://www.leparisien.fr/economie/votre‐argent/le‐salaire‐moyen‐atteint‐2‐410‐euros‐bruts‐mensuels‐13‐03‐2013‐
2637973.php.  
20
 Similarly, the median monthly salary is €1,675. 
21
 ARCEP, “Mobile contracts in France in 2012,” February 7, 2013, http://www.arcep.fr/index.php?id=35, accessed April 19, 
2013. 
22
 Mediametrie, “Internet everywhere” (translated), February 27 2013, Accessed April 19, 
http://www.mediametrie.fr/internet/communiques/l‐annee‐internet‐2012‐l‐internet‐sur‐tous‐les‐ecrans‐tous‐les‐reseaux‐au‐
plus‐pres‐de‐l‐internaute.php?id=818#.UXvC8MV8NNE, and Alexandra Bellamy, “French people loves their smartphones and 
tablets” (translated), LesNumeriques.fr, December 11 2012, Accessed April 19 2013, http://www.lesnumeriques.com/france‐
amoureuse‐smartphones‐tablettes‐n27347.html.  
23
 Ipsos MediaCT, “PCs, smartphones, tablets: cumulative and complementary use” (translated), September 22, 2011, accessed 
April 23, 2013, http://www.ipsos.fr/ipsos‐mediact/actualites/2011‐09‐22‐pc‐smartphones‐tablettes‐usages‐se‐cumulent‐et‐se‐
completent.  
283
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
F
RANCE
ISPs are also the four main mobile phone operators and work in conjunction with some 40 mobile 
virtual network operators (MVNOs). France Telecom is the formerly state-owned company that 
has since been privatized and renamed “Orange.”
24
The government still directly owns 13.5 percent 
of shares in the company, with a further 13.5 percent owned by a sovereign wealth operated by the 
state.
25
“Free” is a newcomer in the mobile market—its 3G license was awarded by the French 
regulatory authority  in  December  2009—and has  quickly picked up  market  share  through  an 
aggressive price war.  
The telecommunications industry in France is regulated by the Regulatory Authority for Electronic 
and Postal Communication (ARCEP),
26
while competition is regulated by France’s Competition 
Authority and, more broadly, by the European Commission (EC).
27
The commissioner of ARCEP 
is  appointed  by  the  government,  though  as  an  EU  member  state,  France  must  ensure  the 
independence  of  its  national  telecommunications  regulator.  Given  that  the  French  state  is  a 
shareholder in Orange, the country’s leading telecommunications company, the EC stated that it 
would closely monitor the situation in France to ensure that European regulations were being 
met.
28
The EC has previously stepped in when the independence of national telecommunications 
regulators seemed under threat, notably in Romania, Latvia, Lithuania, and Slovenia.
29
Despite 
these warnings, ARCEP remains an independent and impartial body and decisions made by the 
regulator are usually seen as fair.  
ARCEP  agreed  with  the  opinion  of  the  Competition  Authority  when  asked  by  the  French 
government to consider the fairness of the terms governing mobile network sharing and national 
data roaming. The regulator concluded that “infrastructure-based competition is vital to ensuring a 
healthy state of competition and strong capital investment” and that these two  issues are  “not 
incompatible  with  this  goal  of  a  competitive  marketplace.”
30
ARCEP  also  placed  Free  under 
investigation after the ISP released a firmware update that included an “ad-blocker” function to 
remove  advertisements  from  appearing  on  websites.
31
Executives  at  Free  were  reportedly 
attempting to force Google to compensate the ISP for the high levels of data traffic coming from 
YouTube and other Google sites, similar to an arrangement the American company had made with 
24
 “France Telecom becomes Orange,” Orange, July 1, 2013, http://www.orange.com/en/group/France‐Telecom‐becomes‐
Orange.  
25
 According to Cofisem, as of July 2013, the major shareholders in Orange were Fonds Stratégique d'Investissement (13.5%), 
French State (13.45%), Employees (4.81%), and company‐owned shares (0.58%). 67.66% are owned by “other shareholders.” 
“Orange – European Equities,” NYSE Euronext, accessed July 29, 2013, 
https://europeanequities.nyx.com/en/products/equities/FR0000133308‐XPAR/company‐information.  
26
 “Autorité de Régulation des Communications Électroniques et des Poste,” http://www.arcep.fr/index.php?id=1&L=1.  
27
 “Autorité de la concurrence,” http://www.autoritedelaconcurrence.fr/user/index.php.  
28
 “ARCEP must remain independent vis‐a‐vis government – EC,” Telecompaper, January 14, 2011, accessed April 16th 2013, 
http://www.telecompaper.com/news/arcep‐must‐remain‐independent‐vis‐a‐vis‐government‐ec‐‐778936.  
29
 Arjan Geveke, “Improving Implementation by National Regulatory Authorities,” European Institute of Public Administration, 
2003, accessed April 24, 2013, http://aei.pitt.edu/2592/1/scop_3_3.pdf.  
30
 “ARCEP reviews the Competition Authority’s balanced opinion on the terms governing mobile network sharing and roaming,” 
ARCEP, March 11, 2013, accessed April 16th 2013, 
http://www.arcep.fr/index.php?id=8571&L=1&tx_gsactualite_pi1%5Buid%5D=1592&tx_gsactualite_pi1%5Bannee%5D=&tx_gs
actualite_pi1%5Btheme%5D=&tx_gsactualite_pi1%5Bmotscle%5D=&tx_gsactualite_pi1%5BbackID%5D=26&cHash=b419a25d8
87293a12673299e88aaa3d4.  
31
 Cyrus Farivar, “France’s second‐largest ISP deploys ad blocking via firmware update,” Ars Technica, January 3, 2013, 
http://arstechnica.com/business/2013/01/frances‐second‐largest‐isp‐deploys‐ad‐blocking‐via‐firmware‐update/.  
284
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested