download pdf file from folder in asp.net c# : Google search pdf metadata Library control component asp.net web page html mvc FOTN%202013_Full%20Report_032-part1535

F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
G
ERMANY
The German Basic Law guarantees freedom of expression and freedom of the media (Article 5) as 
well as the privacy of letters, posts, and telecommunications (Article 10). These articles generally 
safeguard offline as well as online communication. In addition, a groundbreaking 2008 ruling by the 
Federal Constitutional Court established a new fundamental right warranting the “confidentiality 
and  integrity  of  information  technology  systems”  grounded  in the general  right of personality 
guaranteed by Article 2 of the Basic Law.
94
These rights were contested in the political aftermath of the September 2001 terrorist attacks in the 
United  States  (cf.  the  2001  Act  for  Limiting  the  Secrecy  of  Letters,  the  Post,  and 
Telecommunications).
95
However, after several cases concerning the infringement of the rights of 
journalists, a Federal Constitutional Court ruling in February 2007 set a strong precedent for the 
protection of journalists’ sources.
96
On March 29, 2012, in response to this ruling, the Federal 
Parliament issued the Act on Strengthening Press Freedom (Gesetzes zur Stärkung der Pressefreiheit im 
Straf- und Strafprozessrecht, PrStG), which protects journalistic sources and establishes high barriers 
for searching and seizing journalists’ property.
97
In addition to the aforementioned rulings on the 
liability  privilege  of  providers,  these  developments  constitute  a  trend  of  strengthening  media 
freedom in Germany. In particular, the rulings of the Federal Constitutional Court continue to 
promote freedom of expression. 
Online journalists are generally granted the same rights and protections as journalists in the print or 
broadcast media. Although the functional boundary between journalists and bloggers is starting to 
blur, the German Federation of Journalists maintains professional boundaries by issuing press cards 
only to full-time journalists. Similarly, the German Code of Criminal Procedure grants the right to 
refuse testimony solely to individuals who have “professionally” participated in the production or 
dissemination of journalistic materials.
98
The German Criminal Code (StGB) includes a paragraph on “incitement to hatred” (§ 130 StGB), 
which penalizes calls for violent measures against minority groups and assaults on human dignity.
99
94
 BVerfG [Federal Constitutional Court], Provisions in the North‐Rhine Westphalia Constitution Protection Act 
(Verfassungsschutzgesetz Nordrhein‐Westfalen) on online searches and on the reconnaissance of the internet null and void, 
judgment of February 27, 2008, 1 BvR 370/07 Absatz‐Nr. (1 ‐ 267), 
http://www.bverfg.de/entscheidungen/rs20080227_1bvr037007.html; See also, Press release no. 22/2008, 
http://www.bundesverfassungsgericht.de/en/press/bvg08‐022en.html. For more background cf. Wiebke Abel/Burkhard 
Schaferr, “The German Constitutional Court on the Right in Confidentiality and Integrity of Information Technology Systems – a 
case report on BVerfG”, NJW 2008, 822”, 2009, 6:1 SCRIPTed 106, http://www.law.ed.ac.uk/ahrc/script‐ed/vol6‐1/abel.asp.  
95
 This Act enables secret services to intercept, monitor, and record private communications, including the surveillance of 
journalists under specific conditions. It also restricts journalistic privileges such as the right to refuse to give evidence. “Gesetz 
zur Beschränkung des Brief‐, Post‐ und Fernmeldegeheimnisses” [Law on the restriction of correspondence, posts and 
telecommunications secrecy], http://www.gesetze‐im‐internet.de/g10_2001/index.html
96
 BVerfG [Federal Constitutional Court], “Cicero‐Urteil,” judgment of February 27, 2007, 1 BvR 538/06, Absatz‐Nr. (1 ‐ 82), 
http://www.bverfg.de/entscheidungen/rs20070227_1bvr053806.html ; For the European context, see David Banisar, “Speaking 
of Terror: A Survey of the Effects of Counter‐terrorism Legislation on Freedom of the Media in Europe”, Council of Europe, 
2008, http://www.coe.int/t/dghl/standardsetting/media/Doc/SpeakingOfTerror_en.pdf
97
 Cf. the press release of the Federal Ministry of Justice, March 30, 2012: http://bit.ly/1bhKUOP
98
Code of Criminal Procedure (StPO), § 53 (1) 5, http://www.gesetze‐im‐internet.de/englisch_stpo/englisch_stpo.html#p0198.  
99
 Cf. fn. 54. 
315
Google search pdf metadata - add, remove, update PDF metadata in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Allow C# Developers to Read, Add, Edit, Update and Delete PDF Metadata
pdf metadata viewer online; adding metadata to pdf
Google search pdf metadata - VB.NET PDF metadata library: add, remove, update PDF metadata in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Enable VB.NET Users to Read, Write, Edit, Delete and Update PDF Document Metadata
pdf xmp metadata editor; batch pdf metadata
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
G
ERMANY
The German people mostly regard this provision as legitimate, particularly because it is generally 
applied in the context of holocaust denials.
100
Website owners or bloggers are not required to register with the government. However, due to 
clauses  in  both  the  Telemedia  Act  (Telemediengesetz,  TMG)  and  the  Interstate  Treaty  on 
Broadcasting (Rundfunkstaatsvertrag, RFStV), most  websites  and  blogs  need  to  have  an  imprint 
naming the person in charge and contact address. The anonymous use of e-mail services, online 
platforms, wireless internet access points, and public telephone booths are legal. Although the 
Federal  Minister  of  the  Interior  and  some  other  members  of  the  conservative  parties  have 
repeatedly expressed their disapproval of anonymity on the internet,
101
this situation is not likely to 
change. With explicit references to the constitution, several courts have repeatedly affirmed the 
right to anonymity and its  necessity for the exercise of the constitutional right to freedom  of 
expression.
102
The right of anonymity notwithstanding, the telecommunication act of 2004 stipulates that the 
purchase  of  SIM  cards  requires  registration,  including  the  purchaser’s  full  name,  address, 
international mobile subscriber identity (IMSI), and international mobile station equipment identity 
(IMEI) numbers if applicable.
103
In this way, the growing penetration of mobile internet threatens 
to further erode the possibility of anonymous communication.  
The use of proxy servers is common in Germany, but more for the purpose of circumventing 
copyright restrictions than to avoid censorship. There are no figures available for the extent of their 
use. 
Excessive interceptions by secret services formed the basis of a 2008 Federal Constitutional Court 
ruling, which established a new fundamental right warranting the “confidentiality and integrity of 
information technology systems.” The court held that preventive covert online searches are only 
permitted  “if factual indications  exist of a  concrete danger” that  threatens  “the life, limb,  and 
freedom of the individual” or “the basis or continued existence of the state or the basis of human 
existence.” The court also established that any covert infiltration of information technology systems 
requires a court order and that statutes permitting such infiltrations must “contain precautions in 
order to protect the core area of private life.”
104
Based on this Constitutional Court ruling, the 
100
 BVerfG, [Federal Constitutional Court] 1 BvR 2150/08 from November 4, 2009, Absatz‐Nr. (1 ‐ 110), 
http://www.bverfg.de/entscheidungen/rs20091104_1bvr215008.html ; See also the Press release no. 129/2009 of 17 
November 2009, Order of 4 November 2009 – 1 BvR 2150/08 – § 130.4 of the Criminal Code is compatible with Article 5.1 and 
5.2 of the Basic Law, http://www.bverfg.de/pressemitteilungen/bvg09‐129en.html . 
101
 Cf. Anna Sauerbrey, “Innenminister Friedrich will Blogger‐Anonymität aufheben” [Federal Minister of Interior wants to 
abolish anonymity of bloggers], Tagessspiel online, August 7, 2011, http://www.tagesspiegel.de/politik/internet‐innenminister‐
friedrich‐will‐blogger‐anonymitaet‐aufheben/4473060.html
102 
E.g. Oberlandesgericht (OLG) Hamm [German Federal Court of Appeals Hamm], File I‐3 U 196/10, August 3, 2011, 
http://www.justiz.nrw.de/nrwe/olgs/hamm/j2011/I_3_U_196_10beschluss20110803.html
103
 Telecommunications Act (TKG), § 111, http://www.bfdi.bund.de/EN/DataProtectionActs/Artikel/TelecommunicationsAct‐
TKG.pdf?__blob=publicationFile
104
 Bundesverfassungsgericht [Federal Constitutional Court], Provisions in the North‐Rhine Westphalia Constitution Protection 
Act (Verfassungsschutzgesetz Nordrhein‐Westfalen) on online searches and on the reconnaissance of the Internet null and void, 
judgment of February 27, 2008, 1 BvR 370/07; For more background cf. W Abel and B Schafer, “The German Constitutional 
316
C# PDF url edit Library: insert, remove PDF links in C#.net, ASP.
Help to extract and search url in PDF file. Program.RootPath + "\\" Output.pdf"; // Open a PDF file. String uri = @"http://www.google.com"; // Create the
remove metadata from pdf file; edit multiple pdf metadata
VB.NET PDF url edit library: insert, remove PDF links in vb.net
Extract and search url in existing PDF file in VB Program.RootPath + "\\" Output.pdf" ' Open a PDF file. Dim uri As String = "http://www.google.com" ' Create
bulk edit pdf metadata; adding metadata to pdf files
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
G
ERMANY
Federal Parliament passed an act in 2009 authorizing the Federal Bureau of Criminal Investigation 
(BKA) to conduct covert online searches to prevent terrorist attacks on the basis of a warrant.
105
In 
addition  to  online  searches,  the  act  authorizes  the  BKA  to  employ  methods  of  covert  data 
collection, including dragnet investigations, surveillance of private residences, and the installation 
of a program on a suspect’s computer that intercepts communications at their source. 
The amended telecommunication act of 2013 reregulates the “stored data inquiry” requirements 
(Bestandsdatenauskunft).
106
Under the new provision, approximately 250 registered public agencies, 
among  them  the  police  and  customs  authorities,  are  authorized  to  request  from  ISPs  both 
contractual user data and sensitive data, such as PINs, passwords, and dynamic IP addresses. 
While the 2004 law  restricted the disclosure of  sensitive user  data  to criminal offenses, the 
amended  act  extends  it  to  cases  of  misdemeanors  or  administrative  offenses.  Additionally, 
whereas the disclosure of sensitive data and dynamic IP addresses normally requires an order by 
the competent court, contractual user data (such as the user’s name, address, telephone number, 
and date of birth) can be obtained through automated processes. The requirement of judicial 
review (Richtervorbehalt) has been subject to two empirical studies, both of which found that in the 
majority of cases a review by a judge does not take place.
107
Data protection experts criticize the 
lower threshold for intrusions of citizens’ privacy as disproportionate. Two members of the Pirate 
Party and a lawyer who had already filed the complaint against the data retention law in 2007 have 
filed a new constitutional complaint against the telecommunication act.
108
Telecommunications  interception  by  state  authorities  for  reasons  of  criminal  prosecution  is 
regulated by the code of criminal procedure (StPO) and is understood as a serious interference 
with basic rights. It may only be employed for the prosecution of serious crimes for which specific 
evidence exists and when other, less-intrusive investigative methods are likely to fail. According 
to recent statistics published by the Federal Office of Justice, there were a total of 21,118 orders 
for  telecommunications  interceptions  in  2011,  of  which  1,345  concerned  internet 
communications.
109
This is an increase of about 35 percent compared to 2010. There were also a 
Court on the Right in Confidentiality and Integrity of Information Technology Systems – a case report on BVerfG”, NJW 2008, 
822, (2009) 6:1 SCRIPTed 106, http://www.law.ed.ac.uk/ahrc/script‐ed/vol6‐1/abel.asp
105
 Dirk Heckmann, “Anmerkungen zur Novellierung des BKA‐Gesetzes: Sicherheit braucht (valide) Informationen” [Comments 
on the amendment of the BKA act: Security needs valid information], Internationales Magazin für Sicherheit nr. 1, 2009, 
www.ims‐magazin.de/index.php?p=artikel&id=1255446180,1,gastautor
106
 Bundesrat, “Mehr Rechtssicherheit bei Bestandsdatenauskunft” [More legal certainty for stored data inquiry], Press release 
no. 251/2013, May 3, 2013, http://www.bundesrat.de/DE/presse/pm/2013/094‐2013.html
107
 Two independent studies from by the Universität of Bielefeld (2003: Wer kontrolliert die Telefonüberwachung? Eine 
empirische Untersuchung zum Richtervorbehalt bei der Telefonüberwachung“ [Who controls telecommunication surveillance? 
An empirical investigation on judicial overview of telecommunication surveillance], edited by Otto Backes and Christoph Gusy, 
2003) and Max‐Planck‐Institut Institute for Foreign and International Criminal Law (Hans‐Jörg Albrecht, Claudia Dorsch, 
Christiane Krüpe 2003: Rechtswirklichkeit und Effizienz der Überwachung der Telekommunikation nach den §§ 100a, 100b StPO 
und anderer verdeckter Ermittlungsmaßnahmen [Legal reality and efficiency of wiretapping, surveillance and other covert 
investigation measures], http://bit.ly/wDVLS5) evaluated the implementation of judicial oversight of telecommunication 
surveillance. Both studies found that neither the mandatory judicial oversight nor the duty of notification of affected citizens 
are carried out. According to the study by the Max Planck Institute, only 0,4 % of the requests for court orders were denied. 
108
 Breyer, Patrick, “Verfassungsbeschwerde gegen Bestandsdatenauskunft eingereicht” [Constitutional complaint against 
stored data inquiry submitted], July 1, 2013, http://bestandsdatenauskunft.de/?p=357.   
109
 Bundesamt für Justiz [Federal Office of Justice], “Übersicht Telekommunikationsüberwachung (Maßnahmen nach §100a 
StPO) für 2011,” July 23, 2012 [Summary of telecommunication surveillance for 2011] http://bit.ly/18aJxwx.  
317
DocImage SDK for .NET: Document Imaging Features
of case-sensitive and whole-word-only search options. 6 (OJPEG) encoding Image only PDF encoding support. devices OCR Add-on: Support Google baseed Tesseract OCR
preview edit pdf metadata; rename pdf files from metadata
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
G
ERMANY
total of 14,153 orders requesting internet traffic data in 2011.
110
Surveillance measures conducted 
by  the  secret  services  under  the  Act  for  Limiting  the  Secrecy  of  Letters,  the  Post,  and 
Telecommunications exceed these figures. For 2011, the competent Parliamentary Control Panel 
reported that a total of 2.8 million telecommunications – most of them e-mail – were scanned, of 
which only 290 were considered relevant.
111
The e-mail contents were scanned for keywords 
relating to certain “areas of risk,” namely international terrorism, proliferation of arms and other 
military technology, and human smuggling.
112
For purposes of criminal prosecution, since 2009, the German police have used Trojan-like pieces 
of software to spy on criminal suspects. The Trojan, programmed by the commercial manufacturer 
DigiTask, not only enables the police to legally eavesdrop on encrypted conversations but also has 
the  potential  for  a  wider  range  of  actions,  some  of  which  are  illegal.  Among  these  illegal 
encroachments  are  the  searching  of  digital  devices,  logging  of  keystrokes,  and  planting  of 
“backdoors”  that  allow  for  the  remote  installation  of  additional  software  or  insertion  of  false 
evidence. Five German states admitted to the use of the “Federal Trojan” (Bundestrojaner) but denied 
the  use  of  any  illegal  functions.
113
Due  to  the  considerable  public  criticism  following  the 
“Bundestrojaner affair,” the Federal Police decided to develop in-house capacity to produce its own 
lawful  intrusion  software.  More  controversially,  the  Federal  Police  have  purchased 
FinFisher/FinSpy IT, another commercial spyware, for the “transition period” until its own solution 
is operational.
114
Recent evidence shows that German police authorities regularly make use of radio cell queries for 
criminal investigation.
115
In the states of Berlin and Saxony, for example, radio cell queries were 
used in 2012 in the context of criminal investigations for which millions of data records were 
110
 Bundesamt für Justiz, “Übersicht Verkehrsdatenerhebung (Maßnahmen nach § 100g StPO) für 2011” [Summary of traffic 
data collection], July 23, 2012, http://bit.ly/179zDvJ.  
111
 These are aggregated figures related to the three areas of risk in which scannings took place according to the report of the 
Parliamentary Control Panel. Cf. Deutscher Bundestag, Drucksache 17/12773, March 14, 2013, p.7, 
http://dip21.bundestag.de/dip21/btd/17/127/1712773.pdf. Please note that the annually presented numbers do not refer to 
the last year but to the year before, i.e. 2011.  The Parliamentary Control Panel periodically reports to the parliament and 
nominates the members of the G10 Commission. The G10 Commission controls surveillance measures and is also responsible 
for overseeing telecommunications measures undertaken on the basis of the Counterterrorism Act of 2002 and the 
Amendment Act of 2007. See also: http://www.bundestag.de/htdocs_e/bundestag/committees/bodies/scrutiny/index.html.   
112
 Cf. the report of the Parliamentary Control Panel: Deutscher Bundestag, Drucksache 17/12773, March 14, 2013, p.  6, 
http://dip21.bundestag.de/dip21/btd/17/127/1712773.pdf
113
 Deutsche Welle, “Several German states admit to use of controversial spy software,” October 11, 2011, 
http://www.dw.de/dw/article/0,,15449054,00.html
114
 Meister, Andre, “Secret Government Document Reveals: German Federal Police Plans To Use Gamma FinFisher Spyware”, 
netzpolitik.org, January 16, 2013, http://bit.ly/10zhgPA; For the classified document see: “Bericht zur Nr. 10 des Beschlusses 
des Haushaltsausschusses des Deutschen Bundestages zu TOP 20 der 74. Sitzung am 10. November 2011” [Report of Article 10 
of the decision of the Parliament's Budget Committee], https://netzpolitik.org/wp‐upload/BMI‐Bericht‐Sachstand‐CC‐
TK%C3%9C.pdf; EDRI, “Details on German State Trojan programme”, October 24, 2012, 
http://www.edri.org/edrigram/number10.20/details‐german‐‐state‐spyware‐Staatstrojaner. 
115
 Berlin Commissioner for Data Protection and Freedom of Information, Alexander Dix: “Abschlussbericht zur rechtlichen 
Überprüfung von Funkzellenabfragen [Report on the legal examination of radio cell queries], p. 16, http://www.datenschutz‐
berlin.de/attachments/896/Pr__fbericht.pdf?1346753690 . Data are currently available for the states of Berlin and Saxony. In 
both states radio cell queries were used in 2012 for hundreds of lawsuits for which millions of data records were collected. 
318
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
G
ERMANY
collected without informing the individuals affected, as required by law.
116
The extensive use of 
radio cell queries has raised questions of proportionality.
117
A constitutional complaint filed by ISPs in 2012 successfully challenged the existing provisions 
that mandated ISPs to retain customer data and provide information on users' contractual data, 
PIN  numbers,  keys,  and  passwords  to  law  enforcement  agencies  and  secret  services  upon 
request.
118
The Federal Constitutional Court held that these provisions breach the individual right 
of self-determination over personal information of the Basic Law. The Federal Constitutional 
Court particularly criticized as partly unconstitutional the duty of telecommunications providers 
to provide information about passwords and other access protection measures.
119
Following the EU Data Retention Directive, the 2007 Law on the Revision of Telecommunications 
Monitoring  and  other  Covert  Investigation  Measures  and  on  the Implementation  of Directive 
2006/24/EC mandated that ISPs and mobile phone companies have to retain traffic data for six to 
seven months to facilitate criminal investigations. A constitutional complaint led to the repeal of the 
national data retention provisions in 2010.
120
The German government has not transposed the EU 
Data Retention Directive within the stipulated timeframe into German law and does not intend to 
do so.
121
On  May  31, 2012, the European Commission filed a  complaint against the German 
government due to non-compliance, proposing that the court impose a daily penalty payment of € 
315,036.54.
122
A 2012 survey by the German Federal Network Agency shows that, in the absence of a legal 
obligation  for  data  retention,  the  four  major  mobile  communications  providers  in  Germany 
continue to store user data for a period of between 7 and 210 days.
123
116
 E.g. in Berlin, in the first half of 2012, 128 lawsuits with radio cell queries and 200 realized queries. In 302 analysed cases 
(2009‐04/2012) more than 6,619,155 data sets have been recorded, shown in this handout of the Berlin Chamber of Deputies, 
“Ergebnisse der polizeilichen Auswertung ‐Funkzellenabfragen‐” [Results of the police investigation on radio cell queries], 
https://www.piratenfraktion‐berlin.de/wp‐content/uploads/2012/08/0480_001.pdf. Cf. also Andre Meister, 
“Funkzellenabfrage geht weiter: Jeder Berliner ist jedes Jahr zwei Mal verdächtig” [Radio cell queries continue: Each citizen of 
Berlin is suspected twice a year], August 28, 2012, https://netzpolitik.org/2012/funkzellenabfrage‐geht‐weiter‐jeder‐berliner‐
ist‐jedes‐jahr‐zwei‐mal‐verdachtig/ ; In Saxony 60 cases have been reported from January to September 2012: Saxon 
Parliament, Drs 5/10379, http://ws.landtag.sachsen.de/images/5_Drs_10379_‐1_1_4_.pdf
117
 Berlin Commissioner for Data Protection and Freedom of Information, 2012, see footnote 35, p. 17 ; Landgericht Dresden 
[District Court of Dresden] Az. 15 Qs 34/12, http://bit.ly/15RxTaL.  
118
 Dokumentations‐ und Informationssystem für Parlamentarische Vorgänge, “Gesetz zur Änderung des 
Telekommunikationsgesetzes und zur Neuregelung der Bestandsdatenauskunft” [Act to amend the Telecommunications Act 
and the revision of the existing stored data inquiry], ID: 17‐48610, 
http://dipbt.bundestag.de/extrakt/ba/WP17/486/48610.html
119
 Bundesverfassungsgericht [Federal Constitutional Court], judgment of January 24, 2012, 1 BvR 1299/05, Absatz‐Nr. (1 ‐ 192), 
http://www.bverfg.de/entscheidungen/rs20120124_1bvr129905.html  
120
 BVerfG, judgment of March 2, 2010, 1 BvR 256/08, Absatz‐Nr. (1 ‐ 345), 
http://www.bverfg.de/entscheidungen/rs20100302_1bvr025608.html
121
 Nikolas Busse, “Jeden Tag 315.036,54 Euro Strafe” [For each day a fine of Euro 315,036.54], FAZ.net, May 31, 2012, 
http://www.faz.net/‐gpg‐709kp
122
 European Commission, “Data retention: Commission takes Germany to Court requesting that fines be imposed”, Press 
release IP/12/530, May 31, 2012, http://europa.eu/rapid/press‐release_IP‐12‐530_en.htm . 
123
 Speicherdauer” [duration of storage], http://wiki.vorratsdatenspeicherung.de/images/BNetzA_Speicherdauer.pdf 
319
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
G
ERMANY
German authorities also request user data from internet content providers. From July–December 
2012, Google reported an increasing number of requests (1,550 compared to 1,426 requests for 
the same period in 2011), putting Germany at number four on the list of the countries that request 
the most  user data,  behind the  United  States, India, and France.
124
Microsoft  reported 8,419 
requests, affecting 13,226 accounts. In 7,088 of these cases (84.2 percent), at least “some customer 
data” was disclosed.  Skype data has  been  listed separately: in 2012, there were 686 requests, 
affecting 2,646 accounts.
125
There are no legal obligations to report security breaches. However, according to the Federal 
Ministry of Interior, approximately 1,100 cyberattacks took place in 2012. As a response to these 
estimates, the ministry has developed a “Cyber Security Strategy for Germany,” thereby following 
the global trend to improve the security of information networks in a proactive manner.
126
On June 
16, 2011, Germany´s Interior Minister Hans-Peter Friedrich introduced the new National Cyber 
Response  Centre  tasked  to  optimize  the  cooperation  between  several  federal  authorities  and 
agencies such as the Federal Office for Information Security (BSI) and the Federal Office for the 
Protection of the Constitution (BfV). The Cyber Response Centre is a sub-unit of the Ministry of 
Interior  with 10 permanent employees.
127
In addition,  a National Cyber  Security Council  was 
founded in 2011. It consists of government officials and associated business representatives who 
meet at least three times a year. Academic experts can be invited if required.
128
In March 2013, the 
Federal Ministry of the Interior proposed a law to improve the security of information networks 
which  would  have  made  it  a  mandatory  obligation  for  telecommunication  firms  and  critical 
infrastructure operators to report security breaches to the Federal Office for Information Security 
(BSI).
129
The Federal Ministry of Economics and Technology blocked the legislative draft in the 
early consultation phase. Digital rights advocates criticized the legislative proposal because it did 
not include a notification of users in case of security breaches. Industry associations, on the other 
hand,  feared  potential  costs  and  bureaucratic  burdens  of  notifying  the  Federal  Office  for 
Information Security.
130
124
 Google, “Google Transparency Report. User Data Requests. Germany. July to December 2012”, 2013, 
http://www.google.com/transparencyreport/userdatarequests/DE/?hl=en_US
125
 Microsoft, “2012 Law Enforcement Requests Report”, http://www.microsoft.com/about/corporatecitizenship/en‐
us/reporting/transparency/
126
 "German firms see rising Chinese cyberattacks," February 24, 2013, http://www.thelocal.de/sci‐tech/20130224‐48165.html
Cf. also Federal Ministry of the Interior, “Cyber Security Strategy for Germany,” Edition February 2011, p.8, 
http://www.cio.bund.de/SharedDocs/Publikationen/DE/Strategische‐Themen/css_engl_download.pdf?__blob=publicationFile.  
127
 Federal Ministry of the Interior, “Bundesinnenminister Dr. Hans‐Peter Friedrich eröffnet das Nationale Cyber‐
Abwehrzentrum“ [Germany´s Interior Minister Hans‐Peter Friedrich introduced the new national National Cyber Response 
Centre], Press Release, June 16, 2013. Cf. also Federal Ministry of the Interior, “Cyber Security Strategy for Germany”, Edition 
February 2011, p.9, http://www.cio.bund.de/SharedDocs/Publikationen/DE/Strategische‐
Themen/css_engl_download.pdf?__blob=publicationFile.    
128
 Christian Tretbar, “Friedrich: Speichern von Daten dient einem 'edlen Zweck‘“ [Friedrich: Data storage provides for a good 
cause], July 14, 2013, http://bit.ly/143AqhH.  
129
 Cf. Federal Ministry of the Interior, “Entwurf eines Gesetzes zur Erhöhung der Sicherheit informationstechnischer Systeme“ 
[Draft legislative proposal for improving the security of information networks], March 5, 2013, http://bit.ly/XsVWs1.  
130
 Cf. Andre Meister, “ IT‐Sicherheitsgesetz vor dem Aus: Wirtschaft verhindert Meldepflicht über Sicherheitsvorfälle“ [Cyber 
security law on the brink: Industry blocks reporting obligation for security breaches], June 5, 2013, 
https://netzpolitik.org/2013/it‐sicherheitsgesetz‐vor‐dem‐aus‐wirtschaft‐verhindert‐meldepflicht‐uber‐sicherheitsvorfalle/.  
320
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
G
ERMANY
In June 2012, the media reported the establishment of a new cyberwarfare unit within the German 
military  forces  (Bundeswehr).  However,  the  unit  is  said  to  be  poorly  staffed  compared  to  its 
international allies.
131
131
 The Economic Times, “Germany prepares special unit to tackle cyberattack,” June 6, 2012, 
http://articles.economictimes.indiatimes.com/2012‐06‐06/news/32079025_1_cyber‐warfare‐cyber‐attack‐special‐cyber. Cf. 
also Kuhn Johannes, “Deutschlands Hackertruppe übt noch” [Germany´s hacking unit still practices], June 5, 2012, 
http://www.sueddeutsche.de/digital/bundeswehr‐im‐cyberwar‐deutschlands‐hackertruppe‐uebt‐noch‐1.1374819
321
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
H
UNGARY
H
UNGARY
Revisions to the criminal code, passed on June 25, 2012 and scheduled to take effect in 
July  2013,  could  allow  the  government  to  block  websites  if  host  providers fail  to 
respond to takedown notices (see L
IMITS ON 
C
ONTENT
). 
The Supreme Court fined two blog owners for defamation based on readers' comments, 
even though the comments were deleted (see V
IOLATIONS OF 
U
SER 
R
IGHTS
). 
The  fourth  modification  of  the  constitution  annulled  previous  decisions  of  the 
Constitutional  Court,  causing  uncertainty  as  to  how  previous  legal  protections, 
particularly  regarding  free  speech,  will  be  interpreted  (see  V
IOLATIONS  OF 
U
SER 
R
IGHTS
). 
2012 
2013 
I
NTERNET 
F
REEDOM 
S
TATUS
F
REE
F
REE
Obstacles to Access (0-25) 
Limits on Content (0-35) 
Violations of User Rights (0-40) 
10 
Total (0-100) 
19 
23 
* 0=most free, 100=least free 
P
OPULATION
9.9 million
I
NTERNET 
P
ENETRATION 
2012: 
72 percent
S
OCIAL 
M
EDIA
/ICT
A
PPS 
B
LOCKED
No
P
OLITICAL
/S
OCIAL 
C
ONTENT 
B
LOCKED
 
No
B
LOGGERS
/ICT
U
SERS 
A
RRESTED
No
P
RESS 
F
REEDOM 
2013
S
TATUS
:
Partly Free
K
EY 
D
EVELOPMENTS
:
M
AY 
2012
A
PRIL 
2013 
322
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
H
UNGARY
When Hungary transitioned from a one-party state to a parliamentary democracy in 1989–1990, 
very few people were using the internet in the country. In the following years, dial-up connections 
spread and the number of users expanded, particularly in the 2000s when the price of internet 
started to decrease while the availability of broadband connections increased. Today, a majority of 
the population is online. Information and communication technologies (ICTs) are being used not 
only for social activities and newsgathering, but also increasingly for political activism. 
In the 2010 parliamentary elections, the conservative Hungarian Civic Union (Fidesz) and its ally, 
the Christian Democratic People’s Party (KDNP), won a 53 percent majority,
1
granting them more 
than two-thirds of the seats in parliament and enabling them to draft and accept a series of laws 
without meaningful political or public consultation.
2
The new laws regulating the media, including 
online media outlets and news portals, are of particular concern.
3
A new regulatory authority, the 
National Media and Infocommunications Authority (NMHH) and its decision-making body, the 
Media Council, were also  established  to oversee  the  mass communications industry, with the 
power to penalize or suspend outlets that violate stipulations of the media regulations. In April 
2011, the national assembly adopted a new constitution, the Fundamental Law of Hungary, which 
includes a provision concerning the supervision of the mass communications industry and the media 
as a whole. The parliament also created the National Agency for Data Protection, whose independence 
has been called into question due to the political appointment process of the agency’s leadership. 
Immediately after the 2010 media laws were passed, Hungary came under fierce criticism from the 
international community, as the laws were deemed incompatible with the values of the European 
Union.  Despite the  modifications to  the  media laws in May  2012 based  on the ruling of the 
Hungarian Constitutional Court in December 2011, members of the Organization for Security and 
Co-operation in Europe (OSCE) and the Council of Europe have argued that the laws remain 
unsatisfactory, and that unclear provisions and the significant power given to the NMHH continue 
to threaten media freedom.
4
In particular, high fines can be imposed on all types of media outlets 
by the one-party Media Council based on an obscure content provision. In January 2013, the 
Council of Europe welcomed the results of the dialogue with the Hungarian government about 
media  regulation,
5
while  domestic  nongovernmental  organizations  (NGOs)  expressed  their 
continued concerns to the Secretary General of the Council of Europe.
6
1
 Toplist, Parliamentary Election of 2010, April 25, 2010, National Election Office, http://bit.ly/1bhDO9u.  
2
 For more details about the overhaul of the legislature, see “Democracy and Human Rights at Stake in Hungary. The Viktor 
Orbán Government's drive for centralisation of power," Norwegian Helsinki Committee, 2013, http://bit.ly/WrcX3T, and in 
general, what has been happening in Hungary since the 2010 parliamentary elections see Kim Lane Scheppele's Testimony at 
the Helsinki Commission Hearing on Hungary, March 19, 2013, http://bit.ly/Y1Cu8c.  
3
 Act CIV of 2010 on the freedom of the press and the fundamental rules on media content, http://bit.ly/1hbKJBW ; Act CLXXXV 
of 2010 on media services and on the mass media, http://bit.ly/197GmZJ.  
4
 “Revised Hungarian media legislation continues to severely limit media pluralism, says OSCE media freedom representative,” 
Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe, May 25, 2012, http://www.osce.org/fom/90823
5
 “Secretary General welcomes changes to Hungarian laws on media and judiciary,” Council of Europe, January 29, 2013, http://bit.ly/WuGSZY.  
6
 “Letter of Hungarian NGOs on Media Legislation to Mr. Thorbjørn Jagland, Secretary General, Council of Europe,” Standards 
Media Monitor, February 4, 2013, http://bit.ly/197GoRm.  
I
NTRODUCTION
323
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
H
UNGARY
According to the International Telecommunication Union (ITU), internet penetration in Hungary 
stood  at  72  percent  in  2012,  up  from  53  percent  in  2007,
7
while  the  National  Media  and 
Infocommunications Authority of Hungary (NMHH) reported in late 2012 that there were over 
two million broadband internet subscriptions in a country of ten million  inhabitants.
8
NRC, a 
company specializing in internet market research in Hungary, puts the internet penetration at 63 
percent  in  2012.
9
In  2011,  50  percent  of  households  had  an  internet  subscription,  the 
overwhelming majority using a  broadband connection.
10
Dial-up  internet service is not widely 
used. The ITU and NMHH also recorded a mobile phone penetration rate of 117 percent and 2.94 
million mobile internet subscriptions,
11
while over 78 percent of residential areas had 3G coverage 
by mid-2012.
12
In 2012, only 26 percent of the population had never used the internet, a decrease 
from  52  percent  in 2006.
13
A  2011 Eurobarometer survey  found  that  the main  reasons  why 
Hungarian households do not have internet subscriptions were that the monthly subscription was 
too expensive, the cost of buying a computer and modem was too high, or that no one in the 
household had an interest in using the internet.
14 
There are geographical, socioeconomic, and ethnic differences in Hungary’s internet penetration 
levels,  with  lower  access  rates  found  in  rural  areas
15
and  among  the  Roma  community,  the 
country’s  largest  ethnic  minority.
16
An  industrial  expert  noted  that  internet  use  is  largely 
determined by age and education, resulting in a higher concentration of internet users in cities, 
since most young people leave rural areas to attend universities or get jobs in urban centers. He 
added that in 2012, among users between 15–24 years of age, the internet penetration was over 90 
percent; similar rates were found among users having a degree.
17
7
 International Telecommunication Union (ITU), “Percentage of individuals using the Internet, fixed (wired) Internet 
subscriptions, fixed (wired)‐broadband subscriptions,” 2007 & 2012, accessed July 25, 2013, http://bit.ly/6bZQ1.  
“Flash report on wireline service,” National Media and Infocommunications Authority (NMHH), October 2012, 
http://nmhh.hu/dokumentum/154927/vezetekes_gyj_2012_okt_eng.pdf
9
 “Internet penetrációs adatok” [Internet penetration data], 2012/II, http://nrc.hu/kutatas/internet_penetracio
10
 Special Eurobarometer 362, “E‐communications household survey”(Eurobarometer, July 2011): 49‐65, http://bit.ly/nMMupu.  
11
 “Flash report on mobile internet,” NMHH, October 2012, http://bit.ly/1azZkFJ; Hungary's population was 9,958,000 in early 
2012. See, “Population, vital statistics,” Hungarian Central Statistical Office (KSH), http://bit.ly/1bj3WEr.  
12
 “Flash report on mobile internet,” NMHH, June 2012, http://bit.ly/1azZkFJ.  
13
 “Individuals who have never used the internet. Percentage of individuals aged 16 to 74,” Eurostat, accessed December 27, 
2012, http://epp.eurostat.ec.europa.eu/tgm/table.do?tab=table&init=1&plugin=1&language=en&pcode=tin00093
14
 Special Eurobarometer 362, “E‐communications household survey” (Eurobarometer, July 2011): 56. 
15 
Anna Galácz, Ithaka Kht, eds., “A digitális jövő térképe. A magyar társadalom és az internet. Jelentés a World Internet projekt 
2007. évi magyarországi kutatásának eredményeiről” [The map of the digital future. The Hungarian society and the internet. 
Report on the results of the 2007 World Internet Project's Hungarian research], (Budapest: 2007): 20. 
16 
Statistically speaking, someone who is younger, studying, working or has a degree, and living in the capital or in a city is more 
likely to use internet than the elderly, unemployed or pensioner, with lower educational background, living in a village. See, 
World Internet Project (WIP), Report on the Hungarian Research for the World Internet Project 2007 (Budapest: Ithaka, 2008): 
26, http://worldinternetproject.com/_files/_Published/_oldis/Hungary_Report_2007.pdf; “Internet‐riport 2011/Q3” [Internet‐
report 2011/Q3], Nrc.hu, 2011, http://nrc.hu/index.php?name=OE‐eLibrary&file=download&keret=N&showheader=N&id=215
17
 Imre Kurucz, “Hogyan tovább, internetpenetráció?” [What's next internet penetration?], In: Marketingkutató [Marketing 
Researcher] Nr. 3, Winter 2012, p. 24. 
O
BSTACLES TO 
A
CCESS
324
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested