download pdf file from server in asp.net c# : Analyze pdf metadata application software cloud windows html azure class FOTN%202013_Full%20Report_036-part1539

F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
I
NDIA
interception  of  electronic  communications.
71
But  while  the  state  information  and  technology 
minister denied the order,
72
at least two service providers confirmed that there was a state-wide 
ban on Facebook and YouTube.
73
Service was subsequently restored. On February 14 and 15, 
however, DEITY ordered national blocks on more than 80 individual YouTube and Facebook pages 
after  a  Kashmiri  sentenced  to  death  for    assisting  with  a  Pakistani  terrorist  attack  on  India’s 
parliament  in  2001  was  executed  without  warning  or,  critics  said,  due  process.
74
The  Hindu 
newspaper reported that the block was based on a court order procured by Jammu and Kashmir 
police.
75
Since these were implemented at the same time as the ones involving the business institute 
described above, Indian ISPs blocked 164 pages based on court orders in the space of two days, 
some due to a highly politicized conflict, others from private, commercial interests.  
Administrative requests requiring service providers to take down content also spiked during these 
incidents. Facebook cooperated with the government during the northeastern unrest, though it was 
not clear how many pages were taken down as a result.
76
Twitter was asked to remove 20 accounts, 
but the extent of their cooperation was also unclear.
77
Google reported that removal requests from 
India in the second half of 2012 increased 90 percent compared to the first part of the year, notably 
from CERT-In during the northeastern riots, but the company did not comply with all.
78
While 
international companies often independently assess deletion requests to see if the flagged content 
violates  local  law  or  user  guidelines  before  complying,  domestic  companies  may  be  less 
discriminating. In March 2013, the Software Freedom Law Center said police ordered a web portal 
to delete an allegedly defamatory article under Section 91 of the penal code, which allows them to 
request information for the purposes of an ongoing investigation—even though the section does not 
provide for deletion of online content and is not applicable in defamation investigations. It was not 
an isolated incidence, the Center reported.
79
Intermediaries are  pressured into  policing content  by multiple actors.  Both local and overseas 
companies are vulnerable to criminal prosecution if they fail to comply with complaints about 
content—not just from officials, but from anyone in India. The 2000 IT amendment made them 
liable  for  illegal  content  posted  by  third  parties,  though  Section  79  of  the  2008  amendment 
introduced  some  protections  for  companies  and  their  customers.
80
In  April  2011,  however, 
Information Technology (Intermediaries Guidelines) Rules implementing the act undermined these 
protections—omitting, for example, any requirement  to notify the person  responsible  for the 
censored material.
81
The guidelines, which cover internet and mobile service providers as well as 
71
 Snehashish Ghosh, “Indian Telegraph Act, 1885,” Center for Internet and Society, March 15, 2013, http://bit.ly/15Cdzq0.  
72
 “Youtube and Facebook ‘Blocked’ in Kashmir,” Al Jazeera, October 2, 2012, http://aje.me/PSPJjK.  
73
 Kul Bhushan, “YouTube, Facebook Banned in Kashmir: Reports,” Think Digit, October 1, 2012, http://bit.ly/W6Z4XA.  
74
 Arundhati Roy, “Afzal Guru's Hanging Has Created a Dangerously Radioactive Political Fallout,” Guardian, February 18, 2013, 
http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2013/feb/18/afzal‐guru‐dangerous‐political‐fallout
75
 Shalini Singh, “164 Items Blocked Online in Just 2 Days.” 
76
 “Working With Government to Remove Hateful Content: Facebook,” Indo‐Asian News Service via NDTV, August 21, 2012, 
http://www.ndtv.com/article/india/working‐with‐government‐to‐remove‐hateful‐content‐facebook‐257603
77
 “India Faces Twitter Backlash over Internet Clampdown,” Reuters, August 24, 2012, http://reut.rs/O8kGha.  
78
 Google, “India.” 
79
 “S.91 of CrPC – the Omnipotent Provision?” Software Freedom Law Center, March 19, 2013, http://bit.ly/18zxqdo.  
80
 Erica Newland, “Shielding the Messengers: Internet on Trial in India,” Center for Democracy and Technology, March 20, 2012, 
https://www.cdt.org/blogs/erica‐newland/2003shielding‐messengers‐internet‐trial‐india
81
 Vikas Bajaj, “India Puts Tight Leash on Internet Free Speech,” New York Times, April 27, 2011, http://nyti.ms/15BHZ0P.  
355
Analyze pdf metadata - add, remove, update PDF metadata in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Allow C# Developers to Read, Add, Edit, Update and Delete PDF Metadata
google search pdf metadata; pdf xmp metadata editor
Analyze pdf metadata - VB.NET PDF metadata library: add, remove, update PDF metadata in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Enable VB.NET Users to Read, Write, Edit, Delete and Update PDF Document Metadata
adding metadata to pdf files; batch pdf metadata
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
I
NDIA
web hosts, search engines and social networks, require them to disable access to offensive content 
within 36 hours of discovering it or receiving a complaint, either by blocking it or taking it down, 
or face prosecution leading to possible fines or jail terms.
82
A March 2013 clarification stated that 
acknowledging a complaint within 36 hours was sufficient if the content was disabled within a 
month.
83
This  confused  the  process  further,  while  doing  nothing  to  address  other  glaring 
oversights.
84
While the CER committee explicitly limited the power of private complainants, the Guidelines 
opened the floodgates. Any individual can complain to a service provider about content that they 
deem, for  example, defamatory,  disparaging,  harmful,  blasphemous,  pornographic, promoting 
gambling or infringing proprietary rights.
85
None of these categories are defined. Experts say many 
violate the constitution by restricting legal speech—watching pornography, for example, is legal in 
India, and there are no limits on “disparaging,”
86
—a failing criticized by a parliamentary committee 
in March 2013.
87
Critics also objected to the 2011 rules telling cybercafes to stop users from 
accessing pornography  on  similar grounds;  they  were  encouraged to  install  filtering  software, 
although it’s not clear how many complied.
88
May 2012 amendments to the Copyright Act limited liability for intermediaries such as search 
engines that link to illegally-copied material, but mandated that they disable public access for 21 
days within 36 hours of receiving written notice from the copyright holder, pending a court order 
to block or remove the link.
89
Rules clarifying the amendment in March 2013 appeared to give 
intermediaries power to assess the legitimacy of the notice from the copyright holder and refuse to 
comply, but critics said the language was too vague to restore the balance between the complainant 
and the intermediary.
90
Civil society has been active in opposing the Intermediary Guidelines. In tests, the Center for 
Internet and Society demonstrated they could be used to render thousands of innocuous posts 
82
  Ujwala Uppaluri, “Constitutional Analysis of the Information Technology (Intermediaries' Guidelines) Rules, 2011,” Center for 
Internet and Society, July 16, 2012, http://bit.ly/1fRtyI2; Amol Sharma, “Is India Ignoring its own Internet Protections?” Wall 
Street Journal, January 16, 2012, http://on.wsj.com/xTjSiG.  
83
 Department of Electronics and Information Technology, “Clarification on The Information Technology (Intermediary 
Guidelines) Rules, 2011 under section 79 of the Information Technology Act, 2000,” March 18, 2013, http://bit.ly/17cRimc.  
84
 B. Singh, “Clarification On The Information Technology (Intermediary Guidelines) Rules, 2011 Under Section 79 Of The 
Information Technology Act, 2000,” Center Of Excellence For Cyber Security Research And Development In India, April 4, 2013, 
http://perry4law.org/cecsrdi/?p=621
85
 Ministry of Communications and Information Technology, “Information Technology Act, 2000,” April 11, 2011, 
http://www.mit.gov.in/sites/upload_files/dit/files/RNUS_CyberLaw_15411.pdf.  
86
 Ujwala Uppaluri, “Constitutional Analysis.” 
87
 Ishan Srivastava, “Parliament Panel Blasts Govt Over Ambiguous Internet Laws,” Times of India, March 28, 2013, 
http://articles.timesofindia.indiatimes.com/2013‐03‐28/internet/38098800_1_rules‐self‐regulation‐pranesh‐prakash
88
 Javed Anwer, “No Access to Pornography in Cyber Cafes, Declare New Rules,” Times of India, April 26, 2011, 
http://articles.timesofindia.indiatimes.com/2011‐04‐26/internet/29474462_1_cyber‐cafe‐cafe‐owners‐cubicles
89
 Specifically, any providers offering “transient or incidental storage of a work or performance purely in the technical process 
of electronic transmission or communication to the public” through “links, access or integration.” See, Pranesh Prakash, 
“Analysis of the Copyright (Amendment) Bill 2012,” Center for Internet and Society, May 23, 2012, http://bit.ly/JSDMLg
Ministry of Law and Justice, “Copyright (Amendment) Act 2012,” June 7, 2012, http://bit.ly/Kt1vlQ.  
90
 Chaitanya Ramachandran, “Guest Post: A Look at the New Notice and Takedown Regime Under the Copyright Rules, 2013,” 
Spicy IP, April 29, 2013, http://bit.ly/16zSzWf; Ministry of Human Resource Development, “Copyright Rules 2013,” March 14, 
2013, http://bit.ly/YrhCS5.  
356
VB.NET TIFF: TIFF Tag Viewer SDK, Read & Edit TIFF Tag Using VB.
Therefore, if you want to analyze or diagnose one TIFF file format, you must need a of TIFF file which is used as a tool to save metadata information), we
pdf metadata extract; pdf xmp metadata
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
I
NDIA
inaccessible.
91
Legal  challenges  are  pending, including  one submitted  by a cyberlaw expert  in 
Kerala in early 2012, who called them unconstitutional.
92
In April 2013, the Supreme Court agreed 
to reexamine them based on a petition by a consumer affairs website.
93
The site, MouthShut, which 
hosts user-generated reviews of products and services, said it had faced “hundreds of legal notices, 
cybercrime complaints and defamation cases” based on the rules, as well as calls from police officers 
to delete negative reviews.
94
The case is still pending.
95
Other companies have been hit with criminal and civil charges even when there was no evidence 
that they were aware of the offending content, when they subsequently deleted it, or when they 
had  no  control  over  user-generated  content  hosted  overseas  by  parent  companies.  Some  of 
Google’s mapping practices left the company’s representatives   liable for 3 years imprisonment, 
according to one expert.
96
In December  2011,  journalist  Vinay  Rai filed a criminal complaint 
against  21  internet  firms,  including  Facebook  and  Google,  for  hosting  content  he  considered 
offensive, such as images depicting religious figures.
97
The charges invoked articles of the penal 
code that ban the sale of offensive material, including to minors, and punish criminal conspiracy.
98
Even under the broad auspices of the Intermediary Guidelines, the case had no foundation, because 
there  was  no  evidence  he  had  complained  about the  images.  Some  subsequently  blocked  the 
content, and others had charges dismissed on technical grounds,
99
but proceedings involving 11 
companies were ongoing in May 2013.
100
Civil content complaints are also being heard by Indian 
courts, including one against several internet firms filed by Islamic scholar Aijaz Arshad Qasmi filed 
in December 2011.
101
Meanwhile, Facebook was subject to a police complaint in November 2012 
for  disabling  an  activist’s  account.  The activist,  based in  Uttar  Pradesh,  said  the  closure  was 
triggered by complaints from other internet users made in retaliation for his work.
102
Individuals,  as  well  as  companies,  are  liable  for  third-party  generated  content.  In  2009,  the 
Supreme Court declined to quash a lawsuit against a student relating to third party comments in a 
group he created on Google’s social network Orkut, rendering bloggers liable to civil or criminal 
91
 Kirsty Hughes, “Internet Freedom in India—Open to Debate ,” Index on Censorship, January 22, 2013, http://bit.ly/Xwxtxz.  
92
 Prachi Shrivastava, “Read Parts of First Writ Challenging Censorious IT Act Intermediaries Rules in Kerala,” Legally India, 
March 6, 2012, http://bit.ly/w4J7AN.  
93
Ashok Bindra, “Supreme Court of India to Examine the Validity of 2011 IT Rules Act,” TMC Net, May 1, 2013, 
http://www.tmcnet.com/topics/articles/2013/05/01/336479‐supreme‐court‐india‐examine‐validity‐2011‐it‐rules.htm
94
 Nikhil Pahwa, “MouthShut Challenges IT Rules In The Supreme Court Of India,” Medianama, April 23, 2013, 
http://www.medianama.com/2013/04/223‐mouthshut‐it‐rules‐supreme‐court‐of‐india/
95
 “Stop Crying Wolf: Just Wait and Watch!” Software Freedom Law Center, August 23, 2013, http://bit.ly/12rUOqJ.  
96
 S. Ronendra Singh, “Google Should Follow Indian Laws, say Rival Mapmakers,” The Hindu, April 7, 2013, http://bit.ly/Y6hnQV.  
97
 Amol Sharma, “Facebook, Google to Stand Trial in India,” Wall Street Journal, March 13, 2012, http://on.wsj.com/x7z1ZT.  
98
 Rishi Majumder, “The War on the Web is a War on Us,” Tehelka, February 18, 2012, http://bit.ly/1bhno11.  
99
 Pratap Patnaik and Bibhudatta Pradhan, “Indian Court Quashes Charges Against Microsoft on Content,” Bloomberg, March 
19, 2012, http://bloom.bg/x8qhvq; Kul Bhushan, “Web Censorship: Delhi Court Drops Google India, 7 Others From Lawsuit,” 
April 13, 2012, http://www.thinkdigit.com/Internet/Web‐censorship‐Delhi‐court‐drops‐Google‐India_9279.html.  
100
 “US Snubs India Over Case Against Google, Facebook,” Press Trust of India via NDTV, May 3, 2013, http://bit.ly/104kAkV.  
101
 Kul Bhushan, “Web Censorship Row: Delhi Court to Summon Facebook Via E‐mail,” Think Digit, April 20, 2013, 
http://www.thinkdigit.com/Internet/Web‐censorship‐row‐Delhi‐court‐to‐summon_9349.html
102
 Prasant Naidu, Lucknow Lawyer Files FIR Against Facebook For Disabling His Account,” Lighthouse Insights, November 20, 
2012, http://lighthouseinsights.in/lucknow‐lawyer‐files‐fir‐against‐facebook‐for‐disabling‐his‐account.html
357
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
I
NDIA
prosecution for comments posted by third parties.
103
No prosecutions have been reported since this 
ruling,  but  it  may  have  encouraged  self-censorship.  Online  journalists  and  bloggers  approach 
certain topics with caution, including religion, communalism, the corporate-government nexus, 
links between government and organized crime, Kashmiri separatism, and hostile rhetoric from 
Pakistan.  
The central authorities are not known to systematically employ progovernment commentators, but 
other factors exert a manipulative influence on digital discourse. Paid news, or “advertorials,” are 
common in the traditional media in India, from unclear disclosure of paid endorsements to bribery 
and other kickbacks for coverage. In mid-2013, Indian digital media website Medianama reported 
this phenomenon had increased on digital platforms in the past three years.
104
Of  greater  concern  for  political  and  social  expression  are  the  estimated  20,000  nationalistic 
“Internet Hindus” trolling websites to attack those who discuss sensitive topics online, some posting 
up to 300 comments a day.
105
While far from the only group with an agenda on the Indian web, 
they  are  “so  numerous,  so  committed  and  can  appear  so  organized”  that  they  may  have  a 
disproportionate  impact  on legislators. Commentators  note that  official content regulation has 
occurred in step with the increase of aggressive, partisan debates being driven by national events 
like the  2008 terror  attacks.
106
Some  go  further,  tying  the  activity directly  to  the  opposition 
Bharatiya Janata Party, who acknowledged operating 100 paid social media campaigners posting 
under multiple IDs in early 2013, but denied allegations that they “flood the internet with right-
wing propaganda.”
107
The ruling Congress party launched  a rival online campaign in April but 
denied compensating participants. Internet users in India occasionally accuse individuals or media in 
Pakistan of manipulating discussions about the disputed Kashmir valley in domestic online forums, 
and some insurgent groups have also used digital tools to spread propaganda.
108
There is plenty of 
outspoken pushback against politicized trolling, but others may be deterred from expressing their 
views.  
Many  traditionally  marginalized  groups  benefit  from  internet  access  to  share  information  and 
connect with others, including Dalits, who are at the bottom of the Hindu caste system.
109
While 
rural and impoverished communities are underserved by internet access, mobile initiatives like 
CGNet encourage villagers to report news and information to the moderators of a central online 
103
 Marshall Kirkpatrick, “Orkut User Loses in Indian Supreme Court,” ReadWrite, February 24, 2009, 
http://readwrite.com/2009/02/24/orkut_user_loses_in_indian_sup#awesm=~ogYvZHQ5ELvHTf
104
 Nikhil Pahwa, “Our Views On Paid News In Digital Media & Blogs In India,” Medianama, June 21, 2013, http://bit.ly/17r8VRE.  
105
 Jason Overdorf, “India: Meet the ‘Internet Hindus,’” Global Post, June 18, 2012, http://bit.ly/Pac0bP.  
106
 Ramachandra Guha, “Who Milks this Cow?” Outlook, November 19, 2012, http://bit.ly/Z25RV0.  
107
 Kunal Pradhan, “Election #2014: As Cyber War Rooms Get Battle‐Ready, BJP and Congress are Reaching Out to a New 
Constituency Spread Across Social Media,” India Today, February 8, 2013, http://bit.ly/16DM9Rv.  
108
 Rashmi Drolia, Chhattisgarh Cyber Police asks Facebook to Shut Down Maoist Page,” Times of India, June 1, 2013, 
http://articles.timesofindia.indiatimes.com/2013‐06‐01/india/39673868_1_facebook‐page‐facebook‐authorities‐profile
109
 Pramod K. Nayar, “The Digital Dalit: Subalternity And Cyberspace,” The Sri Lanka Journal of the Humanities 37 (1&2) 2011,  
available at Academia, http://www.academia.edu/1482588/THE_DIGITAL_DALIT_SUBALTERNITY_AND_CYBERSPACE
358
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
I
NDIA
forum via calls or SMS.
110
Begun in Chhattisgarh, the project has moved to nearby Madhya Pradesh 
and receives around 500 reports a day.
111
Online activists are also vocal on internet freedom issues, such as the content regulation that 
followed the northeastern riots.
112
Charges against social network users under the IT Act’s vague 
Section 66 also sparked strong public opposition, though these have yet to see effective results (see 
Violations of User Rights). Human rights issues spurred online actions during the coverage period, 
particularly in the aftermath of a shocking gang rape on December 16,
2012. Inspired by the success 
of a 2011 social media movement in support of anti-corruption campaigner Anna Hazare,
113
number of social media campaigns became part of what some dubbed the nirbhaya (“fearless one”) 
movement, helping propel women’s rights onto the public agenda.
114
This helped drive public 
protests,  which  achieved  some  results  when  the  government  introduced  two  new  pieces  of 
legislation that parliament ratified in February and April, strengthening the legal penalties for sexual 
harassment.
115
However, others called for tighter regulation of online pornography as the driver 
behind the rise in sexual assaults against women.
116
The debate has yet to improve the online 
environment  for  women.  Many  say  authorities  are  reluctant  to  recognize  online  threats  and 
harassment as violations of the IT Act.
117
An all-female rock band in the Kashmir valley disbanded 
after online threats from radical religious groups.
118
Police around the country abused laws to threaten internet users during the coverage period. They 
were particularly active in Maharastra state, where blogger and cartoonist Aseem Trivedi was held 
for  several  days  on  sedition  charges,  and  five  people  were  detained  for  social  media  posts, 
sometimes in the middle of the night. At least eight more were charged for social media activity in 
other states under Section 66 of the IT Act, including three men in Jammu and Kashmir who were 
held for 40  days.  Civil society opposition  has yet  to result  in  significant reform. Government 
surveillance, which requires  no judicial oversight, is transitioning to  a secretive, multi-million 
dollar Central Monitoring System, allowing officials to retrieve content and metadata from any 
electronic communication in India in real time, without the help of service providers. Much of the 
architecture of the system is already in place, and is scheduled to be fully operational by 2014, 
110
 Preeti Mudliar, Jonathan Donner, and William Thies, “Emergent Practices Around CGNet Swara, A Voice Forum for Citizen 
Journalism in Rural India,” Microsoft Research, March 2012,  http://research.microsoft.com/apps/pubs/?id=156562
111
 Elisa Tinsley, “In Rural India, a Hub for Tech, Mobile Innovation Gives Isolated People a Voice,” International Journalists 
Network, September 5, 2013, http://ijnet.org/blog/rural‐india‐hub‐tech‐mobile‐innovation‐gives‐isolated‐people‐voice
112
 “Govt vs Twitter Provokes Angry Reactions, Hashtags like Emergency 2012,” NDTV, August 23, 2012, http://bit.ly/OyHngx.  
113
 Jaimon Joseph, “How Anna Hazare Became a Media Phenomenon,” IBN Live, August 22, 2011, http://bit.ly/16JFofn.  
114
 Shoma Chaudhary, “The Girl Who Fired an Outcry in India,” Daily Beast, April 3, 2013,  http://thebea.st/11V6lMR; Swasti 
Chatterjee, “8 Months After the Nirbhaya Case, Where Do We Stand?” Times of India, August 25, 2013, http://bit.ly/19NCqs5.  
115
 Nagendra Sharma, “Two Bills, Two Punishments for Sexual Harassment,” Hindustan Times, April 8, 2013, 
http://www.hindustantimes.com/India‐news/NewDelhi/2‐bills‐2‐punishments‐for‐sexual‐harassment/Article1‐1038995.aspx.  
116
 Neha Thirani Bagri and Heather Timmons, “India Considers Banning Pornography as Reported Sexual Assault Rises,” New 
York Times, April 22, 2013, http://nyti.ms/15CasOX.  
117
 Divya Arya, “Why Are Indian Women Being Attacked on Social Media?” BBC, May 7, 2013, http://bbc.in/109OXot.  
118
 “Kashmir Girls Pursue Career in Music Amid Fatwa,” Hindustan Times, May 2, 2013, http://bit.ly/18eiNeJ.  
V
IOLATIONS OF 
U
SER 
R
IGHTS
359
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
I
NDIA
despite never having been reviewed by parliament. Meanwhile, a privacy law proposed by experts 
in October 2012 has yet to be drafted.      
Article 19 (1) of the Indian constitution protects freedom of speech and expression.
119
ICT usage is 
governed primarily by the Telegraph Act, the penal code, the code of criminal procedure, and the 
IT Act. Section 66 of the 2008 IT amendment punishes ill-defined “offensive,” “menacing,” or 
“false” electronic messages that cheat, deceive, mislead, or annoy, with jail terms of up to three 
years.
120
Experts say the Official Secrets Act has been used to limit expression in the past, and is not 
adequately balanced by the Right to Information Act.
121
The Armed Forces Special Powers Act affects freedom of speech and expression in conflict zones, 
allowing security forces to bypass due process while shielding them from prosecution for human 
rights violations in non-military courts. Human rights groups and the international community have 
criticized the act, which is in effect in Jammu and Kashmir and several northeastern states, for 
compromising constitutional guarantees and protections.
122
Criminal charges have been filed against cartoonists and journalists in relation to content published 
online. In September 2012, police in Maharastra arrested 25-year old cartoonist Aseem Trivedi, on 
charges of sedition—which carries a life sentence—as well as violating the Prevention of Insult to 
National Honor Act and the IT Act.
123
Trivedi was released on bail and the sedition charge was 
dropped  after  a  public  campaign,  but  the  others  remain  pending.
124
Trivedi’s  anti-corruption 
cartoons  first  attracted  official  sanctions  in  December  2011  when  his  website  Cartoons against 
Corruption was suspended by its hosting company based on a complaint to Mumbai police; Trivedi 
reposted the cartoons, which are widely available online.  
While Trivedi’s case was widely reported, local officials who abuse legal charges to suppress online 
reporting are less likely to be called to account. In May 2012, a district official in Jharkhand filed 
bribery charges against a video journalist who had submitted a right to information request about 
the use of public funds intended for job creation, apparently trumped up to pressure him to drop 
the investigation.
125
Ordinary  internet  users  in  India also  risk  prosecution  for  online  postings criticizing  powerful 
figures. In April 2012, a professor at a university in West Bengal and several others were arrested 
for circulating a caricature via e-mail and Facebook that mocked a number of government officials, 
119
 Government of India, “The Constitution of India,” http://lawmin.nic.in/coi/coiason29july08.pdf.   
120
 “Govt to Issue Fresh Guidelines to Prevent Misuse of Sec 66 (A),” Press Trust of India via The Hindu, November 29, 2012, 
http://bit.ly/19e28VH; Apurva Chaudhary, “Indian Govt Issues Guidelines To Prevent Misuse Of Sec 66A; PIL In Supreme Court,” 
Medianama, November 29, 2012, http://bit.ly/SvBdiN.  
121
 Iftikhar Gilani, “Government to review Official Secrets Act,” Tehelka, October 15, 2011, http://bit.ly/1aztkkV.  
122
 “Repeal AFSPA: UN Expert to India,” Hueiyen News Service, May 2, 2013, http://e‐pao.net/GP.asp?src=17..030513.may13  
123
 Committee to Protect Journalists, “Indian Cartoonist Jailed for Images Criticizing Government,” September 10, 2012, 
http://cpj.org/2012/09/indian‐cartoonist‐jailed‐for‐images‐criticizing‐go.php
124
 Sumit Galhotra, “Sedition Dropped, but Indian Cartoonist Faces Other Charges,” CPJ Blog, October 18, 2013,  
 http://cpj.org/blog/2012/10/sedition‐dropped‐but‐indian‐cartoonist‐faces‐other.php
125
 Committee to Protect Journalists, “Charges Against Indian Video Journalist Must be Dropped,” May 25, 2012, 
http://cpj.org/2012/05/charges‐against‐indian‐video‐journalist‐must‐be‐dr.php.  
360
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
I
NDIA
and charged under Section 66 of the IT Act as well as criminal defamation provisions of the penal 
code, before being released on bail.
126
Abuse of Section 66 escalated during the coverage period, most notoriously in the western state of 
Maharashtra. On November 19, 2012, police in Palghar, a town in Thane district near the state 
capital Mumbai, detained two Facebook users for complaining that the funeral of Bal Thackeray, 
leader of the right wing Hindu party, Shiv Sena, was disrupting Mumbai services—an opinion 
shared by the Supreme Court, who ruled that bringing the city to a halt to observe the mourning 
was illegal.
127
Twenty-one year old Shaheen Dhadha posted the complaint and Renu Srinivasan 
‘liked’ it, angering Shiv Sena supporters who gathered outside the police station and smashed a 
medical clinic belonging to Dhadha’s uncle.
128
The detentions were widely criticized, both on social 
media and by public figures, and the women were released on bail within hours. Two policemen 
who ordered the arrest were suspended, the magistrate who granted them bail transferred, and the 
charges ultimately dropped, though Shiv Sena activists were still trying to challenge this decision in 
early 2013.
129
Yet the case had a disturbing coda. A Palghar branch of Shiv Sena launched a strike 
to protest the suspension of the two police officers, which was publicly criticized on Facebook 
under  an  account  belonging  to  19  year  old  Sunil  Vishwakarma  on  November  28.  Shiv  Sena 
supporters delivered him to local police, who detained him for several hours, supposedly for his 
own protection. Vishwakarma denied authoring the comment, and police filed charges against an 
unknown individual for hacking his account.
130
Journalists ferreting out other abuses of the act learned that Mumbai police had detained two Air 
India employees, Mayank Sharma and K.V. Jaganathrao, in May 2012 under Sections 66 and 67 on 
grounds that they made derogatory comments about politicians and insulted the national flag in a 
closed Facebook group.
131
The charges apparently stemmed from a personal spat with a colleague, 
Sagar Karnik.
132
The men said they were arrested in an overnight weekend raid and jailed for 12 
days  months  after  the  complaint  against  them  was  filed.
133
Following  media  reports,  police 
scrambled to rectify the situation by accepting a complaint from Jaganathrao about Karnick—also 
under Section 66 of the IT Act—for insulting his reputation on Facebook and Orkut.
134
Other Section 66 charges were filed against social media  users around the country during the 
coverage period. Many, like the Palghar girls, were young, like 22 year old Henna Bakshi and her 
friend, Kamalpreet Singh, charged by Chandigarh police in September 2012 for criticizing traffic 
126
 Soudhriti Bhabani, “Professor Held for Uploading Caricature of Mamata on Social Site,” Daily Mail, April 13, 2012, 
http://dailym.ai/19K2TYK.   
127
 Julie Mccarthy, “Facebook Arrests Ignite Free‐Speech Debate In India,” NPR, November 28, 2012, http://n.pr/TuViZ3.  
128
 Julie Mccarthy, “Facebook Arrests Ignite Free‐Speech Debate;” “Two Girls Held for FB Post Questioning Bandh for 
Thackeray's Funeral,” Zeenews, November 19, 2012, http://bit.ly/XsFr0A.  
129
 “Palghar Court Closes Case Against Girls Arrested for Facebook Comments,” Press Trust of India via NDTV, February 1, 2013, 
http://www.ndtv.com/article/india/palghar‐court‐closes‐case‐against‐girls‐arrested‐for‐facebook‐comments‐325157
130
 “I Did Not Post on Raj Thackeray, FB Account was Hacked: Palghar Boy,” Firstpost, November 29, 2012, http://bit.ly/18ej1CL.  
131
 Jaganathrao was called K.V.J. Rao in some reports. Saurabh Gupta, “Arrested for Facebook Posts, They Spent 12 Days in Jail, 
Lost Their Air India Jobs,” NDTV, November 25, 2013, http://bit.ly/1eQaRpk.  
132
 “Cyber Police Station Files FIR Under 66A Against Sagar Karnik,” The Hindu, December 3, 2012, http://bit.ly/15CaGFE.  
133
 Meena Menon, “Jailed Air India Employees Demand Compensation,” The Hindu, March 23, 2013, http://bit.ly/ZVPNDe.  
134
  Saurabh Gupta, “Facebook Row: Mumbai Police Book Man Whose Complaint Led to Air India Employees' Arrests,” NDTV, 
December 2, 2012, http://bit.ly/TCdOen.  
361
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
I
NDIA
officials.
135
Many were detained, usually briefly, and sometimes on grounds it would protect them, 
though  this  may  well  have  amplified  the  impression  that  they  were  guilty  of  wrongdoing—
especially when  detentions occurred  at night or  bail was  denied. Anti-corruption activist Ravi 
Srinivasan was arrested in his home in the union territory of Puducherry at 5am in October 2012 
for  offending a local  politician on Twitter.
136
Orissa police arrested  20-year-old Pintu Sahu in 
December for posting an image of a Hindu deity sitting on a mosque on Facebook, representing a 
controversy  between  Mulsims and  Hindus over  a  local  shrine.
137
In  February, police  in Uttar 
Pradesh  arrested  Sanjay  Chowdhary,  a  civil  servant,  for  insulting  a  religious  community  and 
political leaders on Facebook, and denied at least one application for bail.
138
The most extreme case 
was in Jammu and Kashmir, where three men were arrested in October in connection with a video 
on Facebook, considered blasphemous, that spurred thousands of people to protest.
139
They were 
held for more than 40 days under the IT Act before being granted bail on December 12, although 
there was no evidence they had uploaded the video, which police said originated in Pakistan.
140
The cases appeared to stall at the police level, without coming to trial. Yet legal arguments in bail 
hearings concentrated on proof—such as whether the police took screen shots of the offending 
posts—while the accused often blamed the content on hackers. This distracted from the fact that 
the charges themselves undermine constitutional free speech protections. 
Section 66 faced numerous legal challenges in the past year. One petitioner told the Bombay High 
Court in 2013 that it should not apply to social media, which is mostly in the public domain, when 
the same content in print would not lead to prosecution.
141
Several members of parliament said 
they  were  working  on  amending it, though one  motion  to amend it  was  deferred  pending  a 
Supreme Court ruling.
142
The motion was revealing, however. In it, Member of Parliament P. 
Rajeev said that the 2008 IT amendment passed in the Lok Sabha in just seven minutes—along with 
six  other bills—and went  through the upper  Rajya Sabha  without discussion.
143
One  inspiring 
challenge was filed with the Supreme Court in November 2012 by 21 year old student Shreya 
135
 “Chandigarh Police Awaits Logs From Facebook in Abusive Remarks Case,” Indian Express, September 20, 2012, 
http://m.indianexpress.com/news/chandigarh‐police‐awaits‐logs‐from‐facebook‐in‐abusive‐remarks‐case/1005204/
136
 Puducherry was formerly known as Pondicherry. Dhananjay Mahapatra, “Puducherry Justifies Arrest Under Section 66A of IT 
Act,” Times of India, January 12, 2013, http://bit.ly/16zV4bY; Priscilla Jebaraj, “IAC Volunteer Tweets Himself into Trouble, Faces 
Three Years in Jail,”  The Hindu, November 1, 2012, http://bit.ly/16zV4bY.  
137
 “Orissa: Youth Held for FB Photos of Hanuman on Mosque,” Outlook, December 8, 2012, http://bit.ly/VEwiB3.  
138
 “Man Held for Facebook Posts Denied Bail,” Indo‐Asian News Service via Hindustan Times, February 6, 2013,  
http://www.hindustantimes.com/India‐news/UttarPradesh/Man‐held‐for‐Facebook‐posts‐denied‐bail/Article1‐1007698.aspx
139
 Arif Munshi, “Blasphemous Picture on Facebook Triggers Massive Protest,” Greater Kashmir, October 29, 2013, 
http://www.greaterkashmir.com/news/2012/Oct/30/blasphemous‐picture‐on‐facebook‐triggers‐massive‐protest‐27.asp
140
 “Arrested For Video on Facebook, Three Men in Jammu and Kashmir Spend Over 40 days in Jail,” NDTV, December 7 2012, 
http://bit.ly/SCmvH9; “India 2012 International Religious Freedom Report,” in International Religious Freedom Report for 2012, 
Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights and Labor, United States Department of State, http://1.usa.gov/16zVajO.  
141
 “Section 66A of IT Act Challenged as 'Unconstitutional', Court Seeks Center's Reply,” Press Trust of India, February 28, 2013, 
http://bit.ly/WlM44R.  
142
 Rajeev Chandrasekhar, “Don't Kill Freedom of Speech,” Times of India, November 30, 2012,  http://bit.ly/16zVf73; Apurva 
Chaudhary, “Indian Govt Issues Guidelines To Prevent Misuse Of Sec 66A; PIL In Supreme Court,” Medianama, November 29, 
2012, http://bit.ly/SvBdiN.  
143
 P. Rajeeve, “Resolution Re. Need To Amend Section 66a Of Information Technology Act, 2000,” December 14, 2012, 
available at Software Freedom Law Center, http://sflc.in/wp‐content/uploads/2013/03/P.RajeeveResolution_RS.pdf
362
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
I
NDIA
Singhal.
144
Despite this activity, the sole, insufficient reform was a government advisory requiring 
senior  police  officers to  approve  arrests  for social media  postings,  which  the  Supreme Court 
enforced in mid-2013, outside the coverage period of this report.
145
State  surveillance,  like  content  control,  is  growing  in  scale  and  sophistication,  and  India’s 
inadequate legislative framework provides almost no privacy protections. A 2007 Supreme Court 
ruling held that wiretapping would potentially violate constitutional protections under Article 19, 
the right to freedom of speech and expression and Article 21, the right to life and personal liberty, 
unless it was “permitted under the procedure established by law.” The court ordered the creation of 
a government committee to review phone tap orders, which are governed by the Telegraph Act, 
but did not require judicial oversight.
146
A 2007 amendment was made to 419A Rules which govern 
the act, elaborating the procedure and limiting national and state home ministry officials of a certain 
rank to order phone taps.
147
The amended 2008 IT Act also allowed both central and state officials to intercept, monitor or 
decrypt electronic communications or direct others to do so. Both this and the Telegraph Act 
stipulate surveillance should be done to protect defense, national security, sovereignty, friendly 
relations with foreign states, and public order, and that it should be subject to approval, limited to 
60 days—fewer in emergencies—and renewable for a maximum of 180 days.
148
Yet the IT Act 
adds  a  clause  allowing  surveillance  for  “investigation  of  any  offense;”  moreover,  while  the 
procedure for high-level government authorization seems to involve a case-by-case assessment, 
systematic, mass surveillance is not prohibited.
149
Additional requirements followed in 2011. The government authorized eight separate bodies to 
issue surveillance-related orders directly to service providers, from intelligence agencies to the tax 
bureau.
150
IT Act regulations required cybercafe owners to copy and retain customers’ photo ID 
and browser history for a year.
151
Officials railed against international providers that prevent the 
government from tracking  users by encrypting communications,
152
and required some, such as 
144
 Bhadra Sinha, “SC Slams Facebook Arrests, Takes Up 66A,” Hindustan Times, November 29, 2012, http://bit.ly/QOlCy2
Cordelia Jenkins, “Who is Shreya Singhal?” Live Mint, November 29, 2012, http://bit.ly/RkLiCm .   
145
 J. Venkatesan, “No Blanket Ban on Arrests for Facebook Posts, says SC,” The Hindu, May 16, 2013, http://bit.ly/1839Eou.  
“PUCL Leader Gets Bail in Facebook Post Case,” The Hindu, May 14, 2013, http://bit.ly/129FnAB.  
146
 Privacy International, “Chapter ii: Legal Framework,” in India, November 14, 2012, http://bit.ly/17cVl1Q; Justice Ajit Prakash 
Shah, “Report of the Group of Experts on Privacy,” October 16, 2012, http://bit.ly/VqzKtr.  
147
 Jadine Lannon, “Rule 419A of the Indian Telegraph Rules, 1951,” Center for Information and Society, June 20, 2013, 
http://cis‐india.org/internet‐governance/resources/rule‐419‐a‐of‐indian‐telegraph‐rules‐1951
148
 Jadine Lannon, “Indian Telegraph Act, 1885, 419A Rules and IT (Amendment) Act, 2008, 69 Rules,” Center for Information 
and Society, April 28, 2013, http://bit.ly/14N1qCT.  
149
 Pranesh Prakash, “How Surveillance Works in India,” New York Times, July 10, 2013, http://nyti.ms/164b2sm.  
150
 Research and Analysis Wing, the Intelligence Bureau, the Directorate of Revenue Intelligence, the Enforcement Directorate, 
the Narcotics Control Bureau, the Central Bureau of Investigation, the National Technical Research Organization and the state 
police. See, Privacy International, “Chapter iii: Privacy Issues,” in India Telecommunications Privacy Report, October 22, 2012, 
https://www.privacyinternational.org/reports/india/iii‐privacy‐issues#footnoteref1_ni8ap74
151
 “Information Technology Act, 2000,” Ministry of Communications and Information Technology, April 11, 2011, 
http://www.mit.gov.in/sites/upload_files/dit/files/RNUS_CyberLaw_15411.pdf
152
 Joji Thomas Philip, “Can't Track Blackberry, Gmail: DoT,” Economic Times, March 16, 2011, http://bit.ly/1bhkFo8; Joji Thomas 
Philip and Harsimran Julku, “E‐services like Gmail, BlackBerry, Skype Can't be Banned for Lack of Scrutiny: Telecoms Security 
Panel,” Economic Times, June 16, 2011, http://bit.ly/16TBotD.  
363
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
I
NDIA
Nokia and BlackBerry, to establish local servers subject to Indian law under threat of blocking their 
services.
153
(This effort was still ongoing in April 2013, when internal Home Ministry minutes 
suggested the government intends to require internet phone services like Skype to install local 
servers.
154
 Under  a  2011  Equipment  Security  Agreement  that  did  not  appear  on  the  DOT 
website,
155
telecom operators were told to develop the capacity to pinpoint any customer’s physical 
location within 50 meters. “Customers specified by Security Agencies” were prioritized for location 
monitoring by June 2012, with “all customers, irrespective of whether they are the subject of legal 
intercept or not,” by June 2014;
156
operators were in “various stages” of compliance by August 
2012.
157
In October 2012, a government-appointed group described this framework as “an unclear 
regulatory regime that is inconsistent, nontransparent, prone to misuse, and that does not provide 
remedy or compensation to aggrieved individuals.”
158
Service providers are required by license agreements to cooperate with official requests for data.
159
Experts  said  that  while  non-compliance  carries  a  possible  seven  year  jail  term,  unlawful 
interception is punishable by just three years’ imprisonment.
160
Google and Facebook received more user data requests from India in 2012 than any other country 
except  the  U.S,  but  didn’t  always  comply.
161
In  January  2012,  responding  to  a  freedom  of 
information request, the Home Ministry reported Indian officials issuing 7,500 to 9,000 phone 
interceptions per month.
162
During the  coverage period, some news  reports cited the “review 
committee” responsible for reviewing electronic interception orders every 90 days, established 
following the 2007 Supreme Court ruling and comprised of Cabinet Secretary Ajit Seth, Telecom 
Secretary R. Chandrasekhar and Legal Affairs Secretary B.A. Agrawal. In October 2012, The Hindu, 
citing this unnamed committee’s “internal note,” said interception involving 10,000 phones and 
1,000 email IDs had been authorized by several agencies between June and August—some new, 
and some renewing existing orders.
163
In January 2013, the Economic Times said it had reviewed a 
153
 In 2013, outside the coverage period of this report, BlackBerry confirmed their “lawful access capability” met “the standard 
required by the Government of India,” though business customers would be unaffected. Anandita Singh Mankotia, 
“Government, BlackBerry Dispute Ends,” Times of India, July 10, 2013, http://bit.ly/187FX9z. For Nokia, see Thomas K Thomas, 
“Despite India Server, IB Unable to Snoop into Nokia E‐mail Service,” The Hindu, July 14, 2011, http://bit.ly/1fRqjAt.  
154
 Joji Thomas Philip, “Net Telephony Providers Will be Asked to Set Up Servers in India” Economic Times, May 20, 2013, 
http://bit.ly/15BHST3.  
155
 Nikhil Pahwa, “New Telecom Equipment Policy Mandates Location Based Services Accuracy Of 50Mtrs: COAI,” Medianama, 
June 17, 2011, http://bit.ly/keKNxY.  
156
 Cellular Operators Association of India, “Additional Cost Implication for the Telecom Industry as Government Mandates 
Location Based Services to Meet its Security Requirements,” press release, June 16, 2011, http://bit.ly/18zURS6.  
157
 “Operators Implementing Location‐based Services: Govt,” Press Trust of India via NDTV, August 9, 2012, http://bit.ly/S4zNcT.  
158
 Justice Ajit Prakash Shah, “Report of the Group of Experts on Privacy.” 
159
 Saikat Datta, “A Fox On A Fishing Expedition,” Outlook, May 3, 2010, http://www.outlookindia.com/article.aspx?265192
160
 Pranesh Prakash, “How Surveillance Works in India,” New York Times, July 10, 2013, http://nyti.ms/164b2sm.  
161
 “Indian Govt Snooped on 13 Users Per Day in 2012, says Google Report,” Press Trust of India, March 11, 2013,  
http://bit.ly/Y5oepb; Facebook, “Global Government Requests Report,” January—June 2013, http://on.fb.me/1dmxPnW. By 
contrast, India did not appear in the top five countries that made the most requests to Microsoft. See, Microsoft, “2012 Law 
Enforcement Requests Report,” http://bit.ly/ZwBiGV.  
162
 Shyamlal Yadav, “9,000 Orders for Phone Interception a Month: Govt,” Indian Express, January 23, 2012, ttp://bit.ly/ylTTmN.  
163
 Sandeep Joshi, “10,000 Phones, 1,000 E‐mail IDs Under the Scanner,” The Hindu, October 12, 2012, http://bit.ly/14T5EHr.  
364
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested