F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
I
NDIA
committee document covering October—December 2012, and involving surveillance orders for 
10,000 phones and 1,300 emails.
164
Abuse of surveillance has been widely reported, including monitoring of lawmakers, politicians, 
and journalists
165
—in one case, implemented by an ISP on the basis of an emailed government 
order that turned out to be fake.
166
In 2011, two senior Mumbai police officers were found to have 
sold phone records for money;
167
another in 2012 apparently requisitioned cell phone records “to 
keep an eye on his girlfriend.”
168
Much of this activity is driven by what The Hindu newspaper characterized as “massive purchases of 
communications intelligence equipment from secretive companies from India and abroad” by both 
state and other actors. Two suppliers are domestic: Clear Trail markets  a “data traffic inspect 
engine”  for  mobile  surveillance.  Shoghi  Communications  supplies  GSM  monitoring  and  other 
equipment,  but  its  only  client  is  the  government.
169
In  2010,  Outlook  magazine  documented 
intelligence  agencies operating  dozens  of cellphone  monitoring  devices  that  don’t  require  the 
target’s  number—and  therefore  don’t  require  cooperation  from  service  providers.  “We  have 
deployed the system … in the hope that we might pick up critical conversations, but most of the 
time, we end up getting private calls,” an unnamed intelligence official told Outlook.
170
Security 
agencies have even tried to limit the spread of these technologies. In 2011, the federal Intelligence 
Bureau was reported trying to shut down at least 33 passive interception units at internet hubs 
around the country. Many were being operated by state police with a tendency to misuse the 
equipment—or even mislay it.
171
On May 8, 2013, the Bureau issued a directive banning junior 
police officers from requesting mobile data records.
172
Yet the Bureau is itself a civilian organization 
without a statutory foundation or parliamentary oversight.
173
Rather than correct this abuse, the government is transitioning to a nationwide surveillance project 
known as the Central Monitoring System (CMS), which allows government agents to bypass service 
providers in favor of interception equipment on intermediary premises allowing them to monitor 
electronic traffic on any platform or device directly, in real time.
174
Reports estimated the total cost 
was  in the region of 8 billion rupees ($132 million).
175
Proponents  said  the  system  improved 
security by reducing the number of third parties involved in interceptions, and by documenting the 
164
 Harsimran Julka and Joji Thomas Philip, “Home Ministry Ordered 10k Wire Taps in Last 90 Days, Orders Tapping of 1300 
Email ids,” Economic Times, January 3, 2013, http://bit.ly/XcPjaC.  
165
 Saikat Datta, “We, the Eavesdropped,” Outlook, May 3, 2010, http://www.outlookindia.com/article.aspx?265191; “800 New 
Radia Tapes,” Outlook, December 10, 2010, http://www.outlookindia.com/article.aspx?268618; “Government Mulling Law to 
Regulate Phone Tapping,” DNA India, December 16, 2010, http://bit.ly/eFX89N.  
166
 Praveen Swami, “The Government’s Listening To Us,” The Hindu, December 1, 2011, http://bit.ly/rH8bO2.  
167
 “Two Delhi Cops May Land in the Dock for Selling Cell Call Records,” Times of India, March 11, 2012, http://bit.ly/1bhmHor.  
168
 “Only Top Cops can Seek Call Records: State Intelligence Bureau,” Times of India, May 17, 2013, http://bit.ly/1bhkSaX.  
169
 Privacy International, “Chapter iii: Privacy Issues.” 
170
 Saikat Datta, “A Fox On A Fishing Expedition.” 
171
 Praveen Swami, “The Government’s Listening To Us.”  
172
 “Only Top Cops Can Seek Call Records: State Intelligence Bureau,” Times of India, May 17, 2013, http://bit.ly/1bhkSaX.  
173
 A Subramani, Ex‐officer questions Intelligence Bureau’s legal status, Times of India, March 26, 2012, http://bit.ly/1aHbVKN.  
174
 Anurag Kotoky, “India Sets Up Elaborate System;” Shalini Singh, “Govt. Violates Privacy Safeguards to Secretly Monitor 
Internet Traffic,” The Hindu, September 9, 2013, http://bit.ly/1etaS0t.  
175
 Pranesh Prakash, “How Surveillance Works in India.” 
365
Pdf metadata viewer online - add, remove, update PDF metadata in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Allow C# Developers to Read, Add, Edit, Update and Delete PDF Metadata
batch edit pdf metadata; pdf metadata online
Pdf metadata viewer online - VB.NET PDF metadata library: add, remove, update PDF metadata in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Enable VB.NET Users to Read, Write, Edit, Delete and Update PDF Document Metadata
pdf keywords metadata; add metadata to pdf
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
I
NDIA
nature and duration of requests in a streamlined “electronic audit trail.”
176
But this may itself be 
vulnerable to cyberattacks.
177
It was never reviewed by parliament. 
Some news reports said the eight agencies already empowered to conduct surveillance would be 
able  to  use  it,  with  the  addition  of  the  National  Investigation  Agency,  which  was  reported 
petitioning for inclusion in October 2012,
178
and possibly the Securities and Exchange Board of 
India.
179
Others said select military agencies would also be involved.
180
In April 2013, the Center 
for Information and Society submitted a freedom of information request to clarify the exact range 
of agencies authorized to conduct electronic surveillance, but had not received a response by the 
end of the coverage period.
181
Operated by a little-known Department of Telecommunications unit, the Center for Development 
of Telematics,
182
it is not known how extensively the CMS has been implemented. One mid-2013 
news report said it was active in New Delhi and neighboring Harayana state, with Kolkata, the 
capital of West Bengal, and the southwestern states of Kerala, Karnataka to follow.
183
Another said 
operation was yet to begin, pending technical certification of 21 regional monitoring centers.
184
But 
many internet and telecommunications firms already have monitoring capabilities installed, some of 
which  are  already  controlled  by the  government,  according  to  The  Hindu, and the  CMS  will 
consolidate  this equipment, too.
185
Since  there  is no legal  requirement to notify the target of 
surveillance—even after the end of an investigation—its implementation may not be apparent, but 
several accounts said it would be fully operational by 2014.  
Some  of  this  activity,  conducted  to  counter  terrorism,  is  legitimate.  But  the  surveillance 
architecture has been put in place without a privacy law, leaving individuals vulnerable, even as the 
kind of personal data they are surrendering to the government diversifies. Since 2010, millions of 
Indian citizens have been issued unique Aadhaar ID numbers as part of an anti-poverty initiative. 
Though not compulsory, officials say not possessing one could limit access to some government 
assistance. The authority that issues the numbers maintains a database of numbers tied to personal 
information  including  biometric  data,  such  as  fingerprints.
186
There  is  no  law  governing  the 
authority—in fact, one was rejected by parliament in 2011. 
176
 Bharti Jain, “Govt Tightens Control for Phone Tapping,” Times of India, June 21, 2013, http://bit.ly/1bXQy3r.  
177
 Anjani Trivedi, “In India, Prism‐like Surveillance Slips Under the Radar,” Time, June 30, 2013, http://ti.me/17cT6vA.  
178
 Yatish Yadav, “NIA Seeks Central Monitoring System to Tap Phones,” Indian Express, October 15, 2012, http://bit.ly/OAHjzx.  
179
 “Govt to Install 'Fool‐Proof' Phone Tapping Setup Soon,” Outlook, June 17, 2013, http://bit.ly/1hbvWHu.  
180
 Maria Xynou, “India´s ‘Big Brother:’ The Central Monitoring System (CMS),” Center for Internet and Society, April 8, 2013, 
http://cis‐india.org/internet‐governance/blog/indias‐big‐brother‐the‐central‐monitoring‐system
181
  Prasad Krishna, “RTI on Officials and Agencies Authorized to Intercept Telephone Messages in India,” Center for Information 
and Society, July 15, 2013, http://bit.ly/1fRqJXu.  
182
 “About C‐DOT,” http://www.cdot.co.in/rti/pdf/rti‐2Inf‐01a‐AboutCDOT(E).pdf. News reports also said national Telecom 
Enforcement, Resource and Monitoring cells, also under the Department of Telecommunications, had a role in implementation. 
Department of Telecommunications, “TERM/Security,” http://www.dot.gov.in/term/term‐security
183
 Shalini Singh, “India’s surveillance project may be as lethal as PRISM,” The Hindu, June 21, 2013, http://bit.ly/15EeV2o.  
184
 Kalyan Parbat, “India’s Surveillance System CMS to be Operational Soon,” Economic Times, September 5, 2013, 
http://bit.ly/17QbPit.  
185
 Shalini Singh, “Govt. Violates Privacy Safeguards.” 
186
 Nandan Nilekani, “The Science of Delivering Online IDs to a Billion People: The Aadhaar Experience,” World 
Bank's Development Economics Lecture, April 24, 2013, http://bit.ly/15AS1O8.  
366
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
NET edit PDF bookmark, C#.NET edit PDF metadata, C#.NET NET read barcodes from PDF, C#.NET OCR scan PDF. Viewer & Editors, C# ASP.NET Document Viewer, C# Online
acrobat pdf additional metadata; batch update pdf metadata
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
PDF Online. Convert PDF Online. WPF PDF Viewer. View PDF in Image to PDF. Image: Remove Image from PDF Page. Edit URL. Bookmark: Edit Bookmark. Metadata: Edit, Delete
edit pdf metadata; edit multiple pdf metadata
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
I
NDIA
In 2011, data protection rules improved privacy protections in commercial transactions but drew 
some criticism from the business community.
187
The EU does not consider India “data secure.”
188
In 
October  2012,  a  group  of  experts  issued  a  government-commissioned  report  providing  a 
foundation for a future privacy bill, though the timeframe for drafting and implementing it isn’t 
clear.  Critically,  this report  clarified  that  exceptions to  the right  to privacy, such  as national 
security and privacy investigations, be assessed according to values of proportionality, legality, and 
democratic rule.
189
Violence  targeting journalists,  right to  information  activists  and whistleblowers  is  common  in 
India.
190
However, there were no significant accounts of physical assaults on bloggers or online 
activists during the coverage period. Some did face threats and pressure in retaliation for online 
activity. Many  individuals  facing charges  under the  IT Act,  for  example,  were  sought out  by 
destructive mobs. Police and security agents were also accused of conducting violent raids while 
investigating alleged digital offenses, including some targeting cybercafe clients.
191
Cyberattacks did not systematically target opposition groups or human rights activists during the 
coverage  period. Loopholes in cyber security were exposed, however,  when the international 
hacking group Anonymous targeted establishment sites, including that of the Supreme Court, in 
June 2012 to protest against decisions regarding file-sharing and copyright issues.
192
187
 Outsourcing firms are exempt. Miriam H. Wugmeister and Cynthia J. Rich, “India’s New Privacy Regulations,” Morrison and 
Foerster Client Alert. May 4, 2011, http://bit.ly/lJSePF; John Ribeiro, “India Exempts Its Outsourcers from New Privacy Rules,” 
Network World, November 2, 2011, http://bit.ly/16TCbuF.  
188
 “India to EU: Declare us a Data Secure Country,” Press Trust of India via Times of India, October 18, 2012, 
http://bit.ly/WCNAOh; Amiti Sen, “EU Not Ready to Give India ‘Data Secure’ Status,” The Hindu, June 15, 2013, 
http://bit.ly/12wvF0g.  
189
 Justice Ajit Prakash Shah, “Report of the Group of Experts on Privacy.” 
190
 Committee to Protect Journalists, “29 Journalists Killed in India Since 1992/Motive Confirmed,” accessed August 2013, 
http://bit.ly/mnq7Mr; Prabhu Mallikarjunan, “Attacks on RTI Activists in India Raise Questions Over Safety Measures,” Indian 
Express, January 17, 2013, http://newindianexpress.com/states/karnataka/article1423834.ece
191
 Jaideep Mazumdar, “The Imphal Taliban,” July 13, 2013, http://www.timescrest.com/opinion/the‐imphal‐taliban‐10718
192
 Rezwan, “India: Netizens Respond To Anonymous India's Protests,” Global Voices, June 9, 2012, http://bit.ly/LbCEzl
367
VB.NET PDF - WPF PDF Viewer for VB.NET Program
NET edit PDF bookmark, C#.NET edit PDF metadata, C#.NET NET read barcodes from PDF, C#.NET OCR scan PDF. Viewer & Editors, C# ASP.NET Document Viewer, C# Online
remove metadata from pdf online; pdf xmp metadata viewer
VB.NET PDF - Create PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
NET edit PDF bookmark, C#.NET edit PDF metadata, C#.NET NET read barcodes from PDF, C#.NET OCR scan PDF. Viewer & Editors, C# ASP.NET Document Viewer, C# Online
batch edit pdf metadata; acrobat pdf additional metadata
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
I
NDONESIA
I
NDONESIA
 The Supreme Court cleared Prita Mulyasari on criminal and civil defamation charges
relating to a personal email she sent in 2009 (see V
IOLATIONS OF 
U
SER 
R
IGHTS
).
 Electronic defamation could lead to 6 years imprisonment or $80,000 fines; offline,
most sentences are less than 2 years—fines amount to 40 cents (see V
IOLATIONS OF
U
SER 
R
IGHTS
).
 Overbroad blocks on pornography compromised legitimate websites, including LGBT
content (see L
IMITS ON 
C
ONTENT
).
 In October 2012, the Constitutional Court rejected a request for judicial review of the
State Intelligence Law (see V
IOLATIONS OF 
U
SER 
R
IGHTS
).
 In  mid-2013,  an  expert  told  the  Associated  Press  50  to  100  militants  had  been
recruited directly through Facebook in the past two years (see L
IMITS ON 
C
ONTENT
).
2012 
2013 
I
NTERNET 
F
REEDOM 
S
TATUS
P
ARTLY 
F
REE
P
ARTLY 
F
REE
Obstacles to Access (0-25) 
11 
11 
Limits on Content (0-35) 
11 
11 
Violations of User Rights (0-40) 
20 
19 
Total (0-100) 
42 
41 
*0=most free, 100=least free
K
EY 
D
EVELOPMENTS
:
M
AY 
2012
A
PRIL 
2013 
P
OPULATION
241 million
I
NTERNET 
P
ENETRATION 
2012: 
15 percent
S
OCIAL 
M
EDIA
/ICT
A
PPS 
B
LOCKED
No
P
OLITICAL
/S
OCIAL 
C
ONTENT 
B
LOCKED
Yes
B
LOGGERS
/ICT
U
SERS 
A
RRESTED
No
P
RESS 
F
REEDOM 
2013
S
TATUS
Partly Free
368
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to create PDF document from other file
NET edit PDF bookmark, C#.NET edit PDF metadata, C#.NET NET read barcodes from PDF, C#.NET OCR scan PDF. Viewer & Editors, C# ASP.NET Document Viewer, C# Online
metadata in pdf documents; adding metadata to pdf files
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to view, annotate, convert and print PDF in
PDF Online. Convert PDF Online. WPF PDF Viewer. View PDF in Image to PDF. Image: Remove Image from PDF Page. Edit URL. Bookmark: Edit Bookmark. Metadata: Edit, Delete
c# read pdf metadata; change pdf metadata
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
I
NDONESIA
Economic development and a democratic political system have spurred internet use in Indonesia, 
though poor infrastructure across the archipelago’s 16,000 islands keeps connections spotty in rural 
areas. Where people once relied on cybercafés, however, they are increasingly using mobile phones 
to go online. This change has fuelled the nation’s extraordinary appetite for social media. Facebook 
usage in the world’s fourth most populous country has shot up in the past four years, while Twitter 
is a lifestyle staple for young internet users, and increasingly politicians. President Susilo Bambang 
Yudhoyono, who will complete his second term in office in 2014, has over 3 million followers.  
Though  introduced  in  1994,  internet  access  only  gained  momentum  after  1998,  when  the 
authoritarian leader Suharto resigned in the face of public protests and Indonesia began its transition 
to democratic rule. Yet the political upheaval, which facilitated extensive human rights abuses that 
were underreported  in the  traditional  media,  may still  be impeding  online discourse. Of the 
millions of active blogs and social media accounts, comparatively few are dedicated to domestic 
politics.  
Home to the world’s largest Muslim population, as well as many different ethnicities, Indonesia’s 
religious and racial tensions are felt in the online space. A sweeping ban on pornography affects 
many sites offering legitimate information on sex education,  LGBT groups, and tribal culture. 
Security threats have resulted in a total of nine laws granting various agencies power to intercept 
electronic communications, but existing privacy protections are inadequate. Just two of the laws 
require judicial oversight, and civil society groups declared one of these—a 2011 law governing 
monitoring for intelligence purposes—unconstitutional in 2012. The Constitutional Court rejected 
their petition for judicial review of the law in October 2012.     
Civil society opposition to laws criminalizing legitimate online speech also has yet to bear fruit.  
Dozens of ordinary internet users have faced criminal charges for defamation via social media or 
personal email under a 2008 Information and Electronic Transactions (ITE) law. By international 
standards, civil laws are more appropriate than criminal in defamation disputes.
1
Yet the 2008 law 
made existing sentences in the penal code even harsher for defamation committed electronically. 
Spoken or written insults could result in a few months or, at worst, four years behind bars; the 
same content shared online or on a cell phone comes with a maximum of six years imprisonment. 
Meanwhile, fines for defamation outlined in the penal code could be paid with less than 50 cents, 
according to the conversion rate on April 30, 2013.
2
Under the ITE law, defamation could cost the 
defendant around $80,000.  
In 2012, the Supreme Court overturned the landmark convictions of housewife Prita Mulyasari on 
criminal  as  well  as  civil  defamation  charges  relating  to  a  personal  email  she  sent  in  2009. 
Astonishingly,  this  has  yet  to  result  in  reform  of  the  ITE  law’s  disproportionate  penalties. 
1
 Article 19, “Criminal Defamation,” accessed August 2013,  http://www.article19.org/pages/en/criminal‐defamation.html
2
 All conversion rates date from April 30, 2013 or the date of the source document, unless otherwise specified.   
I
NTRODUCTION
369
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view, annotate, create and convert PDF
This online HTML5 PDF document viewer library component offers reliable and excellent functionalities. C#.NET users and developers
delete metadata from pdf; pdf metadata editor
VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images
zonal information, metadata, and so on. Extract image from PDF free in .NET framework application with trial SDK components for .NET. Online source codes for
add metadata to pdf file; adding metadata to pdf
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
I
NDONESIA
Meanwhile, an anticybercrime bill drafted in 2010, which would also provide heavier punishments 
for crimes committed online than existing laws, appears to be still pending. Authorities cite the 
wider reach of the internet as justification for this bias against ICTs. But they fail to recognize that 
when criminal complaints can be filed by any individual, the web is just as likely to create new 
opportunities for vindictive prosecution as it is to damage reputations.  
Internet penetration in Indonesia was just over 15 percent in 2012, according to the International 
Telecommunication Union, citing a  national statistics agency.
3
Other estimates were above 20 
percent.
4
Access is not evenly distributed, however. Cable is costly to install across the world’s 
largest archipelago, and poor infrastructure, combined with poverty in rural areas, keeps internet 
use heavily concentrated in cities, particularly on the islands of Java and Bali. One November 2012 
survey estimated more than 90 percent of web users lived in urban areas.
5
The country’s main 
network-access providers, which link retail level ISPs to the internet backbone, are also clustered 
on Java, particularly in Jakarta. Mobile phone usage, on the other hand, is almost ubiquitous. 
Mobile penetration was measured at 115 percent in 2012, indicating some users have more than 
one device.
6
In the past, personal internet access was reserved for older, middle, or upper class urban residents. 
That may be changing, since the nation’s largest broadband provider reported a 41 percent jump in 
fixed-line subscribers from 2012 to 2013.
7
Yet broadband service, which averages IDR 150,000 
($12)  per  month  for  a  fixed-line  connection,  remains  expensive  and  inconvenient  for  many. 
Wireless service is transforming the market, and mobile access has become more popular than 
cybercafes, according to one survey, which reported that 62 percent of urban respondents went 
online using a phone in 2012. Less than half used a cybercafe, down from 83 percent in 2009.
8
The government, particularly the Ministry of Communications and Information Technology (MCI), 
has made internet expansion a priority. To connect rural areas, the MCI launched a program to 
establish desa pintar (smart villages) with high quality internet and mobile phone reception. By 
2012, the MCI reported connecting 5,958 villages.
9
3
 International Telecommunication Union, “Percentage of Individuals Using the Internet, 2000‐2012,” http://bit.ly/14IIykM .  
4
 The Indonesian Internet Service Provider Association reported 63 million internet users in a population of 240 million in 2012, 
putting penetration at 26 percent, while digital market research firm eMarketer reported 24 percent penetration in 2012. See, 
Asosiasi Penyelenggara Jasa Internet Indonesia, “Indonesia Internet User, 2012” http://bit.ly/19KvxsR; Muhammad Al Azhari, 
“LTE May Herald an Internet Revolution in Indonesia,” May 3, 2013,
http://bit.ly/13lfjln; eMarketer, “In Indonesia, a New Digital 
Class Emerges,” March 12, 2013, http://bit.ly/10yQ2ET.  
5
 eMarketer, “In Indonesia, a New Digital Class.”  
6
 International Telecommunication Union, “Mobile‐cellular Telephone Subscriptions, 2000‐2012.” 
7
 “Info Memo,” Telkom Indonesia, 1Q2013, http://bit.ly/1bhCVOb.  
8
 Survey respondents were aged between 15 and 50. eMarketer, “In Indonesia’s Cities, Mobile Boost Internet to No 2 Media 
Spot,” January, 30, 2013, http://bit.ly/XgM0yu.  
9
 “Inilah Sederet Prestasi Yang Diklaim Kominfo” [Communications Ministry Achievements of 2012], Detik,  January 14, 2013, 
http://bit.ly/16AfDFc.  
O
BSTACLES TO 
A
CCESS
370
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
I
NDONESIA
Indonesia has a range of digital service providers, although some privately-owned providers have 
close ties to government ministers. The two largest ISPs are PT Telecom, which is majority state-
owned,  and  Indosat.
10
Their  dominance—along  with  regulatory  obstacles  imposed  by  the 
government—  poses challenges for small ISPs entering the market. Nevertheless, the Indonesian 
Internet Service Provider Association, APJII,
11
had over 250 member ISPs and network access 
providers in 2013, accounting for around 90 percent of the national total.
12
Of the nine mobile phone service providers in operation, the most prominent are PT Telkomsel, 
which covers 60 percent of the market, PT Indosat, with 21 percent, and PT XL Axiata with 19 
percent.
13
Despite their individual allegiances to officials, Indonesian ISPs are a close-knit community thanks 
to the APJII, which was founded in 1996.  In 1997, tired of routing local traffic through expensive 
and  inefficient  international  channels—and  wary  of  a  government-led  solution—they 
independently  created the Indonesia  Internet  Exchange  to allow  member ISPs to  interconnect 
domestically.
14
APJII also engages the government on behalf of providers regarding censorship, 
legal, and regulatory issues in ways that freedom of expression experts view as largely constructive.  
In January 2013, experts were particularly vocal when the attorney general’s office filed corruption 
charges against one ISP, IM2, for selling bandwidth under a public frequency licensed only to its 
parent  company,  Indosat.
15
IM2 was accused of avoiding a private  tax  rate on  the  frequency, 
causing state losses of IDR 1.3 trillion ($134 million).
16
The investigation was ongoing during the 
coverage period of this report; a judge ordered IM2 to pay the full amount in damages and jailed a 
former executive for four years in a highly contested verdict in July.
17
Since ISPs generally rent 
frequencies from other companies in Indonesia, the APJII condemned the investigation along with 
the business community and even Tifatul Sembiring, the communication and information minister. 
Their  concerns seemed  well-founded in  February when  an anti-corruption organization  filed a 
report with the attorney general’s office accusing 16 more ISPs and 5 mobile service providers of a 
similar fraud.
18
It is not clear if those providers will face prosecution.  
10
 Ronald J. Deibert et al., “Indonesia,” in Access Contested: Security, Identity, and Resistance in Asian Cyberspace, ed. 
(Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 2012), 
http://www.apjii.or.id/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=53&Itemid=11.  
11
 Asosiasi Penyelenggara Jasa Internet Indonesia. 
12
 Irvan Nasrun, “Indonesia ISP Association” (presentation, APJII, August 13, 2013), 
http://www.apjii.or.id/v2/upload/Artikel/APJII‐JAPAN‐ASEAN%20Information%20Security.pdf; Muhamad Al Azhari, “An 
Internet Case of Fraud, Tax Evasion,”  Jakarta Globe, February 22, 2013, http://bit.ly/1ajhRsL.  
13
 Oxford Business Group, “The Big Three: A Battle for Subscribers and Profit, Indonesia 2012,” 
http://www.oxfordbusinessgroup.com/news/big‐three‐battle‐subscribers‐and‐profit  
14
 Andy Kurniawan, “Indonesia Internet eXchange, IIX: IIX and IIXv.6 Development Update 2007” (presentation, Asia Pacific 
Network Information Centre), accessed August 2013, http://archive.apnic.net/meetings/25/program/ix/id‐ix‐update.pdf
15
 “IM2 Preparing Defense Ward Internet Doomsday,” Jakarta Post, January 15, 2013, http://bit.ly/15CrmNm ; Al Azhari, “An 
Internet Case of Fraud.”  
16
 Conversion as of January 15, 2013, according to Oanda. The value of the rupiah plunged in 2013; as of July 19, 2013, when 
news reports announced the verdict, the same amount came to US$128 million.  
17
 Mariel Grazella,  “Telco firms rattled by IM2 verdict,” Jakarta Post, July 9, 2013, 
http://www.thejakartapost.com/news/2013/07/09/telco‐firms‐rattled‐im2‐verdict.html
18
 Al Azhari, “An Internet Case of Fraud.” 
371
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
I
NDONESIA
The MCI’s Directorate General of Post and Informatics (DGPT) is the primary body overseeing 
telephone and internet services, responsible for issuing licenses to ISPs, cybercafes, and mobile 
phone service providers. The Indonesia Telecommunication Regulation Body (BRTI) also regulates 
and  supervises  telecommunications.  There  is  some  overlap  between  the  mandates  and 
responsibilities of the two agencies. Based on the ministerial decree that established it, BRTI is 
supposed to  be  generally  independent  and  includes nongovernment  representatives.  However, 
observers have questioned its effectiveness and independence, as it is headed by the DGPT director, 
and draws its budget from DGPT allocations. In May 2012, Sembiring inaugurated nine full BRTI 
members for the years 2012 through 2015. Two additional members remain from the previous 
term.
19
Tens  of  thousands  of  websites  related  to  pornography,  violent  extremism,  or  censorship 
circumvention are blocked in Indonesia under laws that grant  the government power to filter 
content without judicial oversight. While there is no systematic abuse of this system to restrict 
political content, many minority groups, like the LGBT community, find their content inaccessible 
with no clear avenue of appeal.  Social media and communications apps are avidly used, though 
their  potential  for  spreading  hate  speech  remains  a  concern.  Google  blocked  the  notorious 
‘Innocence of Muslims’ video on YouTube after it sparked unrest. 
The internet has expanded Indonesians’ access to information, as they are no longer dependent on 
traditional media for news; many have adopted the internet as their main information source. In 
response, the government’s approach has shifted. The 2008 ITE Law granted the MCI powers to 
monitor and censor online content at its own discretion without a court order, though it did not 
outline the process involved.
20
An anti-pornography law was also passed in 2008
21
—and upheld by 
the courts in 2010, despite being challenged as unconstitutional.
22
Since then, filtering of pornographic material has increased, particularly after some public celebrity 
sex  tape  scandals  in  2010.
23
Defining  what  constitutes  pornography,  however,  has  proved  a 
stumbling  block  in  the  Muslim  majority  nation.  The  U.S.-based  website  of  the  Free  Speech 
Coalition, a trade association for the adult entertainment industry, is censored, along with multiple 
other legitimate sites. Sex education resources and websites hosted by LGBT organizations, both 
19
 BRTI, “Pelantikan Anggota Komite Badan Regulasi Telekomunikasi Indonesia Periode 2012‐2015” [Inaugural Regulatory 
Committee Members Indonesian Telecommunications Regulatory Body Period 2012‐2015], May 3, 2013, 
http://brti.or.id/component/content/article/75‐press‐release/239‐pelantikan‐anggota‐komite‐regulasi‐2012‐2015  
20
 Article 40(2) of the ITE Law states that “the government, in compliance with the prevailing laws and regulations, aims at 
protecting public interest from all forms of disturbances that result from the abuse of electronic information and electronic 
transaction. Law No. 11 of 2008 on Electronic Transaction and Information, available at 
http://www.setneg.go.id/components/com_perundangan/docviewer.php?id=1969&filename=UU%2011%20Tahun%202008.pd
f
21
 “Law No. 44 on Pornography.” 
22
 Karishma Vaswani, “Indonesia Upholds Anti‐pornography Bill,” BBC, http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/8586749.stm
23
 OpenNet Initiative, “Country Profile—Indonesia,” August 9, 2012, http://opennet.net/research/profiles/indonesia.  
L
IMITS ON 
C
ONTENT
372
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
I
NDONESIA
domestically  and  overseas, are consistently  filtered,  and even art and  traditional  attire  can be 
considered explicit.  
The ministry is not known to systematically filter political content or anti-government criticism, 
though other broad restrictions are in place. Encryption and circumvention tools are blocked,
24
though some can be found in practice. Sites that promote terrorism and file-sharing are also subject 
to  restrictions.    In  2011,  after  a suicide  bomber  attacked  a  church  in  central  Java,  the MCI 
announced that it would block 300 out of 900 Islamist websites that the public had reported for 
promoting violence, radicalism or terrorism, though the list of sites was not published.
25
The same 
year, representatives of the Indonesian music industry urged the MCI to shutter 20 websites that 
enabled users to download songs without permission from the artists;
26
four remain closed.
27
In 
July 2012, the APJII mooted banning all websites that allow illegal downloads, but this had yet to 
appear by the end of the coverage period.
28
There is a general lack of clarity about censorship decisions and how to challenge them. The MCI 
maintains  an online database of blacklisted  domains and URLs,  Trust Positif, as a reference  for 
providers on what to filter. Trust Positif listed over 745,000 domain names and 55,000 URLs for 
pornographic content in 2013, a slight—but not dramatic—increase over the previous year;
29
the 
site  also  provides  an  email  address  and  form  for  individuals  to  report  illegal  content. 
Implementation of  these blocks, however, is often  inconsistent across service  providers. Some 
requests are apparently  also  issued  directly  to  providers  on  an  ad  hoc  basis, while individual 
companies have been willing to reverse or ignore censorship orders. In early 2012, the U.S.-based 
International Gay and Lesbian Human Rights Commission reported that a handful of mobile service 
providers had begun blocking its website on MCI instructions, though at least one operator did not 
comply.
30
Besides the ministry, the independent Nawala Foundation provides a free DNS server enabling 
service providers to block hundreds of thousands of websites for pornography and gambling, among 
other categories; a 2013 news report said it had blocked 600 fraudulent stores.
31
It does not publish 
its database, and users generally learn sites are unavailable when they encounter the service’s error 
24
 Deibert, “Indonesia.”  
25
 Ratri Adityarani, “To Fight Terrorism Indonesia Blocks 300 Websites,” TechinAsia, September 29, 2011, http://www.penn‐
olson.com/2011/09/29/terrorism‐indonesia‐blocks‐300‐websites/
26
 Achmud Rouzni Noor II, “Menkominfo Didesak Tutup 20 Situs Musik Ilegal” [MCI Pushed to Close Down 20 Illegal Music 
Website], Detik, July 21 2011, http://www.detikinet.com/read/2011/07/21/161521/1686205/398/menkominfo‐didesak‐tutup‐
20‐situs‐musik‐ilegal.  
27
 Mp3lagu, Pandumusica, Musik‐flazher, and Freedownloadmp3 are no longer accessible, but it was not clear if they were shut 
down or voluntarily discontinued.  
28
 “Indonesia’s ISPs to Block Pirated Music Sites,” Jakarta Post, July 6, 2012, 
http://www.thejakartapost.com/news/2012/07/06/indonesia‐s‐isps‐block‐pirated‐music‐sites.html
29
 The full database is available at Trust Positif, http://trustpositif.kominfo.go.id/files/downloads/index.php?dir=database%2F 
30
 International Gay and Lesbian Human Rights Commission, “IGLHRC Website Banned,” February 7, 2012,  
http://www.iglhrc.org/content/iglhrc‐website‐banned
31
 “Selain Situs Porno, DNS Nawala Hadang Toko Online Palsu” [In Addition to Porn, DNS Nawala Blocks Fake Online Stores],  
Detik, April 22, 2013, http://inet.detik.com/read/2013/04/22/082832/2226480/323/selain‐situs‐porno‐dns‐nawala‐hadang‐
toko‐online‐palsu.  
373
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
I
NDONESIA
message  while  browsing.  Nawala  provides  a  form  for  website  owners  subject  to  accidental 
blocking, though how it processes these complaints and how often it complies is not clear.
32
The  government  has  threatened  service  providers  with  intermediary  liability  for  failing  to 
implement censorship in the past. In 2011, Research in Motion (RIM) agreed to filter pornographic 
websites on their BlackBerry devices in Indonesia after the government regulator warned that the 
firm’s market access could be restricted if it failed to comply.
33
When attempting to access a 
blocked  site,  BlackBerry  users  reportedly  encounter  a  technical  error  rather  than  a  message 
informing them that access to the site has been deliberately restricted.  
In 2012, the Indonesian government made 45 requests to Google to delete videos on YouTube, an 
increase over the previous year.
34
Most requests cited religious reasons, likely in connection with 
the “Innocence of Muslims” video uploaded in the United States, ostensibly to promoting a movie 
that denounced Islam.
35
Many Indonesians joined restive street demonstrations to protest against 
the video, and police said the film drove an increase in terror plots, including one targeting the 
U.S. embassy in Jakarta.
36
Tifatul Sembiring publicly confirmed the government had requested that 
Google block 16 URLs to make it inaccessible in Indonesia.
37
Some activists have successfully used digital tools to mobilize in defense of internet freedom. Strong 
opposition from civil society actors and even some ISPs has successfully derailed some plans for 
more stringent censorship. A draft Regulation on Multimedia Content introduced in early 2010 
prompted a public outcry and fears of increased internet censorship, but it has remained on hold 
since. The blogging community also rallied round Prita Mulyasari, an internet user accused of 
criminal  defamation  in  2009,  with  a  huge  campaign  called  Koin  Keadilan  (“Justice  Penny,”) 
collecting tens of thousands of dollars on her behalf.
38
Indonesia has enjoyed a thriving blogosphere since around 1999, though traditional media outlets—
rather than blogs—typically cover important political developments and corruption investigations. 
Many of the earliest blogs were written by overseas Indonesians working in IT, until the younger 
generation adopted the medium to write about their daily lives. By 2005 and 2006, blogs had begun 
32
 Nawala.org, http://www.nawala.org/  
33
 Femi Adi, “RIM Says Committed To Indonesia, Will Block Porn on BlackBerrys,” Bloomberg, January 17, 2011,  
http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2011‐01‐17/rim‐says‐committed‐to‐indonesia‐will‐block‐porn‐on‐blackberrys.html;  Ardhi 
Suryadhi, “Sensor di Blackberry terus diawasi” [Censorship on Blackberry Continuously Observed], Detik Inet, January 21, 2011, 
http://www.detikinet.com/read/2011/01/21/142056/1551687/328/sensor‐di‐blackberry‐terus‐diawasi
34
 Google Transparency Report, http://www.google.com/transparencyreport/removals/government/ID/?by=product  
35
 Ian Lovett, “Man Linked to Film in Protests Is Questioned,” New York Times, September 15, 2012,  
http://www.nytimes.com/2012/09/16/world/middleeast/man‐linked‐to‐film‐in‐protests‐is‐
questioned.html?_r=2&ref=internationalrelations&; Michael Joseph Gross, “Disaster Movie,” Vanity Fair, December 27, 2012, 
http://www.vanityfair.com/culture/2012/12/making‐of‐innocence‐of‐muslims. 
36
 The Associated Press, “Indonesia Terror Attack: 'Innocence Of Muslims' Film Said To Fuel Embassy Plot,” via Huffington Post, 
October 19, 2012, http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/10/29/indonesia‐terror‐attack_n_2038441.html
37
 “Soal Video ‘Innocence of Muslims’, Tifatul: Sudah 16 URL Diblokir” [‘Innocence of Muslims Video, Tifatul: 16 URLs Already 
Blocked], Detik, September 18, 2013, http://news.detik.com/read/2012/09/18/160114/2024496/10/soal‐video‐innocence‐of‐
muslims‐tifatul‐sudah‐16‐url‐diblokir?nd771104bcj.  
38
 Mega Putra Ratya, “Penghitungan selesai total koin Prita Rp. 650.364.058” [Counting of Coins for Prita has collected a total of 
Rp. 650,364,058], Detik, December 19, 2009, http://m.detik.com/read/2009/12/19/113615/1262652/10/penghitungan‐selesai‐
total‐koin‐prita‐rp‐650364058.  
374
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested