download pdf file from server in asp.net c# : Get pdf metadata application SDK tool html .net azure online FOTN%202013_Full%20Report_038-part1541

F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
I
NDONESIA
to specialize in various topics, including politics, economics, media, food, and entertainment. The 
Salingsilang directory of Indonesian bloggers counted over 5.2 million Indonesian blogs as of the 
end of 2011, covering issues such as popular culture and international current affairs.
39
Indonesians are also avid users of social media, which a January 2013  survey listed as the nation’s 
number one online activity, followed by instant messenger, search engines and e-mail.
40
Social 
media and communication apps, including YouTube, Facebook, and Twitter, are freely available, 
and Indonesia had the fourth largest number of Facebook users in the world in 2013, with 47 
million accounts, according to one report.
41
President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono, who began 
tweeting in April 2012 as @SBYudhoyono, gained two million followers in less than two weeks.
42
Another study described the Indonesian capital, Jakarta, as the world’s most active city on Twitter, 
ahead of Tokyo, London, Sao Paulo, and New York. In addition to this distinction, Indonesia was 
the only country with two cities in the top ten; the second was Bandung, the capital of West Java.
43
As Facebook and Twitter use has grown, the popularity of blogging has declined.  
Social  media  growth  has  produced  new  concerns  about  content  manipulation.  Analysts  say 
anonymous or pseudonymous Twitter accounts circulating politically-motivated rumors and attacks 
on politicians may be part of sponsored campaigns to influence online discourse, or even blackmail 
well-known figures seeking to protect their reputations.
44
Social media pages have also been used 
by religious extremists. In mid-2013, an expert told the Associated Press that 50 to 100 militants 
had been recruited directly through Facebook in the past two years.
45
In September 2012, the Supreme Court finally cleared Prita Mulyasari on criminal and civil charges 
relating to a personal email she sent in 2009 complaining about a local hospital, after three weeks in 
jail,  a  suspended prison  sentence,  and  earlier  court  orders  that she  pay  the institution nearly 
$15,000 in damages. Yet the provisions of the law which allowed the spurious prosecution are still 
on the books, and the status of a promised reform remains unclear. Another legal ruling was less 
positive. In October 2012, the Constitutional Court rejected a civil society petition for judicial 
review of the  2011 State Intelligence Law,  one of  a handful of  laws  that allow authorities to 
intercept electronic communications with inadequate privacy protections. 
39
 Salingsilang has since closed and no 2012 count is available.   
40
 eMarketer, “Indonesia’s Cities, Mobile Boosts Internet.”  
41
 Quintly, a company which provides statistics on global Facebook and Twitter use, is based in Germany. Facebook Country 
Stats, http://www.quintly.com/facebook‐country‐statistics?period=1month.  
42
 “Yudhoyono’s Arrival on Twitter Lets Down Pundits, Porn Star,” Jakarta Post, April 15, 2013, 
http://www.thejakartapost.com/news/2013/04/15/yudhoyono‐s‐arrival‐twitter‐lets‐down‐pundits‐porn‐star.html.  
43
 Semiocast, “Twitter Reaches Half a Billion Accounts, More Than 140 Million in the US,” July, 30, 2012, 
http://semiocast.com/publications/2012_07_30_Twitter_reaches_half_a_billion_accounts_140m_in_the_US.  
44
 “The Anonymous Denizens of the Indonesian ‘Twitterverse,’” Jakarta Post, May 7, 2013, 
http://www.thejakartapost.com/news/2013/05/07/the‐anonymous‐denizens‐indonesian‐twitterverse.html.  
45
 Niniek Karmini, “AP Exclusive: Facebook Broke Indonesia Terror Case,” The Associated Press, June 21, 2013, 
http://bigstory.ap.org/article/ap‐exclusive‐facebook‐broke‐indonesia‐terror‐case
V
IOLATIONS OF 
U
SER 
R
IGHTS
375
Get pdf metadata - add, remove, update PDF metadata in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Allow C# Developers to Read, Add, Edit, Update and Delete PDF Metadata
search pdf metadata; view pdf metadata
Get pdf metadata - VB.NET PDF metadata library: add, remove, update PDF metadata in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Enable VB.NET Users to Read, Write, Edit, Delete and Update PDF Document Metadata
remove metadata from pdf; remove pdf metadata online
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
I
NDONESIA
Indonesia’s constitution guarantees freedom of opinion in its third amendment, adopted in 2000.
46
The  constitution  also  includes  the  right  to  privacy  and  the  right  to  gain  information  and 
communicate  freely.
47
These  rights  are  further  protected  by  various  laws  and  regulations.
48
However, other laws limit free expression, despite legal experts’ opinions that they conflict with 
the constitution.
49
Approximately seven different laws involve internet use, the most prominent being the 2008 ITE 
Law. A 2011 State Intelligence Law introduced penalties of up to ten years’ imprisonment and fines 
over $10,000 for revealing or disseminating “state secrets,” a term which is vaguely defined vaguely 
in the legislation.
50
This framework provides authorities with a range of powers to penalize internet 
users, even though not all are regularly implemented.  
Provisions of the 2008 ITE Law have been used repeatedly to prosecute Indonesians for online 
expression. The law’s penalties for criminal defamation, hate speech, and inciting violence online 
are harsh compared to those established by the penal code. Sentences allowed under Article 45 can 
extend to six years in prison; the maximum under the penal code is four years, and then only in 
specific circumstances—most sentences are less than a year and a half.
51
Financial penalties show an 
even more surprising discrepancy. While the ITE law allows for fines up to one billion rupiah 
($80,000),  the  equivalent  amounts  in  the  penal  code  have  apparently  not  been  adjusted  for 
inflation. Article 310, for example, allows for paltry fines of IDR 4500 for both written and spoken 
libel.
52
As of May 1, 2013, that amounted to 40 cents.  
The trial of housewife Prita Mulyasari for online defamation under the ITE Law is the most notable, 
and only concluded in September 2012. Police first detained Prita—who is widely known by her 
first name—for three weeks in 2009 for an email to friends that criticized her treatment at a private 
hospital in Tangerang city, Banten province.
53
The Tangerang District Court acquitted her on all 
criminal charges,
54
but prosecutors appealed to the Supreme Court, who sentenced her to a six-
month suspended sentence and placed her on probation for one year 2011.
55
Though she did not 
46
 Constitution of 1945, Article 28E(3). 
47
 Constitution of 1945, Articles 28F and 28G(1). 
48
 Among others, “Law No. 39 of 1999 on Human Rights,” “Law No. 14 of 2008 on Freedom of Information,” and “Law No. 40 of 
1999 on the Press.”  
49
 Wahyudi Djafar et al., “Elsam, Asesmen Terhadap Kebijakan Hak Asasi Manusia dalam Produk Legislasi dan Pelaksanaan 
Fungsi Pengawasan DPR RI” [Assessment of the Human Rights Policy in Legislation and the Implementation of Parliament 
Monitoring], Institute for Policy Research and Advocacy, 2008.  
50
 “Indonesian Parliament Passes Controversial Intelligence Bill,” Engage Media, October 25, 2011, 
http://www.engagemedia.org/Members/emnews/news/indoneisan‐parliament‐passes‐controversial‐intelligence‐bill
51
 Human Rights Watch, “The Legal Framework: Criminal Defamation Law in Indonesia,” in Turning Critics Into Criminals, May 4, 
2010, http://www.hrw.org/node/90020/section/6
52
 “Kitab Undang‐Undang Hukum Pidana” [Criminal Law],  available at Universitas Sam Ratulangi law faculty, 
http://hukum.unsrat.ac.id/uu/kuhpidana.htm#b2_16.   
53
 Nadya Kharima, “UU ITE Makan Korban Lagi” [ITE Bill creates a victim again], Primaironline, May 28, 2009, 
http://primaironline.com/berita/detail.php?catid=Sipil&artid=uu‐ite‐makan‐korban‐lagi
54
 Ismira Lutfia et al, “Prita Acquitted, But Indonesia’s AGO Plans Appeal,” Jakarta Globe, December 29, 2009, 
http://www.thejakartaglobe.com/home/prita‐mulyasari‐cleared‐of‐all‐charges/349844.   
55
Faisal Maliki Baskoro and Rangga Prokosso, “Shock Guilty Verdict in Prita Mulyasari Saga,” Jakarta Globe, July 9, 2011, 
http://www.thejakartaglobe.com/jakarta/shock‐guilty‐verdict‐in‐prita‐mulyasari‐saga/451797
376
C# TIFF: TIFF Metadata Editor, How to Write & Read TIFF Metadata
TIFFDocument doc = new TIFFDocument(@"c:\demo1.tif"); // Get Xmp metadata for string. TagCollection collection = doc.GetTagCollection(0); // Get Exif metadata.
view pdf metadata in explorer; change pdf metadata creation date
VB.NET PDF Annotate Library: Draw, edit PDF annotation, markups in
' Get PDF document. Dim fileInpath As String = "" Dim doc As PDFDocument = New PDFDocument(fileInpath) ' Get all annotations. ' Get PDF document.
pdf xmp metadata; preview edit pdf metadata
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
I
NDONESIA
serve any jail time, the decision was criticized for setting a dangerous precedent.
56
The hospital also 
filed a parallel civil suit, despite widespread opposition from bloggers and civil society groups.
57
court ordered her to pay the hospital 204 million rupiah ($14,300) in damages in the civil suit,
58
though the Supreme Court reversed the ruling on appeal.
59
In 2012, the Supreme Court reviewed 
the criminal case again, and found her innocent of all charges.
60
The opposition to Prita’s indictment did not prevent other, similar cases from going to trial. In 
2012, Ira Simatupang, a doctor from a hospital in Tangerang, was charged over private emails to 
friends that accused a colleague of sexual harassment; the colleague denied the charge.
61
She was 
sentenced to five months’ probation without jail time in July 2012. In November, the high court 
extended it to two years; she said she would appeal.
62
Several other criminal cases disproportionate to the offence have been filed under the ITE Law in 
the past two years, including defamation charges filed by a member of parliament involving photos 
of her on Twitter,
63
and an SMS defamation complaint between two politicians.
64
No indictments 
were reported in these cases, which appeared to stall at the police level. Still, they increase self-
censorship, and have begun to spur public demand for the law to be amended. Unfortunately, while 
an MCI spokesman promised to prioritize revising the online defamation provisions in 2013, they 
had yet to materialize during the coverage period of this report.
65
In 2010, the government introduced a draft Computer Crimes Law into parliament.
66
Although 
mostly addressing business transactions, it also stipulated restrictions on computer and internet 
usage, and continued the trend of prescribing harsher penalties for offenses already criminalized 
56
  “Membaca Putusan Kasasi MA Dalam Kasus Prita” [Reading into Supreme Court Decision in Prita Case], Dunia Angara, July 
22, 2011, http://anggara.org/2011/07/22/membaca‐putusan‐kasasi‐ma‐dalam‐kasus‐prita/
57
 Hertanto Soebijoto, “Kasus Prita: Lima LSM Ajukan ‘Amicus Curiae’” [Prita case: 5 NGOs submit Amicus Curiae], Kompas, 
October 14, 2009, http://bit.ly/15BWpOA.  
58
 Cyprianus Anto Saptowalyono, “Humas PT Banten: Putusan Buat Prita Belum Berkekuatan Hukum Tetap” [Banten Corporate 
Public Relations: Verdict for Prita Does Not Have Legal Power], Kompas, December 7, 2009, 
http://m.kompas.com/news/read/data/2009.12.07.13135791.  
59
 Ina Parlina, “Supreme Court Overturns Acquittal of Housewife Prita,” Jakarta Post, July 9, 2011, 
http://www.thejakartapost.com/news/2011/07/09/supreme‐court‐overturns‐acquittal‐housewife‐prita.html
60
 “Ini Dia Kronologi Prita Mencari Keadilan,” Detik, September 18, 2013, 
http://news.detik.com/read/2012/09/18/124551/2023887/10/ini‐dia‐kronologi‐prita‐mencari‐keadilan?nd771104bcj.  
61
 “Prosecutor Demands Six Months in Prison for Doctor Who Sent Offensive Emails,” Jakarta Globe, June 13, 2012, 
http://bit.ly/16AfH7O 
62
 Andi Saputra, “Tangis Dr. Ira, Curhat Perilaku Cabul Atasan via Email Malah Dipidana” [Dr Ira Sentenced for Obscene Email, 
Weeps,”  Detik,   http://bit.ly/ZLLoRx.  
63
 Lia Harahap, “Kartika Siap Hadapi Laporan Anggota F‐Gerindra Noura Gara‐gara Twitter” [Kartika ready to report Gerindra 
Faction Member Noura because of Twitter], Detik, May 13, 2011, http://bit.ly/18Ahben.  
64
 Aprisal Rahmatullah, “Yusuf Supendi Coba Jerat Presiden PKS Dengan Pasel ITE” [Yusuf Supendi use ITE law to report PKS 
(Social Justice Party) President], Detik, March 29, 2011, http://news.detik.com/read/2011/03/29/180409/1604007/10/yusuf‐
supendi‐coba‐jerat‐presiden‐pks‐dengan‐pasal‐ite
65
 “Kemenkominfo Prioritaskan Revisi UU ITE Tahun Ini,” Kompas,  January 13, 2013, 
http://tekno.kompas.com/read/2013/01/16/11530420/Kemenkominfo.Prioritaskan.Revisi.UU.ITE.Tahun.Ini.  
66
 The Computer Crimes Law is abbreviated as TPT or the “Tipiti bill” after its Bahasa name, Tindak Pidana Teknologi Informasi. 
Wendy Zeldin, “Indonesia: Cyber Crime Bill,” Library of Congress, January 13, 2010, 
http://www.loc.gov/lawweb/servlet/lloc_news?disp3_l205401769_text
377
C# PDF Annotate Library: Draw, edit PDF annotation, markups in C#.
Get PDF document. String fileInpath = @""; PDFDocument doc = new PDFDocument(fileInpath); // Get all annotations. Get PDF document.
online pdf metadata viewer; pdf metadata editor online
How to C#: Modify Image Metadata (tag)
VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET Excel How to C#: Modify Image Metadata (tag). With XImage.Raster, you can get the image tags and modify them rapidly
pdf xmp metadata editor; pdf metadata viewer
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
I
NDONESIA
under existing legislation.
67
Passage of the measure would potentially increase the number of laws 
regulating criminal defamation to eight, with each calling for a different sentence.  
A draft law on ICT convergence to replace the Telecommunications Law, the Broadcasting Law, 
and possibly the ITE Law, is also under discussion. Critics have raised concerns that under the law, 
websites and other ICT applications would be required to obtain a license from the MCI for a fee, a 
process that could place restrictions on freedom of expression and the open source community, as 
well as Wi-Fi hotspots.
68
As of May 2013, neither of the drafts had been enacted. 
The police,
69
the Indonesian Corruption Commission,
70
and the national narcotics board Badan 
Narkotika  Nasional  have legal  authority to conduct  surveillance in Indonesia,
71
while the anti-
pornography law requires cybercafe owners to monitor their customers. There is little oversight 
and there are few checks in place to prevent abuse of monitoring powers used to combat terrorism, 
the best known use of surveillance techniques. Surveillance concerns intensified in 2011 with the 
passage in October of a new State Intelligence Law, though several problematic provisions were 
removed prior to  passage,  partly  thanks to  civil society  activism.
72
International  and domestic 
human rights groups said the law authorized the state intelligence body, Badan Intelijen Negara, to 
intercept communications. Although a court order is required in most cases, concerns remain that 
due to limits on judicial independence, permission will be granted too easily.
73
The law is one of at 
least nine that allow surveillance or wiretapping, yet the only other law that explicitly requires 
judicial oversight involves narcotics. Even then, the procedures are unclear. In October 2012, the 
Indonesian Constitutional Court rejected a request for judicial review of the State Intelligence Law 
by  the  Alliance  for  Independent  Journalists,  four  other  civil  society  groups,  and  thirteen 
individuals.
74
In 2013, news reports said the MCI was investigating three ISPs after the University of Toronto-
based  Citizen  Lab  detected  FinSpy  spyware  from  the  FinFisher  surveillance  apparently  being 
operated by the providers or their customers.
75
67
 Muhammad Aminudin, “Cyber Crime Menggurita, DPR Kebut UU Tindak Pidana TI” [Cybercrimes Imminent, Parliament 
Speedup Cybercrime Law], Detik, March 3, 2012, http://inet.detik.com/read/2012/03/25/091604/1875607/399/cyber‐crime‐
menggurita‐dpr‐kebut‐uu‐tindak‐pidana‐ti
68
 Harry Sufehmi, Twitter post, October 8, 2010, 23:30, https://twitter.com/sufehmi
69
 “Law No. 16 of 2003 on the Stipulation of Government Regulation in Lieu of Law No. 1 of 2002 on the Eradication of Crimes of 
Terrorism” (State Gazette No. 46 of 2003, Supplement to the State Gazette No. 4285), available at: http://bit.ly/18zYER7.  
70
 Ministry of State Secretariat of the Republic of Indonesia, “Law No. 30 of 2002 on the Anti‐Corruption Commission,” 
http://www.setneg.go.id/components/com_perundangan/docviewer.php?id=300&filename=UU_no_30_th_2002.pdf.  
71
 Ministry of State Secretariat of the Republic of Indonesia, “Law No. 35 of 2009 on Narcotics,” http://bit.ly/19etZoD.  
72
 International Crisis Group, “Indonesia: Debate over a New Intelligence Bill,” Asia Briefing no. 124, July 12, 2011, 
http://www.crisisgroup.org/en/regions/asia/south‐east‐asia/indonesia/B124‐indonesia‐debate‐over‐a‐new‐intelligence‐
bill.aspx.  
73
 Human Rights Watch, “Indonesia: Repeal new Intelligence Law. Overbroad Provisions Facilitate Repression,” October 26, 
2011, http://www.hrw.org/print/news/2011/10/26/indonesia‐repeal‐new‐intelligence‐law
74
 Arif Abrams, “MK Tolak Uji Materi UU Intelijen Negara” [The Court Rejected State Intelligence Law Judicial Review], 
Kontan, October 10, 2012, http://nasional.kontan.co.id/news/mk‐tolak‐uji‐materi‐uu‐intelijen‐negara.  
75
 Enricko Lukman, “Indonesian Top Internet Service Providers Accused of Spying on Users,” March 18, 2013, 
http://www.techinasia.com/indonesian‐top‐internet‐service‐providers‐accused‐spying‐users/
378
VB.NET PDF: Get Started with PDF Library
rotate PDF pages, C#.NET search text in PDF, C#.NET edit PDF bookmark, C#.NET edit PDF metadata, C#.NET VB.NET PDF: Get Started with .NET PDF Library Using VB.
rename pdf files from metadata; remove metadata from pdf acrobat
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
Scan image to PDF, tiff and various image formats. Get image information, such as its location, zonal information, metadata, and so on.
remove metadata from pdf online; pdf xmp metadata viewer
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
I
NDONESIA
Mobile phone users are technically required to register their numbers with the government by text 
message when they buy a phone, though this obligation is often ignored. Some telecommunication 
companies are known to have complied with law enforcement agencies’ requests for data. In 2011, 
amidst concerns that the RIM’s Blackberry encrypted communication network would hinder anti-
terrorism and anti-corruption efforts, the company reportedly cooperated with the authorities in 
isolated  incidents,
76
and agreed to establish a local server. When they developed this in Singapore 
instead  of  Indonesia,  the  government  threatened  to  introduce  a  regulation  requiring 
telecommunications companies to build data centers in-country. This has yet to materialize, and 
RIM has resisted the pressure,
77
although some recent news reports said it was losing its market 
dominance.
78
There have been no reports of extralegal attacks, intimidation, or torture of bloggers or other 
internet  users.  However,  it  is  common  for  police—and  sometimes  Islamic  fundamentalist 
groups—to conduct searches of cybercafes without prior notice, since the venues are perceived as 
promoting immoral conduct.
79
Most of the searches are conducted without warrants and are rarely 
followed by court proceedings, leading observers to believe police carry out some raids to extract 
bribes from the owners. 
Politically motivated cyberattacks against civil society groups have not been reported in Indonesia. 
However, several government websites have been targeted in the past. 
76
 Arientha Primanita and Faisal Maliki Baskoro, “Pressure on BlackBerry Maker to Build Servers in Indonesia,” Jakarta Globe, 
December 14, 2011, http://www.thejakartaglobe.com/business/pressure‐on‐blackberry‐maker‐to‐build‐servers‐in‐
indonesia/484588
77
 “RIM: Buat Apa Bangun Server Blackberry di Indonesia” [RIM: Create a Server for BlackBerry in Indonesia?], Detik, February 
21, 2012, http://inet.detik.com/read/2012/02/21/151942/1847914/317/rim‐buat‐apa‐bangun‐server‐blackberry‐di‐indonesia.  
78
 “BlackBerry Searching High and Low in India, Indonesia,” Reuters, February 4, 2013, 
http://in.reuters.com/article/2013/02/04/blackberry‐india‐asia‐idINDEE91300220130204
79
 “Shariah Police Arrest Five in Banda Aceh Punk Raid,” Jakarta Globe, September 5, 2012, 
http://www.thejakartaglobe.com/archive/shariah‐police‐arrest‐five‐in‐banda‐aceh‐punk‐raid/
 “Police Bust High School Students for Cutting Class in Favor of Facebook,” Jakarta Globe, March 3, 2010, 
http://www.thejakartaglobe.com/home/police‐bust‐high‐school‐students‐for‐cutting‐class‐in‐favor‐of‐facebook/361673.  
379
VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images
Capture image from whole PDF based on special characteristics. Get image information, such as its location, zonal information, metadata, and so on.
pdf metadata online; batch update pdf metadata
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
You can easily get pages from a PDF file, and then use these pages to create and output a new PDF file. Pages order will be retained.
read pdf metadata; get pdf metadata
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
I
RAN
I
RAN
 In a bid to increase domestic speeds and decrease international data costs, authorities
throttled encrypted traffic from outside connections and set out to transfer Iranian
content to domestically-hosted servers (see O
BSTACLES TO 
A
CCESS
).
 Blogs and news sites which support President Ahmadinejad were blocked as part of a
larger conflict between conservative factions due to the June 2013 presidential election
(see L
IMITS ON 
C
ONTENT
).
 The  government  has  moved  to  more  sophisticated  instruments  for  blocking  text
messages,  filtering  content,  and  preventing  the  use  of  circumvention  tools  in
anticipation of the election (see L
IMITS ON 
C
ONTENT
).
 Sattar Beheshti, a prominent blogger and critic of Ahmadinejad, was killed while in
police custody (see V
IOLATIONS OF 
U
SER 
R
IGHTS
).
2012 
2013 
I
NTERNET 
F
REEDOM 
S
TATUS
N
OT
F
REE
N
OT
F
REE
Obstacles to Access (0-25) 
21 
22 
Limits on Content (0-35) 
32 
32 
Violations of User Rights (0-40) 
37 
37 
Total (0-100) 
90 
91 
*0=most free, 100=least free
e
P
OPULATION
78.9 million
I
NTERNET 
P
ENETRATION 
2012: 
26 percent
S
OCIAL 
M
EDIA
/ICT
A
PPS 
B
LOCKED
Yes
P
OLITICAL
/S
OCIAL 
C
ONTENT 
B
LOCKED
:
Yes
B
LOGGERS
/ICT
U
SERS 
A
RRESTED
Yes
P
RESS 
F
REEDOM 
2013
S
TATUS
Not Free
K
EY 
D
EVELOPMENTS
:
M
AY 
2012
A
PRIL 
2013 
380
C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
String inputFilePath = Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.pdf"; PDFDocument doc = new PDFDocument(inputFilePath); // get a text manager from the document object
extract pdf metadata; analyze pdf metadata
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
I
RAN
This report covers events between May 1, 2012 and April 30, 2013. On June 14, 2013, Iranians 
took to the polls to elect a new president for the first time since the deeply-flawed presidential elections 
of 2009, which led to large-scale protests and a violent crackdown on supporters of the opposition 
“Green Movement.” With an eye on preventing a repeat of 2009, authorities waged an aggressive 
campaign of filtering websites, blogs, and even text messages that expressed support of certain political 
candidates. In the week leading up to the vote, the disruption of services reached its peak. Encrypted 
traffic was throttled to 1 to 5 percent of normal speeds and the authorities used a “white list” to block 
all international connections that were not pre-approved. Because of this, most online tools that allow 
users to circumvention censorship and communicate anonymously were blocked or dysfunctional. A 
large number of Iranian activists and journalists were targeted by sophisticated malware attacks or 
smear campaigns on social media.  
Hassan Rouhani, a cleric and political opponent of President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, was commonly 
seen as the most moderate or pragmatic candidate in the race. This also applied to issues of internet 
freedom, on which he stated that some Iranian authorities were “living in the 19
th
century while 
today’s world is the information world.”
1
Rouhani was elected president after only the first round with 
just over 50 percent of votes and took office on August 3, 2013. 
The internet was first introduced in Iran during the 1990s to support technological and scientific 
progress in an economy that had been badly damaged by eight years of war with Iraq. Until 2000, 
the  private  sector  was  the  main  driver  of  internet  development.  This  changed  under  the 
government of the reformist President Mohammad Khatami (1997–2005), when the authorities 
invested heavily in expanding the internet infrastructure, but also began to clamp down on free 
expression online. Meanwhile, Supreme Leader Ali Hosseini Khamenei first asserted control over 
the internet through a May 2001 decree that centralized service providers’ connections to the 
international internet. Internet filtering, which began toward the end of the Khatami presidency in 
2005, has become more severe since the disputed presidential election in June 2009. 
Alongside the expansion of existing controls, in July 2011 the Iranian authorities began referring to 
the creation of a “National Information Network” (NIN), ostensibly to create a “safe internet.”
2
Though confirmed details of the plan remain sketchy, objectives include the mandatory registration 
of internet protocol (IP) addresses, the moving of government-approved websites to servers based 
inside the country, and the launching of Iranian equivalents of major online services like e-mail, 
social-networking sites, and search engines. These measures will restrict online anonymity, increase 
monitoring capabilities, and allow Iranian authorities to control access to particular international 
1
 Iranian Internet Infrastructure and Policy Report, April – June 2013, June 2013, Small Media, available at 
http://smallmedia.org.uk/InfoFlowReportAPRIL.pdf.http://smallmedia.org.uk/IIIPJune.pdf
2
 “Iran to launch national data network,” Press TV, August 10, 2011, http://www.presstv.ir/detail/193306.html;. 
I
NTRODUCTION
E
DITOR
N
OTE ON 
R
ECENT 
D
EVELOPMENTS
381
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
I
RAN
communication flows during periods of political unrest without the need to shut down all domestic 
services.  
Despite all of these limitations, the internet remains the only viable means for Iranian citizens and 
dissenters to obtain news and organize themselves. Traditional media outlets are tightly controlled 
by the authorities, and  satellite broadcasting from outside Iran is subjected to heavy jamming. 
Paralleling the rise in censorship, the use of virtual private networks (VPNs), proxies, and other 
circumvention tools has also grown dramatically since 2009. Nonetheless, authorities blocked these 
tools in March 2013, forcing users to switch to a different set of well-known tools, which were 
then blocked two months later. These actions were taken as a set of broader measures to increase 
security and cut down on dissent in the run up to the June 2013 presidential election. While sites 
related to discriminated religions, liberal opposition movements, human rights, and international 
news outlets remain blocked,  the past year saw  an increase in filtering of websites and blogs 
supportive of President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, whose relationship with the Supreme Leader has 
soured.  Currency-exchange  sites  were  also  blocked  as  the  government  sought  to  control  the 
devaluation of the Iranian rial. Finally, numerous activists and ordinary Iranians remained in prison, 
while many more were detained over the past year. The brutality of the security forces is well-
known, and this year the death of blogger Sattar Beheshti caused outrage after it was exposed over 
social media.  
Current statistics on the number of internet users in Iran are inconsistent and highly disputed, 
though  most observers  agree  that  usage  continues to  grow. On the  one hand,  data  from the 
Statistical Center of Iran, a government body, suggests that over 21 percent of the country’s 20.3 
million households were connected to the internet in 2011. These statistics also put the number of 
total internet users at 11 million or a penetration rate of almost 15 percent.
3
On the other hand, 
Iran’s Center for Managing National Development of Internet (MATMA), a government-affiliated 
organization,  claimed  that  60  percent  of  Iranians  are  connected  to  the  internet,  though  the 
methodology of the study includes the use of cybercafes. Iran's Media News reports that around 13 
percent of Iranian internet users have access to high-speed internet, while 84 percent still rely on 
dial-up connections.
4
In contrast, the International Telecommunication Union (ITU) estimated the number of internet 
users in Iran at 26 percent for 2012.
5
Citing the Iranian Information Technology Organization as its 
source, the ITU also claimed that there are only four fixed-broadband subscriptions per every 100 
3
 “21.4 of Iranian families have access to the Internet”, Wimax News, accessed June 24, 2013,  
http://wimaxnews.ir/NSite/FullStory/News/?Id=3190.  
4
 Radio Zamaneh, “Most internet users still use dial‐up in Iran,” Payvand Iran News, March 24, 2012, 
http://www.payvand.com/news/12/mar/1222.html.  
5
 “Percentage of individuals using the Internet,” International Telecommunications Union, accessed April 25, 2013, 
http://www.itu.int/en/ITU‐D/Statistics/Pages/stat/default.aspx.  
O
BSTACLES TO 
A
CCESS
382
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
I
RAN
inhabitants.
6
Less than four percent of Iranians have access to a high-speed internet connection of at 
least 1.5 Mbps.
7
In terms of user demographics, men are 58 percent more likely to use the internet 
than women, and 94 percent of fixed-internet subscriptions are located in urban areas.
8
Internet speeds are incredibly slow in Iran, which ranked 164 out of 170 countries in a recent 
study.
9
Furthermore, Iranians have the most expensive internet service in the world when price is 
calculated  relative  to  speed,  quality,  and  download  capacities.
10
In  December  2012,  the 
Communication Regulatory Authority approved an increase of broadband internet tariffs by about 
50 percent, resulting in a cost increase for end users by about 10 to 15 percent. According to the 
CRA, the change in price is due to fluctuations in foreign exchange rates which have increased the 
cost of international data traffic.
11
A directive by the CRA asking all ISPs to separate internet traffic from intranet traffic, in line with 
the  continued  implementation  of  the  National  Information  Network  (NIN), has resulted  in  a 
significant increase in speeds when accessing sites hosted inside Iran.
12
It has been said that the full 
implementation of the NIN plan will result in a tenfold increase in the country’s bandwidth.
13
However, the speed of access to sites hosted outside Iran remains very low and the connection is 
one of the most unstable in the world.
14
A number of major ISPs suffer an average of 10 to 20 
percent of packet loss. Renesys, a global network monitoring service, also reported substantial and 
frequent  disruptions  to  the  connectivity  of specific  ISPs in  Iran.
15
(For  more  on the  National 
Information Network, please see “Limits on Content.”) 
Iran’s mobile telephone sector continues to grow as well. According to the ITU, Iran had a mobile 
phone penetration rate of 76.9 percent, up from 41.7 in 2007.
16
Iran is also considered the largest 
potential market for mobile phones in the Middle East and is reportedly investing heavily in its 
mobile infrastructure.
17
RighTel, the third largest mobile service provider of Iran, increased its 
coverage for 3G and now has 17 cities under partial 3G mobile coverage. However, Iran’s security-
6
 “Fixed (wired)‐broadband subscriptions,” International Telecommunications Union, accessed April 25, 2013, 
http://www.itu.int/en/ITU‐D/Statistics/Pages/stat/default.aspx
7
 “Less than 1 percent of Iranians have high‐speed internet,” Trend, September 3, 2012, 
http://en.trend.az/regions/iran/2061143.html.  
8
 “21.4 of families have access to the Internet”, Wimax News, accessed June 26, 2103 
http://wimaxnews.ir/NSite/FullStory/News/?Id=3190.  
9
 Radio Zamaneh, “Most internet users still use dial‐up in Iran,” Payvand Iran News, March 24, 2012, 
http://www.payvand.com/news/12/mar/1222.html.  
10
 Radio Zamaneh, “Most internet users still use dial‐up in Iran,” Payvand Iran News. 
11
 “The effects of sudden increase of cost accessing Internet,”, ISNA, accessed 26 June, 2013, see http://bit.ly/ZdJ7o1.  
12
"The separation of Internet and Intranet traffic has been initiated", IT Iran, accessed 26 June, 2013 
http://itiran.com/?type=news&id=17699.  
13
 "Launch of National Information Network, First half of this year", IT Iran, accessed 26 June, 2013 
http://itna.ir/vdcfmcd0.w6dy0agiiw.html.  
14
 “BGP Update Report”, SecLists.Org Security Mailing List Archive, accessed 26 June, 2013 
http://seclists.org/nanog/2012/Nov/312.  
15
 Renesys Iran Internet Events Bulletin 
http://www.renesys.com/eventsbulletin‐cgi‐bin/mt‐search.cgi?search=iran&IncludeBlogs=1&limit=20.  
16
 “Mobile cellular,” International Telecommunications Union, accessed April 25, 2013, http://www.itu.int/en/ITU‐
D/Statistics/Pages/stat/default.aspx
17
 “Surfing the web on am iPhone in Iran, Guardian, accessed June 24, 2013, 
http://socialenterprise.guardian.co.uk/it/articles/media‐network‐partner‐zone‐publici/web‐iphone‐iran.  
383
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
I
RAN
driven view of the internet has slowed the development of internet infrastructure in the country. 
For example, a plan to make high-speed wireless internet available in public spaces in Tehran, 
proposed by the ISP MobinNet, was blocked by the CRA after it failed to provide a license to the 
company with  no  official explanation.
18
In  April  2013,  the Psychological Association  of  Qom 
Hawza sent a letter to the parliament requesting that RighTel’s 3G service be blocked in order to 
prevent “the breakdown of Iranian families” and “immorality among the youth.”
19
The use of mobile 
wireless is often criticized for allowing video calls between members of the opposite gender. 
In Iran, the limitations imposed on ICTs closely follow the country’s internal political dynamics. 
For example, beginning around October 6, 2012, and timed with sporadic protests over economic 
conditions, the Telecommunications Company of Iran temporarily blocked several types of foreign-
hosted media files. According to initial reports, this blocking targeted audio (.MP3), video (.MP4, 
.AVI),  and  Adobe  Flash/Shockwave  content.
20
 Over  late  2012  and  early  2013,  authorities 
periodically throttled the speeds of virtual private networks (VPNs) in order to dissuade Iranians 
from their use. In anticipation of the June 2013 presidential elections, the authorities blocked all 
circumvention tools in March 2013 (see “Limits on Content”) and engaged in extreme throttling of 
encrypted traffic, with secure traffic running at between one to five percent of the speeds for 
unsecured and domestic traffic. Authorities effectively ran a “white list” of permitted applications 
and  services, using deep  packet inspection  (DPI)  to monitor content  and distinguish  between 
unencrypted, encrypted, and abnormal traffic. International connections and traffic that did not fall 
within an approved “white list” were throttled and terminated after 60 seconds. Domestic traffic, 
which is monitored, did not fall under these restrictions.
21
In  a bid to decrease costs and improve speeds, authorities have been looking to move Iranian 
content to servers hosted within the country. This would allow the state-owned internet company 
to  avoid  paying high international  traffic costs,  especially taxing  during this  time of  currency 
fluctuations brought on by economic sanctions. According to Iran’s Deputy Minister of ICT, the 
government has already moved more than 90 percent of its websites to providers based inside the 
country and is now pressuring privately-owned websites to follow suit.
22
Compliance has been 
limited, however, primarily because hosting services offered by Iranian companies are significantly 
more expensive than those of their overseas competitors due to economic sanctions on technology 
imports. 
Iran’s deputy minister for ICT has stated that more than 90 percent of the government’s websites 
have been moved to domestic servers, and the authorities are pressuring privately-owned websites 
to  follow  suit.  However,  since  Iranian  companies  cannot  offer  the  same  low prices as  many 
18
 “License to launch a public WiFi network was not issued”, Mehrnews, accessed June 24, 2013, 
 http://www.mehrnews.com/detail/News/1640766.  
19
 Iranian Internet Infrastructure and Policy Report, March – April 2013, April 2013, Small Media, available at 
http://smallmedia.org.uk/InfoFlowReportAPRIL.pdf
20
 “Some  audio and video formats have been blocked in Iran”, BBC Persian, accessed June 24, 2013, 
http://www.bbc.co.uk/persian/science/2012/10/121005_na_audio_and_video_format_blocked_in_iran.shtml.  
21
 Iranian Internet Infrastructure and Policy Report, March – April 2013, April 2013, Small Media, available at 
http://smallmedia.org.uk/InfoFlowReportAPRIL.pdf
22
 “The ministry promises 20 Mbps internet again,” [translated] Mashregh News, July 23, 2011, see http://bit.ly/16tlGLu.  
384
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested