download pdf file from server in asp.net c# : Remove metadata from pdf file software Library dll windows asp.net azure web forms FOTN%202013_Full%20Report_04-part1543

F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
A
NGOLA
advertising revenue from both state and private sources, since it is often denied to news outlets that 
publish critical stories.
31
In recent years, citizens have increasingly taken to the internet as a platform for political debate, to 
express  discontent  with  the  country’s  current  state  of  affairs,  and  to  launch  digital  activism 
initiatives. Similar to many other African countries, the Angolan youth have embraced social media 
tools and used them to fuel protest movements across the country.
32
The positive impact of digital 
media tools in Angola was particularly pronounced during the August 2012 parliamentary elections 
when ICTs were used in innovative ways to advance electoral transparency. For example, citizens 
were able to report electoral irregularities in real time on the monitoring website Eleições Angola 
2012,
33
while  the  National  Electoral  Commission  used  the  internet  and  iPads  to  scan  voter 
registration cards.
34
A Gallup poll cited by the African Media Initiative found that the internet and 
smartphones  had  eroded  the  government’s  control  over  news  and  information,  with  only  16 
percent of polled Angolans giving the president a thumbs-up rating.
35
Nevertheless, the president’s 
ruling MPLA party still swept the elections with over 70 percent of votes.
36
In the past year, concerns over state surveillance of ICTs increased when an investigative news 
report  published  in  April  2013  said  that  the  Angolan  intelligence  services  were  planning  to 
implement  an  electronic  monitoring  system  that  could  track  e-mail  and  other  digital 
communications, with equipment and expertize from Germany. One case of violence against a 
journalist for the online news radio site, Voice of America, was assaulted for his critical reporting, 
while the prominent writer and blogger  Rafael Marques de Morais had his personal computer 
attacked  with  malware in  a  purported attempt  to  compromise  his communications  during  an 
ongoing defamation lawsuit lodged against him in early 2013. 
The Angolan constitution provides for freedom of expression and the press, and in 2006, Angola 
became one of the first African countries to enact a freedom of information law.  In practice, 
however, accessing government information remains extremely difficult. The judiciary is subject to 
considerable  political  influence,  with  Supreme  Court  justices  appointed  to  life  terms  by  the 
president  and  without legislative oversight; nevertheless,  the courts  have been  known to  rule 
against the government on occasion, including most recently in May 2012 when the court rejected 
31
 Freedom House, “Angola,” Freedom of the Press 2013, http://www.freedomhouse.org/report/freedom‐press/2013/angola.  
32
 Sara Moreira, “Year of Change in Angola, But Everything Stays the Same,” Global Voices, December 29, 2012, 
http://globalvoicesonline.org/2012/12/29/angola‐2012‐year‐of‐change‐everything‐stays‐the‐same/.  
33
 Eleições Angola 2012: http://eleicoesangola2012.com/  
34
 “Angolans Vote in Booths Armed with iPads,” news24, August 31, 2012, http://www.news24.com/Africa/News/Angolans‐
vote‐in‐booths‐armed‐with‐iPads‐20120831.  
35
 African Media Ini., Twitter post, August 31, 2012, 7:21am, https://twitter.com/African_Media/status/241480901308063744.  
36
 “Angola’s Ruling Party Declared Election Winner,” CNN, September 3, 2012, 
http://www.cnn.com/2012/09/02/world/africa/angola‐elections.  
V
IOLATIONS OF 
U
SER 
R
IGHTS
35
Remove metadata from pdf file - add, remove, update PDF metadata in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Allow C# Developers to Read, Add, Edit, Update and Delete PDF Metadata
acrobat pdf additional metadata; remove metadata from pdf online
Remove metadata from pdf file - VB.NET PDF metadata library: add, remove, update PDF metadata in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Enable VB.NET Users to Read, Write, Edit, Delete and Update PDF Document Metadata
google search pdf metadata; rename pdf files from metadata
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
A
NGOLA
the appointment of the MPLA-favored candidate to head the National Electoral Commission in 
advance of the August parliamentary elections.
37
Meanwhile,  stringent  laws  regarding  state  security  and  insult  run  counter  to  constitutional 
guarantees and hamper media freedom, such as the Article 26 state security law passed in 2010 
known as that allows for the detention of individuals who insult the country or president in “public 
meetings or by disseminating words, images, writings, or sound.”
38
Politicians, on the other hand, 
are  immune.  Defamation and  libel are  crimes punishable by imprisonment.  In recent years,  a 
number of journalists in the traditional media sphere have been prosecuted for criminal defamation 
in lawsuits initiated by government officials,
39
though such actions have not been taken against 
online journalists or internet users as of yet.  
In August 2011, a new Law on Electronic Communications and Services of the Information Society 
was  enacted,  which  delineated  citizens’  rights  to  privacy  and  security  online,  among  other 
provisions related to regulating the telecommunications sector.
40
Despite these acknowledgments, 
the Angolan government has become increasingly keen on limiting internet freedom through legal 
measures,  as  indicated  by  the  alarming  Law  to  Combat  Crime  in  the  Area  of  Information 
Technologies and Communication introduced by the National Assembly in March 2011. Often 
referred to as the cybercrime bill, the law was ultimately withdrawn in May 2011 as a result of 
international pressure and vocal objections from civil society. The new law aimed to limit freedom 
of expression more harshly online than offline by increasing penalties prescribed for offenses laid 
out under Angola’s criminal code committed through electronic media. For example, Article 16 of 
the cybercrime bill increased the penalty for defamation, libel, and slander conducted online over 
the penalty defined in the criminal code by a third.
41
If  passed,  the  law  also  would  have  empowered  the  authorities  with  the  ability  to  intercept 
information from private devices without a warrant
42
and prosecute individuals for objectionable 
speech expressed using electronic media tools and on social media platforms. Sending an electronic 
message interpreted as an effort to “endanger the integrity of national independence or to destroy 
or influence the functionality of state institutions” would have yielded a penalty of two to eight 
years in prisons, in addition to fines. The law would have further criminalized the dissemination of 
any  “recordings,  pictures  and  video”  of an  individual  without  the subject’s  consent,
43
even  if 
produced lawfully, which could have impeded journalists’ ability to report on public protests or 
37
 “Angola Court Removes ‘MPLA’ Election Head Susana Ingles,” BBC News, May 18, 2012, http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world‐
africa‐18117413.  
38
 “Angola: Revise New Security Law, Free Prisoners in Cabinda,” Human Rights Watch, December 9, 2010, 
http://www.hrw.org/news/2010/12/08/angola‐revise‐new‐security‐law‐free‐prisoners‐cabinda.  
39
 “Angola: Defamation Laws Silence Journalists,” Human Rights Watch, August 12, 2013, 
http://www.hrw.org/news/2013/08/12/angola‐defamation‐laws‐silence‐journalists.  
40
 AVM Advogados, “News from Angola,” newsletter, August 2011, http://www.avm‐
advogados.com/newsletter/2011.08/2011‐08_avm‐newsletter_eng.html#NFA‐01.  
41
 “Angola: Withdraw Cybercrime Bill,” Human Rights Watch, May 13, 2011, http://www.hrw.org/news/2011/05/13/angola‐
withdraw‐cybercrime‐bill.  
42
 “Angola Clamps Down on Internet, Social Media,” Journalism, April 15, 2011, http://www.journalism.co.za/index.php/news‐
and‐insight/news130/165‐media‐freedom1/4034‐angola‐clamps‐down‐on‐internet‐social‐media.html.  
43
 Committee to Protect Journalists, “Angola,” Attacks on the Press in 2011, February 2012, http://cpj.org/2012/02/attacks‐on‐
the‐press‐in‐2011‐angola.php.  
36
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
C# Sample Code: Remove Password from PDF File in C#.NET. These C# demos will help you to delete password for an encrypted PDF file. // Define input file path.
pdf metadata; remove metadata from pdf acrobat
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
Remove bookmarks, annotations, watermark, page labels and article threads from PDF Document and metadata. NET Demo Code to Optimize An Exist PDF File in Visual
pdf metadata online; view pdf metadata in explorer
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
A
NGOLA
instances of police brutality using digital tools. The bill additionally prescribed penalties between 8 
and 12 years in prison for espionage and whistle blowing activities, which would have included the 
act of seeking access to classified information on an electronic system “in order to reveal such 
information or to help others to do so.” The same penalty was provided for accessing unclassified 
information that could be deemed as endangering state security.
44
In an unexpected move, the Angolan government in May 2011 decided to remove the proposed 
cybercrime legislation from parliament moments before it was due to be voted into law, in large 
part as a result of widespread opposition and pressure from civil society.
45
However, a government 
minister publicly stated the same year that special clauses regarding cybercrimes would instead be 
incorporated into an ongoing revision of the penal code, leaving open the possibility of internet-
specific restrictions coming into force in future.  
There are no restrictions on anonymous communication such as website or SIM card registration 
requirements, and to date, there is little evidence that the state illegally monitors and intercepts the 
electronic communications of its citizens. Nevertheless, an investigative report conducted by the 
exile news and information outlet Club-K revealed in April 2013 that intelligence and state security 
services were planning to implement an electronic monitoring system that could track e-mail and 
other digital communications. According to Club-K, the sophisticated monitoring equipment was 
imported from Germany and included German technicians who assisted in the system’s installation 
on a military base in Cape Ledo.
46
The details of Club-K’s findings could not be corroborated as of 
August 2013.  
Meanwhile, there is no concrete evidence of whether or to what extent ICT service providers are 
required to assist the government in monitoring the communications of their users, though the 
strong presence of the state in the ownership structure of Angola’s telecoms, particularly of mobile 
phone operators, suggests that the authorities are likely able to wield their influence over service 
providers if desired. Cybercafes, however, are not known to be subject to such requirements.  
Attacks and extralegal violence against journalists in the traditional media sphere are unfortunately 
common in Angola,
47
and these actions may become more common against online journalists and 
social media users as the internet increasingly becomes an empowering tool for citizens to vocalize 
discontent  and  mobilize  against  the  government.  One  case  of  violence  against  Antonio 
Capalandanda, a journalist for the online news and radio site Voice of America, was reported in 
May 2012, when the journalist was approached by an individual who identified himself as a state 
security  agent and  threatened  to  harm  Capalandanda  if he  continued  to  report  on topics  the 
44
 “Angola: Withdraw Cybercrime Bill,” Human Rights Watch. 
45
 Louise Redvers, “Angola Victory for Cyber Activists?”  
46
 “Alemães montam sistema de escuta em Angola” [Germans assemble listening system in Angola], Club‐K, April 23, 2012, 
http://www.club‐k.net/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=14932:alemaes‐montam‐sistema‐de‐escuta‐em‐
angola&catid=11:foco‐do‐dia&Itemid=130.  
47
 According to the Committee to Protect Journalists, at least 10 journalists have been killed in Angola since 1992. See, “10 
Journalists Killed in Angola since 1992/Motive Confirmed”, Committee to Protect Journalists, accessed August 2013, 
http://www.cpj.org/killed/africa/angola/. ; “Angola: Stop Stifling Free Speech,” Human Rights Watch, August 1, 2012, 
http://www.hrw.org/news/2012/08/01/angola‐stop‐stifling‐free‐speech.  
37
VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
Ability to remove consecutive pages from PDF file in VB.NET. Enable specified pages deleting from PDF in Visual Basic .NET class.
batch pdf metadata; extract pdf metadata
VB.NET PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in
Image: Insert Image to PDF. Image: Remove Image from PDF Page. Image Link: Edit URL. Bookmark: Edit Bookmark. Metadata: Edit, Delete Metadata. Form Process.
pdf xmp metadata; clean pdf metadata
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
A
NGOLA
government  deemed  objectionable. Known  for his  reporting  on human  rights  issues,  political 
violence, and corruption in Angola, Capalandanda was later assaulted in December 2012 by two 
unidentified assailants who also stole his camera, voice recorder, and notepads. In January 2013, 
Capalandanda’s e-mail account was hacked by an unknown entity.
48
Independent and exile news websites have also been subject to technical violence such as hacking 
and  denial-of-service (DDoS)  attacks, particularly  during periods  of political  contestation.  For 
example,  at  the  height  of  anti-government  protests  in  February  2011,  the  website  of  the 
independent  outlet  Club-K  was  met  with  frequent  interruptions  to  the  point  of  temporary 
disablement.  The popular blog  Maka  Angola,  produced by the renowned critical writer Rafael 
Marques de Morais,  was  also  subject to a number of targeted DDoS  attacks  in 2011.
49
More 
recently  in  early  2013,  Morais’s  personal  computer  was  attacked  with  customized  malware, 
purportedly  to compromise  his  communications  during  an  ongoing defamation  lawsuit  lodged 
against him for his 2011 book, Blood Diamonds: Corruption and Torture in Angola.
50
48
 “Angola: Continued Threats, Acts of Intimidation and Surveillance of Journalist Mr Antonio Capalandanda,” Frontline 
Defenders, January 8, 2013, http://www.frontlinedefenders.org/node/21235.  
49
 Candido Teixeira, “So This is Democracy, 2011 – National Overview Angola 2011,” Media Institute of Southern Africa, 2011, 
http://www.misa.org/downloads/2011/Angola_STID2011.pdf.  
50
 “Angola: Defamation Laws Silence Journalists,” Human Rights Watch.  
38
C# PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
Ability to remove a range of pages from PDF file. Free trial package for quick integration in .NET as well as compatible with 32 bit and 64 bit windows system.
add metadata to pdf; remove metadata from pdf file
C# PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net
Remove bookmarks, annotations, watermark, page labels and article threads from PDF while compressing. Document and metadata. C#.NET DLLs: Compress PDF Document.
change pdf metadata; remove pdf metadata
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
A
RGENTINA
A
RGENTINA
 Cases of intermediary liability were on the rise in 2012 and early 2013, with companies
such  as  Google  and Yahoo facing  take down  requests  and facing fines should they
choose not to comply with court orders (see L
IMITS ON 
C
ONTENT
).
 Argentines utilized social media to mobilize thousands of people for 8N, the largest an
antigovernment protest movement in Argentina in over a decade, which took issue
with corruption, violent crime, and inflation (see L
IMITS ON 
C
ONTENT
).
 In November 2012, a pilot cybercrimes unit was created to combat rising incidents of
hacking in Argentina (see V
IOLATIONS OF 
U
SER 
R
IGHTS
).
2012 
2013 
I
NTERNET 
F
REEDOM 
S
TATUS
F
REE
F
F
REE
Obstacles to Access (0-25) 
Limits on Content (0-35) 
10 
Violations of User Rights (0-40) 
Total (0-100) 
26 
27 
*0=most free, 100=least free
K
EY 
D
EVELOPMENTS
:
M
AY 
2012
A
PRIL 
2013 
P
OPULATION
40.8 million
I
NTERNET 
P
ENETRATION 
2012: 
60 percent
S
OCIAL 
M
EDIA
/ICT
A
PPS 
B
LOCKED
No
P
OLITICAL
/S
OCIAL 
C
ONTENT 
B
LOCKED
No
B
LOGGERS
/ICT
U
SERS 
A
RRESTED
No
P
RESS 
F
REEDOM 
2013
S
TATUS
Partly Free
39
VB.NET PDF File Permission Library: add, remove, update PDF file
Image: Insert Image to PDF. Image: Remove Image from PDF Page. Image Link: Edit URL. Bookmark: Edit Bookmark. Metadata: Edit, Delete Metadata. Form Process.
edit pdf metadata acrobat; pdf metadata viewer
C# PDF bookmark Library: add, remove, update PDF bookmarks in C#.
Help to add or insert bookmark and outline into PDF file in .NET framework. Ability to remove and delete bookmark and outline from PDF document.
add metadata to pdf programmatically; get pdf metadata
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
A
RGENTINA
Although it has been the focus of academic study since the 1980s, the internet was first used for 
commercial purposes in Argentina in 1991.
1
Internet penetration has steadily increased since, and 
Argentina is now home to one of the largest contingents of internet users in South America. In 
2009, access began accelerating, due in part to government policies aimed at improving services and 
expanding broadband connections throughout the country. 
Argentina has an active legal environment, especially regarding free speech and the internet. The 
country’s legal framework has generally protected online freedom of expression and Argentines 
have free access to a wide array of online information. During 2012, multiple legal initiatives were 
presented in Congress regarding matters of intermediary liability, internet neutrality, and network 
surveillance.  
Several  court  judgments  between  2010  and  2013  restricted  access  to  websites  on  claims  of 
defamation  or intellectual property rights violations, with  one ruling  leading to  the  accidental 
blocking of an entire blog-hosting platform. A series of injunctions against search engines in 2012 
also imposed intermediary liability and forced companies to delete links from results presented to 
users.  Although  some  of  these  rulings  threaten  internet  freedom,  due  process  was  generally 
followed in each case and parties were given the chance to appear before the court to dispute the 
charges filed against them. 
The  majority  of  injunctions filed in  2012  were  brought  by  celebrities regarding  content  they 
deemed damaging to their reputations. Although some intermediaries were subsequently ordered 
to  remove  links  and  those individuals  who  posted  the  questionable material were  ordered  to 
provide plaintiffs with monetary compensation, the Court of Appeals overturned some of these 
rulings after receiving  criticism from freedom  of expression advocates  as well as international 
technology companies.
2
In 2012, Argentina also witnessed several instances of retaliation against 
online journalists, including violence, breaches of privacy, and the exposure of bloggers’ personal 
information.  
During  the  December  2012  World  Conference  on  International  Communications,
3
Argentina 
signed  the  International  Telecommunications  Regulations  a  “binding  global  treaty  designed  to 
facilitate  international  interconnection  and  interoperability  of  information  and  communication 
1
 Jorge Amodio, “Historia y Evolución de Internet en Argentina” [History and Evolution of the Internet in Argentina], Internet 
Argentina (blog), May 16, 2010, http://blog.internet‐argentina.net/p/indice.html
2
 The BLUVOL case is particularly relevant. Following a decision regarding defamatory content posted as a comment in a blog 
hosted on blogspot, a Buenos Aires Court of Appeal ordered Google to pay 10,000 Argentine pesos (US$ 2,300) plus court costs 
for damages suffered by the claimant. For case details, see: http://www.diariojudicial.com.ar/documentos/2013‐
Marzo/Bluvol_c_Googlex_daxos_por_blog.doc 
3
 The landmark WCIT conference was convened by ITU in Dubai in December 2012. See: ITU, World Conference on International 
Telecommunications (WCIT‐12): http://www.itu.int/en/wcit‐12/Pages/default.aspx
I
NTRODUCTION
40
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
A
RGENTINA
services.”
4
Despite its status as a signatory, Argentina maintained reservations about being bound by 
the regulations, wanting to safeguard the ability  to take any  measures necessary  to protect  its 
national  interests.
5
Civil  society  organizations  in  Argentina  remained  heavily  involved  in  the 
meeting and expressed continued interest in its outcome.
6
Internet penetration in Argentina has improved consistently over the past decade, reaching 55.8 
percent as of 2012.
7
Mobile web connectivity has also increased in recent years, as cellular phones 
have  continued  to  grow  in  popularity.
8
The  expansion  of  Argentina’s  information  and 
communications technology (ICT) sector has been facilitated by increased government investment in 
telecommunications  infrastructure  and  equipment  over  the  past  three  years.  According  to 
government figures, by September 2012, the number of internet subscriptions in Argentina had 
reached  12.2  million,  with  10.3  million  residential  connections  and  1.9  million  commercial 
connections. As compared to data from 2011, these figures depict an increase of approximately 38 
percent in the residential sector and 100 percent in the commercial sector.
9
Broadband connections, 
offering an average speed of 3 Mbps, have proliferated in recent years, accounting for more than 99 
percent of the internet market by late 2012.
10
Although access is growing across the country, the national Statistics institute,Instituto Nacional de 
Estadísticas y Censos, reports a stark gap between large urban areas (such as the capital Buenos Aires, 
Cordoba, and Santa Fe) and rural provinces; the former account for over 60 percent of home 
internet  connections  in  the  country.
11
In  addition  to  socioeconomic  disparities  and  price 
4
 Anahí Aradas, “Los Lationamericanos y el Control de Internet” [Latin Americans and Control over the Internet], BBC Mundo 
Tecnología online, December 14, 2012, 
http://www.bbc.co.uk/mundo/noticias/2012/12/121214_tecnologia_gobernanza_internet_dubai_aa.shtml
5
 “La Argentina Firmó con Reservas la Propuesta para una Nueva Regulación de Internet” [Argentina Signed the Proposal for 
New Internet Regulation with Reservations], Infotechnology, December 14, 2012, http://www.infotechnology.com/internet/La‐
Argentina‐firmo‐con‐reservas‐la‐propuesta‐para‐una‐nueva‐regulacion‐de‐Internet‐20121214‐0001.html
6
 Hisham Almiraat, “What Happened at the WCIT‐12: Interview with Beatriz Busaniche,” Global Voices Advocacy, December 15, 
2012, http://advocacy.globalvoicesonline.org/2012/12/15/what‐happened‐at‐the‐wcit‐12‐interview‐with‐beatriz‐busaniche
Enrique A. Chaparro, “Después de la WCIT, y Más Allá” [After the WCIT, and Beyond], Fundación Vía Libre, December 19, 2012, 
http://www.vialibre.org.ar/2012/12/19/despues‐de‐la‐wcit‐y‐mas‐alla/
7
 International Telecommunication Union, “Percentage of Individuals Using the Internet, Fixed (Wired) Internet Subscriptions, 
Fixed (Wired)‐broadband Aubscriptions,” 2006 & 2011, http://www.itu.int/ITU‐D/ICTEYE/Indicators/Indicators.aspx#
International Telecommunication Union, “Statistics: Percentage of Individuals Using the Internet, 2000‐2012,” June 17, 2013, 
http://www.itu.int/en/ITU‐D/Statistics/Documents/statistics/2013/Individuals_Internet_2000‐2012.xls
8
 El Tribuno, “El Tribuno, con el Presidente de Google  en Argentina” [The Tribune with the President of Google Argentina], El Tribuno 
online, November 22, 2012, http://bit.ly/1dSs6Db.  
9
 National Institute of Statistics and Censuses, “Accesos a Internet” [Press Reports on Access to Internet, Third Quarter of 2012], 
Ministry of Economics and Public Finances, Institute of Statistics and Censuses, accessed March 18, 2013, 
http://www.indec.gov.ar/nuevaweb/cuadros/14/internet_12_12.pdf.  
10
Yahoo, “La Argentina está Fuera del Podio de Velocidad de Internet en América Latina” [Argentina is Outside the Podium of 
Internet Speed in Latin America], Yahoo News, May 30, 2012, http://ar.noticias.yahoo.com/argentina‐podio‐velocidad‐internet‐
am%C3%A9rica‐latina‐181000405.html
11
 National Institute of Statistics and Censuses, “Accesos a Internet” [Press Reports on Access to Internet, Third Quarter of 
2012], Ministry of Economics and Public Finances, Institute of Statistics and Censuses, accessed March 18, 2013, 
http://www.indec.gov.ar/nuevaweb/cuadros/14/internet_12_12.pdf
O
BSTACLES TO 
A
CCESS
41
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
A
RGENTINA
differences,  National  access  points  in  geographically  remote  areas  such  as  Patagonia  and  the 
Northwest contribute to this urban-rural divide.
12
The average broadband plan costs 115 pesos 
(US$23) per month for the first twelve months, compared to a minimum monthly wage of 2,875 
pesos (US$560). While some studies indicate that the average cost of a broadband plan could be 
almost twice the aforementioned figure, such cost disparity is likely the result of differing scopes of 
analysis—if only the initial price of service is analyzed, a lower cost estimate results; if cost is based 
on average prices for the first two years of service, a higher cost estimate is seen.
13
In recent years, the Argentine government has accelerated its efforts to promote internet access via a 
number of progressive policies. These include: the Digital Agenda of 2009, which established a 
national  plan  for  ICTs  to  connect  citizens  with  government  institutions  in  order  to  create  a 
“knowledge  society;”  the  Argentina  Connected  Plan  of  2010,  a  five-year  initiative  to  expand 
infrastructure and telecommunications services to the entire country; and the Equal Connection Plan 
of 2010, which led to the provision of internet connections at all public secondary schools and laptop 
computers for students throughout the country. Although universal service obligations have been in 
place  since 2001, the Universal Service Trust  Fund,  a  government  initiative  predicated on the 
enforcement of access commitments, was not enacted until November 2010.
14
As of 2013, these policies have resulted in increasing internet access in rural areas, schools, parks, 
and public spaces.
15
Some provinces have also made arrangements with the national government to 
build  a  wider  fiber-optic  network. In  certain  areas,  rural  cooperatives are  responsible  for the 
installation of the network, resulting in significant growth in local penetration rates, and allowing 
provincial  governments  to  plan  for  future  triple  play  service.
16
Considering  the  national 
government’s share of the mobile spectrum, discussions have arisen regarding the availability of tetra 
play service (a bundled service package of broadband internet, television and telephone along with 
wireless  service provisions) in the near  future.  Should  the  federal government decide to  move 
12
 Interview with employee of the Library of the National Communications Commission,, February 18, 2012. 
13
 Hernán Galperín, “Prices and Quality of Broadband in Latin America: Benchmarking and Trends,” Center for Technology and 
Society, University of San Andrés, August 2012, http://www.udesa.edu.ar/files/AdmTecySociedad/12_ENG.pdf
14
 The Universal Serice Trust Fund reinvests one percent of profits from ICT telecommunications companies’ profits to narrow 
the gap in access to broadband services across provinces. 
15
 “Inclusion Digital fue Eje de las Politicas Llevadas Adelante,” [Digital Inclusion was the Center of the Policies], Terra Noticias, 
December 19, 2012, http://noticias.terra.com.ar/inclusion‐digital‐fue‐eje‐de‐las‐politicas‐llevadas‐
adelante,474e7ceb0e2bb310VgnCLD2000000ec6eb0aRCRD.html; “,” [The Equal Connection Plan Continues its Success in 2013], 
AE Tecno,, December 24, 2012, http://tecno.americaeconomia.com/noticias/programa‐argentino‐conectar‐igualdad‐continua‐
con‐exito‐hacia‐el‐2013; “Rural Schools and Islands Will Connect to Internet Through Satellite Antennas,” Diario Victoria, 
August 3, 2012, http://www.diariovictoria.com.ar/2012/08/escuelas‐rurales‐y‐de‐islas‐contaran‐con‐conexion‐a‐internet‐a‐
traves‐de‐antenas‐satelitales/; “Escuelas Rirales y de Islas Contarán con Conexión a Internet a Través de Antenas Satelitales” 
[Island and Rural Schools will have Internet Connection via Satellite Dishes], July 30, 2012, 
http://www.argentinaconectada.gob.ar/notas/3266‐avanza‐la‐instalacin‐internet‐satelital‐escuelas‐rurales‐y‐frontera; Angeles 
Castro, “Ochenta Plazas Tendrán Acceso a Internet” [Eighty Parks will have Internet Access], La Nacion, July 2, 2012, 
http://www.lanacion.com.ar/1486839‐ochenta‐plazas‐tendran‐acceso‐a‐internet
16
 “El 91% de los Neuquinos Tiene Acceso a Banda Ancha en su Casa” [91% of Neuquen People Have Broadband Access at 
Home] La Mañana Neuquen, January 21, 2013, http://www.lmneuquen.com.ar/noticias/2013/1/21/el‐91‐de‐los‐neuquinos‐
tiene‐acceso‐a‐banda‐ancha‐en‐su‐casa_175489; “Cooperativas Instalaron Fibra Optica en el Sur Cordobes” [Cooperatives 
Installed Fiber Optics in the South of Cordoba], El Comercial, December 27, 2012, http://bit.ly/GzrS8W ; “Provinces Will Offer 
their Version of Triple Play Hand in Hand with the Equal Connection Plan”, iProfesional, February 2, 2013, http://bit.ly/13Ijpo3;  
“Implementation of the Network that will Bring Internet to the Whole Province Goes Forward”, El Esquiú, January 28, 2013, 
http://www.elesquiu.com/notas/2013/1/28/sociedad‐269839.asp
42
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
A
RGENTINA
forward  with  such  offerings,  partnerships  may  be  formed with local governments  allowing  for 
federal assistance in the form of necessary infrastructure. It is in this context that the government has 
deemed  the  Federal  Wireless  Network  an  issue  of  public  interest,  a  classification  which  will 
prioritize the expansion of national internet access.
17
In keeping with its expanding ICT investment, 
the Argentine government is now building the first three communications satellites in the country’s 
history.
18
The aforementioned government initiatives have resulted in a surge of data traffic over the national 
network.
19
Although this is a boon to projects dedicated to increasing internet access, in some cases, 
such occurrences have been detrimental to quality of service.
20
Despite new installations of network 
access points designed to improve the user experience, the regional landscape has resulted in small 
businesses being provided with lower quality than residential users.
21
The government has spent 
substantial time and money improving the national network, however connection gaps remain in 
some provinces, where penetration rates remain as low as 25 percent.
22
When  the  telecommunications  industry  was  privatized  in  the  1980s,  the  former  state-owned 
operator was split into two companies: Telecom Argentina, which covers the Northern region of the 
country, and Telefonica de Argentina, which covers the South. Some 300 other companies have 
since  been  granted  licenses  to  operate  as  internet  service  providers  (ISPs).
23
Many  of  these 
enterprises  are  regional  providers  and  serve  as  provincial  subsidiaries  of  the  aforementioned 
umbrella companies or other large firms such as Fibertel (of Grupo Clarín), which also controls a 
notable share of the broadband market.
24
To date, the State has not interfered with international internet connectivity. However, as part of 
the Argentina Connected Plan, the government has begun work on an internal state-sponsored fiber-
optic cable backbone, to be managed by a government-owned firm upon its completion, which is 
17
 “Declaran de interés público la Red Federal Inalámbrica” [Federal Wireless Network Declared A Public Interest], Ambito, 
December 17, 2012, http://ambito.com/noticia.asp?id=667793
18
 “Por Primera Vez Argentina Construirá Tres Satélites de Comunicaciones" [For the First Time Argentina Will Build Three 
Communications Satellites], Ambito, September 10, 2012, http://www.ambito.com/noticia.asp?id=653735
19
 Canal AR, “En un Año Se Cuadruplicó el Tráfico de Datos en la Red Nacional de NAP” [In One Year the Data Traffic of the NAP 
National Network Quadrupled], Canal AR, September 13, 2012, http://www.canal‐ar.com.ar/nota.asp?Id=17758
20
, “Argentina Ocupa el 38 Lugar en la Calidad del Acceso a Internet” [Argentina Ranks 38
th
 on Internet Quality], El Esquiú, 
September 7, 2012, http://www.elesquiu.com/notas/2012/9/7/tecnologia‐253616.asp
21
 “Center in La Plata will Improve Internet Connection”, Bureau de Presna, June 7, 2012, 
http://www.bureaudeprensa.com/comunicados/view.php?bn=bureaudeprensa_inte&key=1339083712; “Brasil y Argentina 
Lideran el Ranking de Centros de Interconexión a Internet” [Brazil and Argentina Lead the Ranking of Internet Interconnection 
Centers”, CABASE, December 18, 2012, http://www.cabase.org.ar/wordpress/brasil‐y‐argentina‐lideran‐el‐ranking‐de‐centros‐
de‐interconexion‐a‐internet/; Jorge Gustavo, “Las Pymes Reciben Peor Servicio de Banda Ancha que el Segmento Residencial” 
[Small Businesses Have Worst Internet Quality than ResidentialSegment], Cronista, January 28, 2013, http://bit.ly/123ngzN.  
22
 “ArSat Invest 830 Million Dollars on Telecommunications,” Prensario Internacional, July 17, 2012; “Conectar “Desigualdad”: 
Más del 75% de los Hogares de Jujuy No Poseen Acceso a Internet” [‘Unequal´Connection:75% of the Homes in Jujuy Lack 
Internet Access,” Jujuy al Día, January 9, 2013, http://www.jujuyaldia.com.ar/2013/01/09/conectar‐desigualdad‐mas‐del‐75‐
de‐los‐hogares‐de‐jujuy‐no‐poseen‐acceso‐a‐internet/; National Institute of Statistics and Censuses, “Encuesta Nacional sobre 
Acceso y Uso de Tecnologías de laInformación y la Comunicación (ENTIC)” [National Inquiry on Access and Use of TICs], 
December 11, 2012, http://www.indec.gob.ar/nuevaweb/cuadros/novedades/entic_11_12_12.pdf
23
 “Informacion de las Empresas” [Business Information], National Communications Commission, accessed March 20, 2012, 
http://www.cnc.gob.ar/ciudadanos/internet/empresas.asp?offset=0
24
 “Argentina Broadband Overview,” Point‐Topic.  
43
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
A
RGENTINA
currently scheduled for 2015.
25
It remains to be seen whether or not this project will result in 
greater centralization – and greater government control – of the backbone. 
Mobile phone penetration in Argentina is significantly higher than internet usage, with 59 million 
lines active as of late 2012,
26
or 143 cellular telephone subscriptions per 100 inhabitants.
27
The 
mobile  phone  market  in  Argentina  is  dominated  by  three  providers:  Telefonica’s  Movistar, 
Telecom´s Personal, and Claro, owned by Mexican billionaire and world’s richest man Carlos Slim 
Helu.
28
Each provider covers approximately one third of the market; all offer 3G services.  
Following a 2004 agreement that permitted Telefónica to buy Movicom, a cell phone company that 
was utilizing 850MHz and 1900 MHz cellular frequencies, the government has restricted the use of 
those specific bands.
29
In accordance with the purchase agreement for Movicom, Telefónica was 
required to relinquish the frequencies to the state free of charge in order to avoid concentration of 
the radio-electric spectrum in the hands of a few. After repeated postponement of auctions for the 
frequency bands in 2012, the situation was finally resolved by the federal government. President 
Fernandez de Kirchner announced that Libre.ar, a branch of government-owned corporation ArSat, 
would administer the frequencies, offering cellular phone services through small businesses and 
telephone  cooperatives.
30
This  decision,  implemented  via  Resolution  71/2012  of  the 
Communication  Secretariat,
31
(and  justified  with  the  rationale  that  only one  of  the  companies 
bidding for the bands met necessary requirements related to future investment and development
32
allows the government to regain control over the mobile sector.
33
To date, such control has not 
extended to the government overtaking ICTs.  
The Argentine government planned to launch its proprietary mobile service in March 2013, through 
an arrangement with Movistar, Personal, and Claro that allows the three providers to use state-
owned frequencies. As of publication, however, the government’s mobile service had not yet been 
launched. When implemented, the agreement will allow some telephone cooperatives and small 
25
 Government‐owned corporation AR‐SAT would manage the network. AR‐SAT began operating in July 2006. Its stated purpose 
is to promote the Argentine space industry and increase satellite services to different parts of the country. AR‐SAT Company 
website: http://www.arsat.com.ar
26
 National Institute of Statistics and Censuses, “Historic Series of Communications: Active Cellphones,” National 
Communications Commission, accessed June 5, 2012, http://www.indec.gob.ar/nuevaweb/cuadros/14/sh_comunicac2.xls   
27
 International Telecommunication Union, “Statistics: Mobile‐Cellular Subscriptions, 2000‐2012,” June 17, 2013, 
http://www.itu.int/en/ITU‐D/Statistics/Documents/statistics/2013/Individuals_Internet_2000‐2012.xls
28
 “The Richest People on the Planet 2013,” Forbes, April 4, 2013, http://www.forbes.com/billionaires/
29
 Gekkye, “Argentina Licita Frecuencias de Telefonia Celular” [Argentina Bids Cellular Telephony Frequencies], Geekye online, 
June 6, 2012, http://geekye.infonews.com/2012/06/06/tecnologia‐23977‐argentina‐licita‐frecuencias‐de‐telefonia‐celular.php
30
 Marcelo Canton, “Ponen en Marcha la Empresa Estatal de Celulares” [Libre.ar, The State Mobile Company Started Working], 
Clarin, December 14, 2012, http://www.clarin.com/politica/Ponen‐empresa‐estatal‐celulares‐Librear_0_828517184.html;  Juan 
Pedro Tomás, “Nuevamente Retrasan Licitación de Espectro Móvil” [Once More, Bid for the Mobile Spectrum is Delayed,” BN 
Americas, June 8, 2012, http://bit.ly/1eUxPvl.  
31
 Resolution 71/2012, Communications Secretariat, Contabilis, http://contablis.com.ar/legislacion/resoluciones/resolucion‐71‐
2012‐sec‐comunicaciones
32
 “Planificación Anunció que ARSAT Explotará Frecuencias para Telefonía Celular” [It was Announced that ArSat Will Exploit 
Cellular Phone Frequncies], TELAM, September 9, 2012, http://www.telam.com.ar/nota/37042/
33
 “Estado Administrará 25% del Espectro para Servicios Móviles con ARSAT”[The State will Administer 25% of the Mobile 
Services Specter], Media Telecom, December 14, 2012, http://bit.ly/15F0VvO.  
44
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested