download pdf file from server in asp.net c# : Edit pdf metadata online SDK software API .net windows asp.net sharepoint FOTN%202013_Full%20Report_040-part1544

F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
I
RAN
acting against national security and disseminating online propaganda against the government. As of 
March 2013, he remained in detention pending any formal trial.
82
As previously mentioned, even conservative supporters of President Ahmadinejad faced abuse over 
their online activities. For instance,  Ahmad Shariat, who runs the conservative blog Nedaee az 
Daroon, was arrested on July 22, 2012 after publishing a post critical of the Revolutionary Guards 
and Iran’s judiciary system.
83
The arrest was widely condemned in the Iranian blogosphere.
84
Iranians outside of Iran were also intimidated for their online activities. Shahin Najafi, an Iranian rap 
artist, faced heavy criticism for a song that he published online titled Naghi (the name of a Shi’a 
Imam). Some have called the song blasphemous and a number of Grand Ayatollahs issued apostasy 
sentences (fatwas)  against  him.
85
The father  of  an  Iranian student in  the  Netherlands was also 
arrested for his son’s satirical posts on Facebook. The authorities threatened the son that if he does 
not return to Iran, his father will be executed.
86
Finally, Iman Amiri, an internet security student at 
Malmo University in Sweden, was arrested on January 21, 2013 upon returning to Iran. He is now 
in detention at Evin Prison and was reportedly subject to torture to force a confession.
87
Numerous 
other dissidents who are active online were arrested in late 2012 and early 2013, although many of 
their cases relate more strongly to their offline activities.
88
There was a significant rise in the reports of individuals arrested for their activities on Facebook. In 
October  2012,  four  internet  users  in  Sirjan  were  arrested  because  of  their  supposed  use  of 
antigovernment activities and the insulting of officials on Facebook. In an interview, Mehdi Bakhshi, 
the attorney general of Sirjan, warned internet users “to avoid any illegal online activities, such as 
publishing photos  of  women not  wearing  hijab,  otherwise  there would be  legal consequences 
awaiting them.”
89
In the same month, the individuals behind a Facebook page that published photos 
of Iranian girls were arrested for promoting “vulgarity and corruption among Iranian youths.”
90
Iran’s Cyber Police warned well-known athletes and artists against publishing personal photos on 
social networking websites. Ali Niknafs, the deputy supervisor of recognition and prevention at 
82
 “A weblogger is in detention without trial for more than five months,” Human Rights Activists News Agency, March 4, 2013, 
https://hra‐news.org/en/a‐weblogger‐is‐in‐detention‐without‐trial‐for‐more‐than‐five‐months.  
83
 “The editor of Nedaee az Daroon was arrested”, accessed June 24, 2013,  
http://www.digarban.com/node/7984 
84
 Fred Petrossian, “Iran: Pro‐Ahmadinejad Blogger Jailed,” GlobalVoices, July 31, 2012, 
http://globalvoicesonline.org/2012/07/31/iran‐pro‐ahmadinejad‐blogger‐jailed/.  
85
 “Harsh reactions to a song by an Iranian Rapper”, BBC Persian, May 09, 2012 
http://www.bbc.co.uk/persian/rolling_news/2012/05/120509_u07_shahin_najafi_reaction.shtml.  
86
 “Iranian seizes father for son’s facebook post”, RNW, accessed June 24, 2013, http://www.rnw.nl/english/article/iran‐seizes‐
father‐sons‐facebook‐posts.  
87
 “A network security student was arrested after his arrival to Iran,” Human Rights Activists News Agency, March 12, 2013, 
https://hra‐news.org/en/a‐network‐security‐student‐was‐arrested‐after‐his‐arrival‐to‐iran#more‐2482.  
88
 “2013: Netizens Imprisoned,” Reporters Without Borders, accessed June 27, 2013, http://en.rsf.org/press‐freedom‐
barometer‐netizens‐imprisoned.html?annee=2013.  
89
 “Four people arrested in Iran for ‘insulting authorities’ in Facebook”, BBC Persian, accessed June 24, 2013,  
http://www.bbc.co.uk/persian/iran/2012/10/121026_l39_facebook_iran_arrest.shtml.  
90
 “Facebook band ‘Tehran babes’ has been disintegrated,” [translated] Momtaznews, accessed June 24, 2013, see 
http://bit.ly/15vXiTi.   
395
Edit pdf metadata online - add, remove, update PDF metadata in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Allow C# Developers to Read, Add, Edit, Update and Delete PDF Metadata
pdf remove metadata; adding metadata to pdf
Edit pdf metadata online - VB.NET PDF metadata library: add, remove, update PDF metadata in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Enable VB.NET Users to Read, Write, Edit, Delete and Update PDF Document Metadata
bulk edit pdf metadata; endnote pdf metadata
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
I
RAN
Cyber Police, stated that sharing personal photos through social media would increase the chances 
of improper use of photos, harming the reputation of Iranian celebrities.
91
In March 2012, the Communications Regulatory Authority issued Bill 106,
92
which required the 
registration of all IP addresses in use inside Iran. Implementing such registration will allow the 
authorities to track users’ online activities even more thoroughly and is a fundamental part of 
implementing the National Information Network through the restriction of anonymity online.  
As of March 2012, customers of cybercafes must provide personal information (such as their name, 
father’s name, national ID number, and telephone number) before using a computer. Cafe owners 
are required to keep such information, as well as customers’ browsing history, for six months. 
They are also required to install closed-circuit surveillance cameras and retain the video recordings 
for six months.
93
Mehdi Mir-Mohammadi, head of the IT-Union of Tehran commented that some 
of the elements in the new regulations infringe on user’s privacy and expressed concern over the 
fact that they could be taken advantage of and lead to new forms of cybercrimes.
94
In addition, the CCL obliges ISPs to record all the data exchanged by their users for a period of six 
months, but it is not clear whether the security services have the technical ability to process all this 
data. When purchasing  a mobile phone subscription or  prepaid SIM  card, users must  present 
identification, facilitating the authorities’ ability to track down the authors and recipients of specific 
messages.  
Despite international legal restrictions placed on the selling of surveillance equipment to the Iranian 
government, there have been numerous media reports that Chinese and some Western companies 
have been providing the Iranian authorities with technology to monitor citizens’ digital activities. 
Specifically,  investigative  reports  by  Reuters  and  the  Wall  Street  Journal  found  that  Huawei 
Technologies
95
and ZTE Corporation,
96
both Chinese firms, were key providers of surveillance 
technology  to  Iran’s  government,  allegations  both  companies  have  denied.  According  to  an 
uncovered PowerPoint presentation outlining the system’s capabilities, Iran’s MobinNet ISP would 
potentially  have  the  capacity  to  utilize  deep  packet  inspection  (DPI)  to  conduct  real-time 
91
“There is no compensation for lost dignity”, IRSport24, accessed June 24, 2013, 
http://www.irsport24.com/Default.aspx?PageName=News&Action=Subjects_Details&ID=15222.  
92
 Bill 105, Communication Regulation Authority, http://cra.ir/Portal/File/ShowFile.aspx?ID=f1a93935‐938c‐4d93‐9eed‐
b47bc20685d4.  
93
 Golnaz Esfandiari, “Iran Announces New Restrictions For Internet Cafes,” Payvand, January 5, 2012,  
http://www.payvand.com/news/12/jan/1048.html?utm_source=Payvand.com+List&utm_campaign=d6730c3065‐
RSS_EMAIL_CAMPAIGN&utm_medium=email. 
94
 “Internet cafes are required to authenticate users, all the pages viewed in the Internet cafes should be recorded”, Asriran, 
accessed June 24, 2013, see http://bit.ly/1fIAhE5.  
95
 Steve Stecklow, Farnaz Fassihi, and Loretta Chao, “Chinese Tech Giant Aids Iran,” The Wall Street Journal, October 27, 2011, 
http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052970204644504576651503577823210.html. 
96
 “UANI Calls on Chinese Telecom Giant ZTE to Withdraw from Iran,” Market Watch, press release, March 26, 2012, 
http://www.telecomyou.com/newscenter/news/uani‐calls‐on‐chinese‐telecom‐giant‐zte‐to‐withdraw‐from‐iran‐marketwatch‐
press‐release
396
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
C#.NET edit PDF bookmark, C#.NET edit PDF metadata, C#.NET edit PDF digital signatures, C#.NET edit PDF sticky note read barcodes from PDF, C#.NET OCR scan PDF.
pdf metadata viewer online; pdf keywords metadata
How to C#: Modify Image Metadata (tag)
C#.NET edit PDF bookmark, C#.NET edit PDF metadata, C#.NET edit PDF digital signatures, C#.NET edit PDF sticky note read barcodes from PDF, C#.NET OCR scan PDF.
adding metadata to pdf files; pdf metadata reader
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
I
RAN
monitoring of communication traffic, block websites, track users, and reconstruct e-mail messages 
as a means of monitoring citizens. 
97
Filtering and physical intimidation are supplemented by hacking and distributed denial-of-service 
(DDoS)  attacks  on  the  websites  of  government  critics,  including  leading  opposition  figures. 
Throughout 2012 and early 2013, there was a rise in the number of hacking incidents. Numerous 
Facebook accounts of Iranians users who were deemed to be un-Islamic were hacked and defaced 
with a statement from Iran’s judiciary saying, “By judicial order, the owner of this page has been 
placed under investigation.” The friends of such users were also tagged in posts containing similar 
messages. 
98
Mana Neyestani, a well-known Iranian caricaturist, had his Facebook fan page hacked 
by a group called “Islam’s Soldiers.” The hacking group added its logo and a number of caricatures 
with pro-Assad, anti-Israel, and anti-Saudi Arabia themes to Neyestani’s Fan page during the few 
hours they had control. 
99
It is not clear what role the Iran’s Cyber Police or other security forces 
played in this incident. 
Iran has significantly increased its hacking capabilities in recent years. According to Jeff Bardin, the 
chief intelligence officer at the American open source intelligence company Treadstone 7, Iran has 
become much more sophisticated and pervasive in its use of online tools. There have also been 
several  officially  announced  plans  on  recruiting  and  training  hackers.  The  Deputy  of  IT  and 
Communications at Iran’s Civil Defense Organization announced that a Cyber Defense program of 
study would be introduced to some universities in the country on the graduate level. He added, 
“Familiarizing managers and commanders with the concepts of cyber defense is one of the main 
strategies of the Civil Defense Organization.”
100
In the first such plan by a tertiary institution in 
Iran, the University of Lorestan announced that it will actively work to take down and hack into 
national and international websites that display anti-Islamic content.
101
Researchers at Amirkabir 
University are currently developing a “national network of cyber defense” while a team at Shiraz 
University  is  creating  its  own  domestically-produced  anti-virus  software  in  support  of  a 
government ban on foreign digital security software.
102
According to Zone-H, a website dedicated to tracking hacking incidents, there were a total of 
1,387 website defacements attributed to Iranian hackers during March 2013 alone, with a similar 
number in February. The majority of these are attributed to the Ashiyane Digital Security Team, 
which ranks as the second most active group in world, with defacements of thousands of websites 
linked to foreign governments and high-level organizations.
103
It is also noteworthy that the head of 
97
 “Special report: How foreign firms tried to sell spy gear to Iran”,  Reuters, accessed June 24, 2013, 
http://www.reuters.com/article/2012/12/05/us‐huawei‐iran‐idUSBRE8B409820121205.  
98
 “Combating immoral crimes in Facebook”, Fardanews, accessed June 24, 2013, http://bit.ly/OQdomi.  
99
 “Iran: ‘Soldiers of Islam’ hack catoonist’s Facebook page”, Cyberwarzone, accessed June 24, 2013, 
http://cyberwarzone.com/iran‐%E2%80%9Csoldiers‐islam%E2%80%9D‐hack‐cartoonists‐facebook‐page.  
100
 “Iranian gov’t pays paramilitary hackers, bloggers to bring you Islamic Revolution 2,0”, Arstechnica, accessed June 24, 2013, 
http://arstechnica.com/tech‐policy/2012/06/iran‐expands‐online/   
101
 “New mission of Lorestan University: Hacking anti‐regime sites inside and outside the country”, Daneshjoonews, accessed 
June 24, 2013, http://www.daneshjoonews.com/node/7380.  
102
 “Middle East and North Africa CyberWatch – March 2013,” CitizenLab, April 2, 2013, https://citizenlab.org/2013/04/middle‐
east‐and‐north‐africa‐cyberwatch‐march‐2013/.  
103
 Ashiyane Digital Security Team Report on Zone‐H 
397
VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
PDF Metadata Edit. Offer professional PDF document metadata editing APIs, using which VB.NET developers can redact, delete, view and save PDF metadata.
view pdf metadata; pdf metadata editor
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to create PDF document from other file
C#.NET edit PDF bookmark, C#.NET edit PDF metadata, C#.NET edit PDF digital signatures, C#.NET edit PDF sticky note read barcodes from PDF, C#.NET OCR scan PDF.
c# read pdf metadata; change pdf metadata creation date
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
I
RAN
Ashiyane, Behrouz Kamalian, was sanctioned under the European Union’s human rights sanctions 
regime for being linked with the IRGC and responsible for cyber-crackdown both against domestic 
opponents and reformists and foreign institutions. 
104
In the weeks leading up to the presidential 
elections, there was also a significant increase in targeted cyberattacks against high profile activists 
and journalists traced back to Iranian servers.
105
 http://zone‐h.org/archive/filter=1/notifier=Ashiyane%20Digital%20Security%20Team/page=3.  
104
 Council of the European Union, “Council Regulation (EU) No 1002/2011 of 10 October 2011 Implementing Article 12(1) of 
Regulation (EU) No 359/2011 Concerning Restrictive Measures Directed Against Certain Persons, Entities and Bodies in View of 
the Situation in Iran,” The Official Journal of the European Union, October 10, 2011, p.5. (http://eur‐
lex.europa.eu/LexUriServ/LexUriServ.do?uri=OJ:L:2011:267:0001:0006:EN:PDF) ‐ See more at: 
http://www.defenddemocracy.org/behrouz‐kamalian#_ftn2.  
105
 Iranian Internet Infrastructure And Policy Report, March – April 2013 http://smallmedia.org.uk/InfoFlowReportMARCH.pdf.  
398
C# TIFF: TIFF Metadata Editor, How to Write & Read TIFF Metadata
Tiff ›› C# Tiff: Edit Tiff Metadata. C# TIFF - Edit TIFF Metadata in C#.NET. Allow Users to Read and Edit Metadata Stored in Tiff Image in C#.NET Application.
pdf xmp metadata viewer; add metadata to pdf file
VB.NET PDF - Create PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
C#.NET edit PDF bookmark, C#.NET edit PDF metadata, C#.NET edit PDF digital signatures, C#.NET edit PDF sticky note read barcodes from PDF, C#.NET OCR scan PDF.
edit pdf metadata; pdf metadata editor online
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
I
TALY
I
TALY
 Despite limited progress, Italy continued to lag behind most other countries of the
European Union in terms of internet penetration and average speed (see O
BSTACLES
TO 
A
CCESS
).
 Dozens of file-sharing and video-streaming websites were blocked over the past year
for illegally hosting copyrighted materials (see L
IMITS ON 
C
ONTENT
).
 The Court of Cassation clarified that a 1948 law prohibiting “clandestine press” could
not be applied to blogs, easing fears that blogs could face blocking for failing to register
with the authorities (see L
IMITS ON 
C
ONTENT
).
 Social media and blogging were critical in the nascent Five Star Movement’s success in
the February 2013 parliamentary elections, in which it received more votes than any
single party (see L
IMITS ON 
C
ONTENT
).
 A  Livorno  court  decided  that  an  insulting  Facebook  post  can  be  considered  as
defamation by “other means of publicity,” since the social network allows for the broad
diffusion  of  posts.  In  the  case,  a  user  was  found  guilty  of  defaming  her  former
employer  and  ordered  to  pay  a  fine.  The  ruling  may  open  the  door  for  further
defamation cases related to Facebook posts (see V
IOLATIONS OF 
U
SER 
R
IGHTS
).
2012 
2013 
I
NTERNET 
F
REEDOM 
S
TATUS
F
REE
F
F
REE
Obstacles to Access (0-25) 
Limits on Content (0-35) 
Violations of User Rights (0-40) 
12 
12 
Total (0-100) 
23 
23 
*0=most free, 100=least free
e
P
OPULATION
60.9 million
I
NTERNET 
P
ENETRATION 
2012: 
58 percent
S
OCIAL 
M
EDIA
/ICT
A
PPS 
B
LOCKED
No
P
OLITICAL
/S
OCIAL 
C
ONTENT 
B
LOCKED
:  
No
B
LOGGERS
/ICT
U
SERS 
A
RRESTED
No
P
RESS 
F
REEDOM 
2013
S
TATUS
Partly Free
K
EY 
D
EVELOPMENTS
:
M
AY 
2012
A
PRIL 
2013 
399
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view, annotate, create and convert PDF
More details are given on this page. C#.NET: Edit PDF Password in ASP.NET. Users are able to set a password to PDF online directly in ASPX webpage.
rename pdf files from metadata; modify pdf metadata
C# PDF Sticky Note Library: add, delete, update PDF note in C#.net
Allow users to add comments online in ASPX webpage. Able to change font size in PDF comment box. Able to save and print sticky notes in PDF file.
remove metadata from pdf online; pdf xmp metadata editor
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
I
TALY
Italy’s first computer network emerged in 1980, when a group of nuclear physicists connected all 
of the country’s nuclear research institutes. At the beginning, the internet was just one of several 
packet-switching networks that coexisted in Italy. The dominant telecommunications firm at the 
time,  Telecom  Italia,  tried  to  impose  its  privately  owned  system,  while  various  center-left 
governments,  aware of  the  importance  of  interconnectivity,  supported  integration  among  the 
networks. Ultimately, the  adaptability  and  simplicity  of  the  internet prevailed.  Access to  the 
internet was available to private users after 1995, and the number of internet service providers 
(ISPs) soared within a short period of time. Among the remaining obstacles to greater internet 
penetration include a lack of familiarity with computers and with the English language, as well as 
the  dominance  of  commercial  television  and  the  diversion  of  consumers’  telecommunications 
spending to mobile telephony. 
High ownership concentration in the media sector continued to impact the country’s information 
landscape in late 2012 and early 2013.
1
Former prime minister Silvio Berlusconi still owns, directly 
and  indirectly,  a  private  media  conglomerate.  After  his  Il  Popolo  della  Libertà  (The  People  of 
Freedom, PdL) party withdrew its support, the technocratic government of Mario Monti collapsed 
in  December  2012.  While  the  PdL  did  not  have  sufficient  political  power  to  push  through 
controversial initiatives such as the wiretapping bill, it did manage to block any move that might 
undermine Berlusconi’s position in the media market.
2
When fresh election did arrive in February 
2013, the use of social media and the web proved to be a major innovation, resulting in a strong 
showing  from  the  digitally-savvy  Movimento  5  Stelle  (Five  Star  Movement,  M5S).  The  highly-
fragmented outcome of the elections, in which no party was able to obtain an outright majority, is 
unlikely  to produce the  stable  environment required for new  prime  minister Enrico Letta  to 
address some of the outstanding legal issues regarding freedom of expression online. 
Italy’s  internet  penetration  rate  lags  behind  many  other  European  Union  countries.  Mobile 
telephone  usage  is  ubiquitous,  however,  and  internet  access  via  mobile  phones  has  grown 
significantly in recent years. Italian authorities do not generally engage in political censorship of 
online speech, although authorities are highly active in blocking file-sharing and live-streaming sites 
if  they are shown to illegally  provide access  to copyrighted content. As in previous years, no 
bloggers were imprisoned as of mid-2013, though a Facebook user was fined over a defamatory 
post  concerning her former employer. Defamation and  libel are central issues in the country, 
particularly when sensitive information obtained from government wiretaps is leaked to the public, 
often at the expense of high-profile individuals. Furthermore, despite a number of judicial decisions 
asserting that intermediaries cannot be prosecuted for content posted by users, existing laws are 
1
 For an overview see, for example, the ITU, “Europe: Level of Competition” Report at http://www.itu.int/ITU‐
D/icteye/Reporting/ShowReport.aspx?ReportFormat=PDF&ReportName=%2FTREG%2FLevelOfCompetition2007&RP_intRegionI
D=5&RP_intLanguageID=1&RP_intYear=2012&ShowReport=true, accessed February 08, 2013.  
2
 As an important political leader, and supporter of the Monti government (albeit quite reluctantly) Silvio Berlusconi also 
retained significant influence over the appointment of state regulators. Such conditions also made the country’s leadership 
resistant to confront the peculiar “imperfections” of Italy’s editorial and broadcasting sectors. 
I
NTRODUCTION
400
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
I
TALY
applied in a contradictory manner and are often overturned at every appeal, resulting in extended 
legal battles. 
Since the 1990s, the Italian government has supported the internet as a catalyst for economic 
growth,  increased  tourism,  reduced  communication  costs,  and  more  efficient  government 
operations. According to the International Telecommunication Union (ITU), Italy had an internet 
penetration rate of 58 percent at the end of 2012, an increase from 40.8 percent in 2007.
3
While 
Italy’s internet penetration rate is higher than the global average, it is below the norm for the 
European Union (EU). The relatively low penetration rate is often attributed to unfamiliarity with 
the internet among the older generations, as well as a lack of understanding about the internet’s 
utility among certain segments of the population. 
From March 2012 to March 2013, over 250,000 broadband subscription lines were added, sending 
the total to 13.82 million. Average download speeds also increased, with almost 89 percent of 
Italian subscribers achieving nominal speeds of 2 Mbps or more.
4
Despite the progress, Italy has 
fallen behind most EU countries in this area, and the country’s users access the internet at an 
average speed of 4.4 Mbps; by comparison, the average speed in the Netherlands is 9.9 Mbps, in 
the Czech Republic 9.6 Mbps, and in Portugal 5.3 Mbps.
5
The  main  point  of  internet  access  is  the  home,  with  some  22  million  people  using  home 
connections at least once a month, as of early 2012.
6
The workplace is the second most common 
access point, followed by schools and universities. While less than half of Italy’s internet users are 
female, women comprise 55 percent of new users. Cost is not a significant barrier to access. The 
price for a broadband connection may range from €20 to €40 ($27 to $53) per month, compared to 
average monthly per capita income of around $2,750.
7
ADSL broadband connections are available on about 97 percent of Italy’s territory and plans were 
outlined to bring it to 99 percent by the end of 2012 with the help of mobile broadband.
8
Little 
3
 International Telecommunication Union (ITU), “Percentage of individuals using the Internet, fixed (wired) Internet 
subscriptions, fixed (wired)‐broadband subscriptions,” 2011 & 2006, accessed July 13, 2012, http://www.itu.int/ITU‐
D/ICTEYE/Indicators/Indicators.aspx#
4
 “Quarterly Telecommunications Markets Observatory, AGCOM, March 31, 2013, 
http://www.agcom.it/Default.aspx?message=visualizzadocument&DocID=11333.  
5
 Akamai, “State of the Internet: 1
st
 Quarter, 2013,” Volume 6, Number 1, 
http://www.akamai.com/dl/whitepapers/akamai_soti_q113.pdf?curl=/dl/whitepapers/akamai_soti_q113.pdf&solcheck=1&WT
.mc_id=soti_Q113& (subscription required). 
6
 Giancarlo Livraghi, ed., “Dati sull’internet in Italia” [Data on the Internet in Italy], accessed February 15, 2013, 
http://www.gandalf.it/dati/dati3.htm
7
 “Broadband—Italy,” Socialtext, accessed February 19, 2013, https://www.socialtext.net/broadband/index.cgi?italy; “GDP per 
capita (current US$)” The World Bank, 2008‐2012, accessed August 5, 2013, 
http://data.worldbank.org/indicator/NY.GDP.PCAP.CD.  
8
 “Domestic Market,” Telecom Italia, March 3, 2012, http://www.telecomitalia.com/tit/en/about‐us/profile/domestic‐
market.html. The goal of 99 percent by the end of 2012 appears still unfulfilled as of early 2013. Socialtext puts the figure for 
ADSL at 88 per cent (as of October 2012). 
O
BSTACLES TO 
A
CCESS
401
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
I
TALY
progress has been made on the five-year, €2.5 billion ($3.3 billion) plan to connect 15 of Italy’s 
largest cities using fiber-optic cable, proposed in 2010 by Italy’s three largest telecommunications 
operators. A similar investment plan for €9 billion ($11.8 billion) by Telecom Italia also faced 
delays. These plans are now suspended given Italy’s precarious financial crisis.  
Mobile phone use is much more widespread than internet access, with the penetration rate reaching 
158 percent in 2012, which translates to 4.3 mobile subscribers for every fixed-line subscriber.
9
The majority of subscriptions are prepaid. Telecom Italia Mobile (TIM), Vodafone, Wind, and 3 
Italia are the major carriers, and all of them operate third-generation (3G) networks. Access to 
mobile internet has been increasing in recent years, and as of 2011, some 59.4 percent of internet 
users reported accessing the internet through their smart phones.
10
As elsewhere, sales of tablet 
computers have been on the rise among the younger generation since 2010 and are likely to keep 
growing in the coming years.  
In  March  2012,  the government  launched  the “Digital  Agenda”  initiative,  intended to  expand 
broadband access and e-government  functions.
11
A project of the infrastructure and economic 
development minister, several other ministries (economy, research and university, public health, 
and so on) should be involved in this operation, which is supposed to profoundly “transform” Italy’s 
public administration. The six strategic areas of the “Digital Agenda” include infrastructure and 
cyber security, e-commerce,  e-government,  e-learning  (e-books, digital  policy literacy  and e-
participation), research and innovation in ICT, and smart cities and communities. As recent as April 
2013, Prime Minister Enrico Letta reiterated the need to pursue many of the Digital Agenda items 
first proposed by his predecessor, Mario Monti.
12
Access to the internet for private users is offered by 13 different ISPs. Telecom Italia has the largest 
share of the market, followed by Vodafone, Fastweb, and Tiscali. Telecom Italia owns the physical 
network,  but  it  is  required  by  European  Union  (EU)  legislation  to  provide  fair  access  to 
competitors. Further, Telecom Italia has announced plans to divest its infrastructure holdings into a 
separate subsidiary in a bid to increase profits and avoid legal repercussions associated with its 
current monopoly holdings.
13
The main regulatory body for telecommunications is the Authority for Communications Security 
(AGCOM), an independent agency that is accountable to the parliament. Its responsibilities include 
providing access to networks, protecting intellectual property rights, regulating advertisements, 
and overseeing public broadcasting. The parliament’s majority party appoints AGCOM’s president, 
9
 International Telecommunication Union (ITU), “Mobile‐cellular telephone subscriptions,” 2012, accessed February 19, 2013 
http://www.itu.int/ITU‐D/ICTEYE/Indicators/Indicators.aspx#
10
 ITU, Measuring the Information Society 2011, p.154, http://www.itu.int/net/pressoffice/backgrounders/general/pdf/5.pdf
11
 Italian text at http://www.gazzettaufficiale.it/moduli/DL_181012_179.pdf. See also http://www.agenda‐
digitale.it/agenda_digitale/.  
12
 Mauro del Vecchio “Agenda Digitale, nuova corsa”, Punto Informatico, April 30, 2013, http://punto‐
informatico.it/3780111/PI/News/agenda‐digitale‐nuova‐corsa.aspx
 “Telecom Italia: CDA approva il progetto di societarizzazione della rete di accesso”, [Telecom Italia: CDA approves corporate 
reorganization of the network grid,” 
13
 Telecom Italia, May 30, 2013,  
 http://www.telecomitalia.com/tit/it/archivio/media/comunicati‐stampa/telecom‐italia/corporate/economico‐
finanziario/2013/05‐30a.html 
402
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
I
TALY
and commissioners have been known to come under pressure from the government to take certain 
actions regarding television broadcasts, particularly when Berlusconi was prime minister.
14
Angelo 
Marcello Cardani was appointed as AGCOM president in July 2012 and remains the current head 
under Prime Minister Letta.
15
Another important player in the field of communications is the Italian Data Protection Authority 
(DPA). Set up in 1997, the DPA today has a staff of more than 100 people, and four of its main 
members are elected by parliament for seven-year terms. The DPA is tasked with supervising 
compliance by both governmental and nongovernmental entities with data protection laws, and 
“banning or blocking processing operations that are liable to cause serious harm to individuals.”
16
It 
is generally viewed as professional and fair in carrying out its duties. 
In  Italy, websites  are principally blocked  or  taken down for offenses related to defamation or 
copyright infringement. There are little restrictions on politically-orientated content, although the 
vague legal environment does lead to a degree of self-censorship as ISPs and users seek to avoid 
prosecution. Intermediaries and content providers often required to take down illegal content at 
the  request  of  executive  bodies  or  judicial  authorities.  Facebook,  Twitter,  YouTube,  and 
international blog-hosting sites are freely available. Further, social media and blogging has been 
employed by political groups to mobilize potential voters and even crowd-source party decisions.   
Websites related to gambling, child pornography, and illegal file-sharing are blocked in Italy. Since 
2006, online gambling has been permitted only through state-licensed websites; ISPs are required 
to block access to a list of international or unlicensed gambling sites identified by the Autonomous 
Administration of State Monopolies (AAMS), available on its website and updated regularly.
17
similar  list  of  illegal  sites  is  maintained  by  the  National  Center  for  the  Fight  against  Child 
Pornography on the internet, established in 2006 within the Postal and Communications Police 
Service. This list, which is forwarded onto ISPs for implementation, is formulated through internal 
research as well as complaints submitted by users.
18
The public availability of the child pornography 
blacklist has drawn consternation from some child advocates, who have expressed concern that this 
encourages visits to the sites by users with circumvention tools. Internet subscribers can also pay a 
small fee to sign up for a voluntarily “family internet” package from ISPs, in which access to adult 
pornography and sites with violent content is blocked.  
14
 Michael Day, “Silvio Berlusconi caught out trying to stifle media,” The Independent, March 18, 2010, 
http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/europe/berlusconi‐caught‐out‐trying‐to‐stifle‐media‐1923147.html . 
15
 Cardani is a former chief of staff of Mario Monti when the latter was EU Anti‐Trust commissioner. He also worked within the 
EU Commission for a while; http://www.agcom.it/Default.aspx?message=contenuto&DCId=184.  
16
 “The Italian Data Protection Authority: Who We Are,” Data Protection Authority, November 17, 2009, 
http://www.garanteprivacy.it/garante/doc.jsp?ID=1669109
17
 The blacklist is available (in Italian) at http://www.aams.gov.it/site.php?id=2484.  
18
 “Centro nazionale per il contrasto alla pedopornografia sulla rete” [National Center for the Fight against Child Pornography 
on the Internet], State Police, March 10, 2010, http://www.poliziadistato.it/articolo/view/10232/.  
L
IMITS ON 
C
ONTENT
403
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
I
TALY
The website Avaxhome.ws was blocked on November 23, 2012, after a Milan court received a 
complaint from Mondadori, a publishing company owned by the Berlusconi family.
19
Among other 
things, the site hosted links to several global newspapers and magazines available in PDF form. 
Since the website profited from the hosting of copyrighted publications, Mondadori argued that it 
could not enjoy the protection granted to ordinary news websites. Nevertheless, information on 
how to circumvent the blocking was soon abundantly available on social media and elsewhere.
20
Following an order from a court in Monza, near Milan, ISPs were also asked to block the web 
forum  downloadzoneforum.net,  which  hosted  links  to  movies  and  other  copyright  protected 
material.
21
Both of these actions were made possible by a 1941 Law on Author Rights,
22
explicitly 
amended by the Berlusconi government in 2005 to include the web.
23
In April 2013, the Postal and Communications Police of Rome blocked 27 websites that allowed 
users to illegally download or stream music and movies online.
24
Italy’s Guardia di Finanza (GdF, 
Finance  Guard)  has  continually  targeted  file-sharing  websites  for  disseminating  material  that 
infringes copyright.
25
Several popular BitTorrent sites, such as The Pirate Bay and BTjunkie, remain 
blocked. Access to Proxyitalia.com, a proxy often used to circumvent government censorship, is 
also blocked since April 2011. 
At the end of 2011, Italy’s Supreme Court overturned a lower court’s verdict by declaring that 
editors of online magazines were not responsible for defamatory comments posted by readers, 
taking note  of  the  difference  between the printed  and electronic press.
26
Nevertheless, in the 
ensuing  years  defamation  cases  have  still  been  brought  against  online  content  providers  and 
intermediaries  that have  led to  the  removal or  blocking of content (for  more  on  Italy’s legal 
environment, see “Violations of User Rights”).
27
For example, in February 2010, three Google 
executives were sentenced in absentia to imprisonment for allowing the circulation of an offensive 
video on YouTube.
28
However, since early 2011, other decisions have ultimately asserted that 
19
 Il Messaggero “Avaxhome sotto sequestro per ricettazione: sul sito giornali pirata”, November 28, 2012, 
http://www.ilmessaggero.it/primopiano/cronaca/avaxhome_sequestrato_sito_edicola_digitale/notizie/234594.shtml. The web 
site is originally from Russia, and for the first time the charge was that of “receiving of stolen goods” (a more serious action) in 
addition to copyright violation.  
20
 Giornalettismo “Avaxhome chiuso: come raggiungerlo”, November 28 2012, 
http://www.giornalettismo.com/archives/629365/avaxhome‐chiuso‐come‐raggiungerlo/. As of February 2013, the web site is 
easily accessibile.  
21
 Mauro Vecchio “Italia, DownloadZone al cimitero warez”, January 31, 2013, http://punto‐
informatico.it/3705271/PI/Brevi/italia‐downloadzone‐al‐cimitero‐warez.aspx.  
22
 Law n.633 of April 22, 1941, available at http://www.altalex.com/index.php?idnot=34610 
23
 Law decree n.7 of January 31, 2005, available at http://www.altalex.com/index.php?idnot=5918.  
24
 “Italian police blocks access to 27 file‐sharing websites,” Telecompaper, April 24, 2013, 
http://www.telecompaper.com/news/italian‐police‐blocks‐access‐to‐27‐file‐sharing‐websites‐‐939415.  
25
 Enigmax, “Italian Court Orders All ISPs to Block KickAssTorrents,” TorrentFreak, May 24, 2012, 
http://torrentfreak.com/italian‐court‐orders‐all‐isps‐to‐block‐kickasstorrents‐120524/.  
26
 “Italian Supreme Court: web magazines are not to be held responsible for readers’ comments,” Law & the Internet (blog), 
December 14, 2011, http://www.blogstudiolegalefinocchiaro.com/wordpress/?p=279
27
 M. Del Vecchio, “Espressione digitale, libero bavaglio”, Punto Informatico July 9, 2013Il senatore Torrisi (PdL) http://punto‐
informatico.it/3845739/PI/News/espressione‐digitale‐libero‐bavaglio.aspx
28
 This is related to a video posted by a user that showed a mentally disabled child being bullied by his classmates, although 
Google removed the video as soon as it was notified. The appeal decision for the “Vivi Down” case, as it was known, was 
expected at the end of December 2012, but as of early 2013, there had been no update. See Cristina Sciannamblo “Caso 
404
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested