F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
I
TALY
content hosts are not responsible for prescreening content. For example, in July 2011, a Rome 
court specializing in intellectual property overturned a lower court’s decision and found that Yahoo 
was not liable to punishment for listing search results that allowed users to access websites that may 
violate  copyright.”
29
Similarly,  in  March  2013,  the  Courthouse  of  Milan  ruled  that  phrases 
stemming from Google’s “Autocomplete”’ or “Related Searches”  features could not be seen as 
defamatory, since results were based on software calculations and did not represent the views of 
the search engine company.
30
In April 2012, the Supreme Court imposed an obligation on publishers to update their online 
archives to ensure that outdated facts do not inadvertently damage an individual’s reputation. The 
case involved a story about the 1993 arrest of a politician on corruption charges in northern Italy. 
Although the man was ultimately acquitted, news of his arrest continued to appear in search results. 
Following  the  European  Union  (EU)  principle  of “the right  to  oblivion”  (or  “the  right to  be 
forgotten”), the Supreme Court ordered the outlet to update the story to indicate the new facts. 
However, it also found that there were no grounds for libel since the events recounted in the article 
were true, even if they were incomplete or outdated.
31
In a case from January 2013, a court in Milan ordered the blocking of 10 online platforms that 
index links to the online streaming of sports events.
32
In 2011, RTI, a subsidiary of the Berlusconi-
owned Mediaset media conglomerate, had sued Google for allowing users, via its blog-hosting 
platform “Blogger,” to stream Italian soccer matches. In December of that year, a Rome court ruled 
that web platforms were not in breach of the law so long as users removed streamed copyrighted 
materials upon being notified.
33
However, in the more recent case from 2013, the Milan court 
ruled that, even if the soccer game itself was not protectable, distributers could seek copyright 
protection over its broadcast.
34
Vividown, aspettando la sentenza d'Appello”, December 7, 2012, http://punto‐informatico.it/3666664/PI/News/caso‐vividown‐
aspettando‐sentenza‐appello.aspx.  
29
 Giulio Coraggio, “Yahoo! Liable for Searchable Contents!” IPT Italy Blog, April 3, 2011,  
http://blog.dlapiper.com/IPTitaly/entry/yahoo_liable_for_searchable_contents; “PFA vs Yahoo: la decisione del Tribunale di 
Roma riapre il dibattito sulla responsabilità degli ISP nei casi di violazione del diritto d’autore” [PFA vs Yahoo: the decision of the 
Court of Rome reopens the debate on ISP liability in cases of violation of copyright], Key4biz, July 14 2011, 
http://www.key4biz.it/News/2011/07/14/Policy/About_Elly_yahoo_pfa_film_internet_service_provider_isp_diritto_d_autore_
204511.html
30
 Mauro Vecchio, “Google completa senza pensare”, Punto Informatico, March 20, 2013, http://punto‐
informatico.it/3754530/PI/News/google‐completa‐senza‐pensare.aspx
31
 “Italian Supreme Court: the right to oblivion to be protected with newspaper archive updates,” Law & the Internet (blog), 
April 23, 2012, http://www.blogstudiolegalefinocchiaro.com/wordpress/?p=360. See also, Morena Ragone, “Il diritto alla 
memoria, tra privacy e oblio” [The right to memory, including privacy and oblivion], LeggiOggi.it, April 10, 2012, 
http://www.leggioggi.it/2012/04/10/il‐diritto‐alla‐memoria‐tra‐privacy‐e‐oblio/
32
 Mauro Vecchio, “Mediaset, sequestro per lo streaming pallonaro” [Mediaset, seizure for soccer streaming], January 16, 2013, 
http://punto‐informatico.it/3691462/PI/News/mediaset‐sequestro‐streaming‐pallonaro.aspx.  
33
 Guido Scorza, “Mediaset e Google: tra copyright e libertà” [Mediaset and Google: between copyright and freedom], Punto 
Informatico, December 16, 2011, http://punto‐informatico.it/3368416/PI/Commenti/mediaset‐google‐copyright‐liberta.aspx
http://www.telecompaper.com/news/google‐not‐responsible‐for‐streaming‐football‐from‐mediaset; “Court of Rome: not to 
precautionary controls of online content by intermediaries,” Law & the Internet (blog), January 17, 2012, 
http://www.blogstudiolegalefinocchiaro.com/wordpress/?tag=rti. 
34
 Mauro Vecchio “Mediaset, sequestro per lo streaming pallonaro”, January 16, 2013, http://punto‐
informatico.it/3691462/PI/News/mediaset‐sequestro‐streaming‐pallonaro.aspx.  
405
Pdf metadata editor - add, remove, update PDF metadata in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Allow C# Developers to Read, Add, Edit, Update and Delete PDF Metadata
remove metadata from pdf file; pdf metadata viewer online
Pdf metadata editor - VB.NET PDF metadata library: add, remove, update PDF metadata in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Enable VB.NET Users to Read, Write, Edit, Delete and Update PDF Document Metadata
batch edit pdf metadata; pdf metadata viewer
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
I
TALY
While intermediaries are not liable to prosecution for hosting content, they must remove illegal 
content upon receiving notice from a judicial authority in line with provisions laid out in the EU E-
Commerce  Directive.
35
For  example,  Google  received  27  requests  in  the  period  of  July  to 
December 2012, two more with respect to the previous six-month reporting period.
36
The vast 
majority of all court orders involved material that was broadly interpreted as defamatory.  
Decisions related to the blocking of illegal websites are made by the Postal and Communications 
Police,
37
which falls under the Ministry of Interior, and intervenes in areas of cyberterrorism, 
copyright,  hacking,  protection  of  critical  infrastructure,  online  banking,  forensics,  and  online 
gambling.
38
Sites can also be shut down and their data seized by the Financial Police (GdF), a 
division of the Ministry of Economy and Finance, which combats cybercrime, fraud, and a range of 
other illegal activities.
39
Beginning in December 2010, AGCOM has continually sought new powers 
to conduct administrative filtering in a bid to combat online copyright infringement.
40
Under the 
proposal, the agency could block websites hosted outside of the country and remove content on 
Italian servers through an internal five-day review without any degree of judicial oversight. The 
move was criticized by the European Parliament and by internet freedom advocates.
41
As of late 
April 2013, AGCOM stated that it had still not yet taken a final decision on the matter, which has 
been delayed several times.
42
Even in the absence of legal requirements, ISPs tend to exercise some informal self-censorship, 
declining to host content that may prove controversial or that could create friction with powerful 
entities or individuals. Online writers also exercise caution to avoid libel suits by public officials, 
whose litigation—even when unsuccessful—often takes a significant financial toll on defendants in 
the traditional media. The  Italian government does not proactively manipulate news  websites. 
However, coverage in traditional media does affect what is published on news websites, giving the 
outlets controlled by former Prime Minister Berlusconi an indirect influence over online reporting.   
Some restrictions on internet content uncommon in other Western European countries remain in 
place in Italy. Drawing on a 1948 law against the “clandestine press,” a regulation issued in 2001 
holds  that anyone  providing  a  news  service,  including  on the  internet, must be  a  “chartered” 
journalist  within  the  Communication  Workers’  Registry  (ROC)  and  hold  membership  in  the 
35
 Martine Wubben, “Court of Appeal Rome: no monitoring requirement for hosting provider Yahoo,” Future of Copyright, July 
16, 2011, http://www.futureofcopyright.com/home/blog‐post/2011/07/16/court‐of‐appeal‐rome‐no‐monitoring‐requirement‐
for‐hosting‐provider‐yahoo.html. 
36
 Google Transparency Report, “Italy,” Google, accessed August 6, 2013, 
http://www.google.com/transparencyreport/removals/government/IT/ . 
37
 Polizia postale e delle comunicazioni, http://www.poliziadistato.it/articolo/23393/.  
38
 “Attività ed organizzazione,” Polizia di Stato, accessed August 7, 2013, http://www.poliziadistato.it/articolo/view/23395/.  
39
 Guardia di Finanza, http://www.gdf.it/GdF/it/Home/index.html.  
40
 “Subject: Internet censorship in Italy—via administrative procedure,” European Parliament, July 13, 2011, 
http://www.europarl.europa.eu/sides/getDoc.do?pubRef=‐//EP//TEXT+WQ+E‐2011‐006948+0+DOC+XML+V0//EN accessed 
February 2, 2013. 
41
 “Italian Agency to Review Internet Filtering Project,” Reporters Without Borders, July 7, 2011, http://en.rsf.org/italy‐italian‐
agency‐poised‐to‐assume‐05‐07‐2011,40595.html; “Internet Blocking Stopped in Italy (for Now), Digital Civil Rights in Europe, 
July 13, 2011, http://www.edri.org/edrigram/number9.14/internet‐blocking‐agcom‐italy.   
42
 “Italian regulator says still no decision on online copyright,” Telecompaper, April 24, 2013, 
http://www.telecompaper.com/news/italian‐regulator‐says‐still‐no‐decision‐on‐online‐copyright‐‐939469.  
406
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view, annotate, create and convert PDF
An advanced PDF editor enable C# users to edit PDF text, image and pages in Visual Studio .NET project. Use HTML5 PDF Editor to Edit PDF Document in ASP.NET.
google search pdf metadata; endnote pdf metadata
C# TIFF: TIFF Metadata Editor, How to Write & Read TIFF Metadata
C# TIFF - Edit TIFF Metadata in C#.NET. Allow Users to Read and Edit Metadata Stored in Tiff Image in C#.NET Application. How to Get TIFF XMP Metadata in C#.NET.
read pdf metadata; edit pdf metadata acrobat
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
I
TALY
national journalists’ association.
43
The law led to many users, including those conducting scholarly 
research, to collaborate with registered journalists in order to protect themselves from legal action. 
However, in a September 2012 ruling by the Court of Cassation, it was clarified that blogs cannot 
be considered clandestine press.
44
The decision came after an appeal from the Sicilian blogger Carlo 
Ruta, who had been ordered to pay a fine of €150 ($200) for defamatory remarks made on his blog 
“accadeinsicilia.net” back in 2008. In any case, these rules were not generally applied to bloggers 
and, in practice, millions of blogs are published in Italy without repercussions.  
Most policymakers, popular journalists, and figures in the entertainment industry have their own 
blogs, as do many ordinary citizens. Social-networking sites, especially Facebook and Twitter, have 
emerged as  crucial tools  for  organizing protests  and  other mass  gatherings, such  as concerts, 
parties, or political rallies. However, at times, some content on social-networking platforms has 
been aggressive enough to potentially incite violence.
45
Although blogging is very popular in Italy, 
television remains by far the leading medium for obtaining news. 
The widespread use of social media and the web in the February 2013 general elections represented 
a major shift in political strategy. Online tools were central, not only as a communication medium, 
but also as a measure of political allegiances through Facebook “likes” and Twitter hashtags related 
to the many political players.
46
Indeed, even Mario Monti seemed to  utilize new media more 
readily than Silvio Berlusconi, who preferred to rely on his traditional outlets to convey his political 
message. Furthermore, the Five Star Movement (M5S), co-founded by comedian Beppe Grillo, 
based its political campaign almost exclusively on the internet and declined to take part in political 
talk shows or television interviews.
47
After taking office, the Five Star Movement has used the web both to strengthen its political base as 
well as  to conduct  surveys.  For example,  the  party  used  blogs  and  social  media  to  select its 
candidate to run in Italy’s presidential elections,
48
to vote on the expulsion of members who did not 
conform to the movement’s rules and internal decisions, and to provide an outlet for statements by 
Grillo who, due to M5S rules, cannot stand for public office due to past criminal convictions.
49
43
 Law No. 62, March 7, 2001, “Nuove norme sull’editoria e sui prodotti editoriali” [New Rules on Publishing and Publishing 
Products], InterLex, accessed August 21, 2012, http://www.interlex.it/testi/l01_62.htm.  
44
 Mauro Vecchio, “Cassazione: il giornale telematico non è stampa” [Supreme Court: the electronic journal is not a press], 
September 17, 2012, http://punto‐informatico.it/3606488/PI/News/cassazione‐giornale‐telematico‐non‐stampa.aspx.  
45
 For example, in 2009, fan pages for imprisoned Mafia bosses emerged, as did a Facebook group called “Let’s Kill Berlusconi.” 
See Eric Sylvers, “Facebook to Monitor Berlusconi Content,” The New York Times, December 15, 2009, 
http://www.nytimes.com/2009/12/16/technology/internet/16iht‐face.html
46
 Luca Annunziata, “Chi vince le elezioni su Internet?”, Punto Informatico, February 8, 2013, http://punto‐
informatico.it/3713780/PI/News/chi‐vince‐elezioni‐internet.aspx.  
47
 Stephan Faris and Marina di Bibbona, “Italy’s Beppe Grillo: Meet the Rogue Comedian Turned Kingmaker,” Time, March 7, 
2013, http://world.time.com/2013/03/07/italys‐beppe‐grillo‐meet‐the‐rogue‐comedian‐turned‐kingmaker/.  
48
 The first candidate was Milena Gaibanelli, a journalist, who delcined then follone by Stefano Rodotà, former leader of the 
Privacy authority. In the end the incumbent president, Giorgio Napolitano, was re‐elected.  
49
 See Grilloì’s blog at http://www.beppegrillo.it/. Grillo was criticized even on his blog for the advertisements revenues  from 
his blog. 
407
VB.NET PDF- HTML5 PDF Viewer for VB.NET Project
ASP.NET PDF Viewer; VB.NET: ASP.NET PDF Editor; VB.NET to PDF. Image: Remove Image from PDF Page. Image Link: Edit URL. Bookmark: Edit Bookmark. Metadata: Edit, Delete
adding metadata to pdf files; add metadata to pdf file
C# PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file for C#
HTML5 PDF Editor enable users to edit PDF text, image, page, password and so on. C#.NET: WPF PDF Viewer & Editor. C#.NET: Edit PDF Metadata.
clean pdf metadata; online pdf metadata viewer
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
I
TALY
As a signatory to the European Convention on Human Rights, freedoms of speech and the press, as 
well  as  the  confidentiality  of  correspondence,  are  constitutionally  guaranteed  in  Italy.
50
Nonetheless, the courts often issue conflicting decisions when passing judgments on similar cases 
related to internet freedom, particularly when related to intermediary liability. For this reason, 
online freedom of expression advocates have focused their efforts on proposing legal amendments 
to improve protections and prevent censorship rather than engaging in public interest litigation.
51
Though criminal provisions are rarely applied, civil libel suits against journalists, including by public 
officials  and  politicians,  are  a  common  occurrence,  and  the  financial  burden  of  lengthy  legal 
proceedings may have a chilling effect on journalists and their editors.  
Defamation is a criminal offense in Italy, punishable by prison terms ranging from six months to 
three years and a minimum fine of €516 ($670). In cases of libel through the press, television, or 
other public means, there is no prescribed maximum fine.
52
Public debate on libel was renewed 
during the high profile case of Alessandro Sallusti, director of Il Giornale newspaper, which has 
dragged on for years.
53
Many observers have criticized the libel law that can still send a journalist to 
prison.  Worryingly,  when  the  parliament  took  up  proposals  for  a  bill  that  was  meant  to 
decriminalize  libel  for  journalists,  the  final  draft  actually  led  to  a  worsening  of  penalties.
54
Discussions were left unfinished after the fall of the Monti government. Nevertheless, the lack of 
legal clarity continues to threaten freedom of expression for online journalists. 
Furthermore, there are growing concerns over the enforcement of defamation law on Facebook. 
For example, a young woman who posted negative and racist remarks about her former employer 
on the social network was found guilty of libel and made to pay a fine of €1,000 ($1,330) by a court 
in Livorno.
55
In that case, citing Article 595 of the penal code, the court found that a Facebook post 
could be interpreted as an “other means of publicity.” Given this, the judge ruled that a more 
aggravated form of defamation had occurred—defamation by means of the press—and was able to 
order the defendant to pay a higher sum than in a standard defamation case unrelated to the press. 
50
 An English copy of the constitution is available at, 
http://www.senato.it/documenti/repository/istituzione/costituzione_inglese.pdf. See especially Articles 15 and 21. 
51
 Andrea Monti (lawyer specialized on Internet freedom and activist), interview with author, February 20, 2012. 
52
 Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE) Representative on Freedom of the Media, Libel and Insult Laws: 
A Matrix on Where We Stand and What We Would Like to Achieve (Vienna: OSCE, 2005), 79, http://www.osce.org/fom/41958
53
 Sallusti was found guilty of libel over an anonymous op‐ed that had appeared in 2007 in the newspaper Libero, of which he 
was director at the time. Following a number of legal mishaps in the appeal, he was given a prison sentence of more than one 
year due to the Italian law on libel. The sentence was later confirmed by a higher court until, in 2012, the sentence was 
converted into a house arrest. For more information in Italian, please see http://www.ilgiornale.it/speciali/caso‐sallusti.html.  
54
 Ordine dei Giornalisti “Diffamazione a mezzo stampa”, December 7, 2012, http://www.odg.it/content/diffamazione‐mezzo‐
stampa and Francesco Maitoni “Ddl Salva Sallusti, il colpo di coda della democrazia di plastica”, LeggiOggi.it, 
http://www.leggioggi.it/2012/10/25/legge‐bavaglio‐il‐colpo‐di‐coda‐della‐democrazia‐di‐plastica/  
55
 Adriana Apicella, “Diffamazione a mezzo stampa, è reato anche su Facebook” [Defamation by medium of the press, also on 
Facebook?],  Justicetv.it, January 17, 2013,  
http://www.justicetv.it/index.php/news/2992‐diffamazione‐a‐mezzo‐stampa‐e‐reato‐anche‐su‐facebook and also, Mauro 
Vecchio, “Diffamazione, stampa e social pari sono?” [Defamation, are press and social equal?], Punto Informatico, January 15, 
2013, http://punto‐informatico.it/3690966/PI/News/diffamazione‐stampa‐social‐pari‐sono.aspx.  
V
IOLATIONS OF 
U
SER 
R
IGHTS
408
C# TIFF: TIFF Editor SDK to Read & Manipulate TIFF File Using C#.
1. Extract text from Tiff file. 2. Render text to text, PDF, or Word file. Tiff Metadata Editing in C#. Our .NET Tiff SDK supports editing Tiff file metadata.
add metadata to pdf programmatically; preview edit pdf metadata
How to C#: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF for .NET
XDoc.PDF for .NET supports editing PDF document metadata, like Title, Subject, Author, Creator, Producer, Keywords, Created Date, and Last Modified Date.
pdf metadata editor; get pdf metadata
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
I
TALY
The ruling could open the door to similar judgments, in which victims of defamation over social 
networks could seek high amounts of compensation.   
The  monitoring of personal communications is permissible  only if a  judicial warrant has been 
issued, and widespread technical surveillance is not a concern in Italy. Nevertheless, the country’s 
authorities are known for engaging in extensive wiretapping.
56
According to 2006 figures from the 
Max Planck Institute, a German think-tank, Italy led the world in terms of wiretaps, with 76 
intercepts per 100,000 people.
57
Data from 2010 shows that the authorities bug the communication 
lines of roughly one in every 470 adults.
58
Wiretapping is generally restricted to cases involving 
ongoing legal proceedings and terrorism investigations. Since 2001, “pre-emptive wiretapping” may 
occur even if no formal prosecutorial investigation has been initiated. More lenient procedures are 
also in place for Mafia-related investigations.
59
The past year witnessed the failure of a draft wiretap bill (“DDL intercettazioni”) that aimed to 
address concerns over the right to privacy, particularly as information obtained from wiretaps is 
regularly leaked to the media. The bill, promoted by Berlusconi’s PdL over the past few years, has 
been criticized by the Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe Representative on 
Freedom of the Media and the United Nations Special Rapporteur on Freedom of Expression.
60
Indeed, several provisions appeared to threaten media freedom and the right of the public to access 
independent information. These included high fines and jail sentences for filming an individual 
without permission and obligations for websites and blogs to issue corrections within 48 hours of 
receiving notice of an alleged error.
61
The bill was subsequently put on hold in late 2010 but 
revived  in  October  2011  after  incriminating  and  embarrassing  wiretaps  of  Berlusconi’s 
conversations related to a sex scandal were published in newspaper and online.
62
Although not a 
priority for the Monti government, the issue of wiretapping remains on the agenda of current 
Prime Minister Enrico Letta due to continued pressure from Berlusconi’s PdL.
63
56
 See for example Cristina Bassi, “Intercettazioni, quante sono e quanto costano” [Interceptions, How Many and How Much 
They Cost], Sky TG24, June 13, 2010, 
http://tg24.sky.it/tg24/cronaca/2010/06/12/intercettazioni_quante_sono_e_quanto_costano.html
57
 Duncan Kennedy, “Italian bill to limit wiretaps draws fire,” BBC, June 11, 2010, http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/10279312 and 
“Intercettazioni: dati ufficiali” [Interceptions: official data], Il Chiodo (blog), June 19, 2010, 
http://ilchiodo.blogspot.it/2010/06/intercettazioni‐dati‐ufficiali.html. 
58
 Doug Longhini, “We’ll be listening: Amanda Knox case reveals extent of Italian wiretapping,” CBS News, November 23, 2011, 
http://www.cbsnews.com/8301‐504083_162‐57329774‐504083/well‐be‐listening‐amanda‐knox‐case‐reveals‐extent‐of‐italian‐
wiretapping/.  
59
 Privacy International, “Italy: Privacy Profile,” in European Privacy and Human Rights 2010 (London: Privacy International, 
2010), https://www.privacyinternational.org/article/italy‐privacy‐profile
60
 “OSCE media freedom representative urges Italy to amend bill on electronic surveillance,” OSCE Representative on Freedom 
of the Media, June 15, 2010, http://www.osce.org/fom/69428.  
61
 Nadine de Ninno, “Italian Wikipedia Shuts Down Prompted by New Wiretap Act,” International Business Times, October 4, 
2011, http://www.ibtimes.com/italian‐wikipedia‐shuts‐down‐prompted‐new‐wiretap‐act‐321225 
62
 Tom Kington, “Berlusconi wiretaps reveal suspected pimp had visa to join him in China,” The Guardian, September 18, 2011, 
http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2011/sep/18/berlusconi‐pimp‐china‐visa‐wiretaps; Jeffery Kofman, “Silvio Berlusconi 
Wiretaps: ‘Only Prime Minister in His Spare Time,’” ABC News, September 18, 2011, 
http://abcnews.go.com/International/silvio‐berlusconi‐wiretaps‐prime‐minister‐spare‐time/story?id=14546921; John Hooper, 
“Silvio Berlusconi faces fresh claims over parties, prostitutes and pay‐outs,” The Guardian, September 15, 2011, 
http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2011/sep/15/silvio‐berlusconi‐claims‐prostitutes‐wiretap. 
63
 “Intercettazioni, ritorna il ddl Alfano: è polemica” [Interceptions, the Alfano draft law returns], Tgcom24, May 15, 2013, 
http://www.tgcom24.mediaset.it/politica/articoli/1095305/intercettazioni‐ritorna‐il‐ddl‐alfano‐e‐polemica.shtml.  
409
C# PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net
Comments, forms and multimedia. Document and metadata. All object data. Detect and merge image fragments. Flatten visible layers. C#.NET DLLs: Compress PDF Document
batch pdf metadata editor; pdf xmp metadata
C# PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in C#.net
Convert PDF to HTML. |. C#.NET PDF SDK - Convert PDF to HTML in C#.NET. How to Use C# .NET XDoc.PDF SDK to Convert PDF to HTML Webpage in C# .NET Program.
read pdf metadata online; add metadata to pdf
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
I
TALY
In March 2008, Parliament approved a law (No. 48 of 2008) that ratified the Council of Europe’s 
Convention on Cybercrime, which established the period in which internet-related communication 
data should be retained.
64
This matter was further refined with the inclusion in the Italian legislative 
system of the 2006 EU Data Retention Directive two months later.
65
Under the current legal 
framework, ISPs must keep users’ traffic records—though not the content of communications—
for 12 months. This includes broadband internet data, internet telephony, internet use via mobile 
phone, and e-mail activity.
66
The records can only be disclosed in response to a request from a 
public  prosecutor  (a judge) or a  defendant’s lawyer,  and, like their  counterparts elsewhere in 
Europe, Italy’s law enforcement agencies may ask ISPs to make such information readily available in 
the course of criminal investigations. Given the technical burden of this directive, most ISPs now 
use  a  third-party  service  that offers the necessary  security  guarantees for encryption  and data 
storage.  
As Italy moves towards greater e-governance, some concerns have been raised over the protection 
of user data in the hands of public agencies. “Certified Electronic Mail” (PEC), an initiative of the 
national postal service Poste Italiane, was named the public agency most damaging to individual 
privacy at the annual “Big Brother Awards” 2011. The shaming “prize” was given to PEC for its 
gross mishandling of private information kept by the government’s  “Registro delle Opposizioni,” a 
register  of  people  who  wish  to  keep  their  contact  information  hidden  from  advertisement 
companies.
67
Nevertheless, in November 2011, it became mandatory for all businesses to use the 
PEC  service  in  their  communications  with  the public  administration  to  cut  costs  and  reduce 
paperwork.
68
Reports of extrajudicial intimidation or physical violence in response to online activity are rare, 
although individuals who expose the activities of organized crime may be at risk of reprisals in 
certain areas of the country. According to intelligence reports, there are increasing fears that the 
country’s economic crisis may push extremist groups to adopt cybercrimes as a form of protest or 
terrorism.
69
A special branch within the Postal and Communications Police, the National Center 
for Infrastructure Protection (CNAIPIC), is tasked with the protection of the country’s critical 
infrastructure.
70
More common is the defacement or launching of denial-of-service (DoS) attacks 
against banks, business websites, and government institutions. In October 2012, Italian members of 
64
 For a useful timetable of the required retention periods, see Gloria Marcoccio, “Convention on cybercrime: novità per la 
conservazione dei dati” [Convention on Cybercrime: News on Data Retention], InterLex, April 10, 2008, 
http://www.interlex.it/675/marcoccio7.htm. See also Andrea Monti, “Data Retention in Italy. The State of the Art,” Digital 
Thought (blog), May 30, 2008, http://blog.andreamonti.eu/?p=74
65
 Legislative Decree No. 109, May 30, 2008. 
66
 Privacy International, “Italy: Privacy Profile.”  
67
 Cristina Sciannamblo “Big Brother Awards Italia: tutti i vincitori,” Punto Informatico, June 6, 2011, http://punto‐
informatico.it/3182022/PI/News/big‐brother‐awards‐italia‐tutti‐vincitori.aspx
68
 “Ulteriore Deroga fino a fine giugno 2012 per la casella PEC aziendale,” IlSoftware.it, accessed July 24, 2012, http://www.i‐
node.it/2012/05/ulteriore‐deroga‐fino‐fine‐giugno‐2012‐la‐casella‐pec‐aziendale/
69
 Il Corriere della sera, “Servizi: crisi alimenta tensione sociale”, February 28, 2013, 
http://www.corriere.it/cronache/13_febbraio_28/crisi‐terrorismo‐rapporto‐servizi_4d7f35e8‐8178‐11e2‐aa9e‐
df4f9e5f1fe2.shtml.  
70
 Critical infrastructure includes telecommunications networks, energy and water distribution systems, banking networks, and 
transportation and emergency services.   
410
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
I
TALY
the hacktivist group Anonymous leaked 1.35 GB of data it had received in an attack on the Italian 
State Police. The information included details of existing wiretaps, interception techniques, and 
personal information on  police  officers.
71
In  February 2013, the websites  of the police of the 
Campania region, the Courthouse of Milan, and the Department of Penitentiary Administration 
were hacked.  The homepages  of  those  sites were replaced  with  an  image of  the  Anonymous 
emblem  and  a  declaration  of  a  “digital  revolution”  of  young  Italians  against  “government 
delinquents.”
72
Nevertheless, Italy does not rank highly on the list of countries identified as points 
of origin for cybercrimes.
73
71
 Mohit Kumar, “Anonymous Hakcers leaks 1.35GB Italian State Police Data,” The Hacker News, October 25, 2012, 
http://thehackernews.com/2012/10/anonymous‐hackers‐leaks‐135gb‐italian.html.  
72
 “Gli hacker colpiscono ancora: attaccato sito della polizia campana” Corriere della Sera, February 17, 2013, 
http://www.corriere.it/cronache/13_febbraio_17/polizia‐hacker‐anonymous_1727d948‐790b‐11e2‐a28b‐a2fa92ae99be.shtml.   
73
 “Italy leader in mobile attacks,” Global Cyber Security Center (blog), accessed August 21, 2012, 
http://www.gcsec.org/blog/italy‐leader‐mobile‐attacks. It should be noted, nonetheless, that the Global Cyber Security Center 
has been established by Poste Italiane. As active stakeholder in the area of cyber security, the agency may have a vested 
interest in presenting a picture of Italy’s cyber security that is not reassuring by stressing weaknesses rather strengths of the 
Italian information infrastructure system. See, C. Giustozzi, “Italia patria del malware?” Punto Informatico, May 12, 2012 
http://punto‐informatico.it/3513450/PI/Commenti/italia‐patria‐del‐malware.aspx. The “Symantec Threat report 2011” shows 
Italy as highly infected only as far as bots are concerned, 
http://www.symantec.com/content/en/us/enterprise/other_resources/b‐istr_main_report_2011_21239364.en‐us.pdf 
(published April 2012), and the independent report by HostExploit shows Italy scoring well on a “badness” scale (Germany and 
the Netherlands, for example get a worse score), http://hostexploit.com/downloads/viewdownload/7‐public‐reports/39‐global‐
security‐report‐april‐2012.html). These results are also graphically visible in here: http://globalsecuritymap.com/#nl
411
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
J
APAN
J
APAN
 Political speech was constrained online for 12 days before the December 2012 election
under a law banning parties from campaigning online (see L
IMITS ON 
C
ONTENT
).
 In April 2013, the legislature  overturned that law,  but  kept  restrictions on campaign
emails (see V
IOLATIONS OF 
U
SER 
R
IGHTS
).
 2012 amendments to the Copyright Law criminalized intentionally downloading pirated
content, though lawyers called for civil penalties (see V
IOLATIONS OF 
U
SER 
R
IGHTS
).
 Anti-Korean and anti-Chinese hate speech proliferated online amid real-world territorial
disputes (see V
IOLATIONS OF 
U
SER 
R
IGHTS
).
 A constitutional revision promoted by the newly-elected LDP party threatens to erode
freedoms and rights that “violate public order” (see V
IOLATIONS OF 
U
SER 
R
IGHTS
).
2012 
2013 
I
NTERNET 
F
REEDOM 
S
TATUS
N
/
A
F
REE
Obstacles to Access (0-25) 
n/a 
Limits on Content (0-35) 
n/a 
Violations of User Rights (0-40) 
n/a  11 
Total (0-100) 
n/a 
22 
*0=most free, 100=least free
K
EY 
D
EVELOPMENTS
:
M
AY 
2012
A
PRIL 
2013 
P
OPULATION
128 million
I
NTERNET 
P
ENETRATION 
2012: 
79 percent
S
OCIAL 
M
EDIA
/ICT
A
PPS 
B
LOCKED
No
P
OLITICAL
/S
OCIAL 
C
ONTENT 
B
LOCKED
No
B
LOGGERS
/ICT
U
SERS 
A
RRESTED
No
P
RESS 
F
REEDOM 
2013
S
TATUS
Free
412
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
J
APAN
Internet and digital media freedom are generally well established in Japan, where the constitution 
protects  all  forms  of  speech  and  prohibits  censorship.  Given  this  broad  lack  of  restrictions, 
however, some legislation disproportionately penalizes specific online activities.  
Businesses started to recognize the potential of the internet after 1996, when major companies such 
as Nippon Telegraph and Telephone Corporation (NTT) and Fujitsu offered ISP services. In the 
early  2000s,  providers  introduced  high-speed  broadband.  The  world’s  first  large-scale  mobile 
internet  service,  iMode,  was  pioneered  in  1999  by  the  nation’s  largest  mobile  carrier,  NTT 
DoCoMo. Today, the internet is a major part of social infrastructure with 79 percent penetration.  
Japan’s internet industry is characterized by voluntary self-regulation. The government, especially 
the Ministry of Internal Affairs and Communications, maintains a hands-off approach when it comes 
to online content. Law enforcement agencies tend to push for stronger official regulation, and 
sometimes make arrests based on online activity. Police made a misguided attempt to reign in the 
chaotic discussion site 2channel in 2012, briefly charging its founder with abetting a drug dealer 
who had posted a message, but later backed off. Four others, including a student, were detained for 
several  days in  July  2012 when  police believed  them  responsible  for  terror threats  sent  after 
malware commandeered their computers.
Japan’s lawmakers also struggle to balance freedom with protection online, with mixed success. A 
revised copyright law in effect since October 2012 criminalized the deliberate download of a single 
pirated file; an offence now punishable with jail time. The law already threatens uploaders with up 
to 10 years in jail—making the commercial distribution of illegally copied entertainment in Japan 
subject to heavier sentences than the commercial distribution of child pornography.
1
Other developments were more positive, particularly a change to restrictions on political speech on 
the internet that took place in April 2013. In December 2012, politicians stopped using the web for 
12 days prior to the general election, which brought the conservative Liberal Democratic Party to 
power, following an outdated law against online campaigning. Four months after the social-media 
savvy Shinzo Abe assumed office as prime minister on December 26, the ban was reversed, though 
confusing limits remain on campaign emails and advertising.
2
Troublingly,  Abe’s  social  networking  expertise  shows  signs  of  turning  manipulative,  and  his 
rhetoric against neighboring South Korea and China is echoed in increasingly xenophobic online 
discourse, which in turn fuels right-wing demonstrations. At the same time, the LDP is seeking to 
change the very core of Japan’s free speech protections by revising the constitution so that rights 
1
 Downloading and viewing child pornography for personal, non‐commercial use is legal. A draft law criminalizing possession of 
child pornography has been in the pipeline since 2009 yet most opposition parties do not support the current language.  
2
 Ayako Mie, “Election Campaigning Takes to Net: New law Opens Web to Candidates, Voters Ahead of Upper House Poll,” 
Japan Times, April 11, 2013, http://www.japantimes.co.jp/news/2013/04/11/national/election‐campaigning‐takes‐to‐
net/#.UY8XXqIqzFE. 
I
NTRODUCTION
413
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
J
APAN
“shall not violate public interest”—a disturbing change of emphasis. A national referendum must 
still  approve  constitutional  revisions.  So  far,  however,  Abe’s  nationalism  has  attracted  some 
popular support, to the possible detriment of the online space.  
In general, Japanese people experience few obstacles to internet access, with penetration at 79 
percent in 2012.
3
In late 2011, official figures measured household penetration at 86 percent, and 
99 percent for businesses with over 100 employees.
4
Among individuals, figures show that 79 percent used a home computer to access the internet. 
Another  66  percent  used  mobile  phones,  and  another  20  percent  used  smartphones.  Game 
consoles, tablets, and internet-capable TV amounted to less than 10 percent of usage each. Few still 
use dial-up connections in Japan, since 60 percent have fiber-to-the-home broadband, according to 
2013 government figures.
5
Access is high quality with competitive speeds. In April 2013, So-net, 
an ISP backed by Sony, said it was launching the world’s fastest internet service for home use in 
Japan.
6
The average cost of internet access is around 5,000 yen ($50) per month,
7
though many providers 
bundle digital media subscriptions, Voice over IP (VoIP) and e-mail addresses, pushing expenses 
higher. While this remains within reach of most, declining average incomes make staying connected 
increasingly costly, especially for the younger generation.
8
NTT, formerly a state monopoly, was privatized in 1985 and reorganized in 1999 under a law 
promoting functional separation between the company’s mobile, fixed-line, and internet services.
9
Asymmetric regulation, which creates stricter rules for carriers with higher market share, helped 
diversify  the  industry,  though  critics  say  the  expense  of  switching  providers—and  the 
inconvenience  of  losing an email  address  and other  services—ties  customers  to the dominant 
players and creates a barrier for new entrants.
10
While the telecommunications market looks open, 
3
 International Telecommunication Union, “Percentage of Individuals Using the Internet, 2000‐2012,” 
http://www.itu.int/en/ITU‐D/Statistics/Pages/stat/default.aspx.   
4
 Ministry of Internal Affairs and Communications, “Communication Service Use Trend, 2011” [in Japanese], 
http://www.soumu.go.jp/johotsusintokei/statistics/statistics05.html.     
5
 Ministry of Internal Affairs and Communications, “Broadband Subscription Trend, 2013” [in Japanese], 
http://www.soumu.go.jp/johotsusintokei/field/data/gt010103.xls. 
6
 Jay Alabaster, “Sony ISP Launches World's Fastest Home Internet, 2Gbps,” PC World, April 15, 2013, 
http://www.pcworld.com/article/2034643/sony‐isp‐launches‐worlds‐fastest‐home‐internet‐2gbps.html
7
 Informal Freedom House survey of providers’ costs, 2013.   
8
 The average monthly income for working households in 2010 was 700 yen (US$7) less than it was in 1990. See, Ministry of 
Internal Affairs and Communications, “Average Monthly Income and Expenditure per Household (Workers) 1955‐2010,” 
Statistics Bureau, http://www.stat.go.jp/data/chouki/zuhyou/20‐06.xls.  
9
 “Law Concerning Nippon Telegraph and Telephone Corporation, Etc.,” 1984, amended 2005, available on the Ministry of 
Internal Affairs and Communications website, 
http://www.soumu.go.jp/main_sosiki/joho_tsusin/eng/Resources/laws/NTTLaw.htm
10
 Toshiya Jitsuzumi, “An Analysis of Prerequisites for Japan’s Approach to Network Neutrality,” paper submitted to the 
Proceedings of the Telecommunincations Policy Research Conference 2012, http://bit.ly/1dPQDcb.  
O
BSTACLES TO 
A
CCESS
414
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested