download pdf file from server in asp.net c# : Read pdf metadata online application SDK tool html .net asp.net online FOTN%202013_Full%20Report_045-part1549

F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
K
AZAKHSTAN
Mukhtar Ablyazov) were charged with deliberate fomentation of the riots and were shut down in an 
unprecedented  move.  In  November 2012, the Almaty city prosecutor's office filed four suits, 
asking the court to ban Respublika, the newspaper Vzglyad, the satellite TV channel K+, and the Stan 
TV video news site (the latter two are entities registered in Russia and Kyrgyzstan, respectively).
49
Three of the suits included the request to ban both the publication and the “resources that duplicate 
it,” meaning the outlet's websites and accounts in blogging or social networking sites.
50
The fourth 
suit targeted Respublika, and considered 8 print publications and 23 websites as the “single media 
outlet titled Respublika.” Prosecutors alleged that the “analysis revealed presence of propaganda of 
violent  overthrow  of  government  and  undermining  of  state  security”  in  their  content.
51
No 
journalist or editor was convicted, but the court forbade the editorial collectives to reunite in any 
new media outlet.  
The court ordered the suspension of the distribution of the Respublika newspaper on the same day 
that the suit was filed.
52
According to a Respublika representative, the Almaty prosecutor's office 
also listed Google, Facebook, Twitter, and LiveJournal as defendants.
53
A spokesman from the 
office of the general prosecutor refuted this claim and stated that those sites were mentioned “only 
in relation to certain pages and blogs mirroring Respublika and Vzglyad,” while the administrators of 
Facebook and other sites would be “requested to delete or block the appropriate pages, while access 
to Facebook itself would not be blocked.”
54
By the end of 2012 the courts had finished considering 
the cases and ruled to fully satisfy the prosecutor's suits by banning the media outlets,
55
causing a 
tide  of  condemnation  from  international  rights  watchdogs,  domestic  journalists,  and  media 
defenders. 
In addition, the online newspaper and investigatory whistleblower Guljan.org, which is sympathetic 
to the country’s opposition, has repeatedly been charged with libel by state officials. In February 
2012, the wife of Kazakhstan's financial police chief won a case seeking KZT 5 million ($33,300) in 
moral damages for alleged defamation. The court ruling threatened to jeopardize the website with 
bankruptcy, but by the end of the year the fine was repaid.
56
However, on December 4, 2012, the 
Bostandyk district court in Almaty considered the prosecutor's request to suspend Guljan.org and 
agreed to ban it for three months. The court hearing was conducted without the participation of the 
defendants or their representatives, and both the prosecutor's request and the judge's ruling did not 
49
 “Main opposition media silenced in space of a month,” Reporters Without Borders, December 28, 2012, 
http://en.rsf.org/kazakhstan‐main‐opposition‐media‐silenced‐in‐28‐12‐2012,43751.html  
50
 “Прокуратора Алматы подала иски в суд в отношении ряда казахстанских и зарубежных СМИ” [Almaty Prosecutors 
Bring Charges against several Kazakhstani and foreign media], Gazeta.kz, November 21, 2012, gazeta.kz/art.asp?aid=373227 
51
 “Прокуратура Алматы просит суд закрыть ряд оппозиционных СМИ” [“Prosecutors ask court to ban several opposition 
media outlets”], Tengrinews.kz, November 21, 2012, http://m.tengrinews.kz/ru/kazakhstan_news/223826  
52
 “Суд в Алматы приостановил распространение газеты Республика” [Almaty court suspends distribution of Respublika 
newspaper], November 23, 2012, http://news.gazeta.kz/art.asp?aid=373369 
53
 “Almaty prosecutors filed lawsuits against Google, Facebook and Twitter”, November 23, 2012, 
http://en.tengrinews.kz/crime/Almaty‐prosecutors‐filed‐lawsuits‐against‐Google‐Facebook‐and‐Twitter‐14715/ 
54
 “Kazakhstan General Prosecutor's office denies filing lawsuits against Google, Facebook and Twitter”, November 23, 2012
http://en.tengrinews.kz/internet/Kazakhstan‐General‐Prosecutors‐office‐denies‐filing‐lawsuits‐against‐Google‐14731/ 
55
 “«Республику» велено закрыть. Что дальше?” [Respublika is to be closed. What's next?], December 25, 2012,  
http://rus.azattyq.org/content/respublika‐oppositional‐press‐trial‐verdict/24808192.html 
56
 Interview with Mr. Ayan Sharipbayev, journalist of the Guljan.org website, Almaty, January 2013.  
445
Read pdf metadata online - add, remove, update PDF metadata in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Allow C# Developers to Read, Add, Edit, Update and Delete PDF Metadata
pdf remove metadata; google search pdf metadata
Read pdf metadata online - VB.NET PDF metadata library: add, remove, update PDF metadata in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Enable VB.NET Users to Read, Write, Edit, Delete and Update PDF Document Metadata
clean pdf metadata; metadata in pdf documents
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
K
AZAKHSTAN
specify the grounds for the suspension.
57
Moreover, the court that considered the case did not have 
jurisdiction over it.  
A second trial was held in the proper court, the Medeu district court of Almaty, and upheld the 
ban, adding that any URL containing the term “Guljan” (the first name of the site’s editor-in-chief, 
Guljan  Yergaliyeva)  should  be  subject  to  immediate  blocking,  thus  outlawing  the  mirror  site 
“guljan.info” that the editorial staff had hastily registered by then. The second court hearing clarified 
that the formal reason for the shutdown was the website's participation in a campaign to encourage 
citizens to participate in an unsanctioned rally in January 2012.
58
No legal action or investigation 
was  known  by the  journalists or  public  to  be  held against Guljan.org  during the  ten months 
between  when the alleged offence was committed and the court ruling.  The journalists' team 
launched a new site, Nuradam.kz, in February 2013, which fell victim to distributed denial-of-
service (DDoS) attacks on several occasions. Its domain name was subsequently closed on charges 
that  the  website  was  based  on  foreign  servers,  which  is  a  violation  of  domestic  regulations; 
however, the content continues to be available through the use of mirror websites.  
Since  early  2009,  there  has  also  been  an  increase  in  self-censorship  and  content  removal 
implemented  by  companies  hosting  online  information.
59
With  the  2009  internet-related 
amendments  coming  into  force,  most  online  content  providers  intensified  their  moderating 
practices in  order to  censor  content that could expose them  to legal  repercussions.  The  self-
censorship environment was further solidified following the July 2010 adoption of a law granting 
President Nazarbayev the status of “Leader of the Nation,” which essentially places any criticism of 
him and his family under the umbrella of threats to national security or reputation. In 2012, the 
owners of independent political websites have reportedly received “friendly warnings,” urging them 
to remove sensitive (usually, president-related) material. These warnings came from their hosting 
providers, who, in their turn, were approached by the special services.  
From  2012–2013,  no  new  methods  were  used  by  the  government  or  non-state  actors  to 
proactively  manipulate  the  content  and  online  news  landscape,  although  the  presence  of 
government-paid commentators continued to be observed during this period.  
The 2008 blocking of LiveJournal, at the time the most popular blogging platform in Kazakhstan, 
combined with unstable access to Wordpress and Blogspot, have generated significant changes to 
the country’s blogosphere.
60
At that time, there were no major local blogging sites. Since then, 
Yvision.kz has become the most popular Kazakhstan-based blog-hosting platform, with over 80,000 
57
 “Гульжан Ергалиева: Я еще не знаю, в чем меня обвиняют” [Guljan Yergaliyeva: I don't know what are the charges they 
bring against me], December 5, 2012, 
http://forbes.kz/massmedia/guljan_ergalieva_ya_esche_ne_znayu_v_chem_menya_obvinyayut 
58
 “Суд приостановил guljan.org из‐за январских призывов к митингам” [“Court suspended guljan.org for the January 2012 
calls for participation in an unsanctioned rally”], KazTAG report republished by Headline.kz news aggregator 
http://news.headline.kz/chto_v_strane/sud_priostanovil_guljanorg_iz‐za_yanvarskih_prizyivov_k_mitingam.html  
59
 Carl Schreck, “Kazakhstan Puts Pressure on Bloggers,” The National, August 25, 2009, 
http://www.thenational.ae/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20090825/FOREIGN/708249847/1140.  
60
 SUP Media, “LiveJournal in Figures. Autumn 2007,” presentation, November 30, 2007, 
http://www.sup.com/stat_autumn07.pdf
446
VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images
zonal information, metadata, and so on. Extract image from PDF free in .NET framework application with trial SDK components for .NET. Online source codes for
adding metadata to pdf; search pdf metadata
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
such as its location, zonal information, metadata, and so on. Extract image from PDF free in .NET framework with trial SDK components and online C# class source
read pdf metadata java; pdf metadata viewer online
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
K
AZAKHSTAN
users as of January 2013, most of them blogging in Russian. A number of other blogging projects 
(both mass market and niche) are emerging, testing new formats of user-generated content (UGC) 
and services in commercial and non-commercial fields. Many users have migrated to Twitter and 
Facebook, which appear to be popular choices for new users as well.  
The Kazakhstani blogosphere is dominated by the younger generation, but recent years have shown 
broader engagement on the part of professionals, journalists, academics, members of parliament, 
and other public figures, particularly on social networks. In 2012, as political activists continued to 
vigorously use social media to spread their message, the authorities kept recruiting popular, yet 
relatively loyal, bloggers to engage in “special coverage” propaganda campaigns, inviting them on 
“blogger tours,” starting with the visit to oilfields and the Cosmodrome space launch facility, but 
then recruiting bloggers to report from the trials that followed the clashes in Zhanaozen.
61
Their 
coverage was heavily in line with the prosecutor's position. Both the government and bloggers deny 
having any financial ties to one another. 
In an effort to demonstrate a willingness to engage with citizens online, officials and government 
institutions continue setting up and maintaining blogs on popular social-networking platforms. The 
website of every government body and local administration is required to have a blog. In November 
2012, Bolat Kalyanbekov, the chairman of the Committee for Information and Archives at the 
Ministry of Culture and Information, recommended that all government press secretaries have their 
own Twitter accounts “to regularly monitor and participate in discussions, and resolve issues right 
where they occur.”
62
In another instance, the deputy chief of the Presidential Administration, the 
country's  main  policy-making  body,  acknowledged  that  his  staff  is  keeping  an  eye  on  online 
debates.
63
Several grassroots campaigns have been actively employing social media to reach out to potential 
supporters and to coordinate activities. The most notable examples include the environmentalist 
group “Protect Kok-Zhailyau!,” which opposes plans of large-scale construction on the territory of 
a nature reserve near Almaty, and BlogBasta.kz, a non-partisan initiative that supports the political 
mobilization of creative urban youth. Additionally, a movement to oppose budget cuts to maternity 
benefits and an increase in the retirement age, which also used Facebook to organize supporters, 
was  able to develop suggestions  to improve  legislation and  was invited  by the government to 
deliver their report to members of parliament. These cases have shown serious self-organizing 
potential that was not previously present in the online sphere in Kazakhstan.  
61
 “Усилились постжанаозенские баталии блогеров” [“Post‐Zhanaozen battles between bloggers have intensified”], 
Azattyq.org, August 20, 2012, http://rus.azattyq.org/content/twitter‐bloggers‐battle‐about‐zhanaozen‐trial/24680408.html  
62
 “МКИ Казахстана рекомендует пресс‐секретарям госорганов «переехать» в Твиттер” [MCI of Kazakhstan suggests press 
secretaries of state bodies “moving” to Twitter], November 23, 2012, http://www.inform.kz/rus/article/2512711 
63
 “Замглавы Администрации Президента прокомментировал критику алматинцев в адрес Есимова” [Deputy chief of 
presidential administration commented upon the critic of Almaty residents towards Yesimov], December 21, 2012, 
http://tengrinews.kz/kazakhstan_news/zamglavyi‐administratsii‐prezidenta‐prokommentiroval‐kritiku‐almatintsev‐adres‐
225559/ 
447
VB.NET PDF: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF
XDoc.PDF for .NET supports editing PDF document metadata, like Title, Subject, Author, Creator, Producer, Keywords, Created Date, and Last Modified Date.
change pdf metadata creation date; rename pdf files from metadata
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
in PDF, C#.NET edit PDF bookmark, C#.NET edit PDF metadata, C#.NET PDF sticky note, C#.NET print PDF, C#.NET read barcodes from PDF, C#.NET OCR scan PDF.
pdf metadata extract; acrobat pdf additional metadata
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
K
AZAKHSTAN
The government of Kazakhstan continued to use legal and extralegal mechanisms to control the 
activities of internet users in 2012–2013. Restrictions on the use of anonymizing tools remain in 
place, and in March 2012 the Tor Project found evidence that deep packet inspection (DPI) was 
being  used  by  at  least  one  telecommunications  service  provider.  Additionally,  in  2013  two 
individuals were sentenced to one year “restraint of freedom” for posting an anonymous comment 
about corruption on the blog of a tax committee chairman.  
The constitution of Kazakhstan guarantees freedom of the press, but the criminal code also provides 
special protection for state officials, members of parliament, and in particular, the president. In 
practice, the authorities use various legislative and administrative tactics to control the media and 
limit free expression. There are additional restrictions applied during elections and the coverage of 
court trials.  
In 2010, the parliament passed a law granting President Nazarbayev the status of “Leader of the 
Nation,” which attached criminal responsibility to any damage done to his image, including public 
insults  or  distortion  of  his  private  biographical  facts,  among  other  provisions.  More  broadly, 
defamation remains a criminal offense and Kazakhstani officials have a track record of using libel to 
punish critical reporting.  
While no bloggers were legally prosecuted from late 2012 to early 2013, in April 2012, Lukpan 
Akhmedyarov, a journalist of the independent weekly Uralskaya Nedelya, was violently beaten near 
his  home  by  unidentified  attackers.
64
Akhmedyarov  had  repeatedly  reported  on  high-level 
corruption in the western province of Uralsk, appeared in defamation cases before the court, co-
organized political rallies, and ran a personal blog on the official website of his newspaper.
65
The 
case was investigated and, in December 2012, police arrested four suspects, declaring the crime 
cleared,
66
although there still has been no information about the instigators of the crime or their 
potential motives.
67
In late January 2013, the media reported the first case in Kazakhstan of online libel to reach the 
courts. Two officers of the Almaty tax department published an anonymous post on the official blog 
of the chairman of the tax committee, claiming that their supervisor was implicated in crimes of 
corruption. The police inquired into the crime and six months later the offenders appeared in court 
after a series of investigatory activities that included internet protocol (IP) analysis, retrieval of 
video recordings from cameras installed inside the cybercafe from which the comments had been 
64
 “Совершено покушение на Лукпана Ахмедьярова” [Attempt on Lukpan Akhmedyarov's life], April 20, 2012, 
http://rus.azattyq.org/content/lukpan_ahmediyarov_attacked_uralksaya_nedelya/24554128.html 
65
  See the page of Lukpan Akhmedyarov's personal blog on the website of “Uralskaya Nedelya” (Uralsk Week) newspaper 
http://bit.ly/19Kts03.  
66
 “Нападение на Лукпана Ахмедьярова раскрыто” [Attack on Lukpan Akhmedyarov cleared], December 28, 2012, 
http://newskaz.ru/society/20121228/4533449.html 
67
 “За жизнь Лукпана Ахмедьярова исполнителям обещали $10 тыс” [$10,000 was promised to the attackers for life of 
Lukpan Akhmedyarov], January 8, 2013, http://www.zakon.kz/4534211‐za‐zhizn‐lukpana‐akhmedjarova.html 
V
IOLATIONS OF 
U
SER 
R
IGHTS
448
How to C#: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF for .NET
XDoc.PDF for .NET supports editing PDF document metadata, like Title, Subject, Author, Creator, Producer, Keywords, Created Date, and Last Modified Date.
extract pdf metadata; batch edit pdf metadata
VB.NET PDF - Create PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
in PDF, C#.NET edit PDF bookmark, C#.NET edit PDF metadata, C#.NET PDF sticky note, C#.NET print PDF, C#.NET read barcodes from PDF, C#.NET OCR scan PDF.
analyze pdf metadata; pdf metadata online
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
K
AZAKHSTAN
posted, and the cybercafe’s server data regarding online activities from certain PCs. The defendants 
maintained their innocence; however, the court sentenced both to one year of restraint of freedom, 
which requires notifying the police prior to leaving one’s place of residence, education, or work.
68
Beginning in early 2011, anonymizing tools, including proxy websites and specific circumvention 
software, were increasingly being blocked in Kazakhstan, though no court decision had been issued 
against them. Many users wishing to circumvent censorship instead switched to browsers designed 
by the Opera Corporation,
69
whose traffic compression feature was initially meant to facilitate 
browsing with slow connections but also enables users to access blocked websites. On April 21, 
2012, Kazakhstani users  reported  problems  with Opera  browsers, particularly  the  inability  to 
access websites outside of the “.kz” country code zone.
70
The problem was resolved on the same 
day; however, no explanations were provided.
71
In March 2012, the Tor Project announced that 
the service provider KazTransCom JSC had started using deep packet inspection (DPI) to censor 
and  monitor the internet,  particularly SSL-based encryption  protocols.
72
At  approximately the 
same time, users were no longer able to download Tor software from Kazakhstan (at the time of 
the report's update in May 2013, however, the download was possible).  
It is difficult to track or verify efforts by the National Security Committee (KNB) or other agencies 
to monitor internet and mobile phone communications. However, a series of regulations approved 
in 2004 and updated in 2009 oblige telecom operators (both ISPs and mobile phone providers) to 
retain records of users’ online activities, including phone numbers, billing details, IP addresses, 
browsing history, protocols of data transmission, and other data, via the installation of special 
software and hardware when necessary.
73 
Providers must store user data for two years and grant 
access to “operative-investigatory bodies” when sanctioned by a prosecutor.
74
Furthermore, SIM 
card registration is required for mobile phone users at the point of purchase under the civil code; 
however, the requirement is not tightly enforced, and SIM card vendors view the registration as 
optional.
75
The new amendments to the law on countering terrorism, which were signed by the president on 
January 8, 2013 and became effective on January 18, 2013,
76
granted extra powers to the security 
68
 “Клевета в Интернете” [Libel on the internet], January 29, 2013, http://www.nomad.su/?a=13‐201301300007 
69
 “Web browser that bypasses big brother a Kazakh hit,” Reuters, April 13, 2010, 
http://www.reuters.com/article/2010/04/13/us‐kazakhstan‐internet‐browser‐idUSTRE63C37N20100413.  
70
 “Казахстанские интернет‐пользователи испытывают трудности с браузером Opera” [Kazakhstani users experience 
problems with Opera browser], April 21, 2012, http://tengrinews.kz/internet/kazahstanskie‐internet‐polzovateli‐ispyityivayut‐
trudnosti‐s‐brauzerom‐Opera‐212610/ 
71
 See http://my.opera.com/community/forums/topic.dml?id=1369952 
72
 “Updates on Kazakhstan Internet Censorship”, March 2, 2012,
http://bit.ly/yhkSVQ.  
73
 Ksenia Bondal, “Следи за базаром ‐ нас слушают” [Watch out, we are watched], Respublika, republished by Zakon.kz, 
November 5, 2009, http://www.zakon.kz/top_news/152528‐objazyvaet‐li‐ais‐i‐knb‐sotovykh.html.  
74
 See, “Rules of rendering internet access services,” adopted by the governmental decree #1718 on December 30, 2011, and 
the Law on operative‐investigatory activities, dated September 15, 1994, http://www.minjust.kz/ru/node/10182.  
75
 “Сотовая связь: абонент не определен и опасен” [Cellular: caller is uncertain and dangerous], Ipr.kz, June 21, 2011, 
http://www.ipr.kz/kipr/3/1/51#.T7t40tx1BLc.  
76
 Law of the Republic of Kazakhstan on amendments and addenda into several legislative acts of the Republic of Kazakhstan 
regarding counteraction to terrorism [In Russian], January 8, 2013, http://online.zakon.kz/Document/?doc_id=31318154 
449
VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
PDF Metadata Edit. Offer professional PDF document metadata editing APIs, using which VB.NET developers can redact, delete, view and save PDF metadata.
add metadata to pdf; view pdf metadata in explorer
VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF
Best VB.NET PDF text extraction SDK library and component for free download. Online Visual Basic .NET class source code for quick evaluation.
c# read pdf metadata; bulk edit pdf metadata
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
K
AZAKHSTAN
bodies,
77
reiterated a vague term of “fomenting social discord,” and obliged all mass media (thereby 
including online resources and citizen journalists) to “assist” the state bodies involved in counter 
terrorism.
The exact mechanisms of assistance are not
specified.  
On December 30, 2011, the government issued a decree tightening surveillance in cybercafes. 
Under the decree, cybercafe owners are obliged to gather the personal information of customers 
and retain data about their online activities and browsing history. This information is to be retained 
for no less than six months and can be accessed by “operative-investigatory bodies.”
78
The decree 
also banned the use of circumvention tools in cybercafes. Beginning in early 2012, parts of the 
decree came into force,  including the requirement to install  video surveillance equipment and 
filtering software.
79
As of early 2013, none of the cybercafes specifically reviewed for this report 
required an identification card or passport before granting access to internet. It is still unclear how 
these regulations might apply to public Wi-Fi access points.  
The administrators of several opposition-related or independent news websites such as Respublika, 
Zonakz.net  and  Guljan.org  have  reported  suffering  sporadic  DDoS  cyberattacks  since  2009.
80
Although many suspect that regime actors were behind the attacks, their origin has been neither 
independently confirmed nor investigated by the police or the Computer Emergency Response 
Team (CERT),
81
whose responsibility is to address such incidents. 
77
 Alexandr Gribanov, “Закон особого назначения” [“Law of special task”], Vecherniy Almaty newspaper, January 31, 2013, 
http://www.vecher.kz/node/18716  
78
 See, “Rules of rendering internet access services,” adopted by the governmental decree #1718 on December 30, 2011, 
http://medialawca.org/old/document/‐11242
79
  “В интернет‐клубы теперь будут пускать только с удостоверением личности” [Internet clubs will demand IDs], Zakon.kz, 
January 25, 2012, http://www.zakon.kz/kazakhstan/4469529‐takie‐pravila‐okazanija‐uslug‐dostupa‐k.html.  
80
 “Интернет‐СМИ «Фергана.Ру», Zona.kz и «Республика» были атакованы неизвестными хакерами почти одновременно” 
[Internet Media ‘Fergana.ru,’ Zona.kz and ‘Respublika’ Are Attacked by Unknown Hackers Almost Simultaneously], Fergana.ru, 
February 20, 2009, http://www.ferghana.ru/news.php?id=11348
81
 Computer Emergency Response Team (CERT), accessed July 1, 2013, http://kz‐cert.kz/en/ 
450
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
K
ENYA
K
ENYA
 Kenya’s first general election, under the new 2010 constitution was held on March 4,
2013, which saw citizens and politicians alike using ICTs to disseminate information
and prevent electoral violence (see L
IMITS ON 
C
ONTENT
).
 Fearful  of  election-related  unrest,  the  government  blocked  thousands  of  allegedly
inflammatory text messages, mandated bulk texts be pre-screened, and hired a team to
proactively monitor social media for inciting language (see L
IMITS ON 
C
ONTENT
).
 Service providers were required to install internet traffic monitoring equipment known
as the Network Early Warning System (NEWS) by December 2012 to detect cyber
threats, such as online hate speech (see V
IOLATIONS OF 
U
SER 
R
IGHTS
).
2012 
2013 
I
NTERNET 
F
REEDOM 
S
TATUS
F
REE
F
REE
Obstacles to Access (0-25) 
10 
Limits on Content (0-35) 
Violations of User Rights (0-40) 
12 
12 
Total (0-100) 
29 
28 
*0=most free, 100=least free
K
EY 
D
EVELOPMENTS
:
M
AY 
2012
A
PRIL 
2013 
P
OPULATION
43 million
I
NTERNET 
P
ENETRATION 
2012: 
32 percent
S
OCIAL 
M
EDIA
/ICT
A
PPS 
B
LOCKED
No
P
OLITICAL
/S
OCIAL 
C
ONTENT 
B
LOCKED
No
B
LOGGERS
/ICT
U
SERS 
A
RRESTED
No
P
RESS 
F
REEDOM 
2013
S
TATUS
Partly Free
451
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
K
ENYA
Over  the  past  decade,  Kenya  has  made  notable  strides  in  the  field  of  information  and 
communication  technologies  (ICTs),  spurred  by  the  government’s  commitment  to  economic 
development  and  an  engaged  civil  society.  Among  several  success  stories  are  the  start  of 
construction for the Konza Techno City, dubbed “Africa’s Silicon Savannah,” in January 2013,
1
the 
launch of the National ICT Master Plan 2017,
2
and an impressive rise in both internet and mobile 
usage. The large-scale adoption of the M-Pesa mobile money platform,  both domestically and 
regionally, has made the country a global leader in mobile money transfer services.
3
Additionally, 
two SMS-based applications that have become internationally known–Ushahidi and Frontline SMS–
are  based  in  Nairobi  and  paving  the  way  for  the  integration  of  mobile  and  internet  content 
development.
4
Together with Nigeria and Morocco, Kenya has risen to become one of Africa’s 
major tech hubs. 
Kenya held its first general election on March 4, 2013 under the new 2010 constitution. As a result 
of  the  political violence  that ensued  after the last general election  in  2007, there were many 
concerns that ICTs would be used to  propagate  hate speech in  the  lead-up  to the polls.  The 
electioneering period saw the spread of political propaganda and incendiary speech through social 
media,
5
leading to ramped up efforts to limit speech and content that could incite violence. In 
September 2012, for example, the Communications Commission of Kenya (CCK) issued guidelines 
which  mandated  the pre-screening  and  approval  of bulk  messages  containing political content 
before transmission.
6
While there were no known incidents of government filtering or interference with online content 
in the past year, the Blue Coat PacketShaper appliance—a device that can help control undesirable 
traffic by filtering application traffic by content category—was discovered in Kenya alongside 18 
other countries around the world, including China, Bahrain, and Russia in January 2013, though it 
1
 “Kenya Begins Construction of ‘Silicon’ City Konza,” BBC News, January 23, 2013, http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world‐africa‐
21158928?print=true. 
2
 Joseph McOluch (ed.), Connected Kenya 2017, National ICT Master Plan (Kenya: ICT Board, 2012), 
http://www.ict.go.ke/docs/MasterPlan2017.pdf.  
3
  Wolfgang Fengler, “How Kenya Became a World Leader for Mobile Money,” Africa Can…End Poverty (blog), World Bank, July 
16, 2012, http://blogs.worldbank.org//africacan/how‐kenya‐became‐a‐world‐leader‐for‐mobile‐money. 
4
 David Souter and Monica Kerretts‐Makau, “Internet Governance in Kenya ‐‐ An Assessment for the Internet Society,” ICT 
Development Associates Ltd, September 2012, 32, 
http://www.internetsociety.org/sites/default/files/ISOC%20study%20of%20IG%20in%20Kenya%20‐
%20D%20Souter%20%26%20M%20Kerretts‐Makau%20‐%20final.pdf
5
 A report by the Kenya Human Rights commission pointed out that “Kenyans on Twitter and Facebook, ran amok with all 
manner of accusations and counter‐accusations mainly laced on choice epithets betraying raw ethnic chauvinism or blind 
political party loyalty.” See, “Report: Election Propaganda Widespread in Social Media,” African Seer, March 28, 2013, 
http://www.africanseer.com/news/african‐news/265133‐report‐election‐propaganda‐widespread‐in‐social‐media.html
6
 According to article 9.4, “Political Messages shall not contain inciting, threatening or discriminatory language that may or is 
intended to expose an individual or group of individuals to violence, hatred, hostility, discrimination or ridicule on the basis of 
ethnicity, tribe, race, colour, religion, gender, disability or otherwise.” See: “Guidelines for the Prevention of Transmission of 
Undesirable Bulk Political Content/Messages via Electronic Communications Networks,” CCK, September 2012, 
http://www.cck.go.ke/regulations/downloads/Guidelines_for_the_prevention_of_transmission_of_undesirable_bulk_political_
content_via_sms.pdf.  
I
NTRODUCTION
452
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
K
ENYA
is uncertain whether the device has been implemented. Meanwhile, over 300,000 text messages 
were reportedly blocked a day during the March 2013 elections for allegedly containing speech that 
had the potential to incite violence. Precautionary surveillance measures were also implemented to 
curb the spread of provocative and inflammatory speech, which involved a requirement announced 
by  the  CCK  in  March  2012  for  service  providers  to  install  the  internet  traffic  monitoring 
equipment known as the Network Early Warning System (NEWS) by December 2012, citing a rise 
in cyber threats.
7
Citizen and civil society efforts to monitor electoral activities and outcomes through innovative ICT 
tools  played  an  instrumental  role  during  the  elections  period.  The  Uchaguzi  crowd-sourcing 
platform, for example, monitored trends as they were reported in real-time by citizens via SMS, 
and highlighted instances of political violence and electoral malpractice.
8
The spread and use of ICTs is increasing in Kenya, in no small part due to the government’s 
commitment  to  developing  the  country’s  ICT  infrastructure  as  a  tool  for  economic  growth. 
According to the latest CCK data from the last quarter of 2012, the percentage of the population 
with access to the internet stood at over 41 percent, increasing from 28 percent in 2011, though 
the  International  Telecommunications  Union  (ITU)  estimated  a  2012  rate  of  32  percent.
9
Meanwhile, Kenya’s mobile data and internet subscriptions stood at 8.5 million as of December 
2012, with an estimated 17.4 million users,
10
while 34 percent of the population accessed the 
internet via mobile phones.
11
Mobile  phone subscribers stood  at over 30 million,
12
with a 78 
percent penetration rate (72 percent according to ITU data
13
), though many people have more than 
one subscription to take advantage of lower prices or expand their geographic coverage, putting the 
actual  number  of  users  much  lower.  Nevertheless,  the  growth  in  mobile  subscribers  can  be 
attributed to the popularity of mobile handsets as a medium of communication and the increasing 
availability of  value-added mobile services such as internet,  entertainment, and  mobile money 
transfer.  
7
 Okutttah Mark, “CCK Sparks Row with Fresh Bid to Spy on Internet Users,” Business Daily Africa, March 20, 2012, 
http://www.businessdailyafrica.com/Corporate‐News/CCK‐sparks‐row‐with‐fresh‐bid‐to‐spy‐on‐Internet‐users‐/‐
/539550/1370218/‐/item/0/‐/edcfmsz/‐/index.html. 
8
 Juliana Rotich, “Uchaguzi Overview Report for March 4, 2013,” Uchaguzi, March 4, 2013, 
http://sitroom.uchaguzi.co.ke/2013/03/04/uchaguzi‐overview‐report‐for‐march‐4‐2013/. 
9
 Communications Commission of Kenya, “Quarterly Sector Statistics Report, Second Quarter of the Financial Year 2012/13 
(Oct‐Dec 2012),” , 21, http://www.cck.go.ke/resc/downloads/Sector_statistics_for_Quarter_2_‐_2012‐2013.pdf;  International 
Telecommunication Union, “Percentage of Individuals Using the Internet, 2000‐2012,” http://www.itu.int/en/ITU‐
D/Statistics/Pages/stat/default.aspx. 
10
 “Kenya ICT Board launches Julisha ICT Survey report 2013,” Humanipo, February 19, 2013, 
http://www.humanipo.com/news/4084/Kenya‐ICT‐Board‐launches‐Julisha‐ICT‐Survey‐report‐2013. 
11
 Communications Commission of Kenya, “Mobile Penetration in the Country Continues to Increase,” , January 21, 2013, 
http://www.cck.go.ke/mobile/news/index.html?nws=/news/2013/Mobile_penetration.html.  
12
 Communications Commission of Kenya, “Mobile Penetration. 
13
 International Telecommunication Union,”Mobile‐cellular Telephone Subscriptions, 2000‐2012.” 
O
BSTACLES TO 
A
CCESS
453
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
K
ENYA
Kenya is also said to have comparatively low-priced mobile service for Africa, with monthly costs 
averaging KES161 ($1.90) for 30 calls and 100 SMS test messages.
14
These relatively affordable 
costs are largely the result of strong regulatory interventions that have led to the implementation of 
the lowest mobile termination rates across the continent.
15
In November 2012, the CCK slashed 
the mobile termination rate from Sh2.21 to Sh1.44 per minute, which drove down prices for 
mobile phone users.
16
Nevertheless, the CCK also initiated a crackdown against the use and sale of 
counterfeit mobile devices in 2012, setting a deadline of September 30 for users to verify the 
authenticity of their handsets through a database of IMEI numbers created in collaboration with 
device  manufacturers.
17
Millions  of  unverified  handsets  were  deactivated  from  networks  on 
October 1, 2012.
18
Data  bundles  are  now  available  for  prepaid  mobile  customers,  while  mobile  broadband 
subscriptions on GPRS/EDGE and 3G networks have continued to increase as well. By the last 
quarter  of  2012,  broadband  subscriptions  stood  at  over  one  million  users,  representing 
approximately 12 percent of total mobile internet subscriptions.
19
By contrast, the number of fixed 
broadband subscriptions numbered less than 43,000 at the end of 2012, for a penetration rate of 
0.1 percent, according to ITU data.
20
The growth in mobile internet subscriptions can be attributed 
to competitive mobile internet tariffs, special offers and promotions, and the rising use of social 
media, particularly among the youth population. 
While internet penetration continues to increase across the country, there is still a large disparity in 
access between rural and urban areas. A 2012 study by the Internet Society noted that internet use 
in Kenya is largely concentrated in Nairobi and that significant action is still needed to address 
issues  of  access  outside  of  the  capital.
21
Further,  the  cost  of  mobile  devices  and  internet 
subscriptions remains a stumbling block for many impoverished Kenyans to access the web.
22
For 
example, the average user pays about $36 per month for 1-2 Mbps of unlimited data services and 
$37 for unlimited internet through a USB dongle (3G modem),
23
while the average monthly wage 
of an unskilled employee is about KES 4,258 ($53).
24
14
 Frankline Sunday, “Lack of Expertise Slows Down ICT Growth,” Standard Digital, December 22, 2012, 
http://www.standardmedia.co.ke/?articleID=2000073463&story_title=lack‐of‐expertise‐slows‐down‐ict‐growth.  
15
 Mobile termination rates are a measure of the costs that mobile operators charge each other for terminating inter‐network 
calls. 
16
 Sunday, “Lack of Expertise Slows Down ICT Growth.” 
17
 The International Mobile Equipment Identifier (IMEI) of counterfeit phones is either duplicated in many other phones or does 
not conform to the recognized GSMA structure.  IMEI is a 15‐digit number that is unique to each mobile handset. See, 
Communications Commission of Kenya, “Counterfeit Mobile Phones,” http://www.cck.go.ke/counterfeit‐campaign/.  
18
 Muthoki Mumo, “Booming Business for Shops as CCK Shuts Fake Phones,” Daily Nation, October 1, 2012, 
http://www.nation.co.ke/business/news/Fake‐phones‐shut/‐/1006/1522804/‐/bbovmqz/‐/index.html.  
19
 Communications Commission of Kenya, “Quarterly Sector Statistics Report, Second Quarter of the Financial Year 2012/13 
(Oct‐Dec 2012).”. 
20
 International Telecommunication Union, “Fixed (Wired)‐broadband Subscriptions, 2000‐2012.” 
21
 David Souter and Monica Kerretts‐Makau, “Internet Governance in Kenya ‐‐ An Assessment for the Internet Society,” ICT 
Development Associates Ltd, September 2012, 28. 
22
 “Costly Smart Devices and Internet Keep Users Away,” Daily Nation, February 19, 2013, http://bit.ly/XrYk0o 
23
 Orange, “Orange Launches Unlimited Internet Bundles,” press release, January 18, 2011, http://oran.ge/1bWXy5i.  
24
 “Minimum Wage Rates in Kenya,” Wage Indicator, as of June 2012, accessed June 22, 2013, 
http://www.wageindicator.org/main/minimum‐wages/kenya
454
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested