download pdf file from server in asp.net c# : Edit pdf metadata online control SDK platform web page wpf html web browser FOTN%202013_Full%20Report_046-part1550

F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
K
ENYA
Both the government and private sector are working to remedy the disparity between rural and 
urban access through the introduction of digital villages and Pasha (“Inform”) Centers, which are 
small public access sites similar to cybercafes.
25
In November 2012, Kenya’s ICT board announced 
that it had set aside 27 million Kenyan shillings to establish an additional 27 digital villages across 
the country by the end of the year,
26
adding to the 63 centers that have already been built since the 
initiative’s launch in 2009. The board aims to establish centers in 290 constituencies in the long 
term.
27
The Konza Techno City is another government initiative that aims to foster the growth of Kenya’s 
ICT industry and place the country on the map as “Africa’s Silicon Savannah.” Designed to include a 
central business district, a university campus, urban parks, and housing for up to 185,000 people, 
the multi-billion dollar project hopes to create nearly 100,000 jobs in the ICT sector by 2030. 
Construction of the city began in January 2013 on a 5,000-acre plot located some 60 kilometers 
from Nairobi.
28
Kenya has four submarine cables that cumulatively provide the country with a capacity of about 
8.56 Tbps, and a fifth cable announced in November 2012 will soon double the country’s capacity 
to around 15 Tbps.
29
These infrastructural developments have improved available bandwidth, but 
unreliable or slow connections in many areas of the country, power outages, and issues of cost 
remain obstacles to access. Nevertheless, there have been no reports of the government controlling 
the internet infrastructure to limit connectivity.  
Through the  country’s open  market-based licensing process  instituted  in 2008, competition  is 
present in most segments of the telecommunications market, though Safaricom still dominates the 
market for mobile phone services with a 63 percent share of all mobile subscriptions.
30
Safaricom 
also  has  a  dominant position  in  the  ISP  market, commanding  a 69  percent  share  of  internet 
subscriptions as of June 2012, though its dominance has decreased over the past year with Airtel, 
Orange, and Essar gaining market share.
31
Under the 2009 Communications Amendment Act, the CCK is responsible for regulating both 
broadcast  and  online  media.  Its  independence  is  formally  enshrined  in  the  1998  Kenya 
Communications Act, and the body has endeavored to work independently even though most of the 
commissioners remain government appointees and the appointment process is not sufficiently open 
25
 “Kenya Investing Ksh 16.3 Billion in Rural ICT,” Information Policy (blog), July 30, 2009, 
http://www.ictworks.org/2009/07/29/kenyan‐government‐investing‐ksh163‐billion‐rural‐ict/. 
26
 Frederick Obura, “ICT Board to Release Funds for Digital Villages,” Standard Online, November 1, 2012, 
http://www.standardmedia.co.ke/?articleID=2000069710&story_title=Kenya‐ICT‐Board‐to‐release‐funds‐for‐digital‐villages.  
27
 Obura, “ICT Board to Release Funds for Digital Villages.” 
28
 “Kenya Begins Construction of ‘Silicon’ City Konza.” 
29
 Muthoki Mumo, “Internet Capacity to Double Soon After Fifth Fibre Optic Cable Lands,” Daily Nation, November 19, 2012, 
http://www.nation.co.ke/business/news/Fifth‐fibre‐optic‐cable‐lands/‐/1006/1624478/‐/item/0/‐/1uv0vy/‐/index.html.  
30
 Communications Commission of Kenya, “Quarterly Sector Statistics Report, First Quarter of the Financial Year 2012/13,” 15,  
http://www.cck.go.ke/resc/downloads/SECTOR_STATISTICS_REPORT_Q1_12‐13.pdf.  
31
 Souter, “Internet Governance in Kenya ,”,13. 
455
Edit pdf metadata online - add, remove, update PDF metadata in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Allow C# Developers to Read, Add, Edit, Update and Delete PDF Metadata
edit pdf metadata; view pdf metadata
Edit pdf metadata online - VB.NET PDF metadata library: add, remove, update PDF metadata in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Enable VB.NET Users to Read, Write, Edit, Delete and Update PDF Document Metadata
add metadata to pdf file; pdf xmp metadata viewer
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
K
ENYA
and  transparent.
32
In  February  2013,  however,  the  government  for  the  first  time  publicly 
advertised the consumer representative position of the CCK board in accordance with Kenya’s new 
2010 constitution,
33
which states that board positions must be filled competitively.  
The  proposed Independent Communications Commission of Kenya  Bill, 2010 further seeks to 
expand the independence of the country’s ICT regulatory regime by replacing the CCK with the 
Independent Communications Commission of Kenya, which will be expected to function without 
any political or commercial interference.
34
Under the new body, all board positions will be publicly 
advertised, and the four government officials who currently sit on the CCK board will be removed 
and  replaced  by  seven  commissioners  appointed  by  the  president,
35
but  only  on  the 
recommendation of the Public Service Commission.
36
It is expected that the proposed bill will be 
implemented in 2013 in accordance with the fifth schedule of Kenya’s 2010 constitution,
37
which 
provides for media legislation to be enacted within three years of promulgation.
38
Meanwhile, service providers have formed organizations such as the Kenyan ISP Association, the 
Telecommunications Service Providers of Kenya, and the Kenya Cybercafe Owners to lobby the 
government  for  better  regulations,  lower  costs,  and  increased  efforts  to  improve  computer 
literacy.  
The  elections period in March 2013 saw  the widespread use of ICTs, social media tools, and 
innovative crowd-sourcing platforms by citizens and politicians alike to disseminate information. 
Nevertheless,  concerns  over  potential  electoral  unrest  led  the  government  to  take  various 
preemptive actions to curb the spread of hate speech via ICTs, mandating the pre-screening and 
approval of bulk text messages, blocking thousands of other allegedly inflammatory SMS messages, 
and hiring a team to proactively monitor social media sites for inciting language. 
Up until 2013, there were no reports of the Kenyan government employing any form of technical 
filtering or administrative censorship to restrict access to political or other content. However, in 
32
 Open Society Foundations, “Public Broadcasting in Africa Series: Kenya,” 2011, 65,  
http://www.afrimap.org/english/images/report/MAIN%20report%20final%20web%20res.pdf.  
33
 Communications Commission of Kenya, “Govt Advertises Consumers Representative Seat on CCK Board,” press release, 
February 14, 2013, http://www.cofek.co.ke/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=1362%3Agovt‐advertises‐
consumers‐representative‐seat‐on‐cck‐board&catid=1%3Alatest‐news.  
34
 “Independent Communications Commission of Kenya Bill 2010,”  available at Kenya Correspondents Association, 
http://www.kca.or.ke/attachments/article/125/INDEPENDENT%20COMMUNICATIONS%20COMMISSION%20OF%20KENYA%20
BILL‐CN1.pdf. 
35
 Article 5 (1), “Independent Communications Commission of Kenya Bill 2010. 
36
 This is the body that appoints persons to hold or act in public offices. See, “Public Service Commission of Kenya,” Mandate, 
http://www.publicservice.go.ke/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=20&Itemid=61.  
37
 “The Constitution of Kenya, Revised Edition 2010,” 178, available at Embassy of the Republic of Kenya, 
http://www.kenyaembassy.com/pdfs/The%20Constitution%20of%20Kenya.pdf
38
 Article 34 (5) of Kenya’s constitution states that Parliament shall enact legislation that provides for the  
establishment of a body, which shall be independent of control by government, political interests  
or commercial interests, and set media standards and regulate and monitor compliance with those standards.  
L
IMITS ON 
C
ONTENT
456
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
C#.NET edit PDF bookmark, C#.NET edit PDF metadata, C#.NET edit PDF digital signatures, C#.NET edit PDF sticky note read barcodes from PDF, C#.NET OCR scan PDF.
endnote pdf metadata; read pdf metadata online
How to C#: Modify Image Metadata (tag)
C#.NET edit PDF bookmark, C#.NET edit PDF metadata, C#.NET edit PDF digital signatures, C#.NET edit PDF sticky note read barcodes from PDF, C#.NET OCR scan PDF.
online pdf metadata viewer; pdf xmp metadata
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
K
ENYA
January  2013,  the  Citizen  Lab internet  research  group  discovered  evidence  of  the Blue  Coat 
PacketShaper appliance—a device that can help control undesirable traffic by filtering application 
traffic by content category—in Kenya alongside 18 other countries around the world, including 
China, Bahrain, and Russia.
39
No further reports or evidence have surfaced to reveal the extent to 
which the filtering device has been implemented, though its discovery in Kenya is noteworthy given 
the government’s concern over the spread of hate speech and inflammatory content via ICTs in the 
lead-up to the March 2013 elections. 
Intermediaries are responsible for filtering, removing and blocking content considered illegal, such 
as hate speech via text messages, though they are under no obligation to actively monitor traffic 
passing through their networks unless they are made aware of illegal content. Otherwise, Kenyans 
have unrestricted access to social-networking sites such as Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, and the 
blog-hosting site Blogger, all of which rank among the 10 most popular sites in the country.
40
As a result of the political crisis that ensued after the 2007 general elections, the government 
ramped up its efforts to curb the spread of content that could trigger unrest or incite violence prior 
to March 2013. In September 2012, for example, the CCK issued “Guidelines for the Prevention of 
Transmission of Undesirable Bulk Content/Messages via Electronic Communications Networks,”
41
rules  targeting  licensed  content  service  providers  seeking  to  communicate  messages  to  the 
electorate on behalf of politicians or political parties.
42
Under the guidelines, these providers must 
submit a request to a mobile network operator that includes the verbatim content of the message 
and a signed authorization letter from the sponsoring party for approval before a bulk political 
message can be transmitted.
43
The operator then screens and vets the proposed message for any 
inflammatory,  provoking,  or  hateful  language,  and  relays  its  decision  within  18  hours.  The 
guidelines also include a complaints handling process for aggrieved parties.
44
Earlier in June 2012, Safaricom, the dominant mobile phone provider, issued its own guidelines for 
mobile advertising through its various media services to rein in negative political messages ahead of 
39
 Morgan Marquis‐Boire et al., “Planet Blue Coat: Mapping Global Censorship and Surveillance Tools,” Citizen Lab, Munk School 
of Global Affairs, University of Toronto, January 15, 2013, https://citizenlab.org/2013/01/planet‐blue‐coat‐mapping‐global‐
censorship‐and‐surveillance‐tools/#4
40
 Alexa, “Top Sites in Kenya,” http://www.alexa.com/topsites/countries/KE, accessed February 20, 2013. 
41
 According to Aarticle 9.4 of the guidelines, “Political Messages shall not contain inciting, threatening or discriminatory 
language that may or is intended to expose an individual or group of individuals to violence, hatred, hostility, discrimination or 
ridicule on the basis of ethnicity, tribe, race, colour, religion, gender, disability or otherwise.” See: Communications Commission 
of Kenya, “Guidelines for the Prevention of Transmission of Undesirable Bulk Political Content/Messages via Electronic 
Communications Networks,” September 2012. 
42
 “Short Message Service (SMS) & The Kenyan General Elections,” Africa Speaks 4 Africa (blog), accessed June 22, 2013, 
http://www.africaspeaks4africa.org/?p=2550.  
43
CSPs are defined in Article 2.1.9 as “a person authorized by the Communications Commission of Kenya to provide content 
services.” See: “Guidelines for the Prevention of Transmission of Undesirable Bulk Political Content/Messages via Electronic 
Communications Networks,” CCK, September 2012; MNOs are defined in Article 2.1.10 as “a person authorized by the 
Communications Commission of Kenya to build and commercially operate Mobile Telecommunications/Electronic 
Communications Systems.” See: “Guidelines for the Prevention of Transmission of Undesirable Bulk Political Content/Messages 
via Electronic Communications Networks,” CCK, September 2012. “Bulk content” means content that is transmitted on a one‐
to‐many configuration via SMS, MMS and any other similar medium that is capable of providing bulk messaging services.  
44
 Article 9.2.  
457
VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
PDF Metadata Edit. Offer professional PDF document metadata editing APIs, using which VB.NET developers can redact, delete, view and save PDF metadata.
pdf metadata; pdf metadata reader
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to create PDF document from other file
C#.NET edit PDF bookmark, C#.NET edit PDF metadata, C#.NET edit PDF digital signatures, C#.NET edit PDF sticky note read barcodes from PDF, C#.NET OCR scan PDF.
google search pdf metadata; batch update pdf metadata
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
K
ENYA
the March 2013 election.
45
Developed in consultation with the CCK and the electoral commission, 
Safaricom’s  guidelines  indicated  that  it  would  suspend  or  terminate  CSP  contracts  for 
noncompliance with its bulk message approval process, which is identical to the CCK’s process 
outlined above.  
During and after the March 4 elections, the authorities also asked mobile phone providers to block 
any text messages that could incite violence.
46
To do so, service providers installed a firewall that 
could detect messages containing particular words, such as “kill,” which were automatically flagged 
for further scrutiny. According to the permanent secretary of the Ministry of Information and 
Communication, Dr. Bitange Ndemo, mobile phone service providers were blocking more than 
300,000 text messages per day during the electioneering period to prevent electoral violence.
47
 
Individual internet users are generally comfortable expressing themselves freely online and through 
mainstream  media  organizations. Nonetheless, during  the  March  2013  elections,  news outlets 
admitted to practicing self-censorship as part of a “gentleman’s agreement” made by media leaders 
to withhold from reporting on news that could incite ethnic tensions, according to Kenya’s Media 
Owners Association.
48
The agreement to self-censor raised local debate on the balance between the 
national interest and the public’s right to know.  
There are no known state-run, government-influenced, or partisan online news/media outlets to 
date. Citizens are able to access a wide range of viewpoints, and the websites of the BBC, the CNN, 
and Kenya’s Daily Nation newspaper are the most commonly accessed online news outlets.
49
While 
print outlets, television, and radio continue to be the main sources of news and information for 
most  Kenyans,  all  major  television  stations  have  live-stream  features  and  use  YouTube  to 
rebroadcast news clips. They also have accounts on Facebook and Twitter. Notably, there has been 
an increase in the number of blogs in recent years, with a wide range of topics covered from 
entertainment, fashion, and photography, to technology and business.
50
The Bloggers Association of 
Kenya was formed in 2011 to promote the domestic development of online content.
51
45
 “Guidelines for Political Mobile Advertising Safaricom’s Premium Rate Messaging Network,” Safaricom,  
http://www.safaricom.co.ke/images/Downloads/Resources_Downloads/POLITICAL_MOBILE_ADVERTISING_NOTICE_FULL_PAG
E_2b.pdf.  
46
 “Short Message Service (SMS) & The Kenyan General Elections.”. 
47
 Fred Mukindia, “Phone Firms Block 300,000 Hate Texts Daily, says Ndemo,” Daily Nation, March 21, 2013, 
http://www.nation.co.ke/News/Phone‐firms‐block‐300‐000‐hate‐texts‐daily‐says‐Ndemo‐/‐/1056/1726172/‐/ktkiafz/‐
/index.html.  
48
  Jason Straziuso, “Kenya Media Self Censoring to Reduce Vote Tension,” Associated Press, March 7, 2013, 
http://bigstory.ap.org/article/kenya‐media‐self‐censoring‐reduce‐vote‐tension.  
49
 Victor Juma, “Mobile Internet on Course to Becoming Top Earner for Firms,” Business Daily Africa, April 22, 2010, 
http://www.businessdailyafrica.com/Mobile‐internet‐on‐course‐to‐becoming‐top‐earner‐for‐firms/‐/539444/903924/‐
/5e9tqa/‐/index.html.  
50
 “The Kenyan Blog Awards 2013 Nominees,” BAKE, March 27, 2013, http://bloggers.or.ke/the‐kenyan‐blog‐awards‐2013‐
nominees/.  
51
 BAKE is a body that promotes content creation on the web in Kenya and represents a group of content creators who are of 
Kenyan origin, descent or are based in Kenya and want to syndicate their content, network among other fellow content 
creators, or get legal and communal representation from the Bloggers Association of Kenya. 
458
C# TIFF: TIFF Metadata Editor, How to Write & Read TIFF Metadata
Tiff ›› C# Tiff: Edit Tiff Metadata. C# TIFF - Edit TIFF Metadata in C#.NET. Allow Users to Read and Edit Metadata Stored in Tiff Image in C#.NET Application.
pdf metadata online; change pdf metadata
VB.NET PDF - Create PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
C#.NET edit PDF bookmark, C#.NET edit PDF metadata, C#.NET edit PDF digital signatures, C#.NET edit PDF sticky note read barcodes from PDF, C#.NET OCR scan PDF.
read pdf metadata java; search pdf metadata
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
K
ENYA
Meanwhile, the internet continues to be an important platform for political debate and mobilization 
around critical issues. For example, in October 2012, hundreds of Kenyans took to Twitter to 
protest against members of parliament who had voted to award themselves with a substantial send-
off bonus,  using the hashtag, #KOTAgainstMPsBonus.
52
Their proposal was ultimately  tabled, 
though this was not specifically due to the Twitter campaign, as there were many protests from 
different groups occurring simultaneously both on and offline. 
Digital media has also revolutionized the ways in which human rights and civil society groups in 
Kenya network and share information.
53
In early 2013, for example, a partnership of civil society 
organizations launched Uchaguzi,
54
a crowd-sourcing platform designed to help Kenya achieve a 
free, fair, peaceful,  and credible general  election  by empowering Kenyans with  the  ability  to 
monitor the voting process and report on significant incidents in real time via SMS. During the 
election, the platform received over 3,000 messages from ordinary citizens around the country. 
As a result of concerns over increasing cybercrime and potential electoral unrest, service providers 
were required to install internet traffic monitoring equipment known as NEWS, the Network Early 
Warning System, by December 2012. Fourteen bloggers were reportedly targeted for posting hate 
speech during the March 2013 elections period, though no prosecutions were pursued.  
Freedom of expression is enshrined in Article 33 of Kenya’s constitution and includes the right to 
seek, receive or impart information and ideas, while Article 31 provides for the right to privacy. 
These rights, however, do not extend to propaganda, hate speech, incitement to violence, and 
advocacy of hatred. Criminal defamation laws remain on the books, waiting to be repealed or 
amended to conform to Kenya’s 2010 Constitution. Meanwhile, existing laws that are inconsistent 
with it are considered unconstitutional.
55
The 2012 Data Protection Bill is currently being considered in parliament and aims to regulate the 
collection, processing, storing, use, and disclosure of information relating to individuals that is 
processed through automated or manual means.
56
Meanwhile, the 2012 Freedom of Information 
Bill is undergoing stakeholder consultation as of mid-2013.
57
Both bills promise to enhance internet 
freedom in Kenya, illustrating the country’s commitment to the development of its ICT sector and 
the use of ICTs to enhance public sector accountability.  
52
 “#KOTAgainst Mps Bonus: Dozens Protest Against Kenyan MPs Vote for $110,000 Bonuses,” Blottr (blog), October 9, 2012, 
http://www.blottr.com/breaking‐news/kotagainstmpsbonus‐dozens‐protest‐kenyan‐mps‐vote‐110000‐bonuses.  
53
 Larry Diamond, In the Spirit of Democracy (New York: Henry Holt and Company LLC, 2009).  
54
 Swahili for elections. https://uchaguzi.co.ke/.  
55
 The Constitution of Kenya, Article 4. 
56
 Commission for the Implementation of the Constitution “The Data Protection Bill, 2012,”, accessed April 16, 2013, 
http://www.cickenya.org/index.php/legislation/item/174‐the‐data‐protection‐bill‐2012#.UW10zaJ‐bvE.  
57
 Commission for the Implementation of the Constitution, “The Freedom of Information Bill, 2012,” accessed April 16, 2013, 
http://www.cickenya.org/index.php/legislation/item/173‐the‐freedom‐of‐information‐bill‐2012#.UW178KJ‐be.  
V
IOLATIONS OF 
U
SER 
R
IGHTS
459
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view, annotate, create and convert PDF
More details are given on this page. C#.NET: Edit PDF Password in ASP.NET. Users are able to set a password to PDF online directly in ASPX webpage.
pdf metadata viewer online; pdf metadata editor
C# PDF Sticky Note Library: add, delete, update PDF note in C#.net
Allow users to add comments online in ASPX webpage. Able to change font size in PDF comment box. Able to save and print sticky notes in PDF file.
read pdf metadata online; embed metadata in pdf
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
K
ENYA
Nevertheless, the government appears determined to crack down on cybercrime, which includes 
the spread of hate speech online,
58
though prosecutions for web activity have not appeared to be 
politically  motivated.  During  the  electioneering  period  in  March  2013,  14  bloggers  were 
reportedly targeted for posting hate speech online, six of whom were investigated.
59
The other 
eight were not summoned since they had used pseudonyms that made them difficult to identify. No 
prosecutions were ultimately pursued given a lack of sufficient evidence.
60
Meanwhile, controversial blogger Robert Alai
61
was arrested in April 2013 for posting an allegedly 
“offensive tweet” that falsely accused a former gubernatorial candidate of domestic violence against 
his  wife.
62
He  was  charged  under  Article  29(b)  of  the  2009  Kenya  Information  and 
Communications Act, which proscribes the transmission of a message that is known “to be false for 
the purpose of causing annoyance, inconvenience or needless anxiety to another person.”
63
He was 
later acquitted on KES 50,000 ($560) cash bail,
64
though a guilty charge could have yielded a 
penalty of up to three years in prison and a fine up to 1 million Kenyan Shillings (over $11,500).   
While surveillance of the internet and mobile phones was not previously a serious concern in 
Kenya, worries over increasing cybercrime and potential unrest surrounding the March elections 
led the government to implement precautionary surveillance measures to curb the spread of hate 
speech. In March 2012, the CCK announced that telecom service providers needed to install the 
internet  traffic  monitoring  equipment  NEWS,  which  would  help  establish  early  responses  to 
detected cyber threats.
65
A KES32.2 million ($402,500) joint venture between the CCK and the 
ITU, the system reportedly works by assigning a unique internet protocol (IP) identity to individual 
gadgets, effectively making any communication traceable to its device of transmission. In their 
attempts to reassure consumers that the CCK would not proactively spy on internet users, officials 
noted that the system “does not have to read and disclose people’s information” and “will only 
monitor traffic.”
66
In September, service providers were given the deadline of December 2012 to 
comply  with  the  installation  requirement.  Providers  failing  to  comply  would  be  cut  off  by 
58
 Muna Wahome, “New Internet Version to Deepen Spying on Users,” Business Daily, September 2, 2012, 
http://www.businessdailyafrica.com/New‐internet‐version‐to‐deepen‐spying‐on‐users‐/‐/539546/1493584/‐/fc2470z/‐
/index.html.  
59
 Fred Mukinda, “14 bloggers Linked to Hate Messages,” Daily Nation, March 28, 2013, http://www.nation.co.ke/News/14‐
bloggers‐linked‐to‐hate‐messages/‐/1056/1732288/‐/cut5kvz/‐/index.html.  
60
 “Hate Messages ‘Still Rampant on Social Sites,’” Daily Nation, April 17, 2013, 
http://www.nation.co.ke/News/Hate‐messages‐still‐rampant‐on‐social‐sites/‐/1056/1751340/‐/56mc1h/‐/index.html.  
61
 “Twitter Goes Silent As Robert Alai Is Arrested,” Nairobi Wire, August 22, 2012, 
http://www.nairobiwire.com/2012/08/twitter‐goes‐silent‐as‐robert‐alai‐is.html.  
62
 “Robert Alai Arrested for Alleged ‘Libelous’ Twitter Post,” Jambo News Pot, May 15, 2013, 
http://www.jambonewspot.com/robert‐alai‐arrested‐for‐alleged‐libelous‐twitter‐post/; “Tech Blogger and Twitter Bigwig 
Robert Alai Arrested Again Over Annoying Tweets,” Vibe Weekly, May 16, 2013, http://vibeweekly.com/new‐vibe/1158‐tech‐
blogger‐and‐twitter‐bigwig‐robert‐alai‐arrested‐again‐over‐annoying‐tweets.html.  
63
 Communications Commission of Kenya, “The Kenya Information and Communications Act,” 2009, 
http://www.cck.go.ke/regulations/downloads/Kenya‐Information‐Communications‐Act‐Final.pdf.  
64
 Mukinda, “14 Bloggers Linked to Hate Messages.”  
65
 Okutttah Mark, “CCK Sparks Row with Fresh Bid to Spy on Internet Users,” Business Daily Africa, March 20, 2012, 
http://www.businessdailyafrica.com/Corporate‐News/CCK‐sparks‐row‐with‐fresh‐bid‐to‐spy‐on‐Internet‐users‐/‐
/539550/1370218/‐/item/0/‐/edcfmsz/‐/index.html.  
66
 Lilian Nduati, “We Will Not Spy on Kenyans Online, says Internet Watchdog,” Sunday Nation, March 22, 2012, 
http://bit.ly/18Gcsb0.  
460
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
K
ENYA
international backbone operators.
67
As of May 2013, no further information is known about the 
extent to which service providers have complied with the installation requirement or how the 
system has been put into practice. Nevertheless, the interception of messages or the disclosure of 
their content remains a criminal offence.
68
On February 4, 2013, the National Cohesion and Integration Commission  unveiled a toll-free 
Safaricom number for the reporting of hate speech and announced that it had trained and deployed 
about  100  hate  speech  monitors  across  the  country  to  keep  abreast  of  statements  made  by 
politicians or their supporters that could inflame tensions.
69
The government also hired bloggers to 
monitor websites for inflammatory content, in addition to enlisting the help of the Umati Project—
a civic initiative based at Nairobi’s iHub research center—and Kenya’s National Human Rights 
Commission to report on online hate speech.
70
Despite the increased monitoring, there were no 
reported instances of any flagged content being blocked or removed.  
In June 2009, the government announced a new SIM card registration requirement in collaboration 
with  service  providers,  which  was  followed  by  various  public  awareness  campaigns  aimed  at 
informing consumers of the security imperative behind the new requirement. A final deadline of 
December 31, 2012 was set for the SIM card registration exercise,
71
after which point 2.4 million 
unregistered cards were disconnected, including those used in tablets and internet modems.
72
To 
ensure compliance with the new regulation, the government amended the Kenya Information and 
Communications Act (KICA) to place the onus on mobile providers to record and maintain an 
index of all subscribers.
73
Otherwise, there were no reported cases of government abuse of online surveillance in the past 
year, nor are there any known requirements for ICT service providers to proactively monitor their 
users. In addition, netizens did not face any extralegal intimidation or violence, nor were there any 
politically motivated cases of technical violence against civil society or opposition websites.  
67
 Muna Wahome, “New Internet Version to Deepen Spying on Users,” Business Daily, September 2, 2012, 
http://www.businessdailyafrica.com/New‐internet‐version‐to‐deepen‐spying‐on‐users‐/‐/539546/1493584/‐/fc2470z/‐
/index.html.  
68
 Alice Munyua, Grace Githaiga and Victor Kapiyo, “Intermediary Liability in Kenya,” Association of Progressive 
Communications, October 2012, 11, http://www.apc.org/en/pubs/intermediary‐liability‐kenya.  
69
 Roselyn Obala, “NCIC Hires 100 to Monitor Hate Speech,” Standard Online, February 4, 2013, 
http://www.standardmedia.co.ke/?articleID=2000076656&story_title=ncic‐hires‐100‐to‐monitor‐hate‐speech.  
70
 Drazen Jorgic, “Kenya tracks Facebook, Twitter for Election ‘Hate Speech,’” Reuters, February 5, 2013, 
http://news.yahoo.com/kenya‐tracks‐facebook‐twitter‐election‐hate‐speech‐122621161.html.  
71
 Communications Commission of Kenya, “No Extension for Sim‐registration,” December 31, 2012, 
http://www.cck.go.ke/news/2012/Sim_card_registration_deadline.html
72
 Communications Commission of Kenya, “More than 2.4m Unregistered Mobile Lines Disconnected,” January 11, 2013, 
http://www.cck.go.ke/mobile/news/index.html?nws=/news/2013/Unregistered_lines.html.  
73
 Communications Commission of Kenya, “The Kenya Information and Communications (Registration of Subscribers of 
Telecommunication Services) Regulations, 2012,” January 4, 2013, http://bit.ly/1blT2KP.  
461
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
K
YRGYZSTAN
K
YRGYZSTAN
 Illegally  blocked  news  website  Ferghana  News  was  officially  unblocked  by  the  State
Communication Agency in April 2013 (see L
IMITS ON 
C
ONTENT
).
 While instances of filtering controversial content continued, including the blocking of
videos, there was also an increase in the successful use of online platforms to mobilize
against potentially harmful legislation (see L
IMITS ON 
C
ONTENT
).
 A journalist was physically assaulted by a member of parliament after posting online
comments in defense of another politician (see V
IOLATIONS OF 
U
SER 
R
IGHTS
).
2012 
2013 
I
NTERNET 
F
REEDOM 
S
TATUS
P
ARTLY 
F
REE
P
ARTLY 
F
REE
Obstacles to Access (0-25) 
13 
12 
Limits on Content (0-35) 
10 
10 
Violations of User Rights (0-40) 
12 
13 
Total (0-100) 
35 
35 
*0=most free, 100=least free
K
EY 
D
EVELOPMENTS
:
M
AY 
2012
A
PRIL 
2013 
P
OPULATION
5.7 million
I
NTERNET 
P
ENETRATION 
2012: 
22 percent
S
OCIAL 
M
EDIA
/ICT
A
PPS 
B
LOCKED
No
P
OLITICAL
/S
OCIAL 
C
ONTENT 
B
LOCKED
Yes
B
LOGGERS
/ICT
U
SERS 
A
RRESTED
No
P
RESS 
F
REEDOM 
2013
S
TATUS
Not Free
462
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
K
YRGYZSTAN
Shortly before the overthrow of President Kurmanbek Bakiev’s regime in 2010, political pressure 
on the media—both traditional and online—intensified.  The video portal Stan.tv was closed as 
punishment for covering opposition meetings,
1
the country’s largest online portal that was serving 
as the main platform for political discussions was shut down,
2
and all internet service providers 
(ISPs) were forced to cut off their connections to the international internet in order to prevent 
information from leaking out.
3
After Bakiev’s removal in April 2010, however, these restrictions were lifted and the flow  of 
information returned to normal. In 2011, the environment was relatively favorable to internet 
freedom, as the interim government was stable and presidential elections in October 2011 were 
deemed competitive, though flawed. Despite such improvements, internet access remains limited 
primarily  to  urban  areas,  and  a  number  of  legal  and  technical  restrictions  on  online  content 
continue to inhibit internet users.  
Over the past year, the government continued to sporadically block certain types of content that 
were deemed harmful or indecent, such as the “Innocence of Muslims” video that was available on 
YouTube, and a film festival entry about being gay and Muslim. Additionally, the parliament passed 
a law in October 2012 aimed at protecting children from harmful content online that was almost 
identical to legislation passed by Russia; however, the Kyrgyz legislation is less clear regarding 
restrictions on online media and was met with widespread opposition. 
The 2012 court case against independent journalist and blogger Vladimir Farafonov is also likely to 
have a chilling effect on journalism related to political content.  In February 2012, Kyrgyzstan’s 
security  service charged Farafonov with “inciting national hatred” for publishing articles online 
about Kyrgyz-language media and the potential effects of the 2011 presidential election on ethnic 
minorities  living  in Kyrgyzstan.
4
On  July  3, 2012,  Farafonov  was  found  guilty  and  fined  the 
equivalent of $1,000, avoiding the prison sentence recommended by the prosecution. 
Access to information and communications technologies (ICTs) has grown in Kyrgyzstan in recent 
years, with internet penetration rates among the highest in Central Asia, though still low by global 
standards.  According  to  the  International  Telecommunications  Union  (ITU),  the  internet 
1 “Newspaper suspended, TV station raided in Kyrgyzstan,” Committee to Protect Journalists, April 2, 2010, 
http://cpj.org/2010/04/newspaper‐suspended‐tv‐station‐raided‐kyrgyzstan.php.  
2 “Страна, устремленная в будущее… Кыргызстан‐2010. Хроника событий” [The country directed to the future... Kyrgyzstan‐
2010. Chronicle of events], August 30, 2010, http://pda.kabar.kg/kabar/full/18890.  
3 “Блокировка продолжается”[Blocking goes on ], Namba.kg (blog), April 6, 2010 http://blogs.namba.kg/post.php?id=470.  
4 “Kyrgyzstan must drop charges against journalist,” Committee to Protect Journalists, February 29, 2012, 
http://www.cpj.org/2012/02/kyrgyzstan‐must‐drop‐charges‐against‐journalist.php.  
I
NTRODUCTION
O
BSTACLES TO 
A
CCESS
463
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
K
YRGYZSTAN
penetration rate in 2012 stood at 21.7 percent, an increase from 14 percent in 2007.
5
Kyrgyzstan’s 
State Communication Agency (SCA) reported a notably higher 2012 figure of 3.5 million people, 
or about 50 percent of the population.
6
However, a USAID-funded survey by M-Vector Consulting 
Agency  in  2011  found that only 16 percent  of respondents reported ever using the internet.
7
Among them, 51 percent were located in the capital Bishkek and 32 percent in Osh, the country’s 
second largest city. By contrast, only 5 percent of rural respondents reported ever going online, 
reflecting the urban-rural divide in penetration. Similar research conducted in 2012 by the M-
Vector Consulting Agency indicated about 30 percent of the population was using the internet, of 
which around 70 percent were using mobile devices.
8
Cybercafes are a relatively popular means of 
obtaining internet access, with over one-third of internet users reporting that they had accessed the 
internet at such a venue.
9
Fixed-broadband access, via either fiber-optic cables or DSL, is accessible mainly in Bishkek, with 
broadband in the provinces  provided only by  the  state-run KyrgyzTelecom. Broadband speeds 
range from 24 Mbps for DSL to 100 Mbps for the FTTX (fiber to the x) network, which is well-
developed  in  Bishkek.    The  government  has  launched  a  CDMA450  mobile  telephone  and 
broadband network to expand telecom infrastructure into more rural areas, though it has only 
become partially active. CDMA450 phones have become popular in rural areas with more than 
30,000 subscribers as of November 2011. 
Mobile phone penetration is significantly higher than internet penetration in Kyrgyzstan, with a 
penetration  rate  of  nearly  122  percent  in  2012.
10
Mobile  phone  companies  claim  that  their 
networks cover 90 percent of the populated territory in the country, thus extending the possibility 
of internet use for most people as mobile web access expands. At the end of 2010, Beeline (one of 
the largest mobile phone carriers) launched a 3G network that currently covers the entire country. 
In January 2012, another large firm, Megacom, launched its own 3G network in Bishkek and 
reported plans to cover the entire country within six months, though as of 2013 they had not 
implemented these plans. Saima Telecom has launched a 4G network covering Bishkek and some 
suburbs.  
Despite the spread of ICT infrastructure across the country in recent years, the price of internet 
access remains beyond the reach of much of the population. As an indication of the limited access 
among lower income brackets, an M-Vector study conducted in 2011 found that only 6.7 percent 
of individuals with an average monthly income of less than KGS 2,000 (about $44) use the internet, 
compared to about 40 percent of those with a monthly income of KGS 20,000 to30,000 (about 
5 International Telecommunication Union (ITU), “Percentage of individuals using the Internet,” 2007 & 2012, accessed July 13, 
2013, http://www.itu.int/ITU‐D/ICTEYE/Indicators/Indicators.aspx#
6 Report of the State Communication Agency under the government of Kyrgyz Republic for 2012, accessed July 13, 2013,  
http://nas.kg/images/god_ot4et2012.docx.  
7  “Media Consumption & Consumer Perceptions Baseline Survey,” M‐vector Consulting Agency, April 2011, http://m‐
vector.com/upload/news/media_survey_eng/5SectionDInternet.pdf
8  Media Consumption & Consumer Perceptions Baseline Survey 2012 (2nd Wave) Kyrgyzstan,  M‐vector Consulting Agency, 
April 2012, http://m‐vector.com/upload/media_presentation/Presentation_media_2wave_fin_EN_general.pdf 
9  Ibid. 
10  Report of the State Communication Agency under the government of Kyrgyz Republic for 2012, accessed July 13, 2013, 
http://nas.kg/images/god_ot4et2012.docx  
464
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested