download pdf file from server in asp.net c# : Batch edit pdf metadata application control utility azure html web page visual studio FOTN%202013_Full%20Report_049-part1553

F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
L
EBANON
Kamal Batal, director of the human rights organization “MIRSAD,” subsequently e-mailed a letter 
of protest to raise awareness about the issue. Under a military tribunal, both he and Mughraby were 
convicted of defaming the army and forced to pay a fine of $219 each.
65
Currently, Lebanese law does not place restrictions on online anonymity or encryption software. 
However, there have been reports that the draft media laws currently being debated behind closed 
doors in parliament do require some form of registration for news websites, similar to the LIRA 
proposal. Prepaid  mobile  phones  can  be  easily  purchased  around  the  country  without  any  ID 
requirements. However, users must submit their identity card when purchasing a mobile phone 
contract where payment is deferred.  
The issue of surveillance has garnered much public debate and controversy in the past eight years, 
which  witnessed  devastating  violence  and  major  political  shifts,  including  a  chain  of  political 
assassinations (mainly 2005-2008), a 30-day war with Israel (2006), a small-scale civil war (2008), 
and a political climate that continues to divide the country into two large blocks: the “March 14
Alliance”
and the “March 8 Alliance.”
66
At issue was the widespread and aggressive surveillance and 
private data acquisition by the Information Branch of the ISF, the United Nations International 
Independent Investigation Commission  (UNIIIC), and the Special Tribunal for  Lebanon (STL), 
which  were responsible  for  investigating  the  assassinations,  particularly  that  of  the late prime 
minister Rafik Hariri in 2005.
67
The three organizations enjoyed almost free access to private data 
between 2005 and 2008, collecting sources as diverse as university transcripts, medical history, and 
mobile  phone  records in the  name  of  national security.  Their work was  largely facilitated  by 
Marwan Hmadeh, the ranking March 14 member and telecommunications minister from 2005 to 
2008, himself a survivor of a 2004 assassination attempt.  
In general, the laws regulating legal surveillance and the acquisition of communications data are 
vague and widely disputed. Attempts to develop clear privacy laws and regulations have failed, 
mainly because of their highly politicized nature. Currently, the typical process for acquiring user 
data involves a request from the ISF to the Ministry of Interior (or from the army to the Ministry of 
Defense), which is then sent to the prime minister for approval. The order is then sent to the 
telecommunications minister for execution—although in some instances the latter has refused to 
hand over the data to the ISF. This process was approved by the cabinet of ministries in 2009 as part 
of an agreement to share communication data with security and military officials. However, those 
who dispute this process, particularly the last three telecommunications ministers, cite the need to 
obey privacy laws and insist that the government’s 2009 decision is limited to metadata and does 
65
 Jad Melki, Yasmine Dabbous, Khaled Nasser, and Sarah Mallat. (2012). Mapping Digital Media: Lebanon, New York, NY: Open 
Society Foundation. http://www.soros.org/initiatives/media. p. 86‐7. 
66
 The past eight years have witnessed major shifts in Lebanese politics, which were triggered by the high‐profile assassination 
of Prime Minister Rafic Hariri in 2005 that prompted massive protests and forced Syrian troops out of Lebanon, thereby 
changing the balance of power. These events created two major political camps: the March 8 Alliance that included Hezbollah 
and the Free Patriotic Movement, and was viewed as supportive of Syria and Iran, and the March 14 Alliance that included the 
Future Movement, the Progressive Socialist Party and the Lebanese Forces, and was seen as opposed to Syria and allied with 
the USA.  
67
 The UNIIC and later the STL, which were established to investigate the assassination of Lebanese Prime Minister Rafik Hariri 
in 2005, were later accused of collecting private data not relevant to the investigation, including medical records from a local 
gynecological clinic that is frequented by the wives of many Hezbollah members. 
485
Batch edit pdf metadata - add, remove, update PDF metadata in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Allow C# Developers to Read, Add, Edit, Update and Delete PDF Metadata
c# read pdf metadata; adding metadata to pdf files
Batch edit pdf metadata - VB.NET PDF metadata library: add, remove, update PDF metadata in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Enable VB.NET Users to Read, Write, Edit, Delete and Update PDF Document Metadata
batch pdf metadata editor; batch pdf metadata
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
L
EBANON
not cover requests for the content of communications transactions and other specific data. During 
their respective periods in office, the ministers argued that large-scale, broad requests from the ISF 
should be accompanied by a court order. As a result, the three ministers have had conflicts with the 
ISF and Prime Minister Najib Mikati,
68
who had struggled to appease both sides and present himself 
as an independent leader.
69
The politicization of these issues and the failure of any attempts to 
institute  clear regulations  remain the most  serious  problems  when it  comes  to online  privacy 
protection.  
The conflict reached its peak in December 2012 when Sehnaoui, the current telecommunications 
minister, stated through his Facebook page that he had rejected an ISF request dating from October 
17, 2012.
70
Writing on his Facebook  page in December, current telecommunications minister 
Nicolas  Sehnaoui revealed that  the ISF had  requested an expansive  amount  of  information on 
Lebanese citizens for a two-month period of time. The request, based on an investigation into the 
assassination of a former intelligence chief, included the following information: users’ real names, 
phone numbers, addresses, usernames, passwords, IP addresses, and browsing history, as well as 
logs for e-mails, chatting services, discussion forums, VoIP applications, and social media.
71
In his 
Facebook post, the minister called upon “all bloggers, e-journalists, Tweeters and Facebook users 
and all members of our social media community” to pressure the council of ministers to reject the 
ISF request.
72
The minister had previously rejected similar requests and even sent a delegation of 
legal experts to France to discuss the legality of such requests.
73
The debate has addressed the 
legality of the ISF’s right to access the content of text messages, rather than only call records and 
location data.
74
However, some have doubted the validity of the minister’s claims and interpreted it 
as part of the broader dispute between the ISF, the ministry, and their respective political factions, 
which have occurred several times over the past years.
75
In addition, reports of Israeli attempts to infiltrate Lebanon’s telecommunications system abound. 
Over the past four years, several employees working for mobile and fixed phone operators were 
arrested for allegedly carrying out clandestine intelligence activities for Israel.
76
There were also 
numerous reports about spying devices discovered on the network.
77
Moreover, attempts by the 
68
 Sami Halabi. (2011, July 3). Redialing discord. Executive Magazine. http://www.executive‐magazine.com/economics‐and‐
policy/Redialing‐discord/4770.  
69
 (Acting) Prime Minister Najib Mikati resigned March 2013, partly due to a controversy over the term extension for the ISF 
chief, which Mikati supported and the March 8 alliance opposed.   
70
 See: http://www.facebook.com/Nicolas.Sehnaoui/posts/10152314217230285.  
71
 See Hassan Chakrani. (2012, December 4). Lebanon Security Forces: Give Us Your Facebook Password. Al‐Akhbar English. 
http://english.al‐akhbar.com/print/14241, and El‐Nashra. (2012, December 4). Al‐Nashra unveils the documents from the 
information branch (ISF) requesting log files for web sites. http://www.elnashra.com/news/show/554968.  
72
 See: http://www.facebook.com/Nicolas.Sehnaoui/posts/10152314217230285.  
73
 Lebanese law is partly rooted in French law. 
74
 Hassan Chakrani. (2012, December 4). Lebanon Security Forces: Give Us Your Facebook Password. Al‐Akhbar English. 
http://english.al‐akhbar.com/print/14241.  
75
 See: http://www.dailystar.com.lb/News/Local‐News/2013/Feb‐21/207288‐telecoms‐data‐requests‐violate‐
constitution.ashx#axzz2RqKY4Jq6.  
76
 Sami Halabi. (2011, July 3). Redialing discord. Executive Magazine. http://www.executive‐magazine.com/economics‐and‐
policy/Redialing‐discord/4770.  
77
 Sami Halabi. (2011, Jan 3). Broad band’s roadblock. Executive Magazine. http://www.executive‐magazine.com/special‐
report/Broadbands‐roadblock/680.   
486
C# PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in C#.net
Studio .NET project. Powerful .NET control to batch convert PDF documents to tiff format in Visual C# .NET program. Free library are
pdf metadata; rename pdf files from metadata
C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
Powerful components for batch converting PDF documents in C#.NET program. In the daily-life applications, you often need to use and edit PDF document content
view pdf metadata; preview edit pdf metadata
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
L
EBANON
ISF to install and operate surveillance technologies have been apparently halted recently.
78
In fact, a 
public  debate  about  illegal  phone  lines,  surveillance,  and  privacy ensued  after  the  May  2011 
confrontation between former minister of telecommunications Charbel Nahas and the ISF. The 
controversy  was  triggered after  members  of  the ISF  blocked  the minister  and  his  team  from 
entering a ministry building to dismantle a non-commercial mobile network which was allegedly 
used by the ISF for intelligence purposes, without government sanctioning or TRA supervision.
79
When it comes to cybercafes, operators have only a few requirements by which they must abide, 
pertaining to registering their business with the ministry of finance for tax purposes and ensuring 
that all software used in their machines is legal and licensed. Interviewed operators of cybercafes 
said  other  matters  are  left  to  their  own  discretion  and  no  special  requirements  to  aid  the 
government exist. Customers are not obliged to identify or register and no monitoring software is 
installed on machines. They do, however, use firewalls and filters to block pornographic websites, 
particularly to protect children—a matter that caught media attention in April 2006 and led to the 
addition of such provisions to the proposed e-transactions law.   
Cyberattacks are on the rise in Lebanon, especially those emanating from outside of the country. 
Over the past year, several government and news websites were attacked multiple times. For 
example, on April 17, 2012, a group named Raise Your Voice (RYV) simultaneously hacked 15 
government websites, including the state-owned National News Agency and a handful of ministerial 
websites.
80
The same group struck again nine days later, enabling Facebook users to post comments 
on ten government web sites.
81
On June 16, 2012, RYV again hacked two government websites. 
This latter wave of attacks—seemingly initiated by a local Lebanese group—posted comments 
criticizing the government for their economic and developmental policies, especially in relation to 
the electricity shortage and the increasing poverty.
82
More  recently,  on February  23, 2013,  the  group  Team Kuwaiti  Hackers  attacked the  Lebanese 
Parliament’s  website.
83
The hackers posted  sectarian comments that criticized specific  political 
groups, namely Hezbollah and the Syrian regime. Moreover, throughout 2012 and early 2013, 
several  news  reports  surfaced  regarding  multiple  sophisticated  viruses  that  targeted  Lebanese 
computers to infiltrate banks, the financial system, and private financial data.
84
Some experts noted 
78
 Ibid. 
79
 Ibid. 
80
 Naharnet. (2012, April 17). ‘Raise Your Voice’ Hacks 15 Lebanese Government Sites. 
http://www.naharnet.com/stories/en/37035.  
81
 Naharnet. (2012, April 26). RYV Hacks Lebanese Govt. Sites Again, Enables Facebook Users to Post Messages. 
http://www.naharnet.com/stories/en/38244.  
82
 Justin Salhani. (2012, June 6). Two Lebanese government websites hacked. The Daily Star. 
http://www.dailystar.com.lb/News/Local‐News/2012/Jun‐16/177091‐two‐lebanese‐government‐websites‐hacked.ashx.  
83
 The Daily Star. (2013, February 23). Lebanese Parliament website hacked. http://www.dailystar.com.lb/News/Local‐
News/2013/Feb‐23/207634‐lebanese‐parliament‐website‐hacked.ashx.  
84
 Stephen Dockery. (2012, August 11). Virus plunges Lebanon into cyber war. The Daily Star. 
http://www.dailystar.com.lb/News/Local‐News/2012/Aug‐11/184234‐virus‐plunges‐lebanon‐into‐cyber‐war.ashx, and 
SecureList. (2012, August 10). Gauss: Abnormal Distribution. 
http://www.securelist.com/en/analysis/204792238/Gauss_Abnormal_Distribution.  
487
VB.NET Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF
NET edit PDF metadata, C#.NET edit PDF digital signatures, C#.NET edit PDF sticky note Professional .NET PDF converter component for batch conversion.
get pdf metadata; clean pdf metadata
VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.
C#.NET edit PDF digital signatures, C#.NET edit PDF sticky note Best and free VB.NET PDF to jpeg converter SDK for Visual NET components to batch convert adobe
batch edit pdf metadata; remove metadata from pdf
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
L
EBANON
that  the  attacks  may  have  been  state-sponsored  and  aimed  at  disrupting  Syrian  and  Iranian 
finances.
85
The news industry has also been a popular target of such attacks. The most significant has been the 
hijacking of al-Mustaqbal newspaper’s home page on April 10, 2013. In a politically motivated 
attempt to discredit the Special Tribunal for Lebanon (STL), hackers posted the names of alleged 
witnesses in the Rafik Hariri assassination trial.
86
Other attacks have mainly attempted to overload 
news websites, such as those against the websites of Now Lebanon (January 19, 2012), NBN TV 
(February 4, 2012), al-Kifah al-Arabi (March 19, 2012), Murr TV (January 2013 and April 16, 
2013), OTV (July 28, 2012), al-Mayadeen TV (August 23, 2012), Annahar newspaper (October 
15, 2012),
87
and Arrouwad newspaper (April 2013).
88
Some journalists’ personal web sites and 
social media pages have also suffered from such attacks, such as Mona Abou Hamzeh’s Facebook 
page  (May  15,  2012),  Rouaida  Mroueh’s  website  (March  24,  2012),  and  Paula  Yacoubian’s 
Facebook page (January 18, 2013).
89
Many of these cyberattacks are dealt with promptly, though the perpetrators are seldom identified 
and detained. In one reported incident, the Lebanese Cyber Crime and Intellectual Property Rights 
Bureau Unit, which belongs to the ISF, apprehended two Lebanese hackers accused of breaking into 
e-mails  and  Facebook  accounts,  stealing  their  owners’  identities,  and  blackmailing  them  for 
ransom.
90
The increase in similar hacking attacks and blackmail attempts has alarmed Lebanese 
security officials, who remain poorly equipped to deal with them.
91
There have been relatively fewer attacks on the websites of political parties, civil society groups, 
and activists in Lebanon, despite their large numbers and the controversial issues they champion. 
Such incidents include the attacks on the websites of Lebanese Press Photographers (April 14, 
2012), the Mohammad Hussein Fadlallah Foundation (April 16,  2012), the Palestinian Human 
Rights Foundation  (June 15,  2012),  and  the  Lebanese  Parliamentary  Monitor  (November  26, 
2012).
92
Most recently, the Lebanese Dental Association’s website was hacked and the attackers 
posted the Israeli flag on the homepage.
93
Such cyberattacks are likely to increase in the near future 
and  take  on  a  more  significant  political  role,  especially  if  the  situation  in  Syria  continues  to 
deteriorate or in the case of military conflict with Israel. 
85
 Al‐Monitor. (n.d.). Cyber attack on Lebanese banks: Are Iran, Syria finances target? http://www.al‐
monitor.com/pulse/iw/contents/articles/opinion/2012/al‐monitor/a‐cyber‐attack‐against‐lebanese.html.  
86
 The Daily Start. (2013, April 12). Al‐Mustaqbal, STL take action over hacking incident. http://bit.ly/1bNHYJa.  
87
 See: http://blogbaladi.com/annahar‐releases‐mobile‐app‐and‐gets‐hacked.  
88
 Samir Kassir eyes. (2013, April 15). Arrouwad’s Website Hacked twice in two days. 
http://www.skeyesmedia.org/ar/News/Lebanon/3073.  
89
 For a more exhaustive list, please see: http://www.skeyesmedia.org.  
90
 LBC International. (2012, January 9). Facebook and email hackers arrested in Lebanon.  
http://www.lbcgroup.tv/news/16230/facebook‐and‐email‐hackers‐arrested‐in‐lebanon.  
91
 Layal Kiwan. (2013, April 9). يداملا
زازتب䐧ا
ةنصرقلا
فدھو
نانبل
برضي
ةينورتكل䐧ا
تامجھلا
يمانوست. Lebanon Live News. 
http://www.lebanonlivenews.com/idetails.php?id=12725.  
92
 For a more exhaustive list, please see: http://www.skeyesmedia.org.   
93
 Samir Kassir Eyes. (2013, April 12). Press and Cultural Freedom Violations January – February – March 2013 LEBANON, SYRIA, 
JORDAN, PALESTINE  http://bit.ly/12QffiY.  
488
C# PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in C#.net, ASP.
NET components for batch combining PDF documents in C#.NET class. Powerful library dlls for mering PDF in both C#.NET WinForms and ASP.NET WebForms.
analyze pdf metadata; acrobat pdf additional metadata
VB.NET PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in vb.
NET control to batch convert PDF documents to Tiff format in Visual Basic. Qualified Tiff files are exported with high resolution in VB.NET.
bulk edit pdf metadata; read pdf metadata online
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
L
IBYA
L
IBYA
 A Libyan court ordered Russia Today to remove libelous content from its website and
temporarily blocked the news site until it cooperated (see L
IMITS ON 
C
ONTENT
).
 Media reports indicate that Qadhafi’s extensive surveillance apparatus remains online
and operates with little judicial oversight. State control over internet and mobile phone
providers is indicative of the lack of checks and balances in the country’s governance
(see V
IOLATIONS OF 
U
SER 
R
IGHTS
).
 Militia groups temporarily abducted a social media activist and threatened a British
journalist into leaving the country, a sign that nonstate actors are continuing to add to
the overall sense of instability and insecurity in the online media environment (see
V
IOLATIONS OF 
U
SER 
R
IGHTS
).
2012 
2013 
I
NTERNET 
F
REEDOM 
S
TATUS
P
ARTLY 
F
REE
P
ARTLY 
F
REE
Obstacles to Access (0-25) 
18 
17 
Limits on Content (0-35) 
Violations of User Rights (0-40) 
16 
19 
Total (0-100) 
43 
45 
*0=most free, 100=least free
e
P
OPULATION
6.5 million
I
NTERNET 
P
ENETRATION 
2012: 
20 percent
S
OCIAL 
M
EDIA
/ICT
A
PPS 
B
LOCKED
No
P
OLITICAL
/S
OCIAL 
C
ONTENT 
B
LOCKED
:  
Yes
B
LOGGERS
/ICT
U
SERS 
A
RRESTED
No
P
RESS 
F
REEDOM 
2013
S
TATUS
Partly Free
K
EY 
D
EVELOPMENTS
:
M
AY 
2012
A
PRIL 
2013 
489
VB.NET PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in vb.
project. Professional .NET library supports batch conversion in VB.NET. .NET control to export Word from multiple PDF files in VB.
pdf keywords metadata; pdf metadata viewer
C# PDF Print Library: Print PDF documents in C#.net, ASP.NET
C#.NET edit PDF metadata, C#.NET edit PDF digital signatures, C#.NET edit PDF sticky note, C# Quicken PDF printer library allows C# users to batch print PDF
read pdf metadata java; pdf xmp metadata
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
L
IBYA
It has now been two years since the 2011 Libyan revolution, when a popular uprising and ensuing 
civil war deposed the country’s long-time leader, Muammar Qadhafi, and placed the country on a 
shaky path to democracy. Elections for the General National Council (GNC), Libya’s 200-member 
legislative body, were held in July 2012 amidst praise from international observers.
1
The GNC 
elected Prime Minister Ali Zeidan, a former human rights lawyer, and confirmed his choices for 
cabinet  in  November  2012.  While  the  composition  of  Libya’s  first  democratically-elected 
government in 60 years is a great step forward, there are several legal and institutional challenges 
that require immediate attention. The actions of militias, including armed Islamist groups, offset 
many of the gains the government has made in removing many obstacles to internet access and 
limits on online content. 
The internet became publicly available in Libya in 1998, though prices were excessively high and 
access was limited to the elite. Thousands of cybercafes sprang up after 2000, eventually offering 
cheap internet to both urban and rural users.
2
Furthermore, over the following decade, the state 
telecom operator reduced prices, invested in a fiber-optic network backbone, and expanded ADSL, 
WiMAX, and other wireless technologies throughout the country.
3
In its initial stages, there were 
few instances of online censorship in Libya.
4
However, it was not long until the Qadhafi regime 
began to target opposition news websites, particularly after the lifting of United Nations sanctions 
in  2003  led  to  increased  access  to  surveillance  and  filtering  equipment.
5
Overall,  the  highly 
repressive online environment, which included harsh punishments for any criticism of the ruling 
system, contributed to an extreme degree of self-censorship by internet users.
6
Since the victory of the Libyan rebels in 2011, the online information landscape has been relatively 
open. The country has witnessed a flurry of self-expression as Libyans seek to make up for lost time 
under the Qadhafi era, resulting in an increase in news sites, the development of a market for 
online advertising, and massive growth in Facebook use. However, the civil war also impacted 
investment in the country’s information and communications technology (ICT) sector, namely by 
inflicting damages to the infrastructure and sidelining an earlier $10 billion development plan for 
1
 See “Carter Center Congratulations Libyans for Holding Historic Elections,” The Carter Center, July 9, 2012, 
http://www.cartercenter.org/news/pr/libya‐070912.html and “Libya: Final Report, General National Congress Election,” 
European Union Election Assessment Team, July 7, 2012, http://eeas.europa.eu/eueom/missions/2012/libya/pdf/eueat‐libya‐
2012‐final‐report_en.pdf.  
2
 Gamal Eid, “Libya: The Internet in a conflict zone,” The Arabic Network for Human Rights Information, 2004, 
http://www.anhri.net/en/reports/net2004/libya.shtml.  
3
 “Libya – Telecoms, Mobile and Broadband,” Budde.com, accessed August 21, 2013, 
http://www.budde.com.au/Research/Libya‐Telecoms‐Mobile‐and‐Broadband.html
4
 Doug Saunders, “Arab social capital is there – it’s young and connected,” The Globe and Mail, March 5, 2011, 
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/world/doug‐saunders/arab‐social‐capital‐is‐there‐its‐young‐and‐
connected/article1930770/
5
 “Libya,” OpenNet Initiative, August 6, 2009, http://opennet.net/research/profiles/libya
6
 Ismael Dbarra, “Internet in Libya: Everyone is rebelling against continued blocking and censorship,” Elaph (Arabic), March 5, 
2009, www.elaph.com/Web/politics/2009/3/415948.htm
I
NTRODUCTION
490
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
L
IBYA
2020.
7
Additionally, residual self-censorship, weak legal protections, and uncertainties about the 
continued existence of the Qadhafi-era surveillance apparatus pose ongoing challenges to internet 
freedom in the country. 
Internet  penetration  has  traditionally  been  very  low  in  Libya.  While  the  percentage  of  the 
population with access to the internet has quadrupled from 2007 to 2012, the latest estimates still 
put this amount at only 19.9 percent.
8
Of these users, an estimated 80 percent use the wireless 
WiMAX service, 17 percent connect using traditional fixed-lines, and 3 percent employ a fiber-
optic connection.
9
The number of fixed-broadband subscriptions is relatively low, at just over 1 
subscription per every 100 inhabitants in 2012.
10
However, due to the difficulties in obtaining a 
standard internet subscription, it should be noted that many Libyans use unregistered or illegal 
satellite technology to access the internet.  
Compared to the relatively low internet penetration rate, mobile phone use is ubiquitous. There 
are  an estimated 9.59  million subscriptions in Libya, representing a  penetration rate  of 148.2 
percent.
11
Prices have dropped systematically since the introduction of a second mobile provider in 
2003, resulting in greater affordability. By 2013, the price of a prepaid SIM card from the main 
provider, Libyana, was LYD 5 ($4). Smartphones and 3G connectivity have been available since 
2006, though the prohibitive cost of more upscale models impedes their wider dissemination.
12
Similarly, the cost of a home internet connection remains beyond the reach of a large proportion of 
Libyans, particularly those living outside major urban areas. As of early 2013, a dial-up internet 
subscription cost LYD 10 per month ($8), an ADSL subscription was LYD 20 ($16) for a 7 GB data 
plan, and WiMAX was LYD 40 ($31) for a 10 GB data plan, after initial connection fees. By 
comparison, gross national income per capita was only $1,078 per month, pushed up by relatively 
high salaries in oil and gas firms.
13
The LTT announced a plan to decrease the prices of leased lines 
up to 45 percent starting from August 2012 to coincide with the month of Ramadan.
14
The LTT 
also decreased initial WiMAX account connection fees for individual users from LYD 160 ($124) to 
7
 “Libya – Telecoms, Mobile and Broadband,” Budde.com, accessed August 21, 2013, 
http://www.budde.com.au/Research/Libya‐Telecoms‐Mobile‐and‐Broadband.html
8
 “Percentage of individuals using the Internet,” International Telecommunications Union, 2012, accessed August 19, 2013, 
http://www.itu.int/en/ITU‐D/Statistics/Pages/stat/default.aspx
9
 Tom Westcott, “Improving Libya’s Internet Access,” Business Eye, February 2013, pp. 18, available at 
http://www.libyaherald.com/business‐eye‐issue‐1‐february‐2013‐2/.  
10
 “Fixed (wired‐) broadband subscriptions,” International Telecommunications Union, 2012, accessed August 19, 2013, 
http://www.itu.int/en/ITU‐D/Statistics/Pages/stat/default.aspx
11
 “Mobile‐cellular subscriptions” International Telecommunications Union, 2011.Available at http://www.itu.int/en/ITU‐
D/Statistics/Pages/stat/default.aspx
12
“Libyana Introduces 3G Services for First Time in Libya,” The Tripoli Post, September 26, 2006, 
http://www.tripolipost.com/articledetail.asp?c=2&i=311
13
 “Libya – World Development Indicators” The World Bank, accessed August 21, 2013, 
http://data.worldbank.org/country/libya#cp_wdi.  
14
“Discounts up to 45% in the service of custom fonts,” [in Arabic] Libya Telecom & Technology, 
http://www.ltt.ly/news/d.php?i=206, accessed July 23, 2013.  
O
BSTACLES TO 
A
CCESS
491
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
L
IBYA
LYD 120 ($93) and from LYD 260 ($202) to LYD 220 ($171) for households.
15
As of the first 
quarter of 2013, a dial-up internet subscription cost LYD 10 per month ($7), an ADSL subscription 
was LYD 20 ($15) for 20GB, and WiMAX was LYD 30 ($23) for 15GB. WiMAX modems remain 
in short supply since February 2012, resulting in high prices for second-hand devices sold on the 
site Open Souk, Libya’s online marketplace.
16
Many foreign and Libyan organizations and individuals in need  of a reliable and legal internet 
service contract have been driven towards “two-way” satellite internet technology. As two-way 
technology has become more popular, connection fees and equipment costs have been lowered. 
Prices are now at LYD 800 ($622) for the hardware and a monthly subscription costs LYD 255 
($198) for a fast connection and 30 GB bundle, depending on the number of users.
17
The Libyan civil war heavily disrupted the country’s telecommunications sector, with the damage 
estimated at over $1 billion.
18
Upgrades have been projected in an effort to respond to demands for 
increased capacity, such as the laying of the European Indian Gateway and Silphium submarine 
cables,
19
the  construction  of  additional  WiMAX  towers,
20
the creation  of  Wi-Fi hotspots, the 
installation of a long distance fiber-optic cable within the country,
21
and the development of next 
generation broadband.
22
The adult literacy rate is 89 percent and a wide range of websites and 
computer software is available in Arabic.
23
However, limited computer literacy, particularly among 
women, has been an obstacle to universal access. 
Since there have been little improvements to ICT equipment since the Qadhafi era, internet speeds 
remain extremely slow at an average speed of less than 256Kbps, prompting frustrated Libyans to 
create the Facebook page titled, “I hate Libyan Telecom and Technology,” which has reached over 
19,000 followers.
24
IT experts familiar with the issue have cited poor infrastructure, a lack of 
quality  of  service,  technology  constraints  and  continued  lack  of  regulations.  Furthermore, 
broadband is not widely available, bandwidth limitations exist for fixed-line connections, wireless 
users face slower speeds due to heavy congestion during peak hours, and there is a general lack of 
resources and personnel to perform maintenance and repairs.
25
15
 “Now, Libya Max service from Libya Telecom and Technology worth 120 dinars for personal rather than 160,” [in Arabic] 
Libya Telecom & Technology, http://www.ltt.ly/news/d.php?i=188, accessed July 23, 2013. 
16
 See http://ly.opensooq.com/   or https://www.facebook.com/OpenSooq.Libya  it even has a mobile app now. 
17
 See http://www.giga.ly/   or https://www.facebook.com/Giga.ltd 
18
 “Libya – Telecoms, Mobile and Broadband,” Budde.com, accessed August 21, 2013, 
http://www.budde.com.au/Research/Libya‐Telecoms‐Mobile‐and‐Broadband.html.  
19
 “The Activation of The New Upgraded Submarine Cable System between Libya and Italy,” The Tripoli Post, December 25, 
2011, http://www.tripolipost.com/articledetail.asp?c=11&i=7562. 
20
 “ZTE suggest Libya will boast nationwide WiMAX network by Aug‐13,” TeleGeography, January 24, 2013, 
http://www.telegeography.com/products/commsupdate/articles/2013/01/24/zte‐suggests‐libya‐will‐boast‐nationwide‐wimax‐
network‐by‐aug‐13/.  
21
 “Italian Company to Install Fiber‐Optic Network,” Libya Business News, September 29, 2012, http://bit.ly/RbnhMm.  
22
 Tom Westcott, “Improving Libya’s Internet Access,” Business Eye, February 2013, pp. 18, available at 
http://www.libyaherald.com/business‐eye‐issue‐1‐february‐2013‐2/
23
 “Literacy rate, adult total (% of people ages 15 and above),” The World Bank, accessed August 21, 2013, 
http://data.worldbank.org/indicator/SE.ADT.LITR.ZS/countries.  
24
 See https://www.facebook.com/ihateltt 
25
 Interview with ex‐Libyana IT engineer on  March 2013.  
492
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
L
IBYA
Qadhafi’s forces strategically limited access to the internet and mobile phones during the civil war, 
with general access restored in August 2011.
26
Since the end of the conflict, there have been no 
government-imposed  restrictions  on  connectivity,  but  problems  remain  due  to  damaged 
infrastructure. Since May 2012 there have been several disruptions to service, such notably a 26-
hour cut in the entire Eastern region in June 2012
27
and cuts in areas of Tripoli during in July 
2012.
28
Rolling blackouts continued over the past year, particularly due to an overload in electricity 
demand during  summer  and  winter  months,  when  air  conditioning  or heating  is  used.  These 
blackouts are due, in part, to damage to the electricity grid that occurred as a result of the civil 
war, estimated at $1 billion.
29
The state-run Libyan Post Telecommunications and Information Technology Company (LIPTC), 
formerly  the  General  Post  and  Telecommunications  Company  (GPTC),  is  the  main 
telecommunications operator and is fully owned by the government. In 1999, the GPTC awarded 
the  first  internet  service  provider  (ISP)  license  to  Libya  Telecom  and  Technology  (LTT),  a 
subsidiary of the state-owned firm. At least seven other companies—including Modern World 
Communication, Alfalak, and Bait Shams—have also been licensed to provide internet services, 
though LTT retains sole control over Libya’s international gateway to the internet.
30
The LIPTC 
owns two mobile phone providers, Almadar and Libyana, while a third provider, Libya Phone, is 
owned by the LIPTC’s subsidiary, LTT.  
Since  the  revolution,  most  people  access  the  internet  from  their  homes  and  workplaces 
(particularly those working for foreign organizations or companies), followed by mobile phones, 
and  hotel  lobbies. The cybercafe  industry, quasi-decimated in many  parts  of  Libya during the 
conflict, is starting to return to profitable business through catering mainly to foreign workers and 
Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP) calls.  
The post-conflict regulatory environment remains very unclear. The newly elected government has 
a Ministry of Communication,  but it  has expressed no clear vision for the future.  During the 
Qadhafi era, decisions on licensing were made by the government-controlled GPTC. There was 
talk in 2006 surrounding the creation of a new regulator, the General Telecom Authority (GTA), 
though after the 2011 uprising, it remained unclear whether the GTA had come into existence. 
Some suspected the GTA had been formed to oversee the monitoring of online activities.  
26
 “Project Cyber Dawn v1.0, Libya,” The Cyber Security Forum Initiative, April 17, 2011, p. 20,http://www.unveillance.com/wp‐
content/uploads/2011/05/Project_Cyber_Dawn_Public.pdf 
27
 “Internet service back in each of the following areas,” [in Arabic] Libya Telecom & Technology, 
http://www.ltt.ly/news/d.php?i=200, accessed July 23, 2013. 
28
“Internet service outages and Libya iPhone spare result in optical fiber,” [in Arabic] Libya Telecom & Technology, 
http://www.ltt.ly/news/d.php?i=203, accessed July 23, 2013. 
29
 “Cost of last year’s damage to electricity industry put at $1bn,” The Libya Herald, March 28,2012, 
http://www.libyaherald.com/cost‐of‐last‐years‐damage‐to‐electricity‐industry‐put‐at‐1‐bn/
30
 United Nations Economic Commission for Africa, “The Status of Information for Development Activities in North Africa,” 
(paper presented at the twentieth meeting of the Intergovernmental committee of experts, Tangier, Morocco, April 13‐15, 
2005), http://www.uneca.org/na/Information.pdf;“Internet Filtering in Libya – 2006/2007,” OpenNet Initiative, 
2007,http://opennet.net/studies/libya2007; “Telecoms in Libya”[in Arabic], Marefa.org, accessed August 30, 2012, 
http://bit.ly/1bhJYKc.  
493
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
L
IBYA
The Libyan web has opened up extensively since the fall of Qadhafi in August 2011. The online 
media landscape quickly developed as restrictions and regulations on publishing dissipated during 
the extended period of instability. As internet use has increased, so has the market for online 
advertising,  contributing  to  the  overall  expansion  of  Libyan  news  sites  and  online  services. 
Facebook in particular has become an important news source for many Libyans. Under the various 
transitional and interim governments, censorship remained low and sporadic. Over the past year, 
however, there have been a few cases of the state blocking content for political reasons. Moreover, 
habits from decades of oppressive rule and the continued threat posed by militias contribute some 
degree  of  self-censorship among  users,  particularly  on  sensitive subject  areas.  These concerns 
presented some limits on content over the past year, although it is still too early to tell what 
direction Libya is moving during this highly-fluid, uncertain transitional period.  
Web 2.0 services such as YouTube, Facebook, Twitter, and international blog-hosting platforms 
are freely accessible in Libya. In fact, the “Innocence of Muslims” film that sparked protests outside 
the American consulate in Benghazi was not blocked by Libyan authorities, although it was made 
inaccessible by YouTube’s parent company, Google. Facebook was inaccessible for at least one day 
in November 2012, although the LTT was quick to explain on its website that this was not the 
result of state censorship but rather a glitch from the company.
31
While the defeat of the Qadhafi 
regime led to a cessation of state blocking in August 2011, many Qadhafi-era government webpages 
containing information on laws and regulations from before the uprising are inaccessible, as is the 
online archive of the old state-run Libyan newspapers. Some of these websites may have become 
defunct after the officials running them were ousted or hosting fees were left unpaid, but others 
were likely taken down deliberately when the revolutionaries came to power. 
As mentioned, there have been some instances of blocking recorded during the coverage period. 
For example, the website of the television channel Russia Today (RT) was inaccessible in Libya in 
early March 2013. RT had posted an interview with Mahmoud Jibril, head of the National Forces 
Alliance, in which it was alleged that Libya’s last  Prime Minister  under Qadhafi, Baghdadi al-
Mahmoudi, was tortured in custody by government authorities after his recent extradition from 
Tunisia.
32
The Ministry of Communications and Information Technology actually confirmed that 
RT was blocked on their Facebook page, as well as the blocking of another website called Makala.
33
The English site of RT was later unblocked, although as of March 2013, the Arabic version could 
only be accessed through a cached copy or proxy. 
31
 “Reasons for the stop of social networking site Facebook,” [in Arabic] Libya Telecom & Technology, 
http://www.ltt.ly/news/d.php?i=215, accessed July 23, 2013.  
32
 Chris Stephen and Luke Harding, “Libya’s former PM Mahmoudi ‘tortured’ on forced return to Tripoli,” The Guardian, June 
27, 2012, http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2012/jun/27/libya‐mahmoudi‐tortured‐return‐tripoli.  
33
 See post by the Ministry of Communications and Informatics – Libya [in Arabic], 
https://www.facebook.com/cim.gov.ly/posts/403340369762444.  
L
IMITS ON 
C
ONTENT
494
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested