download pdf file from server in asp.net c# : Clean pdf metadata application control tool html azure asp.net online FOTN%202013_Full%20Report_050-part1555

F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
L
IBYA
Some pornographic websites are also among those that continue to be blocked since the end of 
hostilities, according to a decision made by an ad hoc Temporary Steering Committee formed after 
the liberation of Tripoli. The committee is formed of conservative rebel fighters in a bid to be seen 
as the guardians of public morality. Prior to the war, “indecency” was prohibited but sexually-
explicit sites were never blocked. This development has not yet been reversed by the LTT, perhaps 
due to the conservative outlook of some political factions vying for influence in the future of Libya. 
There is little transparency and no legal framework related to the blocking of websites in Libya, as 
the regulations have not yet been formulated. Technically, all regulations of the Qadhafi era remain 
valid.  
Though the environment has loosened considerably since Qadhafi, a sizable number  of Libyan 
bloggers,  online  journalists  and  ordinary  citizens  continue  to  practice  some  degree  of  self-
censorship due to continued instability and the uncertain political situation.
34
Under the newly 
elected government, visas for foreign journalists have become more difficult to obtain. In January 
2013, through a picture she posted on Twitter, a Washington Post reporter revealed that she had 
been  made  to  sign  a  written  pledge  not  to  portray  the  country  in  a  manner  that  might  be 
provocative or distort civil peace.
35
In addition, given the already tense and violent environment, 
many bloggers and individuals choose not to comment on social taboos such as rape or conflicts 
between warring tribes and cities. Online writers also shy away from expressing religious opinions 
for fear of being marked as an atheist or a Shiite sympathizer, both of which can be life threatening.  
Many also avoid publishing content critical of the 2011 revolution. It should be noted that many 
commentators are more afraid of retribution from armed groups and non-state actors rather than 
the  government.  Such  unseen  pressures  contribute  to  an  atmosphere  of  self-censorship  and 
incomplete freedom.
36
Despite these trends, an increasing number of bloggers have demonstrated a willingness to use their 
real name when posting online. Blogging first emerged in Libya in 2003. While even Qadhafi 
launched his  own  blog in  2006,  the number  of  blogs  based  inside  the  country remained low 
compared to other Arab countries.
37
Since the start of the revolution in February 2011, however, 
the contingent of blogs written by those inside Libya has notably increased and many Libyans have 
focused on topics related to political activism. Bloggers, online journalists, and other users have 
vocally  expressed  a  diverse  range  of  visions  for  the  post-Qadhafi  political  order,  the  interim 
government, and other topics.  
After decades of harsh censorship, the online media landscape in Libya is now diverse, with few 
dominant news providers and many local or privately-owned outlets. The online advertising market 
is also growing in the country, allowing independent news sites, such as the Libya Herald, to 
34
 “2013 World Press Freedom Index: Dashed Hopes After Spring,” Reporters Without Borders, http://en.rsf.org/press‐freedom‐
index‐2013,1054.html, last accessed in March 2013. 
35
 See https://mobile.twitter.com/ahauslohner/status/293706323747557377/photo/1 
36
 Tracey Shelton, “Libya’s media has its own revolution,” Global Post, March 18, 2012, 
http://mobile.globalpost.com/dispatch/news/regions/africa/120301/libya‐media‐revolution‐newspapers‐television‐radio‐
journalism‐free‐speech
37
 Claudia Gazzini, “Talking Back: How Exiled Libyans use the web to push for change,” Arab Media Society, February, 2007, 3, 
http://www.arabmediasociety.com/articles/downloads/20070312142030_AMS1_Claudia_Gazzini.pdf
495
Clean pdf metadata - add, remove, update PDF metadata in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Allow C# Developers to Read, Add, Edit, Update and Delete PDF Metadata
delete metadata from pdf; pdf metadata
Clean pdf metadata - VB.NET PDF metadata library: add, remove, update PDF metadata in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Enable VB.NET Users to Read, Write, Edit, Delete and Update PDF Document Metadata
get pdf metadata; change pdf metadata
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
L
IBYA
generate money more than one year after its founding. Websites related to the Amazigh (whose 
language  was  banned  under  Qadhafi)  and  other  minorities  are  now  flourishing.  Interestingly, 
Facebook is often the platform of choice for city and even government officials to publish updates 
and official communication. From April 2012 to April 2013, the number of Facebook users in Libya 
increased  from  some 400,000  to  860,000.
38
The  social  networking  site  was  the  most visited 
website in the country and has also become the main source of news about Libya for a large number 
of users inside and outside the country.
39
In 2012 and early 2013, Facebook, Twitter and other digital media were used to mobilize Libyans 
for activism around a variety of causes. For example, on March 14, 2013, activists coordinated 
protest in Tripoli and at Libyan embassies around the world to protest violence against women. 
Social media had been crucial in bringing attention to numerous cases of sexual harassment against 
terminally ill hospital patients in Libyan hospitals. In addition, social media was a factor in the 
September 21, 2012 protests in Benghazi, in which over 30,000 Libyans expressed their anger at 
the continued  presence of  armed  militias, including  the terrorist  group Ansar  al-Shariah,  and 
demonstrated their solidarity with the United States for the killing of the American Ambassador J. 
Christopher  Stephens  and  two  American  guards  during  the  storming  of  the  US  consulate  in 
Benghazi on September 11.
40
In another example of how the internet is being used to engage 
citizens, the host of the popular TV show called Libya Tonight
41
held an interactive discussion with 
Facebook followers during a media training session at the American University in Cairo in March 
2013.
42
Mass text message campaigns were also used to rally support in the run-up to the July 2012 
elections and for a number of other announcements.  
Freedom of opinion, communication, and press are guaranteed by Libya’s Draft Constitutional 
Charter, released by the Libyan Transitional National Council in September 2011 to outline Libya’s 
governance during the transitional and interim period following the fall of the Qadhafi regime.
43
The formation of a committee to draft the new constitution has been delayed numerous times, as 
Libya searches for stability and rule of law in the post-conflict period. Legal reforms are essential to 
ensure that the rights enshrined in the draft charter are implemented. Although it has now been 
two  years  since  Qadhafi’s  ouster,  scars  from  his  42-year  rule  linger  in  the  national  psyche. 
Restrictive laws remain on the books and a murky surveillance apparatus continues to function with 
little judicial oversight. The gravest threat to user rights, however, are the country’s armed groups. 
38
 Libya Facebook Statistics,” Socialbakers, accessed April 10, 2012, http://www.socialbakers.com/facebook‐statistics/libya, and 
Ghazi Gheblawi, “Free speech in post‐Gaddafi Libya,” Index on Censorship, April 2013, 
http://www.indexoncensorship.org/2013/04/freedom‐of‐speech‐in‐libya/.  
39
 “The Top Sites in Libya,” Alexa, accessed April 10, 2012, http://www.alexa.com/topsites/countries/LY
40
 Suliman Ali Zway and Kareem Fahim, “Angry Libyans Target Militias, Forcing Flight,” The New York Times, September 21, 
2012, http://www.nytimes.com/2012/09/22/world/africa/pro‐american‐libyans‐besiege‐militant‐group‐in‐benghazi.html?_r=0.  
41
 See https://www.facebook.com/LIC.LibyaTonight 
42
 See http://on.fb.me/19GODzU.  
43
 “Draft Constitutional Charter for the Transitional Stage,” Libyan Transitional National Council, September 2011, available at 
http://www.refworld.org/docid/4e80475b2.html.  
V
IOLATIONS OF 
U
SER 
R
IGHTS
496
VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.
Our PDF to HTML converter library control is a 100% clean .NET document image solution, which is designed to help .NET developers convert PDF to HTML webpage
view pdf metadata; batch edit pdf metadata
C# PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in C#.net
Our PDF to HTML converter library control is a 100% clean .NET document image solution, which is designed to help .NET developers convert PDF to HTML webpage
batch update pdf metadata; pdf metadata editor online
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
L
IBYA
A British journalist writing for a Libyan news site was chased out of the country by Islamist fighters 
after exposing the group’s “kill list,” consisting of senior security officials.  
During the Qadhafi era, several laws provided for freedom of speech, but these protections were 
typically offset by vague language restricting the same freedoms. For example, the 1969 Libyan 
Constitutional declaration and the 1988 Green Charter for Human Rights both guarantee freedom 
of speech and opinion but also note that these must be “within the limits of public interest and the 
principles of the Revolution.”
44
Discussions over a new press law in 2007 and a telecommunications 
law in 2010 did not progress and were not implemented.
45
Since 2012, the judiciary has become 
increasingly independent, although all state bodies are still subject to pressure from the armed 
militias that defeated Qadhafi. For example, in April 2013, rebel fighters key to the removal of 
Qadhafi besieged the justice and foreign ministries to demand the passing of the Isolation Law, a bill 
that outlawed former Qadhafi officials from public life.
46
Laws  from  the  Qadhafi  era  remain  on  the  books,  including  measures  that  provide  for  harsh 
punishments for those who published content deemed offensive or threatening to Islam, national 
security, territorial integrity, or the reputation of Qadhafi. The penal code calls for imprisonment 
or the death penalty for anyone convicted of disseminating information critical of the state or the 
“Leader of the Revolution.” The 1972 Publications Act imposes fines and up to two years in prison 
for a variety of violations, including libel, slander, and “doubting the aims of the revolution.”
47
Particularly egregious was a law on collective punishment, which allowed the authorities to punish 
entire families, towns, or districts for the transgressions of one individual.
48
Because of their vague 
wording, these laws could be applied to any form of speech, whether transmitted via the internet, 
mobile phone, or traditional media. A 2006 law mandates that websites registered under the “.ly” 
domain must not contain content that is “obscene, scandalous, indecent or contrary to Libyan law 
or Islamic morality.”
49
Under Qadhafi’s rule, several internet users and online journalists were 
detained, prosecuted, and in some cases, killed, for disseminating or accessing information deemed 
undesirable by the regime. 
Although there is less fear of government repression in the post-Qadhafi era, threats still remain, 
particularly with so few mechanisms to hold the government or militias accountable should they 
abuse their power. George Grant, the British journalist who worked for the online publication the 
Libya Herald, was forced to flee Libya in January 2013 following alleged threats from Islamists, 
according to his tweets and an interview with the BBC.
50
One month earlier, Grant had written an 
44
 IREX, “Media Sustainability Index – Middle East and North Africa,” Media Sustainability Index 2008 (Washington D.C.: IREX, 
2008), 27, http://www.irex.org/system/files/MENA_MSI_2008_Book_Full.pdf
45
 IREX, “Media Sustainability Index – Middle East and North Africa,” Media Sustainability Index 2006/2007 (Washington D.C.: 
IREX, 2009), 33, http://www.irex.org/system/files/MENA%20MSI%202007%20Book.pdf
46
 Rana Jawad, “Why Libya’s militias are up in arms,” BBC News, April 30, 2013, http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world‐africa‐
22361101.  
47
 Freedom House, “Libya,” Freedom of the Press 2011, http://www.freedomhouse.org/report/freedom‐press/2011/libya
48
 IREX, “Media Sustainability Index – Middle East and North Africa,” Media Sustainability Index 2005 (Washington D.C.: IREX, 
2006), 36, http://www.irex.org/system/files/MENA_MSI_2005‐Full.pdf
49
 “Internet Filtering in Libya – 2006/2007,” OpenNet Initiative, and  “Regulations,” Libya ccTLD, accessed August 30, 2012, 
http://nic.ly/regulations.php
50
 See http://www.facebook.com/video/video.php?v=10100408892583391 
497
C# PDF Convert to SVG SDK: Convert PDF to SVG files in C#.net, ASP
Framework 2.0 or above. 100% clean .NET solution for PDF to SVG conversion using .NET-compliant C# language. Easily define a PDF page
pdf remove metadata; metadata in pdf documents
C# PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net
C#.NET PDF page rotator library control, RasterEdge XDoc.PDF, is a 100% clean .NET solution for C# developers to permanently rotate PDF document page and save
analyze pdf metadata; pdf metadata viewer
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
L
IBYA
article regarding a suspected “death list” of senior security officials, drawn up by Islamist fighters 
seeking to undermine the state security presence in Benghazi.
51
In another example, the Libyan 
online activist Hamid al-Tubuly was reportedly abducted in December 2012 by members of the 
Supreme Security Council, a non-state militia, who released him only after a direct plea by the head 
of the GNC.
52
However, it was also rumored that al-Tubuly was not targeted for his online activism 
but rather because the militia wanted to take possession of his house. 
The Qadhafi regime had direct access to the country’s DNS servers and engaged in widespread 
surveillance of online communications.  State of the art equipment from foreign firms such as the 
French company Amesys
53
and possibly the Chinese firm ZTE were sold to the regime, enabling 
intelligence  agencies  to  intercept  communications  on  a  nationwide  scale  and  collect  massive 
amounts of data on both phone and internet usage.
54
Correspondents from the Wall Street Journal 
who visited an internet monitoring center after the regime’s collapse reportedly found a storage 
room lined floor-to-ceiling with dossiers of the online activities of Libyans and foreigners with 
whom they communicated.
55
Extensive efforts were also made to develop the capacity to eavesdrop 
on Skype and VSAT connections. According to current and former staff of LTT, the government 
even obtained  backdoor access to Thuraya satellite phones, which  were  widely  perceived  as  a 
secure means of communication.
56
In general, Libyans must present identification when purchasing 
a SIM card. 
While  many  Libyans  would  like  to  believe  that  such  widespread  surveillance  has  ceased, 
uncertainties remain over the actions of domestic intelligence agencies in the new Libya. A July 
2012 report from the Wall Street Journal indicated that surveillance tools leftover from the Qadhafi 
era had been restarted, seemingly in the fight against loyalists of the old regime.
57
Others suspect 
that it has been activated to target those with an anti-Islamist agenda. During an interview on al-
Hurra TV in March 2012, the Minister of Telecommunications stated that such surveillance had 
been stopped because the interim government wanted to respect the human rights of Libyans. An 
organization representing IT professionals in Libya refuted his remarks in an online statement, 
claiming  those  working  in  the  telecom  sector  report  that  the  surveillance  system  has  been 
reactivated. Such allegations could not be independently verified, however.
58
Given the lack of an 
independent  judiciary  or  procedures  outlining  the  circumstances  under  which  the  state  may 
51
 For the article in question, see George Grant and Mohamed Bujenah, “Update II: Security forces arrest man in connection 
with Benghazi killings, four policemen killed in failed release attempt,” Libya Herald, December 16, 2012, 
http://www.libyaherald.com/2012/12/16/security‐forces‐arrest‐possible‐faraj‐drissi‐assassin‐sparking‐reprisal‐killings/.  
52
 Umar Khan, “Abducted social network activist Hamid al‐Tubuly hits out at the SSC, denies involvement with Mohammed 
Qaddafi,” Libya Herald, December 11, 2012, http://www.libyaherald.com/2012/12/11/abducted‐social‐network‐activist‐hamid‐
al‐tubuly‐hits‐out‐at‐the‐ssc‐denies‐involvement‐with‐mohammed‐qaddafi/.  
53
 Ivan Sigal, “Libya: Foreign Hackers and Surveillance,” Global Voices, October 27, 2011, 
http://advocacy.globalvoicesonline.org/2011/10/27/libya‐foreign‐hackers‐and‐surveillance/
54
 Ibid. 
55
 Paul Sonne and Margarent Coker, “Firms Aided Libyan Spies,” The Wall Street Journal, August 30, 2011, 
http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424053111904199404576538721260166388.html
56
 Sonne and Coker, “Firms Aided Libyan Spies.” 
57
 Margaret Coker and Paul Sonne, “Gadhafi‐Era Spy Tactics Quietly Restarted in Libya,” The Wall Street Journal, July 2, 2012, 
http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052702304782404577488493816611850.html.  
58
“Libya Telecom” Facebook post [in Arabic], March 31, 2012 at 7:16am, 
https://www.facebook.com/LibyaTelecom/posts/201142566662920
498
VB.NET PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in vb.
above versions). 100% clean and managed VB.NET solution that rotates PDF document file in Microsoft Framework application. Offer wide
batch pdf metadata editor; change pdf metadata creation date
C#: How to Delete Cached Files from Your Web Viewer
in PDF, C#.NET edit PDF bookmark, C#.NET edit PDF metadata, C#.NET VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB use in your C# web application is to clean up files
remove metadata from pdf acrobat; embed metadata in pdf
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
L
IBYA
conduct surveillance, there is little to prevent the government, security agencies, or militias who 
have access to the equipment from resuming the practice.  
During the Qadhafi era, opposition websites such as Libya Watanona, or those affiliated with the 
Muslim  Brotherhood or  minority  groups  such  as the Amazigh,  were periodically  hacked. The 
government was widely suspected of being behind the attacks.
59
In January 2011, the opposition 
website  al-Manara  came  under  cyberattack  after  it  had  posted  videos  of  early  anti-Qadhafi 
protesters in Bayda and al-Mostakbal.
60
Periodic attacks continued in 2012 and 2013, with both 
pro-Qadhafi  and  pro-revolution  pages  hacked  by  individuals  or  groups  unaffiliated  with  the 
government.  
59
  “Internet Filtering in Libya – 2006/2007,” OpenNet Initiative, 2007, http://opennet.net/studies/libya2007 
60
 Amira Al Hussaini, “Libya: Gaddafi wages war on the internet as trouble brews at home, “Global Voices, January 17, 2011, 
http://globalvoicesonline.org/2011/01/17/libya‐gaddafi‐wages‐war‐on‐the‐internet‐as‐trouble‐brews‐at‐home/
499
.NET PDF SDK | Read & Processing PDF files
advanced document viewing, editing and clean-up features Able to convert PDF documents into other of text, hyperlinks, bookmarks and metadata; Advanced document
bulk edit pdf metadata; rename pdf files from metadata
XImage.Raster for .NET, Comprehensive .NET RasterImage SDK
image information; APIs for image metadata (tag) modify; and contrast; Multiple options for image clean up. & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image to
google search pdf metadata; pdf metadata reader
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
M
ALAWI
M
ALAWI
 Traditional and online media restrictions relaxed under Joyce Banda, who assumed the
presidency in April 2012 following the death of President Bingu wa Mutharika (see
I
NTRODUCTION
).
 In May 2012 the National Assembly repealed Section 46 of the penal code that had
empowered the information minister to ban any publications deemed “contrary to the
public interest” (see V
IOLATIONS OF 
U
SER 
R
IGHTS
).
 A  draft  E-Bill  was  introduced  in  October  2012  that  aims  to  implement  a  legal
framework for regulating ICTs (see V
IOLATIONS OF 
U
SER 
R
IGHTS
).
 A government plan to implement a so-called “spy machine” for monitoring mobile
phone companies was struck down by a court in late 2012 but sanctioned by parliament
in mid-2013 (see V
IOLATIONS OF 
U
SER 
R
IGHTS
).
 In  October  2012,  criminal  libel  charges  were  brought  against  an  online  news
correspondent, though he was acquitted in February 2013 (see V
IOLATIONS OF 
U
SER
R
IGHTS
).
2012 
2013 
I
NTERNET 
F
REEDOM 
S
TATUS
N
/
A
P
ARTLY 
F
REE
Obstacles to Access (0-25) 
n/a  16 
Limits on Content (0-35) 
n/a  11 
Violations of User Rights (0-40) 
n/a  15 
Total (0-100) 
n/a 
42 
*0=most free, 100=least free
K
EY 
D
EVELOPMENTS
:
M
AY 
2012
A
PRIL 
2013 
P
OPULATION
16 million
I
NTERNET 
P
ENETRATION 
2012: 
4
percent
S
OCIAL 
M
EDIA
/ICT
A
PPS 
B
LOCKED
No
P
OLITICAL
/S
OCIAL 
C
ONTENT 
B
LOCKED
No
B
LOGGERS
/ICT
U
SERS 
A
RRESTED
Yes
P
RESS 
F
REEDOM 
2013
S
TATUS
Partly Free
500
VB Imaging - Intelligent Mail (OneCode) Generator
This professional and 100% clean Intelligent Mail (OneCode) barcode generating SDK allows various image files (like GIF) and common document files (like PDF).
add metadata to pdf; read pdf metadata java
.NET Multipage TIFF SDK| Process Multipage TIFF Files
upload to SharePoint and save to PDF documents. Support clean multipage TIFF files with deskew, binarize, despeckle, etc Support for metadata reading & writing.
pdf xmp metadata; extract pdf metadata
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
M
ALAWI
Internet and mobile phone services were first introduced in Malawi in the late 1990’s, though after 
decades  of  flagging  economic  development,  the  impact  of  information  and  communication 
technologies (ICTs) has been limited for most Malawians compared to other countries in Sub-
Saharan Africa. Penetration rates for digital media tools remain well below average for the region 
due primarily to poor infrastructure and the high cost of access. Nevertheless, the development of 
Malawi’s ICT sector has become a government priority under President Joyce Banda, who in her 
inaugural state of the nation address in May 2012 set out a vision for deploying ICTs as a catalyst for 
economic development.
1
Banda came to power in April 2012 following the death of former President Bingu wa Mutharika, 
who was known for his heavy-handed approach towards the opposition and restrictions against 
fundamental freedoms, including digital media freedoms. In 2011, the Malawi Communication 
Regulatory Authority (MACRA) under the Mutharika government introduced a Consolidated ICT 
Regulatory Management System that became locally known as the “spy machine,” which ostensibly 
aimed to monitor the performance of mobile phone companies to improve quality of service. The 
courts placed an injunction on the system in late 2012, but in June 2013, parliament gave MACRA 
its endorsement to install the machine, despite the court’s ruling. 
The  government does  not systematically block or filter internet  content  in Malawi;  however, 
during violent anti-government protests in July 2011, MACRA reportedly ordered internet service 
providers (ISPs) to block certain opposition news and social media websites, among other media 
tools. No such blocks have occurred under President Banda, though a controversial E-Bill was 
introduced  in  October  2012  that  aims  to  implement  a  legal  framework  for  regulating  ICTs. 
Criticized for its potential to limit internet freedom, the draft E-Bill would require editors of online 
public communications services to reveal their personal information and allow the government to 
appoint “cyber inspectors” to monitor online activity in the public domain.
2
While harassment and violence against traditional media journalists was prolific  under  the late 
president Mutharika, online journalists were not targeted. One online journalist was arrested in 
October 2012 for allegedly insulting the new president and charged with criminal libel, though he 
was acquitted in February 2013 for lack of evidence.  
Malawi is a landlocked and densely populated country that suffers from widespread poverty. With 
80 percent of the population residing in rural areas, the agricultural sector comprises the bulk of 
1
 Cleopa Timon Otieno, “President Banda Unveils Malawi’s ICT Vision as Government Sets Up 7 Telecentres,” Telecentre, (blog), 
May 25, 2012, http://bit.ly/1dSjL2v.  
2
 “Malawi Alert: E‐Bill Puts Freedom of Expression Online in Cross‐hairs,” Nyasa Times, October 4, 2012, http://bit.ly/1fWVQAR.  
I
NTRODUCTION
O
BSTACLES TO 
A
CCESS
501
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
M
ALAWI
the country’s  economic  output.  Accordingly, Malawi’s  presence on the internet  is one  of the 
lowest in the world, with a penetration rate of just over 4 percent as of the end of 2012, according 
to  the  International  Telecommunications  Union.
3
Meanwhile,  there  were  about  1,200  fixed 
broadband subscriptions  in 2012 for a penetration rate of 0.1 percent,
4
and broadband speeds 
average  0.1  Mbps  or  less.
5
Mobile  phone  penetration  in  Malawi  is  also  low  at  28  percent,
6
compared to an average of 76 percent across the continent as of February 2013.
7
Most users log on at internet cafes, as computers are a luxury for ordinary households in Malawi, 
and very few households have access to the internet at home. Nevertheless, the recent introduction 
of affordable 3G and 3.75G mobile broadband services has led to increasing mobile internet access 
and declining patronage at local internet cafe operations, which charge a minimum of 5 Malawian 
kwacha per minute, about $1.00 per hour, and close at 6pm.
8
In addition, service on the GSM 
network has expanded throughout the country to cover 93 percent of the population following the 
removal of a number of regulatory barriers such as long registration processes, making Malawi’s 
GSM signal coverage one of the highest in Africa.
9
DSL services are also available, and Malawi 
Telecommunications Limited (MTL) launched WiMAX wireless broadband services in May 2012.
10
Competition  between  private  ISPs  has  further  enabled  wireless  internet  access  through  Wi-Fi 
hotspots, particularly in urban areas of the country. 
While Malawi’s ICT sector has experienced tremendous growth in recent years, the cost of access 
remains a major challenge for ordinary people. The government does not regulate the price of 
internet  access,  enabling  operators  to  charge  as  they  wish  and  making  the  cost  of  access 
prohibitively high for many Malawians. As of early 2013, the monthly price of fixed-line internet 
access is US$16.50, while a monthly mobile 3G data plan costs about US$24 for 1.5GB of data.
11
The high cost of internet access in Malawi is symptomatic of the many challenges that ISPs face, one 
being the lack of a local internet exchange point, which forces telecoms to rely on upstream service 
providers that are usually based outside Africa. As a result, data that should be exchanged locally 
within  Malawi  or  regionally  must  pass  through  Europe  or  North  America  where  upstream 
providers are based, leading to an unnecessary and expensive waste of upstream bandwidth. 
3
   International Telecommunication Union, “Percentage of Individuals Using the Internet, 2000‐2012,” 
http://www.itu.int/en/ITU‐D/Statistics/Pages/stat/default.aspx
4
 International Telecommunication Union, “Fixed (Wired)‐broadband Subscriptions, 2000‐2012.” 
5
 Broadband Commission for Digital Development, “The State of Broadband 2012: Achieving Digital Inclusion for All,” 
September 2012, http://www.ericsson.com/res/docs/2012/the‐state‐of‐broadband‐2012.pdf.  
6
 International Telecommunication Union, “Mobile‐cellular Telephone Subscriptions, 2000‐2012.” 
7
 “World’s Mobile Penetration,” Parseco(blog), December 18, 2012, http://www.parseco.com/worlds‐mobile‐penetration/.  
8
 Richard Chirombo, “Mobile Phones Push Internet Cafes Under,” Sunday Times, January 22, 2012, 
http://www.bnltimes.com/index.php/sunday‐times/headlines/business/3907‐mobile‐phones‐push‐internet‐cafes‐under.  
9
 Vivien Foster and Maria Shkaratan, “Malawi’s Infrastructure: A Continental Perspective,” Africa Infrastructure Country 
Diagnostic, World Bank, March 2010, 
http://siteresources.worldbank.org/INTAFRICA/Resources/Malawi_country_report_2011.01.pdf.  
10
 “MTL Launches New Wireless Broadband Internet Service,” Daily Times, May 4, 2013, 
http://www.bnltimes.com/index.php/daily‐times/headlines/business/6218‐mtl‐launches‐new‐wireless‐broadband‐internet‐
service.  
11
 “Comparing African Pre‐paid Mobile Broadband Plans,” OAfrica, September 24, 2012, 
http://www.oafrica.com/mobile/african‐pre‐paid‐mobile‐broadband‐plans/.  
502
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
M
ALAWI
Another major challenge facing the telecommunication sector in Malawi is that the country’s power 
and ICT backbones are entirely national in nature, with no regional integration at present, although 
a number of cross-border connections have been proposed.
12
Due to Malawi’s landlocked location, 
the country’s connection to the international fiber network runs through Mozambique, Zambia, 
South Africa and Tanzania.
13
Three new submarine cables are currently competing to be the first to 
start service in Malawi as the country plans to extend a fiber-optic backbone through Tanzania to 
the coast.
14
If a suitable regulatory regime is also put in place, the new cables will bring down the 
cost of international bandwidth and deliver a boost to the broadband market. Meanwhile, the high 
costs of infrastructural development in rural areas has led to an unwillingness by providers to invest 
in the country’s remote regions, though the regulatory authority MACRA is looking to subsidize 
fees to encourage operators to deploy ICT services in the country’s less profitable yet neediest 
areas. 
A low literacy rate of 64 percent and a significant digital gender divide are also hindering progress 
and access to ICTs in Malawi, while unreliable electricity and the high cost of generator power in 
the country strain ICT use. Only 7 percent of the country has access to electricity, giving Malawi 
one of the lowest electrification rates in the world.
15
The electricity grid is concentrated in urban 
centers, though only 25 percent of urban households have access, compared to a mere 1 percent of 
rural households. Half the formal sector enterprises in Malawi have backup generators, which is 
twice the amount found in other low-income African countries. 
According to statistics released in May 2013, there are 22 operational ISPs in Malawi, and despite 
high operating costs and the limited availability of international bandwidth, there is reasonable 
competition between the providers. Malawi Net, formed in 1997, was the country’s first private 
ISP,  followed  in  1999  by Malawi  Sustainable  Development  Network  Programme,  a  semi-
government owned and United Nations Development Project-funded ISP. In the new millennium, 
several private ISPs followed suit, including Africa-Online, Globe Internet Company, Skyband, and 
most recently, Malawi Telecommunications Limited  (MTL). MTL also serves as the  country’s 
telecommunication backbone  since most  ISPs  and  mobile phone  service  providers  use  MTL’s 
infrastructure.
16
Previously a government-owned entity, MTL was privatized in 2005 and is now 80 
percent  owned  by  Telecomm  Holdings  Limited,  while  the  government  retains  the  other  20 
percent. 
Malawi’s  two major  players  in mobile phone  services, Airtel  Malawi  and  Telecom  Networks 
Malawi, together command a mobile teledensity of 18 percent and recently launched 3G mobile 
12
 “PPIAF Assistance in Malawi,” Public Private Infrastructure Advisory Facility, March 2012, 
http://www.ppiaf.org/sites/ppiaf.org/files/documents/PPIAF_Assistance_in_Malawi.pdf.  
13
 “Video: Internet Service Prices Still High in Malawi,” OAfrica, December 8, 2011, http://www.oafrica.com/video/video‐
internet‐service‐prices‐still‐high‐in‐malawi/.  
14
 Beatrice Philemon, “Malawi Keen on Submarine Cable Connection with Tanzania,” Ippmedia, March 18, 2012, 
http://www.ippmedia.com/frontend/index.php?l=39583
15
 “Telekom Networks Malawi (TNM) Ltd. – Malawi – Feasibility Study,” GSMA Green Power for Mobile, 2012, 
http://www.gsma.com/mobilefordevelopment/wp‐content/uploads/2012/06/TNM_Malawi_Feasibility‐Study.pdf.  
16
 “Telecommunications in Malawi,” MBendi, accessed June 1, 2013, 
http://www.mbendi.com/indy/cotl/tlcm/af/ma/p0005.htm.  
503
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
M
ALAWI
services based on UMTS/HSPA technology.
17
A third mobile operator, G-Mobile, was licensed in 
2008 but the rollout of the new network experienced delays. It is currently in court fighting against 
the revocation of its license as a result of a failure to start services on time.
18
A fourth license was 
awarded to Celcom in 2011, and the launch of its services is expected in 2013. Meanwhile, the 
government has encouraged more competition in the market by introducing a converged licensing 
regime, which enabled the country’s two fixed-line operators, MTL and Access Communications, 
to  enter the mobile market. Both telecoms  are  already operating CDMA-based  fixed-wireless 
networks that support full mobility and broadband access using high-speed EVDO technology. 
MACRA is Malawi’s sole regulator, established under the 2008 Communication Act to ensure 
reliable and affordable ICT service provision throughout Malawi. Its mandate is to regulate the 
whole communications sector with respect to telecommunications, broadcasting, postal services, 
and the management of the radio frequency spectrum. As a regulator, it also issues operating 
licenses for mobile and fixed-line phone service providers, ISPs, and cybercafes, though political 
connections are often necessary to receive such licenses.  
The institutional structure of MACRA is not without political interference as its board is comprised 
of a chairman and six other members appointed by the president and two ex-officio members—the 
secretary to the Office of the President and Cabinet and the Information Ministry secretary. The 
director  general,  whose  appointment  also  passes  through  the  president’s  scrutiny,  heads  the 
authority’s management and supports the board of directors in the execution of its mandate.  
Increasing government manipulation of online content through pro-government trolls is the most 
notable trend of 2012 and 2013, as the Malawian government seems to be grappling with the desire 
to restrict critical online speech in spite of their technical inability to do so.  
The government of Malawi does not systematically block or filter any websites primarily out of a 
lack of capacity, though it has demonstrated a desire to censor internet content in the past. During 
violent anti-government protests in July 2011, MACRA reportedly ordered ISPs to block certain 
news websites and social media networks, including Facebook and Twitter, in a supposed effort to 
quell  the  spread  of  violence.
19
The  UK-based  Malawian  online  publication,  Nyasa  Times,  also 
experienced repeated distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attacks that shut down its servers and 
effectively disrupted its reporting of the protests. Known for its critical coverage and sometimes 
exaggerated articles about the government, Nyasa Times was reportedly blocked again in November 
17
 Universal Mobile Telecommunications Service (UMTS) and high‐speed packet access (HSPA). 
18
 Frank Jomo, “Malawi Court Halts Regulator Canceling G‐Mobile’s License, Times Reports,” Bloomberg, May 25, 2011, 
http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2011‐05‐25/malawi‐court‐halts‐regulator‐canceling‐g‐mobile‐s‐license‐times‐reports.html.  
19
 Michael Malakata, “Malawi Blocks Social Media Networks to Quell Protests,” Computer World, July 22, 2011, 
http://news.idg.no/cw/art.cfm?id=3DFADEBE‐1A64‐67EA‐E44251D79A4C6F57.  
L
IMITS ON 
C
ONTENT
504
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested