download pdf file from server in asp.net c# : Read pdf metadata SDK Library project winforms .net azure UWP FOTN%202013_Full%20Report_054-part1559

F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
M
EXICO
demonstrated  no malicious  intent.
60
In the  midst of such  controversy,  the prosecutor’s office 
subsequently dropped the charges and the two were released.  
During the same month, several state congresses made changes to laws pertaining to “public order 
disturbances.”
61
In Veracruz, the approval of Ley de Perturbación (“The Disturbance Act”) has 
criminalized the spreading of false alarms via mobile phones or social media such that the offense 
may now carry criminal charges ranging from prison terms of six months to four years and fines 
equivalent to 1,000 days of wages.
62
Although local attorneys raised concerns that such provisions 
could be used to unnecessarily restrict freedom of expression, as of May 2013, there were no 
known instances of such an occurrence.  
In late 2012 and early 2013, several state governments either planned or initiated legal proceedings 
against journalists and bloggers who had written critical statements about state officials. In one case, 
a list was leaked to the press of journalists that were likely to be sued by the governor of Puebla; in 
another instance, several online journalists were arrested for defamation. The first instance 
occurred in October 2012, when a document was publicized naming nineteen journalists and 
bloggers that Governor Moreno Valle’s administration planned to sue. Of the nineteen named 
reporters allegedly guilty of “engaging in an excess of freedom of expression” which resulted in 
“moral damage” to government officials, seven were online writers.
63
In April 2013, Martin Ruiz Rodriguez, editor of digital newspaper e-consulta, was arrested by police 
in Tlaxaca, Mexico’s smallest state, and one of 13 that penalizes defamation.
64
The order for arrest 
came at the behest of Ubaldo Velasco, the chief clerk of Tlaxcala, who Ruiz had called mediocre in 
a handful of posts on his controversial political blog.
65
Ruiz is one of five contributors to e-consulta 
charged with defamation, a crime punishable in Tlaxcala with fines and up to two years in prison. 
60
 Local media reported that the pair was subject to psychological pressure to plead guilty. According to Amnesty International, 
they were also denied access to a lawyer for 60 hours. See: Javier Duarte Ochoa, “Personas en Riesgo de Prision en Mexico tras 
Publicaciones en Twitter y Facebook” [People at Risk of Prison in Mexico after Publications on Twitter and Facebook], Amnesty 
International, August 31, 2011, http://amnistia.org.mx/nuevo/2011/09/01/personas‐en‐riesgo‐de‐prision‐en‐mexico‐tras‐
publicaciones‐en‐twitter‐y‐facebook/.  
61
 Reporters Without Borders, “After Wasted Month in Prison, Two Social Network Users Freed, Charges Dropped,” September 
22, 2011, http://en.rsf.org/mexico‐two‐social‐network‐users‐held‐on‐02‐09‐2011,40907.html. 
62
 H. Congreso del Estado de Tabasco, “Constitución de la Estado de Tobasco” [Constitution of the State of Tabasco], 
http://www.congresotabasco.gob.mx/60legislatura/trabajo_legislativo/pdfs/decretos/Decreto%20125.pdf; See also:  Leobardo 
Perez Marin, “Aprueban Ley Contra ‘Rumor’; Coartara Libertades” [Law Approved Against ‘Rumor’; Freedoms Abridged], 
Tabasco Hoy, August 31, 2011, http://www.tabascohoy.com/noticia.php?id_nota=220149 (account suspended). 
63
 Alvaro Delgado, “Gobernador de Puebla Presenta Doe de 19 Demandas contra Periodistas” [Governor of Puebla Presents Two 
of Nineteen Lawsuits against Journalists,” Proces, October 23, 2013, http://www.proceso.com.mx/?p=323287
64
 Sin Embargo, “Atentados a la Libertad de Expresión Aumentaron 46% con EPN: Artículo 19; Registra 32 Agresiones a 
Periodistas” [Attacks on Freedom of Expression Increased 46% with EPN: Article 19; Recorded 32 Attacks on Journalists], July 1, 
2013, http://www.sinembargo.mx/01‐07‐2013/672263; Article 19,  “Segundo Informe Trimestral: Reprimir la Protesta [Second 
Quarterly Report: Suppress the Protest], Article 19, May 2013, http://articulo19.org/segundo‐informe‐trimestral‐reprimir‐la‐
protesta/. 
65
 Elvia Cruz, “Un Periodista de Tlaxcala va a Juicio por Llamar a un Oficial 'Mediocre'” [A Journalist from Tlaxcala goes on Trial 
for Calling an Officer ‘Mediocre'], CNN Mexico, April 11, 2013, http://mexico.cnn.com/nacional/2013/04/11/un‐periodista‐de‐
tlaxcala‐va‐a‐juicio‐por‐llamar‐a‐un‐oficial‐mediocre; SDP Noticias, “Detienen a Martín Ruiz, Director de Portal e‐consulta 
Tlaxcala por “Difamación contra Funcionarios” [ Arrest of Martin Ruiq, Director of e‐consulta Tlaxcala, for “Defamation against 
Officials”], April 7, 2013, http://www.sdpnoticias.com/estados/2013/04/07/detienen‐a‐martin‐ruiz‐director‐de‐portal‐e‐
consulta‐tlaxcala‐por‐difamacion‐contra‐funcionarios. 
535
Read pdf metadata - add, remove, update PDF metadata in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Allow C# Developers to Read, Add, Edit, Update and Delete PDF Metadata
pdf metadata; add metadata to pdf
Read pdf metadata - VB.NET PDF metadata library: add, remove, update PDF metadata in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Enable VB.NET Users to Read, Write, Edit, Delete and Update PDF Document Metadata
bulk edit pdf metadata; remove pdf metadata
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
M
EXICO
Although he was released hours after being detained, Ruiz will stand trial for the charges leveled 
against him, which include emotional and psychological damage, at a future date.
66
Four other journalists and managers of e-consulta have also been charged with defamation by state 
cabinet officials in Tlaxcala: Ruiz’ brother, Rodolfo, Roberto Nava Briones, Gerardo Santillan, and 
Arturo Tecuatl. As of May 2013, it was unclear whether criminal proceedings would be upheld or 
whether the charges would be dropped.
67
A few days after Ruiz’ arrest, Aurora Aguilar Rodriguez, 
deputy general of the National Action Party (PAN), publicly denounced the efforts of the Tlaxcala 
state government to censor criticism by filing criminal charges against journalists. It remains to be 
seen whether Aguilar’s comments will influence the state government.
68
 
This is not the first time that contributors to e-consulta have been harassed. In October 2012, 
Gerardo Rojas and Jesse Brena, journalists with the digital newspaper were kidnapped by state 
police in Puebla and held captive in the trunk of a police car for three hours. After taking all of their 
personal belongings,  including the cash they carried, they were abandoned in an empty lot in 
Ciudad Judicial.
69
Although such intimidation was presumably meant to inspire fear in e-consulta 
reporters, the digital news outlet continued operations unabated. 
Apart from a 2008 requirement that cell phone users register with the government (revoked in 
2012)  there  are  no  official  provisions  regarding  anonymity.  The  only  regulation  currently  in 
practice is  unofficial and  pertains  to the safety of  informants  writing  online about drug  cartel 
activity. Moderators of forums disseminating user-generated safety updates on local websites urge 
writers to publish their comments anonymously in order to ensure their safety. 
Despite  a  constitutional  requirement  that  any  interception  of  personal  communications  be 
accompanied by a judicial warrant—a well as the 2010 passage of a law expanding the oversight 
powers of the data protection authority
70
—reports published in 2012 allege that secret surveillance 
of  private  citizens  is  widespread in  Mexico.
71
 In  July  2012,  evidence  was  leaked  (and later 
66
 “Pidió Oficial Mayor de Tlaxcala detención de Director de e‐Consulta” [Mayor of Tlaxcala Called for Detention of Director of e‐
Consulta], e‐consulta, April 7, 2013, http://archivo.e‐consulta.com/2013/index.php/2012‐06‐13‐18‐40‐00/politica/item/pidio‐
oficial‐mayor‐de‐tlaxcala‐detencion‐de‐director‐de‐e‐consulta; Juana Osorno Xochipa, “Liberan a Periodista Detenido por PGJE 
de Tlaxcala” [Free Journalist Arrested for PGJE in Tlaxcala], April 7, 2013, http://www.eluniversal.com.mx/notas/915260.html; 
“Daily Digest: Mexican State Blocks Access to Police, Court Information,” Knight Center for Journalism in the Americas, April 12, 
2013, https://knightcenter.utexas.edu/en/blog/00‐13521‐daily‐digest‐mexican‐state‐blocks‐access‐police‐court‐information
67
 Article 19, “Alerta: Oficial Mayor Intenta Meter a la Carcel a Periodista por Difamacion” [Alert: Mayor Tries to Send Journalist 
to Jail for Defamation], April 8, 2013,  http://articulo19.org/mexico‐criminalizacion‐al‐director‐de‐periodico‐digital‐e‐consulta‐
en‐tlaxcala‐es‐una‐agresion‐a‐la‐libertad‐de‐expresion/
68
 Gerardo Santillan, “Pide PAN en San Lazaro Cesse Persecucion a la Prense en Tlaxcala” [In San Lazaro, PAN Asks for 
Persecution of  the Press to Cease in Tlaxcala] e‐consulta, April 11, 2013, http://archivo.e‐consulta.com/2013/index.php/2012‐
06‐13‐18‐40‐00/nacion/item/pide‐pan‐en‐san‐lazaro‐cese‐persecucion‐a‐la‐prensa‐en‐tlaxcala
69
 Víctor Gutiérrez, “Dos Reporteros, Víctimas de Policías Delincuentes” [Two Reporters, Victims of Police Offense], El Sol de 
Puebla, October 22, 2012, http://www.oem.com.mx/elsoldepuebla/notas/n2742106.htm
70
 Jeremy Mittman, “Mexico Passes Sweeping New Law on Data Protection,” Proskauer Rose LLP, May 11, 2010, 
http://privacylaw.proskauer.com/2010/05/articles/international/mexico‐passes‐sweeping‐new‐law‐on‐data‐protection/
71
 Bob Brewin, “State Department to Provide Mexican Security Agency with Surveillance Apparatus,” NextGov, April 30, 2012, 
http://www.nextgov.com/technology‐news/2012/04/state‐department‐provide‐mexican‐security‐agency‐surveillance‐
apparatus/55490/
536
VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images
Get image information, such as its location, zonal information, metadata, and so on. Extract image from PDF free in .NET framework application with trial SDK
pdf xmp metadata; pdf metadata online
How to C#: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF for .NET
XDoc.PDF for .NET supports editing PDF document metadata, like Title, Subject, Author, Creator, Producer, Keywords, Created Date, and Last Modified Date.
change pdf metadata creation date; add metadata to pdf programmatically
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
M
EXICO
confirmed by the Mexican army
72
) pertaining to the secret purchase of approximately $4.6 billion 
pesos  ($355  million)  of  “spyware”  engineered  to  intercept  online  and  mobile  phone 
communications.  Such  technology,  which  has  been  funded  in  large  part  by  the  U.S.  State 
Department’s Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs, facilitates the real-
time geolocation of callers, the storage of up to 25,000 hours of conversation, and the real-time 
monitoring of packet data.
73
In addition to recording conversations and gathering text messages, 
email, internet navigation history, contact lists, and background sound, the surveillance software is 
also capable of activating the microphone on a user’s cell phone in order to eavesdrop on the 
surrounding environment.
74
The  website  of  the  Mexican  Access  to  Information  agency  (IFAI)  makes  no  mention  of  this 
expenditure — or of the U.S. State Department’s alleged assistance in the tripling of Mexico’s 
surveillance capacity.
75
In March 2012, the Geolocalization Law, which allows the government 
“warrantless access to real time user location data,” was passed nearly unanimously with 315 votes 
in favor, 6 opposed, and 7 abstentions.
76
Such opacity, which renders Mexicans unaware of the 
extent to which they are being surveilled and unable to contribute to discussions concerning the 
legality of using such technology on private citizens, is deeply concerning. Critics of the law warn 
that it is unconstitutional and sets a worrisome precedent of warrantless surveillance.
77
Corruption 
and weak rule of law among state governments—including the infiltration of law enforcement 
agencies by organized crime—also leave room for abuse should private communications fall into 
the wrong hands.   
Mexico continues to be one of the most dangerous countries in the world for journalists, who are 
subject to violence  (often  from drug cartels) for investigating  a range of  issues, notably  those 
involving the drug trade, from trafficking to corruption. This phenomenon has been exacerbated by 
widespread impunity for those carrying out such attacks.
78
While such violence has historically been 
targeted  at  traditional,  rather  than  online  media,  in  2011,  bloggers  and  journalists  posting 
information about sensitive topics online became victims of cartel-related violence for the first 
time, a worrisome trend that has continued to plague online writers. 
Although online writers have attempted to protect themselves, they continued to be the target of 
intimidation  and violence in  2012  and 2013. In September 2012, Ruy  Salgado aka  “El 5anto” 
72
Ryan Gallagher, “Mexico Turns to Surveillance Technology to Fight Drug War,” Slate, August 3, 2012,  
http://www.slate.com/blogs/future_tense/2012/08/03/surveillance_technology_in_mexico_s_drug_war_.html
73
 Robert Beckhusen, “U.S. Looks to Re‐Up its Mexican Surveillance System,” Wired, May 1, 2013, 
http://www.wired.com/dangerroom/2013/05/mexico‐surveillance‐system/
74
 Katitza Rodriguez, “Mexicans Need Transparency on Secret Surveillance,” Electronic Frontier Foundation, July 24, 2012,  
https://www.eff.org/deeplinks/2012/07/mexicans‐need‐transparency‐secret‐surveillance‐contracts; Cryptome, U.S. 
Department of State Contract 58, Communications Intercept System Mexico, http://cryptome.org/2012/06/us‐mx‐spy.pdf
75
Robert Beckhusen, “U.S. Looks to Re‐Up its Mexican Surveillance System,” Wired, May 1, 2013, http;Katitza Rodriguez, 
“Mexicans Need Transparency on Secret Surveillance,” Electronic Frontier Foundation, July 24, 2012.  
76
 Katitza Rodriguez, “Mexico Adopts Alarming Surveillance Legislation,” Electronic Frontier Foundation, March 2, 2012,  
https://www.eff.org/deeplinks/2012/03/mexico‐adopts‐surveillance‐legislation
77
 Cyrus Farivar, “Mexican ‘Geolocalization Law’ Draws Ire of Privacy Activists,” ArsTechnica, April 24, 2012, 
http://arstechnica.com/tech‐policy/2012/04/mexican‐geolocalization‐law‐draws‐ire‐of‐privacy‐activists/
78
 Committee to Protect Journalists, “28 Journalists Killed in Mexico since 1992/Motive Confirmed,” accessed January 12, 2013, 
https://www.cpj.org/killed/americas/mexico/. 
537
VB.NET PDF: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF
XDoc.PDF for .NET supports editing PDF document metadata, like Title, Subject, Author, Creator, Producer, Keywords, Created Date, and Last Modified Date.
batch pdf metadata; acrobat pdf additional metadata
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
Scan image to PDF, tiff and various image formats. Get image information, such as its location, zonal information, metadata, and so on.
edit multiple pdf metadata; metadata in pdf documents
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
M
EXICO
(@5anto), a prominent blogger reporting on corruption and electoral fraud, went missing.
79
Forty-
two days later, Salgado resurfaced to announce that despite multiple death threats, he was alive. In 
a video post, Salgado explained that he had been subject to a forced disappearance, the details of 
which he was afraid to reveal. Citing fear for the safety of his family, Salgado announced that he 
would no longer be writing, but urged others to be brave—and careful—in their reporting.
80
Although  widely  reported  in  international  media,  conflicting  reports  have  emerged  about  a 
February 2013 campaign by an organized crime group to identify the administrator of Valor por 
Tamaulipas, a site issuing reports on security risks in the cartel-dominated state. Although the crime 
group  allegedly  offered  a  reward  of  600,000  pesos  ($47,000)  for  information  leading  to  the 
identification of the site’s owner or his family,
81
residents of the area say they never saw flyers with 
such an  offer.
82
Following reports  of additional threats in April 2013, the site announced the 
shutdown of both its Twitter and Facebook accounts.
83
As of May, 2013, however, the Facebook 
and Twitter pages associated with Valor por Tamaulipas —which have nearly 215,0000 likes and 
33,800 followers, respectively—were back up and running. Conflicting reports alternately claim 
that the sites are clones or that the administrator changed his mind about closing the sites.
84
In February 2013, death threats were issued against members of an informal network of Twitter 
users  sharing  information  about  drug  violence  in  Mante,  Tamaulipas  under  the  hashtag 
#vigilantesmante. The threats, which were transmitted from accounts using the name #ManteZeta 
(the Zeta cartel is active in the area) via YouTube and Twitter, linked to a video depicting the 
murder of three people. Accompanying the link to the video, which was originally published by 
Blog del Narco, a site reporting on cartel-related violence, were threats stating that the same fate 
would befall those tweeting about security risks in Tamaulipas.
85
Murders of online journalists are no longer rare in Mexico. Between September and November 
2011, four people were brutally murdered in connection with their online writings. In each case, 
the bodies,  often  bearing signs  of  torture, were displayed publicly  and accompanied by notes 
79
 Lisa Goldman, “A Prominent Mexican Anti‐Corruption Blogger Has Gone Missing, TechPresident, Spetmeber 17, 2012, 
http://techpresident.com/news/wegov/22862/prominent‐mexican‐anti‐corruption‐blogger‐has‐gone‐missing
80
 Arjan Shahani, “Censorship in Mexico: The Case of Ruy Salgado, Americas Quarterly (blog), October 29, 2012, 
http://www.americasquarterly.org/node/4077
81
 Daniel Hernandez, “Facebook Page in Mexico Draws Attention for Posts on Security Risks, Los Angeles Times, February 9, 
2013, http://articles.latimes.com/2013/feb/19/world/la‐fg‐wn‐mexico‐facebook‐page‐security‐20130218
82
 #Reynosafollow, “Observaciones en el Caso Valor por Tamaulipas” [Observations in the Case of Valor por Tamaulipas], Del 
Twitter al Blog, April 12, 2013, http://chuynews.blogspot.com/2013/04/observaciones‐en‐el‐caso‐valor‐por_12.html
83
 Sin Embargo, “‘Valor por Tamaulipas,’ Que Operaba Bajo Amenaza del Narco, Cierra sus Cuentas de Twitter y Facebook,” 
[‘Valor por Tamaulipas,’ Which Operated Under Threats from Drug Cartels, Closes its Twitter and Facebook Accounts] 
SinEmbargo.mx, April 1, 2013, http://www.sinembargo.mx/01‐04‐2013/576396
84
 “Valor por Tamaulipas Official Facebook Back Online but Will Cease Operations in Eight Days,” Hispanic News Network USA 
(blog), April 7, 2013, http://hispanicnewsnetwork.blogspot.com/2013/04/valor‐por‐tamaulipas‐official‐facebook.html; “Valor 
por Tamaulipas Facebook Page to Remain, but Less Active,” Hispanic News Network USA (blog), April 14, 2013, 
http://hispanicnewsnetwork.blogspot.com/2013/04/valor‐por‐tamaulipas‐facebook‐page‐to.html
85
 Periodistas en Riesgo, Crowdmap, “Amenaza de Muerte contra Tuitero de Tamaulipas” [Death Threat against Twitterers in 
Tamaulipas], ICFJ and Freedom House, February 21, 2013, https://periodistasenriesgo.crowdmap.com/reports/view/45
538
C# PDF - Read Barcode on PDF in C#.NET
Bookmark: Edit Bookmark. Metadata: Edit, Delete Metadata. Watermark: Add Watermark to PDF. Form Process. Data: Read, Extract Field Data. Data: Auto Fill-in Field
pdf metadata viewer online; read pdf metadata java
C# TIFF: TIFF Metadata Editor, How to Write & Read TIFF Metadata
C#.NET. Allow Users to Read and Edit Metadata Stored in Tiff Image in C#.NET Application. C# Overview - View and Edit TIFF Metadata.
batch edit pdf metadata; remove metadata from pdf file
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
M
EXICO
explicitly stating that the murders were retribution for the victims’ posts on popular websites and 
narcoblogs. At least one of the messages was signed “Z” for Zeta.
86
 
Echoing the fears of website moderators, who have implored contributors to continue reporting 
but to do so anonymously, such targeted killings of website contributors were also carried out in 
2012 and 2013.
87
In June 2012, Victor Manuel Baez Chino, a journalist who reported on crime for 
the  digital  edition  of  weekly  newspaper  Mileno  and  also  edited  the  crime  reporters’  website 
Reporteros Policiaos, was kidnapped and murdered. In a note accompanying his body, the Zeta drug 
cartel claimed responsibility for Chino’s killing.
88
In  November 2012, Adrián  Silva  Moreno,  a 
journalist in Tehuacán Puebla working for the online newspaper Glob@l México, was shot to death 
while covering an army raid on a warehouse filled with stolen fuel.
89
Having been warned to leave 
by a soldier, Silva was in the process of driving away when trucks arrived and began firing on his 
car, killing him and his companion, Misray López González, a former policeman.  
In March 2013, journalist Jaime Guadalupe González Domínguez, editor of the online news portal 
Ojinaga Noticias, was murdered in broad daylight in Chihuahua, a state reportedly run by organized 
crime. A group of men shot González 18 times before absconding with his camera. González’s 
murder, which was foreshadowed by written threats warning him to avoid covering certain topics, 
led to the closure of his online news portal, Ojinaga Noticias, which reported on local news, crime, 
sports, and politics.
90
Hate campaigns against journalists also marred Mexican reporti
ng 
in 2012 and 2013, bringing 
attacks  against  traditional  journalists  into  the  domain  of  the  internet.  The  state  Social 
Communication General Coordination Office in San Luis Potosi made use of both Twitter and 
Wordpress blogs in December 2012 and February 2013 to denigrate several journalists writing for 
daily newspaper Pulso. After a video was leaked of the Office’s director, Juan Antonio Hernandez 
Varela, ordering subordinates to create fake social networking accounts for the sole purpose of 
discrediting government critics, Hernandez Varela resigned without explanation. It remains to be 
seen whether such attacks will continue under the new director.
91
86
 Robert Beckhusen, “Mexican Man Decapitated in Cartel Warning to Social Media,” Wired, November 9, 2011, 
http://www.wired.com/dangerroom/2011/11/mexican‐blogger‐decapitated/
87
 Sarah Kessler, “Mexican Blog Wars: Fourth Blogger Murdered for Reporting on Cartel,” Mashable, November 10, 2011, 
http://mashable.com/2011/11/10/mexico‐blogger/
88
 UNESCO Press, “Director‐General Condemns Murder of Mexican Journalist Victor Manuel Baez Chino,” July 11, 2012, 
http://bit.ly/18eVyRR.  
89
 Reporters Without Borders, “Un Periodista Asesinado a Balas en Tehuacán: “’Cuándo se Acabará la Violencia y la 
Impunidad?’[Journalist Murdered in Tehuacan Bales: ‘When Will the Violence and Impunity End?], November 19, 2012, 
http://es.rsf.org/mexico‐un‐periodista‐asesinado‐a‐balas‐en‐19‐11‐2012,43695.html
90
 Committee to Protect Journalists, “Editor de Sitio Web de Noticias Asesinado a Balazos en México” [Editor of News Site 
Murdered by Gunshot in Mexico], March 5, 2013, http://cpj.org/es/2013/03/editor‐de‐sitio‐web‐de‐noticias‐asesinado‐a‐
balazo.php; UNESCO Press, “Director‐General Voices Deep Concern over the Killing of Mexican Journalist Jaime Gonzalez 
Dominguez,” March 11, 2013,  http://bit.ly/14Twxex; Reporters Without Borders, “Self‐Censorship: Newspapers in Northern 
Border States Forced to Censor Themselves?,” March 12, 2013, http://bit.ly/ZlfI6x.  
91
 Reporters Without Borders, “The Dangers of Reporting: Organized Crime, Local Authorities Threaten Reporters and 
Netizens,” March 4, 2013, http://en.rsf.org/mexico‐organized‐crime‐local‐authorities‐04‐03‐2013,44161.html; Eduardo 
Delgado, “Gobierno Estatal Cambia de Vocero” [State Government Spokesman Changes], Pulso, March 5, 2013, 
http://pulsoslp.com.mx/2013/03/05/gobierno‐estatal‐cambia‐de‐vocero/
539
VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
PDF Metadata Edit. Offer professional PDF document metadata editing APIs, using which VB.NET developers can redact, delete, view and save PDF metadata.
preview edit pdf metadata; edit pdf metadata acrobat
VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF
PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Extract PDF Text. VB.NET PDF - Extract Text from PDF Using VB. How to Extract Text from PDF with VB.NET Sample Codes in .NET Application.
pdf metadata reader; remove metadata from pdf acrobat
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
M
EXICO
Cyberattacks have become an issue in Mexico in recent years, and pose a growing threat to critical 
news  sites.  In  September  2011,  three  online  outlets  known  for  critical  coverage  of  state 
government—Expediente  Quintana  Roo,  Noticaribe,  and  Cuarto  Poder—were  temporarily 
disabled by cyberattacks. Personal information and reporters’ notes were also stolen from their 
servers.
92
In November 2011, weekly newspaper Riodoce was informed by its host provider that the 
website had been the target of a large distributed denial of service (DDoS) attack. Widely suspected 
to  be  a  reprisal  for  the  publication’s  aggressive  reporting on  crime  and  drug  trafficking,  the 
cyberattack resulted in the  website  being inaccessible  for  several days.
93
Sporadic  cyberattacks 
continued to be reported in 2012 and early 2013. Vincente Carrera, director of online newspaper 
Noticaribe, which was temporarily paralyzed by DDoS attacks in late 2011 and early 2013, stated 
that recent attacks, which disabled the site for weeks, were likely government retaliation for the 
outlet’s coverage of electoral violations and state debt.
94
One notable case of repeated DDoS attacks targeted rompeviento.tv, an independent, left-leaning 
internet  television  site  intended to  present  the public with an  alternate  perspective on  news. 
Rompviento, which counts an audience of 600,000 visitors per month, was disabled by continuous 
cyberattacks  after  it  aired  contentious  political  content.
95
During  the  broadcast  of  a  debate 
organized by YoSoy132, Rompviento lost broadband access and its webpage subsequently vanished. 
Despite multiple attempts to recover content, the original website appears to have been deleted 
permanently. Administrators of the host platform, mydomain, were unable to provide explanation 
or assistance with the issue. As of May 2013, however, the  new rompeviento.tv  website  was 
accessible both from within Mexico and from outside the country. 
92
 Monica Medel, “Three News Websites Hacked in Mexico,” Knight Center for Journalism in the Americas (blog), July 15, 2011, 
https://knightcenter.utexas.edu/blog/three‐news‐websites‐hacked‐mexico. 
93
 International Freedom of Expression eXchange, “Weekly Goes Offline after Cyber Attack,” news release, November 28, 2011, 
http://ifex.org/mexico/2011/11/30/riodoce_cyberattack/
94
 Tania Lara, “Mexican Digital Newspaper Disabled by Frequent Cyberattacks,” Knight Center for Journalism in the Americas 
(blog), April 20, 2012, http://knightcenter.utexas.edu/blog/00‐9806‐mexican‐digital‐newspaper‐disabled‐frequent‐
cyberattacks. 
95
 In a recent interview, Ernesto Ledesma, Director General of Rompeviento (www.rompeviento.tv) stated that the company 
has identified a pattern of disruptions. Although the signal is steady for cultural programs, when the company attempts to 
broadcast critical political programs, the signal is lost. While Rompviento cannot prove government interference, a pattern has 
emerged in which disruptions seem to be tied to the airing of political content.  
540
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
M
OROCCO
M
OROCCO
 Blocking orders on numerous websites and online tools were lifted as the government
introduced a series of liberalizing measures to counter rising discontent heightened by
the events of the Arab Spring (see L
IMITS ON 
C
ONTENT
).
 Despite  constitutional  reforms  introduced  in  2011,  restrictive  press  and  national
security laws continued to plague the online media landscape and induce a spirit of self-
censorship (see V
IOLATIONS OF 
U
SER 
R
IGHTS
).
 Several online users were arrested under these laws for comments and videos they
posted to Facebook, YouTube, and blogs (see V
IOLATIONS OF 
U
SER 
R
IGHTS
).
2012 
2013 
I
NTERNET 
F
REEDOM 
S
TATUS
N
/
A
P
ARTLY 
F
REE
Obstacles to Access (0-25) 
n/a  11 
Limits on Content (0-35) 
n/a 
Violations of User Rights (0-40) 
n/a  24 
Total (0-100) 
n/a 
42 
*0=most free, 100=least free
e
P
OPULATION
32.6 million
I
NTERNET 
P
ENETRATION 
2012: 
55 percent
S
OCIAL 
M
EDIA
/ICT
A
PPS 
B
LOCKED
No
P
OLITICAL
/S
OCIAL 
C
ONTENT 
B
LOCKED
No
B
LOGGERS
/ICT
U
SERS 
A
RRESTED
Yes
P
RESS 
F
REEDOM 
2013
S
TATUS
Not Free
K
EY 
D
EVELOPMENTS
:
M
AY 
2012
A
PRIL 
2013 
541
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
M
OROCCO
Research universities led the development of the internet in Morocco from the early 1990s, with 
internet access extended to the general public in 1996. Initially, the internet’s diffusion was slow in 
Morocco  due  primarily  to  the  high  cost  of  computers  and  poor  infrastructure.
1
Under  the 
combined impact of the liberalization, deregulation, and privatization of the telecommunications 
sector, as well as the legal and technological modernization of Moroccan broadcasting media, a 
growing and dynamic digital media market has emerged. This phenomenon has been furthered by 
the recent opening of the political system. 
Social media has triggered a revival of the media’s traditional function as a watchdog, acting as a 
check on the misconduct of the political regime. It has also been used as a tool for nascent political 
movements to organize and mobilize supporters across the country, particularly in the context of 
the Arab Spring. The February 20
th
Movement, which started on Facebook and relies heavily on 
digital media for communication, has held rallies throughout the country demanding democratic 
reforms,  a  parliamentary  monarchy, social  justice,  greater  economic  opportunities,  and  more 
effective anticorruption measures. Two weeks after the first demonstrations, King Mohamed VI 
responded by announcing new constitutional reforms in which he promised to devolve limited 
aspects of his wide-ranging powers to the elected head of government and the parliament. Included 
in this  reform  package were provisions to grant greater independence  to the judiciary and  an 
expansion of civil liberties. The king’s proposals were approved by 98.5 percent of Moroccan 
voters in a popular referendum held on July 1, 2011, for which voter turnout was 84 percent. The 
measures resulted in a lifting of all politically-motivated filtering. 
The most remarkable change in internet use among Moroccans is the growing interest in social 
media and user-generated content, as well as domestic news portals. In 2010, the top ten most 
visited websites did not include any Moroccan news website.
2
By 2012, the sixth most visited site 
was  Hespress.com,  the  most  popular  online  news  and  information  website  in  Morocco  with 
estimated 400,000 unique visitors per day. Besides Hespress, the sports website Koora.com is the 
only other Arabic-language site in the Top 10.
3
Before the Arab Spring, government intervention to 
block and delete online content was relatively common. Today, the state no longer engages in 
technical filtering; it uses the existing laws to limit freedom of speech for online users. As a result, 
several online users were arrested over the past year. 
1
 Ibahrine, M. (2007). The Internet and Politics in Morocco: The Political Use of the Internet by Islam Oriented Political 
Movements. Berlin: VDM Verlag. 
2
 Bouziane Zaid and Mohamed Ibahrine, Mapping Digital Media: Morocco, available at, 
http://www.opensocietyfoundations.org/reports/mapping‐digital‐media‐morocco, (accessed February 24 2013). 
3
 Facebook, Google, YouTube, Google Morocco, and Blogspot were the five most visited sites in 2012. See “Top Sites in 
Morocco,” Alexa, http://www.alexa.com/topsites/countries/MA (accessed January 14 2013).  
I
NTRODUCTION
542
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
M
OROCCO
Internet access in Morocco has increased steadily in recent years, although obstacles remain in place 
in certain areas of the country. The internet penetration rate grew from just over 21 percent of the 
population  in 2007 to  55  percent  in 2012, according  to the International  Telecommunication 
Union (ITU).
4
By end of 2012, roughly 2 in 100 inhabitants possessed a fixed-broad subscription, 
or around 17.8 percent of all subscribers.
5
The remaining 82.2 percent of all subscriptions are 
through 3G devices, including both data-only and voice-and-data connections.
6
By December 2012, 
mobile phone penetration reached a rate of 119.7 percent, a rise of almost 20 percentage points 
compared to 2010.
7
Internet access  is currently  limited  to educated and  urban segments  of Morocco’s population. 
There  is  a  major  discrepancy  in  terms  of  network  coverage  between  urban  and  rural  areas. 
Telecommunications companies  do  not abide by the ITU  principle of telecommunications as a 
public  service,  instead  preferring  to  invest  in  more  lucrative  urban  areas.  Rural  inhabitants 
constitute  37.1  percent  of  the  overall  population  and  while  many  have  access  to  electricity, 
television, and radio, most do not have access to phone lines and high speed internet. The high rate 
of illiteracy is another obstacle (43 percent of Moroccans aged 10 and above are illiterate). Most 
Moroccan households are not prepared to access content provided by digital media, but recent 
developments in the telecoms sector show that this situation is likely to change in the near future. 
The Moroccan government has undertaken several programs aimed at improving the country’s ICT 
sector. Launched in March 2005, the GENIE project (the French acronym for “Generalization of 
ICTs in Education”) aims to extend  the use of ICTs throughout the public education system.
8
Owing to positive results, another round of implementation was launched for the period of 2009-
2013 to improve the training and professional development of teachers and encourage the adoption 
of  ICTs  by  public  school  students.  PACTE  (French  for  “Program  of  Generalized  Access  to 
Telecommunications”)  was  launched  in  2008  to  provide  9,263  communities,  or  2  million 
Moroccans,  with telecoms services by  2010.
9
Financing for the project came  from Morocco’s 
Universal Service Fund for Telecommunications. The fund was created in 2005 using contributions 
from  the  three major  telecoms  operators:  Maroc  Telecom, Medi Telecom, and  INWI.  More 
recently, in  2009,  authorities established the national strategy “Maroc Numérique  2013” (Digital 
Morocco 2013).
10
The strategy aims to achieve nationwide access to high-speed internet by 2013 
4
 “Percentage of individuals using the internet,” ITU, 2000‐2012, available at http://www.itu.int/en/ITU‐
D/Statistics/Pages/stat/default.aspx.  
5
 “Fixed (wired‐)broadband subscriptions,” ITU, 2000‐2012,  available at http://www.itu.int/en/ITU‐
D/Statistics/Pages/stat/default.aspx.  
6
 “Internet Market in Morocco: Quarterly Observatory” Agence Nationale de Réglementation des Télécommunications, March 
2013, http://www.anrt.ma/sites/default/files/2013_T1_TB_Internet_en.pdf.  
7
 “Mobile‐cellular subscriptions,” ITU, 2012, http://www.itu.int/en/ITU‐D/Statistics/Pages/stat/default.aspx.  
8
 ANRT, Rapport Annuel (Annual Report), 2008, available at 
http://www.anrt.net.ma/fr/admin/download/upload/file_fr1702.pdf, (accessed 5 January 2013) (hereafter ANRT, Rapport 
Annuel, 2008). 
9
 ANRT, Rapport Annuel, 2008. 
10
 “HM the King chairs presentation ceremony of national strategy ‘Maroc Numeric 2013’,” available at 
O
BSTACLES TO 
A
CCESS
543
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
M
OROCCO
and to develop e-government programs to bring the administration closer to its citizens, while 
encouraging small and medium-sized enterprises to adopt ICTs into their business practices. It has a 
budget of MAD 5.2 billion (around $520 million). 
Perhaps as a result of these efforts, internet use remains relatively affordable. For a 3G prepaid 
connection of up to 7.2 Mbps, customers pay MAD 223 ($26) for initial connectivity fees and then 
MAD 10 per day ($0.82) or MAD 200 per month ($23.6). Internet users pay on average MAD 3 
($0.35) for one hour of connection in cybercafés.  
In the post-Arab Spring era, the government no longer blocks Web 2.0 applications, anonymous 
proxy tools, and Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP) services. However, in February 2012 there 
was a report that Maroc Telecom briefly disrupted VoIP services such as Skype, TeamSpeak, and 
Viber in order to tamper with the quality of the calls. Some speculated that the actions were 
motivated by financial concerns over competition to traditional fixed-line services provided by the 
telecommunications company.
11
Service providers such as ISPs, cybercafes, and mobile phone companies do not face any major 
legal, regulatory,  or  economic  obstacles.
12
The  allocation  of digital resources, such as domain 
names or IP addresses, is carried out by organizations in a non-discriminatory manner.
13
According 
to  the  Network  Information  Centre,  which  manages  the  “.ma”  domain,  there  were  43,354 
registered Moroccan domain names in 2012.
14
The  National  Agency  for  the  Regulation  of  Telecommunications  (ANRT)  is  an  independent 
government body created in 1998 to regulate and liberalize the telecommunications sector. The 
founding  law  of  the  ANRT  considers  the  telecommunications  sector  as  a  driving  force  for 
Morocco’s social and economic development and the agency is meant to create an efficient and 
transparent regulatory framework that favors competition among operators.
15
A liberalization of 
the  telecoms  sector  aims  to  achieve  the  long-term  goals  of  increasing  GDP,  creating  jobs, 
supporting the private sector, and encouraging internet-based businesses, among others. While 
Maroc  Telecom,  the  oldest  telecoms  provider,  effectively  controls  the  telephone  cable 
infrastructure, the ANRT is tasked to settle the prices at which the company’s rivals (such as Medi-
http://www.maroc.ma/PortailInst/An/Actualites/HM+the+King+chairs+presentation+ceremony+of+national+strategy+Maroc+
Numeric+2013.htm (accessed 24 February 2013). 
11
 Hisham Almiraat, “Morocco: Historic Telecom Operator Blocks Skype,” available at, 
http://globalvoicesonline.org/2012/02/19/morocco‐historic‐telecom‐operator‐blocks‐skype/ (accessed 24 February 2013). See 
also, Brahim Oubahouman, “Maroc Télécom interdit Skype et d’autres services VoIP”, available at, 
http://www.moroccangeeks.com/maroc‐telecom‐interdit‐skype‐et‐autres‐services‐voip/ (accessed 24 February 2013). 
12
 Interviews conducted on 20 February 2013, with Dr. Hamid Harroud and Dr. Tajjedine Rachdi, respectively director and 
former director of Information Technologies services of Al Akhawayn University in Ifrane.  
13
 Network Information Centre, the service that manages the domain .ma, is owned by Maroc Telecom. There are calls for 
domain.ma to be managed by an independent entity, not a commercial telecoms company.  
14
 Network Information Centre, available at http://www.nic.ma/statistiques.asp (accessed 18 February 2013). This service is 
owned by Maroc Telecom.  
15
 Lois régissant la poste et les télécommunications (Laws governing the post and telecommunications), available online at 
http://www.anrt.ma/fr/admin/download/upload/file_fr1825.pdf (accessed 11 February 2013). 
544
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested