download pdf file from server in asp.net c# : Adding metadata to pdf application control cloud html azure .net class FOTN%202013_Full%20Report_058-part1563

F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
P
AKISTAN
telecommunications companies, and SIM card vendors are required to authenticate the National 
Identity Card details of prospective customers with the National Database Registration Authority 
before providing service.
91
Furthermore, under the Prevention of Electronic Crimes Ordinance—a 
2007  bill  that  required  ISPs  to  retain  traffic  data  for  a  minimum  of  90  days,  among  other 
regulations
92
—telecommunications  companies  were  required  to  keep  logs  of  customer 
communications and pass them to security agencies when directed by the PTA. While the bill 
officially expired in 2009, the practice is reportedly still active.  
In February 2013, the upper house of parliament passed the Fair Trial Act 2012, which had been 
approved by the National Assembly in December.
93
The legislation allows security agencies to seek 
a judicial warrant to monitor private communications “to neutralize and prevent [a] threat or any 
attempt to carry out scheduled offenses;” and covers information sent from or received in Pakistan 
or between Pakistani  citizens whether they  are resident in the country or not.
94
The bill  was 
proposed by Law Minister Farooq Hamid Naek to thwart terrorism, but its critics counter that the 
act’s wording leaves it open to abuse, and that it grants powers to a broad range of agencies.
95
Under the law, service providers face a one-year jail term or a fine of up to PKR 10 million 
($103,000) for failing to cooperate with the warrant.  
In 2013, a report by Citizen Lab indicated that Pakistani citizens may be vulnerable to oversight 
through  a software tool  present in the country. The “Governmental IT  Intrusion  and Remote 
Monitoring Solutions” known as FinFisher Suite described in the report includes the FinSpy tool, 
which attacks the victim’s machine with malware to collect data including Skype audio, key logs, 
and screenshots.
96
The analysis found FinFisher’s command and control servers in 36 countries 
globally, including Pakistan, on the PTCL network. This does not confirm that actors in Pakistan 
are knowingly taking advantage of its capabilities. Nevertheless, civil society organizations called on 
PTCL to investigate and disable FinFisher tools.
97
Pakistan is also reported to be a long-time customer of Narus,
98
a U.S.-based firm known for 
designing technology that allows for  monitoring of traffic flows and deep-packet inspection  of 
internet communications,  and some  media  reports  say Pakistani  authorities have also acquired 
91
 National Database Registration Authority, “Verification of CNICs: Nadra Signs Contract with Three Cell Phone Companies,” 
July 29, 2009, http://bit.ly/gNdXsW ; Bilal Sarwari, “SIM Activation New Procedure,” Pak Telecom, September 3, 2010, 
http://bit.ly/pqCKJ9.  
92
 Kelly O’Connell, “INTERNET LAW – Pakistan’s Prevention of Electronic Crimes Ordinance, 2007,” Internet Business Law 
Services, April 14, 2008, http://www.ibls.com/internet_law_news_portal_view.aspx?s=latestnews&id=2030
93
 “Senate Passes ‘Fair Trial Bill,’” Dawn, February 1, 2013, http://dawn.com/2013/02/01/senate‐passes‐fair‐trial‐bill/; The 
Gazette of Pakistan, Investigation for Fair Trial Act 2013,” February 22, 2013, http://bit.ly/18esYjq.  
94
 Yasir Rehman, “Fair Trial Act Gives Pakistan Authorities Wiretapping Powers,” Central Asia Online, December 28, 2012,  
http://centralasiaonline.com/en_GB/articles/caii/features/pakistan/main/2012/12/28/feature‐01. 
95
 The laws covers the Inter‐Services Intelligence, the police, Intelligence Bureau and the three military intelligence agencies. 
See, Digital Rights Foundation, “Fair Trial Bill is an Official Intrusion on Privacy: Digital Rights Foundation,” December 22, 2012,  
http://digitalrightsfoundation.pk/fair‐trial‐act‐official‐intrusion‐on‐privacy/ 
96
 Morgan Marquis‐Boire et al, “For Their Eyes Only,” Citizen Lab, May 1, 2013, http://bit.ly/ZVVnrb.  
97
 Digital Rights Foundation, “Global Coalition Of NGOs Call To Investigate & Disable FinFisher’s Espionage Equipment in 
Pakistan,” May 3, 2013, http://bit.ly/18AvwGb.  
98
 Timothy Carr, “One U.S. Corporation’s Role in Egypt’s Brutal Crackdown,” Huffington Post, January 28, 2011, 
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/timothy‐karr/one‐us‐corporations‐role‐_b_815281.html; “Narus: Security Through 
Surveillance,” Berkman Center for Internet and Society at Harvard University, November 11, 2008, http://hvrd.me/ewSFSg.  
575
Adding metadata to pdf - add, remove, update PDF metadata in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Allow C# Developers to Read, Add, Edit, Update and Delete PDF Metadata
pdf remove metadata; add metadata to pdf
Adding metadata to pdf - VB.NET PDF metadata library: add, remove, update PDF metadata in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Enable VB.NET Users to Read, Write, Edit, Delete and Update PDF Document Metadata
search pdf metadata; online pdf metadata viewer
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
P
AKISTAN
surveillance  technology  from  China.  In  2013,  when  news  reports  described  the  possible 
introduction of new filtering software to address the YouTube crisis, some said the information 
ministry objected to its additional capacities for monitoring communications. PTA chief Farooq 
Ahmed Khan denied any intent to use it for surveillance.
99
Pakistan is one of the world’s most dangerous countries for traditional journalists, with seven killed 
in 2012 alone, either on the job or in reprisal for published reports.
100
Violence has yet to affect 
online journalists in the same way, though they are equally vulnerable to some attacks, such as 
double-bombings that target first responders at the scene of one blast with a second, delayed 
detonation. In January 2013, twin blasts hit a Shia Muslim community in Quetta, the provincial 
capital of Balochistan, killing over 100 people, including three media professionals and Irfan Ali, a 
blogger and human rights activist who was helping survivors at the scene.
101
In a particularly high-profile case, an unknown gunman shot 15-year-old Malala Yousufzai in the 
head while she was traveling in a school van in the Taliban-controlled Swat region of Pakistan in 
October 2012; she had received threats for writing an online diary for the BBC in 2009.
102
Though 
she used a pseudonym, the diary included personal details about her family; she also appeared in an 
online video series for The New York Times,
103
among other local media appearances, and became an 
informal spokesperson promoting education for women, which the Taliban had recently banned. 
The Pakistani Taliban claimed responsibility for the shooting, saying she had “divulged secrets of the 
mujahideen and Taliban through BBC [sic].”
104
Yousufzai survived the shooting and was flown to the 
United Kingdom where she was treated for a severe head wound.   
Pakistan was shocked by the attack, and social media played a significant role in driving public 
debate over the case,
105
which criticized military and intelligence leaders for failing to check the 
Taliban,
106
and prompted a retaliatory online smear campaign accusing Yousufzai of being a U.S. 
spy.
107
Local journalists reported Taliban spokesmen contacting them by e-mail and text to defend 
the action and warn against negative coverage.
108
Several other free expression activists and bloggers have  also reported receiving death threats. 
Many publicize them—and sometimes attract more—on Twitter. Most are sent via text message 
from untraceable, unregistered mobile phone connections, often originating from the tribal areas of 
the country, and several include specific details from the recipient’s social media profiles or other 
99
 “PTA and MoIT has No Set Plan of Action over the Internet Censorship,” Green and White (blog), January 10, 2013, 
http://bit.ly/10nnhOt; Anwer Abbas, “PTA, IT Ministry at odds.” 
100
 Committee to Protect Journalists, “Journalists Killed in Pakistan,” accessed February 2013, http://bit.ly/9YP7fx.  
101
 Michael Ross, “Pakistani Activist Killed in Quetta Attacks,” The World, PRI, January 11, 2013, http://bit.ly/ZDXGeY.  
102
 “Diary of a Pakistani School Girl,” BBC News, February 9, 2009, http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/south_asia/7889120.stm . 
103
 Adam B. Ellick, “Class Dismissed: Malala’s Story,” New York Times, October 9, 2012, http://nyti.ms/Tf3CaH.  
104
 Marie Brenner, “The Target,” Vanity Fair, April 2013, http://vnty.fr/109Ff7x.  
105
 “Pakistan Media Condemn Attack on Malala Yousafzai,” BBC News, October 9, 2012, http://bbc.in/VL9AGh.  
106
 Talat Farooq, “Malala is a Mirror,” The News International, October 17, 2012, http://bit.ly/Xlj3CE.  
107
 Electron Libre, “Pakistan: Smear Campaign Against Malala on Social Media,” France 24, October 18, 2012,  
http://www.france24.com/en/20121017‐2012‐10‐17‐2050‐wb‐en‐webnews. 
108
 Sumit Galhotra and Bob Dietz, “After Malala Shooting, Taliban Goes After Media Critics,” CPJ Blog, October 17, 2012, 
http://www.cpj.org/blog/2012/10/after‐malala‐shooting‐taliban‐goes‐after‐media‐cri.php. 
576
VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
adding password, digital signatures and redaction feature. Various of PDF text and images processing features for VB.NET project. Multiple metadata types of PDF
remove metadata from pdf acrobat; pdf metadata editor
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Support adding PDF page number. Offer PDF page break inserting function. DLLs for Adding Page into PDF Document in VB.NET Class. Add necessary references:
preview edit pdf metadata; batch pdf metadata
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
P
AKISTAN
online activity. In addition, some militant Islamic groups in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa and FATA attack 
cybercafés, which they consider sites of moral degradation. In January 2012, an explosion outside 
an internet cafe in Peshawar, provincial capital of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, killed two people;
109
at 
least three more attacks on cybercafés or mobile phone stores were reported in different areas of 
the country in the first half of 2013.
110
Technical attacks against the websites of NGO’s, opposition groups, and activists are common in 
Pakistan but typically go unreported due to self-censorship. Minority organizations such as the 
Catholic-run human rights advocacy group National Commission for Justice and Peace have also 
been  subject  to  technical  attacks.  The  websites  of  government  agencies  are  also  commonly 
attacked, often by ideological hackers attempting to make a political statement. In March 2013, an 
unidentified hacker defaced the electoral commission’s website in advance of elections.
111
Hackers 
defaced websites belonging to the Supreme Court and the PTA in October 2011 demanding stricter 
controls  for  online  pornography.
112
Hackers  have  also  infiltrated  Pakistan’s  internet  registry 
PKNIC,  which  manages  the country’s top  level  domains,  including  major  news  websites  and 
Microsoft and  Google regional homepages. The first attack  came on November  24, 2012 and 
resulted in several sites being defaced, including Google’s search engine, which was replaced with 
an image of penguins and a Turkish-language message reading “Pakistan Downed.”
113
The PKNIC 
failed to adjust its security and was infiltrated again on February 4, 2013, apparently to highlight 
ongoing vulnerabilities.
114
109
 “Bomb Blasts in Pakistan Kill Six, Wound 29,” UPI, January 3, 2012, http://bit.ly/vNBddl.  
110
 “Blast in Nowshera Destroys Internet Cafe, Music Store,” Dawn, February 2, 2013, http://bit.ly/X1XVk8; “Fresh Bomb Attacks 
Kill 2 Shias, Wound 20 in Pakistan,” Press TV, January 13, 2013, http://bit.ly/Ssoth2; Police: Bomb Blast at Mall in Northwestern 
Pakistan Kills 1 Person, Wounds 12,” The Associated Press via Fox News, February 21, 2013, http://fxn.ws/YI5QCq.  
111
 Hisham Almiraat, “Cyber Attack on Pakistan's Electoral Commission Website,” Global Voices Advocacy, April 1, 2013, 
http://advocacy.globalvoicesonline.org/2013/04/01/cyber‐attack‐on‐pakistans‐electoral‐commission‐website/. 
112
 Shaheryar Popalzai, “Compromised: Official Website of the SC Hacked,” Express Tribune, September 27, 2011, 
http://tribune.com.pk/story/261497/hacker‐defaces‐supreme‐court‐website/; Jahanzaib Haque, “Ban Porn or Else: Hacker 
Penetrates PTA Site,” Express Tribune, October 10, 2011, http://bit.ly/pLS7cC.  
113
 “Cyber Vandalism: Hackers Deface Google Pakistan,” Express Tribune, November 25, 2012, http://bit.ly/SlFhlE.  
114
 “Pakistani Hackers Expose PKNIC Vulnerabilities that Caused Defacements of .PK Domains,” Pro Pakistani, November 26, 
2012, http://propakistani.pk/2012/11/26/pakistani‐hackers‐expose‐pknic‐vulnerabilities‐defacements‐of‐pk‐domains/. 
577
C# PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file for C#
Multiple metadata types of PDF file can be easily added and processed in C#.NET Class. Capable of adding PDF file navigation features to your C# program.
read pdf metadata online; pdf metadata viewer online
C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
Supports adding text to PDF in preview without adobe reader installed in ASP.NET. Powerful .NET PDF edit control allows modify existing scanned PDF text.
delete metadata from pdf; adding metadata to pdf
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
T
HE 
P
HILIPPINES
T
HE 
P
HILIPPINES
 The Cybercrime Prevention Act of 2012, currently suspended by the Supreme Court,
would  allow  authorities  to  block  online  content  without  a  warrant,  facilitate
government surveillance, and punish online libel with up to 12 years’ imprisonment
(see L
IMITS ON 
C
ONTENT 
and
V
IOLATIONS OF 
U
SER 
R
IGHTS
);
 Civil society activism fuelled 15 petitions to the Supreme Court to suspend the new
Cybercrime law; its status going forward is unclear (see L
IMITS ON 
C
ONTENT
).
 As of March 2013, there were eight proposed bills in the Senate calling for regulation
of online child pornography, gambling, and phishing, which could add to overbroad
restrictions on cybercrime (see L
IMITS ON 
C
ONTENT
).
2012 
2013 
I
NTERNET 
F
REEDOM 
S
TATUS
F
REE
F
F
REE
Obstacles to Access (0-25) 
10 
10 
Limits on Content (0-35) 
Violations of User Rights (0-40) 
10 
Total (0-100) 
23 
25 
*0=most free, 100=least free
K
EY 
D
EVELOPMENTS
:
M
AY 
2012
A
PRIL 
2013 
P
OPULATION
96 million
I
NTERNET 
P
ENETRATION 
2012: 
36 percent
S
OCIAL 
M
EDIA
/ICT
A
PPS 
B
LOCKED
No
P
OLITICAL
/S
OCIAL 
C
ONTENT 
B
LOCKED
No
B
LOGGERS
/ICT
U
SERS 
A
RRESTED
No
P
RESS 
F
REEDOM 
2013
S
TATUS
Free
578
VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb
VB.NET PDF - Insert Text to PDF Document in VB.NET. Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program.
edit pdf metadata online; metadata in pdf documents
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
application? To help you solve this technical problem, we provide this C#.NET PDF image adding control, XDoc.PDF for .NET. Similar
pdf metadata extract; c# read pdf metadata
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
T
HE 
P
HILIPPINES
People in the Philippines enjoy nearly unrestricted access to the internet.  There have not been any 
reports of the government systematically blocking access to online content. This excellent record 
was marred in September 2012 by the passage of an anti-cybercrime law boosting official powers to 
censor and monitor internet users without judicial oversight.  
The Philippines first connected to the internet almost twenty years ago via the Philippine Internet 
Foundation, but experienced very low penetration until the government deregulated the industry 
in  the  1990s,  allowing  new  players  to  compete  with  the  dominant  Philippine  Long  Distance 
Telephone Company (PLDT). Recent mergers and acquisitions, however, mean PLDT controls 70 
percent of the market and still lacks the kind of competition that would spur it to innovate or 
become  more  efficient  for  the  end  user.  In  addition  to  this  the  de  facto  monopoly,  lack  of 
infrastructure and bureaucratic government regulation continue to slow penetration. Mobile phone 
use is more widespread, though this has yet to result in higher mobile internet use.   
During  the  coverage  period  for  this  report,  the  senate  approved  the  notorious  Cybercrime 
Prevention Act, which President Benigno Aquino Jr. signed into law in September. Civil society 
groups and lawyers immediately petitioned the Supreme Court to issue a restraining order against 
it, particularly  provisions  that allow the government  to block  content  without a court order, 
monitor online activities with the help of service providers, and classify libel—already criminalized 
under the penal code to the detriment of free expression—as a cybercrime punishable by harsher 
jail terms than the same offence committed offline. The court, under newly-appointed Chief Justice 
Maria  Sereno,  suspended  the  law’s  implementation  indefinitely  on  grounds  that  it  may  be 
unconstitutional. Sereno’s predecessor was unseated in an impeachment trial related to corruption 
allegations in May 2012.   
This suspension, while positive, left the status of the law ambiguous, and drew attention to its 
creators’ intent in ways that are already chilling online expression. In oral arguments defending it, a 
government lawyer warned that “liking” a defamatory Facebook post is tantamount to committing 
libel. A libel complaint over a YouTube video is pending, since the investigation cannot continue 
until the status of the law is clarified. Meanwhile, the Philippine National Police formed an Anti-
Cybercrime Group based on one of the act’s provisions in early 2013; it is unclear how the law’s 
suspension will affect the group’s activities.   
I
NTRODUCTION
579
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
By using reliable APIs, C# programmers are capable of adding and inserting (empty) PDF page or pages from various file formats, such as PDF, Tiff, Word, Excel
rename pdf files from metadata; view pdf metadata in explorer
C# PDF Annotate Library: Draw, edit PDF annotation, markups in C#.
Provide users with examples for adding text box to PDF and edit font size and color in text box field in C#.NET program. C#.NET: Draw Markups on PDF File.
read pdf metadata; add metadata to pdf programmatically
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
T
HE 
P
HILIPPINES
Internet penetration in the Philippines stood at 36 percent in 2012.
1
Usage is concentrated in 
urban areas, with rural areas largely underserved.
2
A significant number of users still rely on dial-up 
connections, as just two percent of the population had fixed broadband subscriptions in 2012.
3
Mobile phone subscriptions, on the other hand, have increased significantly in recent years, with 
penetration reaching 107 percent in 2012, indicating that some users have more than one device.
4
SMS has been hugely popular for 2G cell phone users since the mid-2000s. Penetration of 3G 
devices enabling internet access remained comparatively low, at 11 percent, at the end of 2012.
5
In 
the first quarter of 2013, leading mobile service providers Globe Telecommunications and PLDT 
wireless  subsidiary  Smart  Communications  began  expanding  4G  LTE  coverage  outside  the 
metropolitan area surrounding the capital, Manila.
6
Smart was also reportedly testing to improve 
mobile data speeds.
7
The government does not place any known restrictions on internet connectivity. Indeed, bridging 
the digital divide through development of ICT infrastructure is one of the goals of the government’s 
Philippine  Digital  Strategy  for  2011  to  2016.  As  a  result,  it is now  testing  TV  White  Space 
technologies—which  tap  previously  unused  frequencies  and  overcome  physical  obstacles  like 
concrete or dense foliage—to increase connectivity in poor rural areas.
8
However, steep broadband 
subscription fees still stand in the way of higher penetration in a country where 42 percent of the 
population lives on US$2 a day.
9
In 2013, even as legislators urged telecoms to cut rates by  50 
percent  in  order  to  promote  universal  access,
10
the  average  cost  of  broadband  subscriptions 
remained between $7 and $19 a month.
11
An industry monopoly has contributed to these inflated costs. In the 1990s, government legislation 
allowed competitors a foothold in the market, previously dominated by the PLDT, a company that 
1
 International Telecommunication Union, “Percentage of Individuals Using the Internet, 2000‐2012,” 
http://www.itu.int/en/ITU‐D/Statistics/Pages/stat/default.aspx.   
2
 Tam Noda, “Phl to Test TV White Space Technology in Rural Areas,” February 1, 2013, Philippine Star, 
http://www.philstar.com/nation/2013/02/01/903696/phl‐test‐tv‐white‐space‐technology‐rural‐areas
3
 International Telecommunication Union, “Fixed (Wired)‐Broadband Subscriptions, 2000‐2012.”  
4
 International Telecommunication Union, “Mobile‐Cellular Telephone Subscriptions, 2000‐2012.” 
5
 Mary Meeker and Liang Wu, “2012 Internet Trends,” Kleiner Perkins Caufield and Byers, http://kpcb.com/insights/2012‐
internet‐trends‐update
6
 Marlon C. Magtira, “Globe, Smart Activate New LTE Sites,” February 20, 2013, Manila Standard Today, 
http://manilastandardtoday.com/2013/02/20/globe‐smart‐activate‐new‐lte‐sites/
7
 “Philippines Network Tests Huawei Supplied TDD‐LTE Infrastructure,” Cellular‐News, March 21, 2013, http://www.cellular‐
news.com/story/59148.php
8
  Tam Noda, “Phl to Test TV White Space Technology in Rural Areas.”  
9
 Oxford Poverty and Human Development Initiative, “Philippines Country Briefing,” Multidimensional Poverty Index Data Bank, 
(University of Oxford, 2013) http://www.ophi.org.uk/wp‐content/uploads/Philippines‐2013.pdf?cda6c1
10
 Newsbytes.ph, “79% of Philippines Homes no Internet, Telcos Urged to Cut Rates,” January 21, 2013, Digital News Asia, 
http://www.digitalnewsasia.com/digital‐economy/79percent‐of‐philippines‐homes‐no‐net‐access‐telcos‐urged‐to‐lower‐rates  
11
 Based on current rates published by the three biggest providers: Sun Broadband (owned by Digitel and acquired by PLDT in 
October 2011), PLDT, and Globe Telecom as of March, 2013.   
O
BSTACLES TO 
A
CCESS
580
VB.NET PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for vb.net, ASP.NET
page modifying page, you will find detailed guidance on creating, loading, merge and splitting PDF pages and Files, adding a page into PDF document, deleting
pdf keywords metadata; remove pdf metadata online
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
Able to perform PDF file password adding, deleting and changing in Visual Studio .NET project use C# source code in .NET class. Allow
read pdf metadata java; pdf xmp metadata viewer
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
T
HE 
P
HILIPPINES
had been US-owned and Philippine government-owned before its current incarnation as a private 
entity.
12
However,  in  the  absence  of  antitrust  laws  to  promote  healthy  competition  between 
businesses, the PLDT has retained its dominance though a series of mergers and acquisitions. After 
acquiring majority shares in rival Digitel Telecommunications in 2011, it now controls 70 percent 
of the country’s ICT sector.
13
Although the industry appears to have diversified, some of these changes are superficial: The most 
recent government statistics reported 304 registered internet service providers (ISPs) as of 2010,
14
yet most connect to the international internet through the PLDT. The company still owns the 
majority of fixed-line connections—and consequently the most stable backbone—as well as the 
10,000-kilometer domestic fiber optic network that connects to several international networks. It 
also owns or manages several international cable landings,
15
and offers the highest total bandwidth 
capacity of 250 Gbps.
16
By  the  end  of  2012,  the  only  remaining  challenger  to  PLDT’s  Smart  was  Globe 
Telecommunications,  which  purchased  debts  amounting  to  billions  of  Philippine  pesos  from 
struggling competitor Bayan Telecommunications in 2013 with a view to acquiring the company.
17
The rivalry has not resulted in the kind of competition which reduces costs and increases efficiency 
for the end user. Instead, Smart and Globe have been mired in negotiations over interconnecting 
their networks for several years, which has also delayed the development of broadband services in 
many areas.
18
Interconnection  allows  customers to communicate with  users on rival networks 
without incurring extra costs. 
Companies  entering  the  market  go  through  a  two-stage  process.  First,  they  must  obtain  a 
congressional license that involves parliamentary hearings and the approval of both the upper and 
lower houses. Second, they need to apply for certification from the National Telecommunications 
Commission, which has regulated the industry with quasi-judicial powers and developed tariff and 
technical regulations, licensing conditions, and competition and interconnection requirements since 
its creation in 1979. The constitution limits foreign entities to only 40 percent ownership of a 
business to be established in the country. Internet service is currently classified as a value-added 
service and is therefore subject to fewer regulatory requirements than mobile and fixed phone 
services.  
12
 Mary Ann Ll. Reyes, “PLDT: From Voice to Multi‐Media ( First of Two Parts), Philippine Star, 
http://www.philstar.com/business‐usual/2012/10/22/859665/pldt‐voice‐multi‐media‐first‐two‐parts.  
13
 Winston Castelo, “Controversy on PLDT‐Digitel Merger,” The Official Website of Congressman Winston “WINNIE” Castelo, 
November 22, 2011, http://www.winniecastelo.net/controversy‐on‐pldt‐digitel‐merger/.  
14
 National Statistics Office, “Philippines in Figures 2012,” Republic of the Philippines, accessed July 2013, 
http://www.census.gov.ph/old/data/publications/pif2012_in_CD.pdf
15
 Erwin A. Alampay, “ICT Sector Performance Review for Philippines,” in Sector Performance Review (SPR)/Telecom Regulatory 
Environment (TRE) (LIRNEasia, 2011). 
16
 Darwin G. Amojelar, “PLDT says Internet Bandwidth Capacity Up More than Half with Asia Submarine Cable Project,” 
InterAksyon, February 22, 2013, http://bit.ly/1bmgY0r.  
17
 “Globe Used ‘Excess Funds’ to Buy Bayan Debt – CFO”, January 7, 2013, Rappler, http://www.rappler.com/business/19281‐
globe‐used‐%E2%80%98excess‐funds%E2%80%99‐to‐buy‐bayan‐debt‐cfo.  
18
 Aya Lowe, "NTC to Intervene in PLDT‐Globe Interconnection Row,” March 6, 2013, Rappler, 
http://www.rappler.com/business/23135‐ntc‐to‐intervene‐in‐pldt‐globe‐interconnection‐row
581
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
T
HE 
P
HILIPPINES
Institutions governing the ICT sector are highly bureaucratic, often with ambiguous or overlapping 
responsibilities which slow the pace of development. Successive government administrations have 
modified the structure of official ICT bodies, including President Benigno Aquino.
His Executive 
Order 47 of
2011 established an Information and Communications Technology Office under the 
Department of Science and Technology (DOST) tasked with conducting research, development, 
and capacity-building in the ICT industry.
19
However, the division of labor between this office and 
the  Department  of  Transportation  and  Communications,  which  also  deals  with  ICT-related 
communications, as well as the National Computer Center and the Telecommunications Office, 
was hard to perceive.   
A streamlining process is anticipated.  In 2012, Senate Bill No. 50 was passed to create a separate 
and specialized Department of Information and Communications Technology. The bill is pending 
before a bicameral conference committee before being transmitted to the president for approval.
20
If authorized, all other ICT-related agencies will be abolished and their powers and personnel 
transferred to the new department. Some DOST officials challenged the necessity of creating the 
new department.
21
All relevant government bodies are headed by presidential appointees. Critics believe this creates a 
dependence on the incumbent administration and Congress, which determines their budget.
22
In the year’s most significant development, the 2012 Cybercrime Prevention Act was passed into 
law in September, threatening to infringe on the Philippines’ otherwise open online environment 
by introducing content restrictions that even a government lawyer admitted are unconstitutional. 
Under the now-suspended act, the Department of Justice can block online information without a 
warrant.      
While the new anti-cybercrime act remains on hold, there is no systematic government censorship 
of online content, and internet users in the Philippines enjoy unrestricted access to both domestic 
and  international  sources  of  information.  A  wide  range  of  Web  2.0  applications,  including 
YouTube, Facebook, Twitter, and international blog-hosting services, are freely accessible. No 
incidents of politically-motivated website blocking have been reported.
23
The OpenNet Initiative 
19
 Executive Order No. 47, June 23, 2011, Official Gazette, http://www.gov.ph/2011/06/23/executive‐order‐no‐47/
20
 Ricardo Saludo, “Will ICT finally get its own department?,” Manila Times, April 30, 2012, 
http://www.manilatimes.net/index.php/opinion/columnist1/21967‐will‐ict‐finally‐get‐its‐own‐department
21
 Patrick Villavicencio, “DOST Withdraws Support for Dept of ICT,” August 23, 2012, InterAksyon, 
http://www.interaksyon.com/infotech/dost‐withdraws‐support‐for‐dept‐of‐ict
22
 Erwin A. Alampay, “ICT Sector Performance Review for Philippines.” 
23
 Jacques D.M. Gimeno, “Democracy as the Missing Link:  Global Rankings of e‐Governance in Southeast Asia,” in E‐Governance 
and Civic Engagement: Factors and Determinants of E‐Democracy ed. A. Manoharan and M. Holzer (Hershey, PA: IGI Global, 
2012), 561‐583.  
L
IMITS ON 
C
ONTENT
582
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
T
HE 
P
HILIPPINES
found no evidence of national filtering,
24
though several organizations reported monitoring and 
filtering activities in the workplace.
25
The Cybercrime Prevention Act, signed into law on September 12, 2012, allows the Department 
of  Justice  to  “restrict  or  block”  content  without  a  court  order,  including  some  overly-broad 
categories like “cybersex,” which fails to differentiate between consensual and illegal acts.
26
The 
law’s most troubling provisions introduce punitive jail terms for online libel, outlined in Violations 
of User Rights. 
The reaction to the passing of this punitive piece of legislation was encouraging, if full of apparent 
contradictions. Before it took effect, the act’s own sponsor, Senator Edgardo Angara, stated that he 
would amend it to require a court order in support of content restrictions: “I’m trying to trace in 
the record who introduced this kind of provision,” he told local journalists.
27
Activists moved 
quickly to prevent the act’s implementation, and different groups and stakeholders had filed 15 
petitions with the Supreme Court to question its constitutionality by January 2013.
28
In response, 
the justices issued a 120-day restraining order to prevent the law from being acted upon, which the 
court  extended indefinitely in February 2013; in oral arguments, the government’s lawyer 
acknowledged that the clauses relating to content restrictions were unconstitutional.
29
Meanwhile, 
Senator Miriam Defensor Santiago filed a rival bill with congress that, if passed, would repeal the 
act.
30
Santiago told journalists her Magna Carta for Philippine Internet Freedom bill “provides for 
court proceedings in cases where websites or networks are to be taken down and prohibits 
censorship of content without a court order.”
31
It is not clear how much support Santiago’s bill may 
attract, and passing a bill in the Philippines can take months or even years.  
As of March 2013, there are eight other proposed bills in the Senate calling for regulation of online 
content pertaining to child pornography, gambling, and phishing, some of which would require 
ISPs, web hosting services and educational  institutions to  monitor  users  and  disable  access  to 
banned content. The Anti-Child Pornography Act of 2009 also requires ISPs to install unspecified 
“available technology, program or software” to filter content prohibited by the act.
32
24
 OpenNet Initiative, “Internet Filtering in Asia,” 2009, http://opennet.net/research/regions/asia.  
25
 Erwin A. Alampay and Regina Hechanova, “Monitoring Employee Use of Internet: Employers’ Perspective,” Inquirer, January 
24, 2010, http://business.inquirer.net/money/topstories/view/20100124‐249272/Monitoring‐employee‐use‐of‐Internet‐
Employers‐perspective.  
26
 “Republic Act 10175,” Official Gazette, September 12, 2012, http://www.gov.ph/2012/09/12/republic‐act‐no‐10175/.  
27
 “Author of Cybercrime Law to File Bill Amending It,” Rappler, October 3, 2012, http://www.rappler.com/nation/13545‐
author‐of‐cybcerime‐law‐to‐file‐bill‐amending‐it
28
 Mark D. Merueñas, “SC Junks 16th Petition vs. Cybercrime Law,” January 24, 2013, 
http://www.gmanetwork.com/news/story/291825/scitech/technology/sc‐junks‐16th‐petition‐vs‐cybercrime‐law
29
  Edu Punay, “SC Extends TRO on Cyber Law,” Philippine Star, February 6, 2013, 
http://www.philstar.com/headlines/2013/02/06/905368/sc‐extends‐tro‐cyber‐law
30
 “Senate Bill No. 3327,” Senate of the Philippines, accessed July, 2013, http://www.senate.gov.ph/lisdata/1446312119!.pdf.  
31
 Norman Bordadora, “Santiago Proposes Magna Carta for Internet,” Inquirer, December 1, 2012, 
http://technology.inquirer.net/20769/santiago‐proposes‐magna‐carta‐for‐internet#ixzz2RJNaXMVZ
32
 “Republic Act No. 9775,” November 17, 2009, The LawPhil Project, 
http://www.lawphil.net/statutes/repacts/ra2009/ra_9775_2009.html
583
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
T
HE 
P
HILIPPINES
There have been no reports of officials putting pressure on online journalists or bloggers to delete 
content when it is critical of the authorities. However, many news websites are online versions of 
traditional media which self-censor due to the level of violence against journalists in the Philippines. 
While it is fair to surmise that the same attitude is reflected in their online output, the degree is 
difficult to establish. Notably, however, one of the Senate’s main proponents of the libel clause in 
the Anti-Cybercrime Act argued that it would instill self-censorship in internet users—the actual 
phrase was “think before you click,” according to local blogger Raïssa Robles.
33
More generally, the Philippine blogosphere is rich and thriving. Both state and non-state actors 
actively  use  the  internet as  a  platform  to  discuss  politics,  especially  during  elections.  Online 
protests against the Cybercrime Prevention Act were common for several months before and after 
the law was passed, with individuals blacking out their profile pictures on social networks. Many 
dubbed it Cyber Martial Law after the era of military rule in the 1970s when freedom of expression 
was  seriously  threatened.
34
While  encouraging,  these  protests  can  only  be  called  successful 
inasmuch as they spurred the filing of the 15 petitions with the Supreme Court, which are to be 
credited with ultimately suspending the law’s implementation.  
The Cybercrime Prevention Act, which passed in 2012 after more than a decade of deliberations,
35
uncritically adopted archaic libel provisions from the penal code—long challenged by local and 
international human rights groups
36
—and increased  the  minimum penalty for  online violations 
from six months to a staggering six years in jail, apparently at the last minute and without public 
discussion.
37
Other provisions require service  providers to cooperate  with law enforcement in 
monitoring users suspected of cybercrime, and potentially allow police to monitor online traffic in 
real  time. Despite the Supreme Court’s restraining order on the law’s implementation, it has 
already created a chilling effect among internet users.  Violence against traditional journalists exerts 
a negative effect on freedom of expression in the Philippines, but as of 2013, had relatively little 
impact on online communication.
38
33
 Raïssa Robles, “Who Inserted that Libel Clause in the Cybercrime Law at the Last Minute?,” RaissaRobles,  September 18, 
2012, http://raissarobles.com/2012/09/18/who‐inserted‐that‐libel‐clause‐in‐the‐cybercrime‐law‐at‐the‐last‐minute/
34
 T.J.D., “Protests Versus Cybercrime Law Rage on Multiple Fronts,” October 2, 2012, GMA News, 
http://www.gmanetwork.com/news/story/276448/scitech/technology/protests‐vs‐cybercrime‐law‐rage‐on‐multiple‐fronts.    
35
 “The Road to the Cybercrime Prevention Act of 2012,” Rappler, October 9, 2012, http://www.rappler.com/rich‐media/13901‐
the‐road‐to‐the‐cybercrime‐prevention‐act‐of‐2012.   
36
 Human Rights Watch, “Philippines: New ‘Cybercrime’ Law Will Harm Free Speech,” September 28, 2012, 
http://www.hrw.org/news/2012/09/28/philippines‐new‐cybercrime‐law‐will‐harm‐free‐speech
37
 Jillian C. York, “Philippines' New Cybercrime Prevention Act Troubling for Free Expression,” Electronic Freedom Foundation, 
September 18, 2012, https://www.eff.org/deeplinks/2012/09/philippines‐new‐cybercrime‐prevention‐act‐troubling‐free‐
expression
38
 Article 19, “Philippines: ARTICLE 19's Submission to the UN Universal Periodic Review,” November 29, 2011, 
http://www.article19.org/resources.php/resource/2879/en/philippines:‐article‐19%27s‐submission‐to‐the‐un‐universal‐
periodic‐review. 
V
IOLATIONS OF 
U
SER 
R
IGHTS
584
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested