download pdf file from server in asp.net c# : Remove pdf metadata online application SDK tool html winforms asp.net online FOTN%202013_Full%20Report_059-part1564

F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
T
HE 
P
HILIPPINES
The Bill of Rights of the 1987 Constitution protects freedom of expression (Section 4) and privacy 
of  communication  (Section  1).
39
However,  some  laws  undermine  those  protections.  Libel  is 
punishable by fines and imprisonment under the Revised Penal Code. This has historically been 
challenging  to  prove  in  online  cases  which  lack  a  physical  place  of  publication—one  of  the 
requirements  for  an  offline  prosecution—and  in  2007,  a  Department  of  Justice  resolution 
established that Articles 353 and 360 of the Revised Penal Code covering libel do not apply to 
statements  posted  on  websites.
40
This  may  have  discouraged,  but  did  not  stop,  attempts  to 
prosecute online libel. In 2011, a doctor filed a complaint over an allegedly defamatory statement 
about him  posted  in the comments  section of  their  website. In January  2013, the prosecutor 
dismissed the complaint against the website staffers on the basis that they are not responsible for 
content they neither edited nor approved. However, charges are still pending against the third 
respondent who left the comment.
41
The  2012  cybercrime  law  not  only  adopted  the  penal  code’s  definition  of  libel,  but  further 
classified it as a cybercrime punishable by six to twelve years in prison or a fine determined by the 
Department of Justice. The identical offense perpetrated offline carries a lesser sentence of six 
months  to  four  years  and  two  months  imprisonment  under  the  Revised  Penal  Code.
42
government lawyer warned that liking or sharing a libelous post on Facebook or Twitter could 
result in imprisonment.
43
Others pointed out that the law could imprison the living for libeling the 
dead, and that the author of alleged libel could be sued for something written years before the law 
was passed if the content is still available online.
44
One lawyer reposted content that had sparked a 
libel suit against him in 2010 to his Facebook page in an attempt to create the kind of judicial 
controversy that would spur the Supreme Court to intervene over the law.
45
While the legal challenges to the law have left its future in doubt, a private citizen used it to sue a 
neighbor for uploading a video to YouTube under an allegedly libelous title in October 2012; the 
preliminary investigation into the complaint was suspended due to the restraining order issued by 
39
 “1987 Philippine Constitution, Article III, Bill of Rights,” via Asian Human Rights Commission, accessed July 2013, 
http://philippines.ahrchk.net/news/mainfile.php/leg_sel/15/.  
40
 Department of Justice, Resolution No. 05‐1‐11895 on Malayan Insurance vs. Philip Piccio, et al., June 20, 2007. Article 353 
states that, “libel is committed by means of writing, printing, lithography, engraving, radio, phonograph, painting, theatrical 
exhibition, cinematographic exhibition, or any similar means.” The Department also stated that the accused are not culpable 
because they cannot be considered as authors, editors, or publishers as provided for in Article 360. Critics have further noted 
that the Revised Penal Code, which dates from 1932, long predates digital technology, and therefore shouldn’t be applied to 
digital content.  
41
 Rene Acosta, “Prosecutor Drops Libel Complaint vs TV Network,” January 6, 2013, Business Mirror, 
http://www.businessmirror.com.ph/index.php/news/nation/7273‐prosecutor‐drops‐libel‐complaint‐vs‐tv‐network  
42
 Purple Romero, “DOJ Holds Dialogue on ‘E‐Martial Law’,” October 9, 2012, Rappler, http://www.rappler.com/nation/13837‐
it‐s‐not‐e‐martial‐law
43
 “SolGen: Netizens Spreading ‘Libelous’ Posts Criminally Liable,” January 29, 2013, SunStar, 
http://www.sunstar.com.ph/breaking‐news/2013/01/29/solgen‐netizens‐spreading‐libelous‐posts‐criminally‐liable‐265420.  
44
 “Digital Martial Law: 10 Scary Things About the Cybercrime Prevention Act of 2012,” Spot, October 2, 2012, 
http://www.spot.ph/newsfeatures/52041/digital‐martial‐law‐10‐scary‐things‐about‐the‐cybercrime‐prevention‐act‐of‐
2012/1#sthash.4vVhXXNS.dpuf.  
45
 Mark Merueñas, “Lawyer Wants Test Case on Cybercrime Law,” GMA News, October 3, 2012, 
http://www.gmanetwork.com/news/story/276548/news/nation/lawyer‐wants‐test‐case‐on‐cybercrime‐law
585
Remove pdf metadata online - add, remove, update PDF metadata in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Allow C# Developers to Read, Add, Edit, Update and Delete PDF Metadata
google search pdf metadata; batch pdf metadata editor
Remove pdf metadata online - VB.NET PDF metadata library: add, remove, update PDF metadata in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Enable VB.NET Users to Read, Write, Edit, Delete and Update PDF Document Metadata
remove metadata from pdf file; edit pdf metadata
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
T
HE 
P
HILIPPINES
the  Supreme  Court  against  the  cybercrime  law.
46
Another  prominent  case  did  not  involve  a 
criminal prosecution. In 2012, a group of nurses said their hospital had fired them for ‘liking’ a 
Facebook post criticizing the management.
47
Though the state-run hospital denied Facebook was a 
factor in the termination, the case evoked the same fear—of authorities taking arbitrary action over 
ICT content—as the anti-cybercrime law itself.  
The  cybercrime  act  would  also  facilitate  government  surveillance  of  online  communication, 
allowing the authorities to monitor online activities, and requiring service providers to assist the 
government in collecting and storing user data pertaining to acts classified as cybercrimes, including 
spam and file-sharing.
48
The extent to which they already conduct surveillance is not clear. The 
government acted on Section 10 of the law to create an anti-cybercrime group within the Philippine 
police force in March 2013.
49 
It is not known whether the team has begun collecting real-time 
traffic data based on the law’s contested section 12.
50
 Data  Privacy  Act  introduced  into  law  on  August  15,  2012  establishes  parameters  for  the 
collection of personal information and an independent privacy regulator, but only pertaining to data 
voluntarily provided in private or official transactions, such as credit card information or social 
security details.
51
While many clauses are ICT-specific, requiring those who control information 
online to take steps such as assessing reasonably foreseeable vulnerabilities in computer networks, it 
does not redress the provisions in the Cybercrime Prevention Act that would allow monitoring or 
collection of personal data in criminal cases with neither the user nor the court’s consent.
52
Other  laws  with  privacy  implications include  the Anti-Child  Pornography Act  of  2009 which 
explicitly states that its section on ISPs may not be “construed to require an ISP to engage in the 
monitoring of any user,”
53
though it does require them to “obtain” and “preserve” evidence of 
violations, and threatens to revoke their license for non-compliance; section 12 of the law also 
authorizes local government units to monitor and regulate commercial establishments that provide 
internet services. Under the Human Security Act of 2007, law enforcement officials must obtain a 
46
 Tricia Aquino, “Cebu Resident Subpoenaed Over ‘Cyber‐Libelous’ YouTube Post”, October 27, 2012, InterAksyon, 
http://www.interaksyon.com/article/46643/cebu‐resident‐subpoenaed‐over‐cyber‐libelous‐youtube‐post.  
47
 Matika Santos, “Audio Recording Bares Nurses Fired Over Facebook ‘Like’ on Critical Status Update,” Inquirer, October 10, 
2012, http://technology.inquirer.net/18744/audio‐recording‐bares‐nurses‐fired‐over‐facebook‐like‐on‐critical‐status‐update.  
48
 Paul Tassi, “The Philippines Passes a Cybercrime Prevention Act that Makes SOPA Look Reasonable,” Forbes, October 2, 2012, 
http://www.forbes.com/sites/insertcoin/2012/10/02/the‐philippines‐passes‐the‐cybercrime‐prevention‐act‐that‐makes‐sopa‐
look‐reasonable/
49
 Official Homepage of the Philippine National Police, “PNP Activates Anti‐Cybercrime Group,” press release, March 21, 2013, 
http://pnp.gov.ph/portal/press‐news‐releases/latest‐news/969‐pnp‐activates‐anti‐cybercrime‐group.  
50
 Tetch Torres, “Gov’t Admits Cyberlaw Barely Constitutional,” January 29, 2013, Inquirer, 
http://newsinfo.inquirer.net/349173/govt‐admits‐cyber‐law‐barely‐constitutional.  
51
 “Republic Act No. 10173,” Official Gazette, August 15, 2012, http://www.gov.ph/2012/08/15/republic‐act‐no‐10173/; Janette 
Toral, “Salient features of Data Privacy Act of 2012 – Republic Act 10173,” Digital Filipino, December 17, 2012, 
http://digitalfilipino.com/salient‐features‐of‐data‐privacy‐act‐of‐2012‐republic‐act‐10173/
52
 Alec Christie and Arthur Cheuk, “Australia: New Tough Privacy Regime in the Philippines Data Privacy Act Signed Into Law,” 
DLA Piper Australia via Mondaq, October 27, 2012, 
http://www.mondaq.com/australia/x/203136/Data+Protection+Privacy/privacy+law+Philippines
53
 “Implementing Rules and Regulations of the Anti‐Child Pornography Act of 2009,” via University of Minnesota Human Rights 
Library, accessed July 2013, 
http://www1.umn.edu/humanrts/research/Philippines/IRR%20%20of%20the%20Anti%20Child%20Pornography%20Act.pdf.  
586
VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
Ability to remove consecutive pages from PDF file in VB Enable specified pages deleting from PDF in Visual Basic Online source codes for quick evaluation in VB
analyze pdf metadata; edit pdf metadata acrobat
VB.NET PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in
Image: Insert Image to PDF. Image: Remove Image from PDF Page. Image Link: Edit URL. Bookmark: Edit Bookmark. Metadata: Edit, Delete Metadata. Form Process.
change pdf metadata creation date; extract pdf metadata
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
T
HE 
P
HILIPPINES
court order to intercept communications or conduct surveillance activities against individuals or 
organizations suspected of terrorist activity.
54
To date, no abuse of this law has been reported. 
Other bills pending in Congress as of March 2013 would potentially add to privacy concerns by 
requiring ISPs,  web-hosts, and  educational  institutions  to monitor users trying to  access  child 
pornography, gambling sites, or performing illegal hacking.
55
Violence against journalists is a significant problem in the Philippines. As of April 30, 2013, the 
Committee to Protect Journalists reported at least 73 Philippine journalists had been killed in 
relation to their work—most covering political beats—since the organization started compiling 
records in 1992.
56
Not one of these murders has been fully prosecuted—meaning that everyone 
responsible for both ordering and executing the killing have been tried and convicted—creating an 
entrenched culture of impunity that sends the message that individuals exercising free speech can be 
attacked at will. This trend has yet to make itself felt among internet users: There have been no 
prominent cases reported of attacks on bloggers for online expression, though some fear that may 
change as internet penetration grows and more people turn to web-based news sources.  
There are no restrictions on anonymous communication in the Philippines. The government does 
not require the registration of user information prior to logging online or subscribing to internet 
and mobile phone services, especially since prepaid services are widely available, even in small 
neighborhood stores.  
There have been no reports of politically-motivated incidents of technical violence or cyberattacks 
perpetrated  by  the  government  towards  private  individuals.  However,  in  October  2012,  the 
Philippine  chapter  of  the  group  Anonymous  perpetrated  a  series  of  cyberattacks  against 
government- and privately-owned websites.
57
54
 “Republic Act 9372 – Human Security Act of 2011 (full text),” Philippine e‐Legal Forum, July 10, 2007, http://jlp‐
law.com/blog/ra‐9327‐human‐security‐act‐of‐2007‐full‐text/ 
55
 For example, “SBN‐1710: Safer Net Act,” Senate of the Philippines, accessed July, 2013,  
http://www.senate.gov.ph/lis/bill_res.aspx?congress=15&q=SBN‐1710
56
 The organization documented an additional 37 journalist murders in which the motive was not confirmed. Committee to 
Protect Journalists, “73 Journalists Murdered in Philippines since 1992,” accessed May 2013, 
http://cpj.org/killed/asia/philippines/
57
 Camille Diola, “‘Anonymous Philippines’ Hacks Gov’t Websites Anew,” Philippine Star, January 15, 2013, 
http://www.philstar.com/cybercrime‐law/2013/1/15/897221/anonymous‐philippines‐hacks‐gov‐t‐websites‐anew.
587
C# PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
Free online C# class source code for deleting specified PDF pages in .NET console application. Able to remove a single page from PDF document.
adding metadata to pdf files; clean pdf metadata
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
Support to add password to PDF document online or in C# String outputFilePath = Program.RootPath + "\\" Remove.pdf"; // Remove password in the input file and
pdf metadata viewer; pdf metadata reader
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
R
USSIA
R
USSIA
 The number of websites classified as extremist material and blocked by the Ministry of
Justice increased approximately 60 percent from January 2012 to February 2013 (see
L
IMITS ON 
C
ONTENT
).
 In  July  2012,  the  State  Duma  passed  Federal  Law  #139-FZ  which  allows  the
government to create a list of websites that ISPs must block without any mechanism for
judicial oversight. This law is intended to restrict access to sites with illegal content,
such as child pornography, drug-related material, or extremist content; however, sites
with  legitimate  content  have  also  been  blocked  under  this  law  (see  L
IMITS  ON
C
ONTENT
).
 Internet use continued to  be  a significant tool  for mobilization and communication
among civil society and opposition groups (see L
IMITS ON 
C
ONTENT
).
 In July 2012, the Russian criminal code was amended to recriminalize defamation in
traditional and online media (see V
IOLATIONS OF 
U
SER 
R
IGHTS
).
 Cases of criminal prosecution for online activities increased from 38 in 2011 to 103 in
2012 (see V
IOLATIONS OF 
U
SER 
R
IGHTS
).
2012 
2013 
I
NTERNET 
F
REEDOM 
S
TATUS
P
ARTLY 
F
REE
P
ARTLY 
F
REE
Obstacles to Access (0-25) 
11 
10 
Limits on Content (0-35) 
18 
19 
Violations of User Rights (0-40) 
23 
25 
Total (0-100) 
52 
54 
*0=most free, 100=least free
K
EY 
D
EVELOPMENTS
:
M
AY 
2012
A
PRIL 
2013 
P
OPULATION
143.2 million
I
NTERNET 
P
ENETRATION 
2012: 
53 percent
S
OCIAL 
M
EDIA
/ICT
A
PPS 
B
LOCKED
No
P
OLITICAL
/S
OCIAL 
C
ONTENT 
B
LOCKED
Yes
B
LOGGERS
/ICT
U
SERS 
A
RRESTED
Yes
P
RESS 
F
REEDOM 
2013
S
TATUS
Not Free
588
C# PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in C#.
Text in PDF. Image: Insert Image to PDF. Image: Remove Image from PDF Page. Cut Image in Page. Link: Edit URL. Bookmark: Edit Bookmark. Metadata: Edit, Delete
pdf xmp metadata editor; pdf metadata online
C# PDF bookmark Library: add, remove, update PDF bookmarks in C#.
Ability to remove and delete bookmark and outline from PDF document. Merge and split PDF file with bookmark. Save PDF file with bookmark open.
remove pdf metadata; batch update pdf metadata
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
R
USSIA
Since Vladimir Putin’s return to the presidency in May 2012, issues related to internet freedom in 
Russia have continued to move toward the  forefront of social  and political concerns. Activists 
demonstrated the internet’s wide-ranging potential for political mobilization and, in so doing, have 
attracted the close attention of the authorities. Increasingly, the internet is regarded by the Russian 
state as a realm that requires tighter regulation and restrictions.
1
The number of active online users continues to grow, particularly in small towns and among older 
generations.
2
There was a notable increase in the number of websites on the three Russian top-level 
domains (.ru, .su and .рф), and by the end of 2012, a total of 5,156,504 domain names were 
registered by 25 accredited registrars.
3
At the same time, many website owners have begun to 
choose foreign jurisdictions to host their sites; last year showed a rapid growth in Russian demand 
for renting server equipment outside of the country.
4
In July 2012, the government passed Federal Law #139-FZ, which allows for the creation of a 
“blacklist” of websites that internet service providers (ISPs) within Russia are required to block. 
The law is intended to block access to illegal or otherwise harmful material on the internet, such as 
child pornography, material related to drug abuse, and so forth. However, there is no judicial 
approval required to place a website on the blacklist, and many websites with legitimate content 
have also been blocked in the process. Critics warn that the law is difficult to implement without 
negatively impacting otherwise legal online activities, and that it could be used to directly censor 
online content. 
The number of legal restrictions against online users also increased over the past year, including an 
increase in the number of criminal prosecutions against online users, and the recriminalization of 
defamation through legislation passed by the State Duma. Moreover, well-known bloggers like 
Aleksei Navalny and Rustem Adagamov,
5
as well as regular users and activists, were subjected to 
harassment and prosecution. For the first time, internet activists began  to flee Russia, seeking 
asylum in other countries.
6
1
 Elena Milashina, “Russia steps up crackdown on rights groups, Internet,” Committee to Protect Journalists, March 26, 2013, 
http://www.cpj.org/blog/2013/03/russia‐steps‐up‐crackdown‐on‐rights‐groups‐interne.php#more.  
2
 Anastasia Golitsyna, “Google ускоряет шаг” [Google Speeds Up], Vedomosti.ru, January 29, 2013, 
http://www.vedomosti.ru/newspaper/article/383941/google_uskoryaet_shag
3
 “Russian Domains” [in Russian], Statdom.ru, accessed July 30, 2013, http://statdom.ru/.  
4
 “Russian Customers Fill Up European Data‐Centers” [in Russian], accessed July 30, 2013, 
http://www.deac.lv/?object_id=16936
5
 Alan Cullison, “Russia Investigates Allegations Against Opposition Blogger,” Wall Street Journal, January 11, 2013, 
http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424127887324581504578236031175757590.html?KEYWORDS=Russia 
6
 “Estonia Grants Political Asylum to Blogger Who Criticised Russian Orthodox Church,” Agora Human Rights Association, 
October 19, 2012, http://agora.rightsinrussia.info/archive/news/efimov/asylum.   
I
NTRODUCTION
589
VB.NET PDF delete text library: delete, remove text from PDF file
to remove text format by modifying text font, size, color, etc. Other PDF edit functionalities, like add PDF text, add PDF text box and field. Online .NET
pdf xmp metadata; embed metadata in pdf
VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
Remove password from PDF. Dim outputFilePath As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" Remove.pdf" ' Remove password in the input file and output to a new file.
remove metadata from pdf; edit multiple pdf metadata
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
R
USSIA
The internet penetration rate in Russia has continued to grow over the past few years.
7
In 2012, the 
internet penetration rate  stood at 53 percent, up  from 25 percent in  2007,  according  to the 
International Telecommunication Union (ITU).
8
Survey data from the Public Opinion Foundation 
indicates that the estimated number of people who use the internet on a daily basis increased from 
44.3 million users (38 percent of the population) at the end of 2011 to 50.1 million users (43 
percent of the population ) at the end of 2012.
9
During this time period, the greatest growth in 
internet use occurred in villages and towns with less than 100,000 inhabitants.
10
The mobile phone 
penetration rate at the end of 2012 was 161 percent, with approximately 230 million mobile phone 
subscribers among the top seven Russian mobile service providers.
11
In early 2013, Prime Minister Dmitry Medvedev commissioned the Ministry of Communications 
and several other government bodies to develop a series of measures by April 1, 2013 that would 
reduce the  cost of  broadband internet access  for households.
12
The average monthly cost of  a 
broadband connection with a speed of 1 Mbps is $1.80.
13
Currently, however, it costs service 
providers  RUB  12,000  (approximately  US$365)  to  connect  one  household  to  a  broadband 
network.
14
This  cost  may  be  one  of  the  determining factors  in the  persisting gap  in  internet 
penetration between large cities and rural areas, and among different regions of the country. For 
instance, the penetration rate in the Northwestern Federal District reached 62 percent in 2012, 
whereas in the Volga and North Caucasus regions it did not exceed 49 percent.
15
In part, this gap in 
internet access is counteracted by the explosive growth of mobile internet access. By the end of 
2012, there were approximately 22.5 million mobile internet subscribers, an increase of 88 percent 
from 2011.
16
Internet access in schools also varies according to region, with many Russian schools still lacking an 
internet connection. According to a survey conducted by the National Training Foundation, 70 
7
 Public Opinion Foundation, “Интернет в России: динамика проникновения. Осень 2012” [Internet in Russia: Dynamics of 
Penetration. Fall 2012], December 18, 2012, http://runet.fom.ru/Proniknovenie‐interneta/10738
8
 International Telecommunication Union (ITU), “Percentage of individuals using the Internet,” 2007 & 2012, accessed July 13, 
2013, http://www.itu.int/ITU‐D/ICTEYE/Indicators/Indicators.aspx#
9
 Public Opinion Foundation, “Internet in Russia. Report highlights,” accessed July 30, 2013, http://www.ewdn.com/wp‐
content/uploads/2013/03/FOM_Internet_Winter_2012_20131.pdf.  
10
 Public Opinion Foundation, “Internet Audience: Yesterday, Today, Tomorrow...” [in Russian], November 29, 2012, 
http://runet.fom.ru/Proniknovenie‐interneta/10714
11
 Advanced Communications & Media, “Cellular Data,” accessed July 30, 2013, http://www.acm‐consulting.com/data‐
downloads/cat_view/7‐cellular.html.  
12
 “Medvedev Commanded to Decrease the cost of Internet access in Russia” [in Russian], RIA Novosti, January 21, 2013, 
http://ria.ru/economy/20130121/918943794.html. 
13
 Maria Petrova, “Broadband Access to the Internet Must Become Cheaper” [in Russian], Comnews.ru, January 22, 2013, 
http://www.comnews.ru/node/69851
14
 “В село проведут инновационную сеть,” RBC Daily, January 22, 2013, http://www.rbcdaily.ru/media/562949985558334. 
15
 “Dynamics of Internet penetration in Federal Districts and settlements” [in Russian], December 18, 2012, 
http://runet.fom.ru/Proniknovenie‐interneta/10738
16
 “Mobile Internet Market Review. Use of mobile internet through smartphones and tablet PCs,” J'son and Partners Consulting 
Official Website, January 2013, http://bit.ly/15BZjTz.  
O
BSTACLES TO 
A
CCESS
590
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
R
USSIA
percent of schools in cities with more than 1 million inhabitants are connected to the internet, 
whereas in rural areas, less than 45 percent of schools have internet access.
17
In  May 2012, several Russian ISPs (VimpelCom, Megafon, Mobile TeleSystems and  the  state-
controlled company  Rostelecom)  announced  plans to  develop  an  underwater fiber-optic  cable 
connecting towns on the island of Sakhalin to the Far East regions of Kamchatka and Magadan.
18
The project, which would significantly lower prices of internet access on the island, is expected to 
take about two years to complete.
19
It should be noted, however, that there have been multiple 
failed attempts to construct an undersea cable to Sakhalin in the past.
20
There are no specific legal restrictions on ICT connectivity or limitations on social media and 
communication apps. However, in September 2012, members of the State Duma issued a proposal 
that would outlaw the use of anonymizers and circumvention tools that enable users to send and 
receive encrypted data, access blocked websites, or make their online activities less conspicuous.
21
As of May 2013, this proposal had not been acted upon and the use of these tools is still legal, 
although in August 2013 the FSB director revived this debate by announcing that his agency would 
begin working with other Russian law enforcement and security bodies to draft such legislation.
22
The broadband market in Russia is still highly concentrated. State-owned provider Rostelecom 
controls 39 percent of the broadband market, while the other five main providers (VimpelCom, 
ER-Telecom, Mobile TeleSystems, TransTelecom, and AKADO) together control approximately 
40 percent.
23
The remaining 21 percent of the market is controlled by smaller ISPs. This data 
reflects the overall market distribution throughout the country; however, competition is much 
lower in small towns and regions where only a few service providers operate.
24
Similarly, the 
Russian  mobile  communications  market  is  dominated  by  three  leading  companies—Mobile 
TeleSystems, VimpelCom, and Megafon—which together control 82 percent of the market.
25
17
 Компьютерная оснащенность школ. РИАН [“Computer equipment in schools”], RIA Novosti, September 11, 2012, 
http://ria.ru/ratings/20120911/747679545.html. 
18
 «Стартовали проектно‐изыскательские работы по строительству подводной ВОЛС «Сахалин‐Магадан‐Камчатка» 
[“Ctartovali design work for the construction of underwater fiber‐optic ‘Sakhalin‐Magadan‐Kamchatka’”], Corporate website of 
Rostelecom, June 9, 2012, http://www.kamchatka.rt.ru/press/news/news877. 
19
 “Russians to link eastern islands by cable,” Global Telecom Business, May 16, 2012, 
http://www.globaltelecomsbusiness.com/article/3029654/Russians‐to‐link‐eastern‐islands‐by‐cable.html.  
20
 “The island of Sakhalin is still very far away,” The Economist, April 5, 2010, 
http://www.economist.com/blogs/babbage/2010/04/broadband_prices_russia.  
21
 Dmitry Runkevich, Депутаты запретят анонимность в сети [The deputies shall ban anonymity on the Net], Izvesita.ru, 
September 21, 2012, http://izvestia.ru/news/535724
22
 “Russia’s FSB mulls ban on ‘Tor’ online anonymity network,” RT.com, August 16, 2013, http://rt.com/politics/russia‐tor‐
anonymizer‐ban‐571/.   
23
 Advanced Communications & Media, “Russian Residential Broadband Data 2012,” accessed July 30, 2013, http://www.acm‐
consulting.com/data‐downloads/cat_view/16‐broadband.html.   
24
 Интернет в глубинке: обзор стоимости ШПД в небольших городах [Internet in remote places: overview of broadband 
access cost in small towns], Telecomza.ru, April 17, 2013, http://telekomza.ru/2013/04/17/internet‐v‐glubinke‐obzor‐stoimosti‐
shpd‐v‐nebolshix‐gorodax/.  
25
 Advanced Communications & Media, “Cellular Data 2012,” accessed July 30, 2013, http://www.acm‐consulting.com/data‐
downloads/cat_view/7‐cellular/19‐cellular‐2012.html.  
591
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
R
USSIA
The ICT and media sector is regulated by the Federal Service for Supervision in the Sphere of 
Telecom,  Information  Technologies,  and  Mass  Communications  (Roskomnadzor)  under  the 
control of the Ministry of Communications and Mass Media and the Government of the Russian 
Federation.  With the  new  internet  blacklist  law  (Federal Law  #139-FZ)  going  into effect  in 
November 2012, Roskomnadzor now has the authority to determine if a website should be blocked 
based on whether or not the site contains material that is restricted by the law; these decisions do 
not require prior court approval. As a result, Roskomnadzor has become a primary player in the 
field of controlling and filtering information on the internet. Concerning the technical aspects of 
access to the internet, the regulatory bodies generally operate fairly. However, their efforts to 
overcome  the  digital  gap  and  open  up  the  ICT  market  to  greater  competition  have  been 
insufficient. 
In 2012–2013, the Russian government ramped up its practice of restricting online content through 
the blocking of websites. In addition to a 60 percent increase in the number of websites placed on 
the federal list of extremist materials from January 2012 to February 2013, with the enactment of 
Federal Law #139-FZ in November 2012, the regulatory authority can now place websites deemed 
“harmful to the health and development of children” on an internal blacklist of sites that ISPs are 
required to block, without prior decisions or approval by a court. 
Blocking  access  to  information  on  entire  websites,  IP  addresses,  and  particular  webpages  has 
become the most common means in Russia to restrict user activity on the internet. This control 
over online content expanded after Federal Law #139-FZ was passed on July 28, 2012. Commonly 
known as “the internet blacklist law,” this law, for the first time in Russian history, legalised the 
blocking  of  access  to websites  without requiring  a court ruling. Since the law took effect on 
November 1, 2012, websites on which experts find pornographic images of minors, information 
about suicide techniques, or information on preparing or taking drugs can be placed on a special 
register within two days, and access to these sites can be blocked on the basis of a decision by 
Roskomnadzor.  In  addition  to  the  material  targeted  in  the  legislation, blocked  websites  have 
included Ri-online.ru (the website of Ingushetia Online, a local news site), a Jehovah's Witnesses 
site,
26
websites of Caucasian separatists, blogs on LiveJournal, and an analytical article by the public 
figure and academic Yuri Afanasyev.
27
During the first four months of the enforcement of Federal Law #139-FZ (November 1, 2012–
February 28, 2013), 309 domain names were banned and 197 IP addresses were blocked, causing 
approximately 4,000 blockings of those resources that shared IP addresses with banned sites.
28
In 
November 2012, during the first weeks of the implementation of the new law, dozens of websites 
26
 “Jehovah's Witnesses website identified as extremist” [in Russian], SecurityLab.ru, June 15, 2012, 
http://www.securitylab.ru/news/425840.php. 
27
 “Register of extremist materials was replenished with an article by Yuri Afanasyev” [in Russian], Agentura.yu, February 19, 
2013, http://www.agentura.ru/news/28138.  
28
 “The Register Monitoring” [in Russian], February 27, 2013, http://rublacklist.net/4445/#more‐4445
L
IMITS ON 
C
ONTENT
592
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
R
USSIA
were blocked for seemingly arbitrary reasons. Among those sites were popular resources such as 
Lurkmore.to (a wiki-based ironic online encyclopedia for internet subcultures), RuTracker.org (a 
popular torrent tracker), and Lib.rus.ec (an open library).  
In the period from July to December 2012, Google reported that there were 114 requests by the 
Russian authorities to remove content from various Google platforms, compared to 4 requests 
during the same period in 2011.
29
These included 111 requests issued by  police  or executive 
authorities and 3 court orders. Material related to suicide promotion and drug abuse accounted for 
the majority of the removal requests (56 requests and 51 requests, respectively), followed by 3 
cases related to defamation, 3 related to privacy and security, and 1 related to hate speech. In 
response to these requests, Google removed content for violating their own product policies in 
more than half of the cases, and restricted content from local view in about one third of the cases.
30
In  September  2012,  there  were  widespread  demands  from  prosecutors’  offices  and  from 
Roskomnadzor to block access to sites hosting fragments of the “Innocence of Muslims” video. 
According to Google’s Transparency Report, the company decided to restrict in-country access to 
the video in eight countries, including Russia.
31
However, prior to this restriction, demands from 
the General Prosecutor went out to ISPs across the country, instructing the service providers to 
block access to the content prior to any court decisions. Given the varying nature of each request, 
some ISPs opted to block the entire YouTube platform, rendering it temporarily inaccessible for 
users in certain regions, while other ISPs also blocked access to the social network Vkontakte for 
containing pages with links to the video.
32
In each case, the service providers complied with the 
request before the court identified the video as containing extremist material. 
In late 2011, Roskomnadzor announced that it had installed online software to detect “extremist” 
material. Under the new system, websites flagged by the software are given three days to take 
down the allegedly offending content. If a site does not comply, two additional warnings are sent 
followed by a complete shutdown. The test mode version of the software was to begin operating in 
December 2011,  though  its  full  deployment  was  indefinitely  postponed as  of  mid-2012.  The 
Ministry of  Justice, on the other hand, has invited bids to create its own internet  monitoring 
system, apparently for the purposes of examining content related to the Russian government and 
justice systems, and to any European Union statement concerning Russia.
33
The practice of identifying online materials as extremist, which was widespread and used to block 
websites after the adoption of anti-extremist legislation in 2002, expanded in 2012 when dozens of 
webpages were added to a federal list of extremist materials, operated by the Ministry of Justice. 
29
 “Russia,” Google Transparency Report 2012, accessed July 30, 2013, 
http://www.google.com/transparencyreport/removals/government/RU/?hl=en_GB.  
30
 Ibid. 
31
 “Google Transparency Report: Russia,” July‐December, 2012, accessed July 30, 2012, 
http://www.google.com/transparencyreport/removals/government/RU/.  
32
 Maria Kravchenko, “Inappropriate Enforcement of Anti‐Extremist Legislation in Russia in 2012,” edited by Alexander 
Verhovsky, SOVA Center for Information and Analysis, June 26, 2013, http://www.sova‐center.ru/en/misuse/reports‐
analyses/2013/06/d27382/#_Toc357760970
33
 “2012 Surveillance: Russia,” Reporters Without Borders, March 12, 2012, http://bit.ly/VoO1HS.  
593
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
R
USSIA
The federal list contains details of court decisions that identify any online information materials as 
extremist. As of February 2013, the list included 1,704 items, compared to 1,066 as of January 
2012.
34
According to the law, anyone who disseminates these materials, either offline or online, 
may be administratively or criminally prosecuted and receive a penalty ranging from a fine of RUB 
1,000 (approximately $30) to up to 5 years imprisonment, depending upon the legal treatment. 
In total, no less than 608 decisions were made during 2012 to block access to websites, either 
through  court  judgments  or by  service  providers,  compared to  231 decisions in  2011.
35
This 
number does not include blockings made under the new “blacklist law.” At  the end  of 2012, 
Roskomnadzor officials reported that 1206 entries were made on the Unified Register at the site 
Zapret-info.gov.ru, which means either that the information on these sites was deleted or that the 
website was blocked completely.
36
At the end of 2011, new rules for the registration of domain names for the domains “.ru” and 
“.РФ”  were  adopted by  the  Coordination Center  for TLD  RU/РФ
.
37
These rules have  given 
registrars the right to terminate the domain name delegation of a website based on a decision in 
writing by the head of an agency which exercises operational search actions, such as the police, the 
Federal Security Service, the drug police, or the customs agency. In accordance to these rules, in 
February 2012 the domain name registrar Masterhost discontinued its delegation of the Andrei 
Rylkov Foundation for Health and Social Justice’s domain—Rylkov-fond.ru— based on a report by 
the head of the directorate of the Moscow branch of the Federal Service for Drug Control, which 
stated  that  “the  office  received  information  that  the  domain  [...]  contained  materials  that 
propagandised (advertised) the use of narcotics.” In reality, the foundation’s site contained official 
documents on replacement therapy from the World Health Organisation and the United Nations 
Office on Drugs and Crime.
38
Some actions taken  by local prosecutors  and  regional  courts  regarding  the  blocking  of  online 
content have been questionable. In August 2012, for example, the Perm City Court forced an ISP 
to block a free listings website, stating that a search for the phrase “buy marijuana in Perm” using 
the Yandex search engine provided a link to that website. According to a representative from the 
company that ran the site, an advertisement for a smoking blend had indeed been placed on the site. 
However, the government bodies had not contacted the site owner, and instead went straight to 
court. Although the moderator subsequently deleted the advertisement, the ruling to force the 
service provider to block the site’s IP address had already taken legal effect.  
34
 “Federal list of extremist materials,” Ministry of Justice official website, accessed July 30, 2013, 
http://minjust.ru/ru/extremist‐materials?search.  
35
 AGORA Association, Доклад: Россия как глобальная угроза свободному Интернету [Report: Russia ‐ a global threat to 
Internet freedom], http://eliberator.ru/news/detail.php?ID=21
36
 Twitter account of the Head of Russian Association for Electronic Communications (RAEC) Sergey Plugotarenko [in Russian], 
December 21, 2012, https://twitter.com/plugotarenko/status/282014753851854848/photo/1
37
 “The Terms and Conditions of Domain Names Registration in domains .RU and .РФ,” The Coordination Center for TLD RU, 
accessed July 30, 2013, http://cctld.ru/en/docs/rules.php.   
38
 “Rules Governing Registration of Domain Names Allow Law Enforcement to Arbitrarily Block Websites,” Agora Human Rights 
Association, February 7, 2012, http://agora.rightsinrussia.info/archive/news/domains/andrei‐rylkov.   
594
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested