download pdf file from server in asp.net c# : Adding metadata to pdf files application Library utility html .net windows visual studio FOTN%202013_Full%20Report_060-part1566

F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
R
USSIA
In October 2012, the Prosecutor's Office in the Orel region demanded that the court ban the 
website Orlec.ru, a local “free encyclopedia,” based on the claim that the website hosted extremist 
material. The reason stated by the prosecutor—that the material “undermined the public image of 
local self-governments and the [Russian Federation] authorities in general”—indicates the political 
nature of the request.
39
Additionally, there were questions as to whether the material was actually 
planted on the website for the purpose of such an investigation. In the end, the court ruled that the 
particular material, which had already been removed, was extremist, but that the website itself was 
not.   
The  practice of putting pressure on service providers and content producers by telephone  has 
become increasingly common. Police and representatives of the Prosecutor’s Office often call the 
owners and editors of websites to remove unwanted material. Most providers do not wait for court 
orders to remove targeted materials, and such pressure encourages self-censorship. As a result, 
there has been a massive exodus of opposition websites to foreign site-hosting providers, as well as 
a trend toward greater use of social-networking sites. Additionally, as the blacklist law allows the 
government  to  quickly  block  access  to  websites  that  contain  information  considered  to  be 
prohibited, and the evaluation criteria for these decisions is unclear, users and administrators of 
web resources are forced to practice self-censorship in order to avoid responsibility. 
Government  attempts  to  influence  the  blogosphere  and  other  online  sources  of  information 
continued  from 2012–2013. The Kremlin allegedly influences the  blogosphere through media 
organizations  as  well  as  the  progovernment  youth  movements  Nashi  (“Ours”)  and  Molodaya 
Gvardiya (“Young Guard”).
40
The emergence of competing propaganda websites has led to the 
creation  of  a  vast  amount  of  content  that  collectively  dominates  search  results, among  other 
effects.
41
Leaked  e-mails  allegedly  belonging  to  Nashi  leaders  revealed  that  the  pro-Kremlin 
movement  had  been  widely  engaging  in  all  kinds  of  digital  activities,  including  paying 
commentators  to  post  content,  disseminating  DDoS  attacks,  and  hijacking  blog  ratings.
42
Propagandist commentators simultaneously react to discussions of “taboo” topics, including the 
historical  role  of  Soviet  leader  Joseph  Stalin,  political  opposition,  dissidents  like  Mikhail 
Khodorkovsky, murdered journalists, and cases of international conflict or rivalry (with countries 
such as Estonia, Georgia, and Ukraine, but also with the foreign policies of the United States and 
the  European  Union).  Furthermore,  minority  languages  are  underrepresented  in  Russia’s 
blogosphere. 
There are few specific economic constraints that negatively impact the financial stability of online 
media. The most common sources of news and information—the federal TV channels—are owned 
39
 Roman Zholud, “Labelling [sic] a web publication ‘extremist,’: how this is done in Oryol,” Glasnost Defense Foundation Digest 
No. 586, Glasnost Defense Foundation, October 8, 2012, http://www.gdf.ru/digest/item/1/1016#ev1.  
40
 The Kremlin‐affiliated media organizations include the Foundation on Effective Politics, led by Gleb Pavlovsky; New Media 
Stars, led by Konstantin Rykov; and the Political Climate Center, led by Aleksey Chesnakov. 
41
 Ksenia Veretennikova, “‘Медведиахолдинг’: Единая Россия решила формировать собственное медиапространство” 
[‘Medvediaholding:’ United Russia Decided to Form Its Own Media Space], Vremya, August 21, 2008, 
http://www.vremya.ru/2008/152/4/210951.html
42
 Leaked mailboxes are published at this website: http://slivmail.com/ [in Russian]. Email that contains the plan to paralyze 
Kommersant newspaper website published at: http://rumol‐leaks.livejournal.com/12040.html
595
Adding metadata to pdf files - add, remove, update PDF metadata in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Allow C# Developers to Read, Add, Edit, Update and Delete PDF Metadata
batch pdf metadata editor; read pdf metadata
Adding metadata to pdf files - VB.NET PDF metadata library: add, remove, update PDF metadata in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Enable VB.NET Users to Read, Write, Edit, Delete and Update PDF Document Metadata
pdf keywords metadata; analyze pdf metadata
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
R
USSIA
or controlled by the government. In this way, access to opposition and independent sources of 
information depends on one’s access to the internet. On July 23, 2012, amendments to the law 
“On advertising” entered into force, outlawing the advertisement of alcohol-based products on the 
internet.
43
This law has had a considerable financial impact on independent internet resources, as 
advertising is their main source of income. 
During 2012 and 2013, the internet, particularly social networks  like  Twitter, Facebook, and 
Vkontakte, continued to be a significant tool for mobilization and communication between citizens 
and activists. In 2011, opposition activists in Moscow used Facebook to organize street protests in 
reaction to the December 2011 State Duma elections, although local platforms like Vkontakte are 
more popular tools for political mobilization in other regions.
44
Organizers of subsequent protests, 
such as those related to Putin’s inauguration in May 2012 and the January 2013 “March Against 
Scoundrels” protesting the bill banning Americans’ adoption of Russian children, have also made 
use of social-networking platforms to call attention to events. Additionally, crowdfunding websites 
such as RosUznik.org, which raises money for and coordinates the legal defenses of civil activists 
charged in the Bolotnaya Case, have emerged as a way for opposition activists to organize support 
efforts online.
45
During 2012  and  early  2013,  government pressure  against  online users  continued  to  escalate 
through the use of lawsuits, administrative prosecutions, unlawful criminal prosecution using anti-
extremist legislation, and charges for offending government officials.  In July 2012, the State Duma 
introduced  legislation  that  recriminalizes  defamation  for  both  online  and  offline  speech. 
Additionally, the Russian government continues to employ surveillance methods that circumvent 
proper judicial oversight requirements and which threaten the civil liberties of online users. 
Although the constitution grants the right to free speech, this right is routinely violated, and there 
are no special laws protecting online modes of expression. Online journalists do not possess the 
same rights as traditional journalists unless they register their websites as mass media. Recently, 
police have been suppressing online expression through the use of Article 282 of the criminal code, 
which  restricts  “extremism.”  The  term  is  vaguely  defined  and  includes  “xenophobia”  and 
“incitement of hatred toward a social group.” The phrase “social group” is particularly problematic 
as the criminal code does not clearly describe what a social group entails, and several extremism 
cases in 2012 involved broad definitions of the term “social groups” to include the United Russia 
political party and law enforcement officers.
46
43
 Законопроект №81110‐6 [Draft Bill #81110‐6], Official State Duma website, accessed July 30, 2013, http://bit.ly/NlBpxl.  
44
 Tom Balmforth, “Russian Opposition ‘Likes’ Facebook,” Radio Free Europe / Radio Liberty, May 18, 2012, 
http://www.rferl.org/content/russian‐opposition‐likes‐facebook/24585388.html.  
45
 “Arrest extension validated for Moscow riot participants,” Russian Legal Information Agency, August 8, 2012, 
http://rapsinews.com/judicial_news/20120806/264133072.html.  
46
 Maria Kravchenko, “Inappropriate Enforcement of Anti‐Extremist Legislation in Russia in 2012,” edited by Alexander 
Verhovsky, SOVA Center for Information and Analysis, June 26, 2013, http://bit.ly/18A40f8.  
V
IOLATIONS OF 
U
SER 
R
IGHTS
596
VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
Multiple metadata types of PDF file can be Capable of adding PDF file navigation features to your VB formats; merge, append, and split PDF files; insert, delete
preview edit pdf metadata; view pdf metadata in explorer
C# PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file for C#
Multiple metadata types of PDF file can be Capable of adding PDF file navigation features to your C# formats; merge, append, and split PDF files; insert, delete
get pdf metadata; view pdf metadata
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
R
USSIA
Despite claims that the State Duma is planning to adopt special legislation establishing criminal and 
civil liability for internet activities and offenses,
47
existing laws do not differentiate between online 
and offline activities. In the case of some crimes, such as defamation, slander, or extremism, use of 
the internet can be considered an aggravating factor.  
In  July  2012,  the  State  Duma  passed  amendments  to  the  criminal  code  that  recriminalized 
defamation, after having just decriminalized it less than a year earlier. The revision of Article 128.1 
of the code makes it easier to use this provision arbitrarily with the aim of pursuing those who 
criticize government policy. Revisions to Article 129 of the code officially  make defamation  a 
criminal  offense,  with  applicable  punishment  including  a  fine  of  up  to  RUB  5  million 
(approximately  $170,000).  Previously,  when  prosecuted  for  defamation,  one  could  typically 
expect a suspended sentence, especially as a first offender. Now the maximum possible fine allowed 
under the criminal law can be applied under section 5, Article 128.1, with no reduction in other 
negative legal consequences for the person convicted. 
A draft law concerning the introduction of criminal liability for publicly insulting the feelings of 
religious believers was introduced in the State Duma in September 2012.
48
The law, which came 
into effect on July 1, 2013, establishes fines up to RUB 300,000 (approximately $10,000) or 1 year 
imprisonment. Critics point out that the law is too vaguely worded and that key terms, such as 
“worship” or “religious traditions,” are not properly defined, making it difficult to predict the ways 
in which the law will be implemented. It is also unclear in what ways online activities might be 
prosecuted under this new law. 
The practice of criminal prosecution has expanded over the past year: in 2012 there were 103 cases 
of criminal prosecution against online users, compared to 38 cases in 2011.
49
The majority of these 
cases were related to incitement of hatred against national and social groups or calls for extremism 
published on social networks. A few charges for insulting government representatives and inciting 
riots have been registered as well. In April 2012, blogger Dmitry Shipilov was sentenced to 11 
months of correctional labor for his brusque article addressed to the governor of the Kemerovo 
region, Aman Tuleev.
50
The Investigative Committee of the Russian Federation opened a criminal 
case  in March 2012  against journalist and blogger  Arkadiy Babchenko  for writing a blog  post 
encouraging an unauthorized protest, with references to using force against police authorities.
51
Additionally, on May 14, 2012, State Duma deputy Aleksandr Khinshtein sent a request to the 
47
 Vladimir Bogdanov, Анонимки на просвет [Anonymity on clearance], RG.ru, September 11, 2012, 
http://www.rg.ru/2012/09/11/anonim.html.  
48
 Законопроект №142303‐6 [Draft Bill #142303‐6], Official State Duma website, accessed July 30, 2013, 
http://asozd.duma.gov.ru/main.nsf/(SpravkaNew)?OpenAgent&RN=142303‐6&02. See also “Analysis on Russia’s New 
Blasphemy Law: 28 February 2013,” The Institute on Religion and Public Policy, http://www.religionandpolicy.org/reports/the‐
institute‐country‐reports‐and‐legislative‐analysis/europe‐and‐eurasia/russia/analysis‐on‐russia‐s‐new‐blasphemy‐law‐2013/.  
49
 “Russia: a global threat to internet freedom,” Agora Human Rights Association, February 4, 2013, 
http://agora.rightsinrussia.info/archive/reports/global‐threat
50
 “Блогер получил 11 месяцев за оскорбление Тулеева” [Blogger received 11 months for insulting Tuleyev], Grani.ru, April 3, 
2012, http://grani.ru/Internet/m.196855.html
51
 “Independent journalist sued for ‘extremist’ blog entry,” Gazeta.ru, March 21, 2012, 
http://en.gazeta.ru/news/2012/03/21/a_4099301.shtml.  
597
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
such as how to merge PDF document files by C# code PDF document pages and how to split PDF document in APIs, C# programmers are capable of adding and inserting
pdf metadata editor; c# read pdf metadata
VB.NET PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for vb.net, ASP.NET
On this VB.NET PDF document page modifying page, you will find detailed guidance on creating, loading, merge and splitting PDF pages and Files, adding a page
change pdf metadata creation date; pdf metadata viewer
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
R
USSIA
General Prosecutor's Office to open a criminal case against users of Twitter and Facebook who 
called for participation in public protests in Moscow on May 6, 2012, though it appears that the 
General Prosecutor has not acted on the request.
52
Various forms of administrative and legal pressure against online bloggers and activists continued in 
2012–2013. In August 2012, Maksim Efimov, the chair of the Karelia Youth Human Rights Group, 
sought asylum in Estonia after prosecutors requested that he be committed to a psychiatric ward. In 
April 2012, Efimov was charged with insulting the feelings of Orthodox believers for his critical 
article entitled “Karelia is tired of priests,” which described the close cooperation between the 
Karelian regional government and representatives of the Russian Orthodox Church.
53
Efimov has 
been  granted  political  asylum  in  Estonia,  while  the  criminal  case  against  him  remains  under 
investigation by the Karelian Investigative Committee.
54
In May 2012, a civil activist from Tuymen, Nikolay Lyambin, was arrested on suspicion of drug 
possession. Lyambin claims that the drugs were planted and relates his detention and prosecution to 
his activities online, as he was one of the creators of an opposition group on the social network 
Vkontakte.
55
In February 2013, Pavel Khotulev, who criticized regional standards of education in 
Tatarstan in his blog post, was sentenced to pay a fine of $3,300 for incitement of hatred against 
Tatars.
56
Privacy and anonymity are key concerns for many online users in Russia. There are currently no 
restrictions on the use of circumvention tools or anonymizers, although such tools may be banned 
in the near future. Presently, identification is needed for signing a contract for internet access or 
cellular services. Additionally, owners of public Wi-Fi spots are required to use content filters to 
protect children  from  potentially  accessing  “harmful” information (Article 6.17 of  the  code  of 
administrative offenses). This requirement may force owners to implement age checks for users. In 
October 2012, State Duma members from the Liberal Democratic Party of Russia revived the idea 
of forcing social network users to enter their passport details when registering on these websites.
57
However, later that month the State Duma decided that this proposal was unnecessary.
58
The extent to which internet users in Russia are subject to extralegal surveillance of their online 
activities remains unclear; however, recent  evidence suggests that  the Russian government has 
significantly increased its surveillance capabilities over the past few years. Since 2000, all ISPs have 
52
 “Retweeted to General Prosecutor”, Gazeta.ru, May 14, 2012, http://www.gazeta.ru/politics/2012/05/14_a_4583269.shtml
53
 Vyacheslav Kozlov, “Blogger faces up to 2 years in jail for critising Russian Orthodox church,” Gazeta.ru, April 13, 2012, 
http://en.gazeta.ru/news/2012/04/13/a_4345165.shtml.  
54
 “Blogger who Criticized Orthodox Church Seeks Political Asylum in Estonia,” Agora Human Rights Association, accessed July 
30, 2013, http://agora.rightsinrussia.info/archive/news/efimov/estonia.   
55
 “New fraud criminal cases in Tymen” [in Russian], Golosa.info, May 18, 2012, http://www.golosa.info/lambin. 
56
 “Pavel Hotulev has been convicted” [in Russian], Evening‐Kazan.ru, February 15, 2013, http://www.evening‐
kazan.ru/news/pavlu‐hotulevu‐vynesen‐obvinitelnyy‐prigovor.html. 
57
 “В Госдуме рассматривают возможность регистрации в соцсетях по паспорту” [State Duma considering registering social 
networks with passport], Kommersant‐FM, October 11, 2012, http://www.kommersant.ru/doc/2041985
58
 “MPs oppose passport details for social networks,” Russian Legal Information Agency, October 12, 2012, 
http://rapsinews.com/legislation_news/20121012/264976106.html.  
598
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
Besides, using this PDF document metadata adding control, you can created PDF file by adding digital signature Create PDF Document from Existing Files Using C#.
pdf xmp metadata viewer; edit multiple pdf metadata
C# TIFF: TIFF Editor SDK to Read & Manipulate TIFF File Using C#.
1. Support embedding, removing, adding and updating ICCProfile. 2. Render text to text, PDF, or Word file. Tiff Metadata Editing in C#.
edit pdf metadata online; endnote pdf metadata
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
R
USSIA
been required to install the “system for operational investigative measures,”
59
or SORM-2, which 
gives  the  FSB  and  police  access  to  internet  traffic.  The  system  is  analogous  to  the 
Carnivore/DCS1000 software used by the U.S. Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), and operates 
as a packet-sniffer that can analyze and log data passing through a digital network.
60
ISPs that do not 
comply with SORM system requirements are promptly fined, and may have their license revoked if 
problems  persist.  Russian  authorities  are  technically  required  to  obtain  a  court  order  before 
accessing an individual’s electronic communications data; however, the authorities are not required 
to show the warrant to ISPs or telecom providers, and FSB officers have direct access to operators’ 
servers through local control centers.
61
There  is  increasing  evidence  that  Russian  surveillance  technology  is  being  used  for  political 
purposes, including the targeting of opposition leaders. In a Supreme Court case in November 
2012 involving Maxim Petlin, an opposition leader in the city of Yekaterinburg, the court upheld 
the government’s right to eavesdrop on Petlin’s phone conversations because he had taken part in 
so-called “extremist activities,” namely antigovernment protests. Online surveillance represents 
somewhat less of a threat in the major cities of Moscow and Saint Petersburg than in the regions, 
where almost every significant blog or forum is monitored by the local police and Prosecutor’s 
Office. Most of the harassment suffered by critical bloggers and other online activists in Russia 
occurs in the regions. 
Extralegal intimidation is also used to limit users’ abilities to interact and mobilize on the internet. 
For example, in the fall of 2012, Yuliya Bashinova, a journalist at the internet publication Grani.ru, 
was summoned for questioning by the Investigative Committee to explain why she had signed a 
petition  on  the  website  of  Amnesty  International  in  support  of  human  rights  defender  Igor 
Kalyapin.
62
It has been reported that investigators have held talks with citizens who signed the 
petition in several Russian cities. 
Despite the reduction in the severity of violence over the past year, implicit impunity for those who 
commit  violence  against  bloggers,  online  journalists,  and  other  online  users  is  common. 
Information on investigations into crimes committed in previous years is usually not available to 
citizens. Between 2008 and 2011 there were three internet-related murders and one attempted 
murder, according to research conducted by the AGORA Association.
63
Only one of these resulted 
in a prosecution: according to the verdict, the murder of Magomed Evloev, the owner of the 
59
 Konstantin Nikashov, “СОРМ для IP‐коммуникаций: требуется новая концепция” [SORM for IP‐Communications: New 
Concept Needed], Iksmedia.ru, December 10, 2007, http://www.iksmedia.ru/topics/analytical/effort/261924.html?__pv=1. For 
more information on SORM, see V.S. Yelagin, “СОРМ‐2 история, становление, перспективы” [SORM‐2 History, Formation, 
Prospects], Protei, http://www.sorm‐li.ru/sorm2.html
60
 B. S. Goldstein, Y. A. Kryukov, and V. I. Polyantsev, “Проблемы и Решения СОРМ‐2” [Problems and Solutions of SORM‐2], 
Vestnik Svyazi no. 12 (2006), http://www.protei.ru/company/pdf/publications/2007/2007‐003.pdf
61
 Andrei Soldatov and Irina Borogan, “Russia’s Surveillance State,” World Policy Journal, Fall 2013, 
http://www.worldpolicy.org/journal/fall2013/Russia‐surveillance.  
62
 “Grani.ru journalist summoned to Investigative Committee” [in Russian], Grani.ru, September 6, 2012, 
http://grani.ru/Society/Law/m.206066.html. 
63
 Ibid. 
599
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
application? To help you solve this technical problem, we provide this C#.NET PDF image adding control, XDoc.PDF for .NET. Similar
read pdf metadata online; batch edit pdf metadata
C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
text character and text string to PDF files using online text to PDF page using .NET XDoc.PDF component in Supports adding text to PDF in preview without adobe
pdf xmp metadata; remove metadata from pdf online
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
R
USSIA
website Ingushetia.ru, was the result of a police officer’s careless handling of a gun.
64
There has 
been no prosecution dealing with the attempted murder of journalist and blogger Oleg Kashin, and 
there were  dozens of other assaults and beatings for  which no individual has been brought to 
justice. Critics blame the Russian Federal Security Service for failing  to provide the necessary 
operational support to solve such cases.
65
From 2012–2013, the threat of cyberattacks continued, including DDoS attacks on websites and 
hacking  into  the  private  accounts  of  users.  The  police  and  Investigative  Committee  have 
consistently failed to investigate these attacks, including dozens of cyberattacks on online media and 
opposition websites. During 2012, at least 47 episodes of DDoS attacks were registered,
66
but only 
 of  them  (against  the  official  websites  of  the  government  and  the  prime  minister)  were 
investigated.
67
Most  of  the  attacks  occurred  during  important  events  such  as  the  presidential 
election or mass protests. There were also significant attacks launched against independent media 
outlets. In May  2012,  a  botnet  of  182,000 computers was  used  to attack  the  website of the 
television channel  Dozhd. On June 12, 2012, a single  botnet made up of 133,000  computers 
attacked four online media outlets, including the websites of Novaya Gazeta, the radio station Echo 
of Moscow, Slon.ru, and the website for Dozhd.
68
In the past, similar cyberattacks on media outlets 
have been linked to leaders of the progovernment youth group Nashi.
69
In January 2013, President Vladimir Putin signed Decree #31c “On the formation of a state system 
for  detecting,  preventing  and  mitigating  the  effects  of  computer  attacks  on  the  information 
resources of the Russian Federation.” Under this decree, the FSB has been vested with the task of 
developing  a  method  for  preventing  and  investigating  attacks  by  hackers  on  Russia’s  internet 
resources, and with promoting international cooperation in the fight against cybercrime; however, 
no further steps have been taken toward the prevention of cybercrime.  
64
 Svetlana Bocharova, “The end at the “Oriental Fairytale” [in Russian], October 4, 2010, 
http://www.gazeta.ru/politics/2010/08/04_a_3404590.shtml.  
65
 “Advocate blames FSB of inactivity while investigation of  attempted murder of Oleg Kashin” [in Russian], Openinform.ru, 
November 6, 2012, http://openinform.ru/news/pursuit/06.11.2012/27620/
66
 AGORA Association, Доклад: Россия как глобальная угроза свободному Интернету, [Report: Russia ‐ a global threat to 
Internet freedom], http://eliberator.ru/news/detail.php?ID=21.  
67
 Второй красноярский хакер получил срок за атаки на сайт Путина в мае 2012 года [Second hacker from Krasnoyarsk 
sentenced to jail for cyber‐attacks against Putin's website on May 2012], Gazeta.ru, March 29, 2013, 
http://www.gazeta.ru/social/news/2013/03/29/n_2823469.shtml.   
68
 Alexander Panasenko, Впервые сайты четырех российских СМИ атакованы одним ботнетом [For the first time fout 
websites of Russian media are under attack of one botnet], Anti‐Malware.ru, June 14, 2012. http://www.anti‐
malware.ru/news/2012‐06‐14/9345.  
69
 “Mail Leaks Link Youth Tsars to Cyberattack,” RIA Novosti, February 9, 2012, 
http://en.rian.ru/russia/20120209/171235899.html.  
600
VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb
Multifunctional Visual Studio .NET PDF SDK library supports adding text content to adobe PDF to add a single text character and text string to PDF files in VB
pdf metadata viewer online; remove metadata from pdf file
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
Edit URL. Bookmark: Edit Bookmark. Metadata: Edit, Delete Metadata. a PDF to two and four new PDF files are offered Provides you with examples for adding an (empty
remove pdf metadata online; add metadata to pdf programmatically
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
R
WANDA
R
WANDA
ICT  development  continued  to  spread,  expanding  access.  Rwandan  internet  users
became  more  active  on  social  media  and  vocal  in  criticizing  the  government  (see
O
BSTACLES TO 
A
CCESS 
and L
IMITS ON 
C
ONTENT
).
A number of independent online news outlets and opposition blogs were intermittently
inaccessible in Rwanda, though it is uncertain whether the disruptions were due to
deliberate government interference, as was the case in past years, or to technical issues
(see L
IMITS ON 
C
ONTENT
).
An amended media law expanded the rights of journalists and recognized freedom for
online communications; however, it retained provisions that may increase government
control over internet content (see V
IOLATIONS OF 
U
SER 
R
IGHTS
).
A new law on interception authorized high-ranking security officials to monitor e-mail
and  telephone  conversations  of  individuals  considered  potential  threats  to  “public
security” (see V
IOLATIONS OF 
U
SER 
R
IGHTS
).
SIM card registration requirements were launched in 2013 (see V
IOLATIONS OF 
U
SER
R
IGHTS
).
2012 
2013 
I
NTERNET 
F
REEDOM 
S
TATUS
P
ARTLY 
F
REE
P
ARTLY 
F
REE
Obstacles to Access (0-25) 
13 
12 
Limits on Content (0-35) 
19 
18 
Violations of User Rights (0-40) 
19 
18 
Total (0-100) 
51 
48 
*0=most free, 100=least free
K
EY 
D
EVELOPMENTS
:
M
AY 
2012
A
PRIL 
2013 
P
OPULATION
10.8 million
I
NTERNET 
P
ENETRATION 
2012: 
17 percent
S
OCIAL 
M
EDIA
/ICT
A
PPS 
B
LOCKED
No
P
OLITICAL
/S
OCIAL 
C
ONTENT 
B
LOCKED
Yes
B
LOGGERS
/ICT
U
SERS 
A
RRESTED
No
P
RESS 
F
REEDOM 
2013
S
TATUS
Not Free
601
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
R
WANDA
In recent years, the government of Rwanda under President Paul Kagame has embarked on an 
ambitious  economic  development  strategy  that  aims,  among  other  things,  to  create  a  vibrant 
industry for information and communication technologies (ICTs) and position Rwanda as a regional 
ICT hub. Although internet penetration remains low—hampered primarily by poverty and lack of 
appropriate infrastructure, especially in rural areas—access is continually expanding with public 
and private investments in broadband technology across the country, and mobile internet access is 
increasing at an impressive rate. Meanwhile, the proliferation of ICTs has contributed to progress 
in the country’s governance, health, education, agriculture, and finance sectors.
1
While ICT development has been among the top priorities for the Rwandan government, the 
country’s tenuous political environment and sensitive ethnic relations since the 1994 genocide has 
led the government to exert some controls over online content and expression. A few critical news 
websites that were previously blocked in 2010-2011 were intermittently inaccessible in Rwanda 
throughout 2012 and early 2013, though a number of critical blogs were unavailable altogether. In 
addition, worries remain that the government’s firm restrictions on print and broadcast media—
particularly on contentious content concerning the ruling party and the 1994 genocide—will cross 
over into the internet sphere, as occurred when the authorities blocked the online version of an 
independent newspaper in the lead-up to the 2010 presidential election. Nevertheless, there were 
no reported cases of imprisonment or violence against online journalists or internet users in 2012-
2013. 
Progressive  amendments  to  the  2009  Media  Law  were  adopted  in  March  2013,  providing 
journalists  with the  “right to  seek,  receive, give and broadcast information  and ideas  through 
media;”  the  amendments  also  explicitly  recognize  freedom  for  online  communications. 
Nevertheless, the passage of the new law has led to some fears of increasing government control 
over the establishment of online outlets. The government-run Media High Council systematically 
monitors all print and broadcast media coverage during the country’s annual genocide mourning 
period every April, and the monitoring of online media was incorporated for the first time during 
Rwanda’s 18
th
commemoration period in April 2012. Legislative initiatives in 2012 also expanded 
the  surveillance  and  interception  capabilities  of  security  authorities,  and  there  are  increasing 
indications that  the  government  may be systematically monitoring  and intercepting e-mail and 
other private communications.  
Poverty continues to be the primary impediment barring Rwandans from accessing new ICT tools, 
especially the internet. Over 90 percent of the population lives in rural areas, with the majority 
1
 Ministry of Youth and ICT, “Measuring ICT sector performance and Tracking ICT for Development (ICT4D) towards Rwanda 
Socio‐Economic Transformation,” Rwanda ICT Sector Profile 2012, http://bit.ly/18lFhdJ.  
I
NTRODUCTION
O
BSTACLES TO 
A
CCESS
602
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
R
WANDA
practicing subsistence agriculture and approximately 45 percent living below the poverty line.
2
Consequently, internet penetration in Rwanda is still low at 8 percent in 2012, up from 7 percent 
in  2011,  according  to  estimates  from  the  International  Telecommunication  Union  (ITU).
3
Meanwhile, official government statistics cite a penetration rate of 26 percent in 2012.
4
In addition, 
access is still limited mostly to Kigali, the capital city, and remains beyond the economic capacity of 
most citizens, particularly those in rural areas who are limited by low disposable incomes and who 
do not have high levels of ICT awareness or digital literacy.
5
Between 70 and 90 percent of the 
population speaks only Kinyarwanda, making internet content in English unavailable to the majority 
of Rwandans.
6
In the face of such challenges, the Rwandan government has made ICT development a high priority. 
Recent  government  initiatives  include  the  “National  ICT  Literacy  and  Awareness  Campaign” 
launched in early 2013 that aims to familiarize at least 200,000 Rwandans with ICT tools within six 
months.
7
The government has also invested in a project to enhance digital literacy among women as 
part of an effort to bridge Rwanda’s gender gap and encourage women entrepreneurs.
8
In addition, 
MTN Rwanda has launched a portable solar energy system known as the “Comeka ReadySet,” 
which is a multifunctional energy system that can charge mobile phones as well as power lights, 
radios, tablets and other devices, enabling ICT use among citizens living in rural areas with little to 
no electricity.
9
Accordingly, Rwanda was ranked by the ITU as the most dynamic African country 
in the field of ICTs in its “Measuring the Information Society 2012” ICT Development Index.
10
 
The expansion of broadband internet services across the country is further facilitating access to new 
media tools and technologies. A 2013 analysis of worldwide broadband download performance 
ranked Rwanda in first place in Africa for download speeds and 62nd place globally with an internet 
speed of 7.88 Mbps as of February 2013.
11
In partnership with the private sector, the country is 
2
 Central Intelligence Agency, “Rwanda,” The World Factbook, accessed April 12, 2013, 
https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the‐world‐factbook/geos/rw.html
3
 International Telecommunication Union, “Percentage of Individuals Using the Internet, 2000‐2012,” 
http://www.itu.int/en/ITU‐D/Statistics/Pages/stat/default.aspx
4
 Calculated as total estimated internet users divided by total population, from a 2010 RURA survey. See, Ministry of Youth and 
ICT, “Measuring ICT sector performance and Tracking ICT for Development (ICT4D)”; Daniel Nkubito, “ISSUE PAPER: Internet 
Connectivity and Affordability in Rwanda,” REF. NO: 002/12/2012, http://ppd.rw/wp‐content/uploads/2012/12/internet‐
connectivity‐and‐affordability‐in‐Rwanda‐issue‐paper‐Final.pdf
5
 Ministry of Youth and ICT, “Measuring ICT sector performance and Tracking ICT for Development (ICT4D).”  
6
 Ann Garrison, “Rwanda Shuts Down Independent Press,” Digital Journal, April 14, 2010, 
http://www.digitaljournal.com/article/290545; Beth Lewis Samuelson and Sarah Warshauer Freedman, “Language Policy, 
Multilingual Education, and Power in Rwanda,” Language Policy 9, no. 3 (June 2010), http://bit.ly/1bmZW5X.  
7
 “ICT Literacy Campaign Gets Under Way,” Rwanda Focus, January 21, 2013, http://bit.ly/1fDDDuz.  
8
 “Promoting Digital Opportunities for Women in Rwanda,” Rwanda Telecentre Network, December 22, 2012, 
http://www.rtnrwanda.org/index.php/en/news/100‐promoting‐digital‐opportunities‐for‐women‐in‐rwanda. Other major ICT 
projects that aim to expand access to ICTs include: the Kigali Metropolitan Network, the National Backbone , the IT innovation 
center, Wibro wireless broadband, the ICT Bus, One Laptop per Child, TracNet, and the Regional Communications Infrastructure 
Program. See, Rwanda Development Board, http://www.rdb.rw/.  
9
 Eric Bright, “MTN Launches Portable Renewable Energy System in Rwanda,” Rwanda Focus, January 29, 2013, 
http://focus.rw/wp/2013/01/mtn‐launches‐portable‐renewable‐energy‐system‐in‐rwanda/.  
10
 International Telecommunication Union, “Measuring the Information Society 2012,” http://www.itu.int/ITU‐
D/ict/publications/idi/index.html; Tom Jackson, “ITU Report Ranks Rwanda’s ICT Sector Most Dynamic,” Humanipo, October 16, 
2012, http://www.humanipo.com/news/1884/ITU‐report‐ranks‐Rwandas‐ICT‐sector‐most‐dynamic
11
 Net Index, “Rwanda,” Download Index, accessed February 24, 2013, http://www.netindex.com/download/allcountries/
603
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
R
WANDA
aiming to deploy a much wider National Last Mile broadband network in 2013 to expand internet 
penetration countrywide, complementing the 1,380 mile fiber-optic telecommunications network 
built in 2011 that links Rwanda to the undersea cables running along the East African coast.
12
As a  result of these  infrastructural developments,  internet prices are  decreasing.  In 2012, the 
Broadband Systems Corporation, a local service provider, charged monthly fees of about US$30 for 
single users and $46 for multiple users, while the cost of using the  internet  in a cybercafe  is 
approximately $1.28 for 30 minutes.
13
Mobile phone penetration in Rwanda is significantly higher than that for internet access, growing 
from 40 percent in 2011 to over 50 percent in 2012, according to the ITU, while government 
figures noted a penetration rate of 57 percent in May 2013.
14
This growth has been largely a result 
of increasing competition between the three main mobile phone operators—MTN, TIGO and 
AIRTEL
15
—whose  respective  market  share  is  64  percent, 34  percent,  and  2 percent.
16
Rural 
populations have a comparatively high mobile phone usage rate compared to rural internet access 
rates,
17
as access has been made easier by a well-developed mobile phone network that covers 
nearly 98 percent of the population.
18
Innovative initiatives targeting rural populations have further 
encouraged increased mobile phone and internet usage, such as the e-Soko (“e-market”) program 
created by the Rwanda Development Board that provides farmers with real-time information about 
market prices for their agricultural produce on their mobile devices.
19
 
Internet access via mobile phones has been available since 2007, but the high cost of data-enabled 
handsets  and  limited  bandwidth  restrained  its  popularity  in  the  first  few  years.  With  the 
government-sponsored  fiber-optic  cable  expansion  project  completed  in  early  2011,  internet 
services  throughout  the  country  have  improved,  facilitating  increased  mobile  phone  internet 
access.
20
As of September 2012, mobile internet tariffs range from 20 Rwfr/Mb to 50 Rwfr/Mb 
(US$0.03/Mb  to  $0.08/Mb),  and  the  three  mobile  internet  companies—MTN,  TIGO  and 
AIRTEL—offer their customers daily bundles at 1,000 Rwfr, 800 Rwfr and 650 Rwfr (US$1.52, 
12
 The fiber‐optic project is meant to boost access to various broadband services, increase electronic commerce, and attract 
foreign direct investment through business process outsourcing. “Rwanda Completes $95 Mln Fibre Optic Network,” Reuters 
Africa, March 16, 2011, http://af.reuters.com/article/investingNews/idAFJOE72F07D20110316
13
 Laurent Kamana, “National Backbone Reduces Internet Prices, Increases Speed,” New Times, February 28, 2012, 
http://www.newtimes.co.rw/news/index.php?i=15282&a=64384.  
14
 “Rwanda Mobile Penetration Tops 57%,” Biztech Africa, May 1, 2013, http://bit.ly/13L8xYk.  
15
 Airtel and Tigo have the same tariffs for on‐net (RWF20 or US$0.03) and East Africa mobile (RWF120  orUS$0.18) telephone 
tariffs. TIGO remains with the highest off‐net (RWF90  or US$0.13) and international (RWF240  or US$0.36) tariffs. MTN charges 
RWF60 per minute both for off‐net and EAC tariffs. MTN dominates the outgoing voice traffic with 53 percent of on‐net traffic; 
49 percent of off‐net traffic and 89 percent of international voice traffic. See, RURA, “Statistics and Tariff Information in 
Telecom Sector as of September 2012,” Republic of Rwanda, http://bit.ly/GzwThp.  
16
 RURA, “Statistics and Tariff Information in Telecom Sector as of September 2012.” 
17
 As illustrated by an August 2011 report from MTN Rwanda, one of the largest telecom operators in the country, which stated 
that the majority (60 percent) of its mobile voice users resides outside of Kigali. See, Saul Butera, “Rwanda: High Costs Affecting 
Rural Internet Penetration,” New Times, August 15, 2011, http://bit.ly/1aFj4aU.  
18
 RURA, “Statistics and Tariff Information in Telecom Sector as of September 2012.”  
19
 Ruth Kang’ong’oi, “Rwanda Telecenter Network Introduces Web 2.0 to Farmers,” CIO East Africa, November 15, 2011, 
http://www.cio.co.ke/view‐all‐top‐stories/4482‐rwanda‐telecenter‐network‐introduces‐web‐20‐to‐farmers.html.  
20
 MasimbaTafirenyika, “Information Technology Super‐charging Rwanda’s Economy,” Africa Renewal, April 2011, 
http://www.un.org/ecosocdev/geninfo/afrec/vol25no1/rwanda‐information‐technology.html.  
604
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested