download pdf file on button click in asp.net c# : Online pdf metadata viewer control application utility azure web page wpf visual studio FOTN%202013_Full%20Report_069-part1575

F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
S
YRIA
party. Publicizing  problems  faced  by  religious  and ethnic  minorities  or  corruption  allegations 
related to the ruling family, such as those of Assad’s cousin Rami Makhlouf, are also off limits. Most 
Syrian users are careful not only to avoid such sensitive topics when writing online, but also to 
avoid visiting blocked websites.
34
However, the period of May 2012 to April 2013 witnessed a 
large number of local Syrian users expressing opposition to Assad, his father, Makhlouf, the Baath 
party, and certain ethnic or sectarian groups.
35
Pro-regime forces have employed a range of tactics to manipulate online content and discredit news 
reports or those posting them, though it is often difficult to directly link those who are carrying out 
these activities with the government. Most notable has been the emergence of the Syrian Electronic 
Army (SEA)  since April 2011, a pro-government hacktivist group that targets the websites  of 
opposition forces and human rights websites, often shutting them down (see “Violations of User 
Rights”). For news websites and other online forums based in the country, it is common for writers 
to receive phone calls from government officials offering “directions” for how to cover particular 
events.
36
The Syrian government also pursues a policy of supporting and promoting websites that 
publish pro-government materials in an attempt to popularize the state’s version of events. These 
sites typically cite the reporting of the official state news  agency SANA, with  the same exact 
wording often evident across multiple websites. Since early 2011, this approach has also been used 
to promote the government’s perspective about the uprising and subsequent military campaign.
37
Social media has played a crucial role in the Syrian uprising, though its primary utility has been 
information sharing rather than planning street protests. The “Syrian Revolution 2011” Facebook 
page, which by March 2013 had over 750,000 members from both inside and outside the country, 
has been a vital source of information for dissidents.
38
As the Syrian government shifted to the use 
of heavy arms and missiles against opposition fighters, the role of citizen journalists has shifted from 
live event coverage to documenting the bloody aftermath of an attack. Several YouTube channels 
belong to armed rebels, particularly Islamist groups. Both Facebook and YouTube have removed 
content related to the Syrian uprising, mainly due to content that promotes violence or contains 
graphic content, such as videos of torture or killing. Hundreds of thousands of videos have been 
posted to YouTube by citizen journalists, mostly documenting attacks. A Syrian group working on 
categorizing YouTube videos and sharing them via a platform called “OnSyria” had posted almost 
200,000 videos as of April 2013.
39
Syria's  constitution  provides  for  freedom  of  opinion  and  expression,  but  these  are  severely 
restricted in practice, both online and offline. Furthermore, a handful of laws are used to prosecute 
34
 Email communication from a Syrian blogger. Name was hidden. 
35
 Interview, via Skype, with a Syrian activist. Damascus. November 2012. Name is hidden. 
36
 Guy Taylor, “After the Damascus Spring: Syrians search for freedom online.” 
37
 Guy Taylor, “After the Damascus Spring: Syrians search for freedom online.” 
38
 “The Syrian Revolution 2011 Facebook Statistics,” Socialbakers.com, accessed March 31, 2013, 
http://www.socialbakers.com/facebook‐pages/420796315726‐the‐syrian‐revolution‐2011. 
39
 See http://onsyria.org/ 
V
IOLATIONS OF 
U
SER 
R
IGHTS
685
Online pdf metadata viewer - add, remove, update PDF metadata in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Allow C# Developers to Read, Add, Edit, Update and Delete PDF Metadata
add metadata to pdf file; search pdf metadata
Online pdf metadata viewer - VB.NET PDF metadata library: add, remove, update PDF metadata in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Enable VB.NET Users to Read, Write, Edit, Delete and Update PDF Document Metadata
read pdf metadata java; pdf metadata online
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
S
YRIA
online users who express their opposition to the government. Citizen journalists and YouTube 
users are detained and often tortured by both government forces and, at times, rebel fighters. 
Surveillance tools are used to identify and harass those who oppose the Assad government, often 
through targeted malware attacks against their computer systems and online accounts. Finally, the 
websites  of  opposition  groups  and  human  rights  organizations  are  consistently  targeted  with 
cyberattacks from hackers linked to the government. 
Laws such as the penal code, the 1963 State of Emergency Law, and the 2001 Press Law are used to 
control traditional media and arrest journalists or internet users based on vaguely worded terms 
such  as  threatening  “national  unity”  or  “publishing  false  news  that  may  weaken  national 
sentiment.”
40
Defamation offenses are punishable by up to one year in prison if comments target the 
president and up to six months in prison for libel against other government officials, including 
judges, the military, or civil servants.
41
The judiciary lacks independence and its decisions are often 
arbitrary. Furthermore, some civilians have been tried before military courts. 
Since anti-government protests broke out in February 2011, the authorities have detained hundreds 
of internet users, including several well-known bloggers and citizen journalists. However, many of 
those targeted are not known for their political activism, making the reasons behind their arrest 
often unclear. This arbitrariness has raised fears that users could be arrested at any time for even the 
simplest online activities—posting on a blog, tweeting, commenting on Facebook, sharing a photo, 
or uploading a video—if it is perceived to threaten the regime’s control. Veteran blogger Ahmad 
Abu al-Khair was taken into custody in February 2011 while traveling from Damascus to Banias and 
was later to released, though he has remained in hiding.
42
More recently, in an effort to pressure al-
Khair to turn himself in, security forces have twice detained his brother, once for a period of 60 
days.
43
Bassel Khartabil, an open source activist and recipient of the 2013 Index on Censorship 
Digital Freedom Award, remains in prison after he was taken by authorities without explanation in 
March 2012.
44
Human rights activists who work online are also targeted by the government. Authorities raided the 
offices  of  the  Syrian Center for Media  and Freedom of Expression (SCM)  in February 2012, 
arresting 14 employees.
45
SCM member and civil rights blogger Razan Ghazzawi
46
was released 
after 22 days in detention and fled to Sweden.
47
Five members remain in prison and face up to 15 
years for “publicizing terrorist acts” over their role in documenting human rights violations by the 
40
 Articles 285, 286, 287 of the Syrian Penal Code. 
41
 Article 378 of the Syrian Penal Code. 
42
 Anas Qtiesh, “Syrian Blogger Ahmad Abu al‐Khair Arrested This Morning,” Global Voices Online, February 20, 2011, 
http://advocacy.globalvoicesonline.org/2011/02/20/syrian‐blogger‐ahmad‐abu‐al‐khair‐arrested‐this‐morning/
43
 Email communication with activist in Syria who wished to remain anonymous, April  2012. 
44
 William Echikson, “Supporting freedom of expression in all forms,” Google – Europe Blog, March 23, 2013, 
http://googlepolicyeurope.blogspot.co.uk/2013/03/supporting‐freedom‐of‐expression‐in‐all.html.  
45
 Maha Assabalani, “My colleagues are in prison for fighting for free expression,” UNCUT ‐ Index on Censorship, May 11, 2012, 
http://uncut.indexoncensorship.org/2012/05/my‐colleagues‐are‐in‐prison‐for‐fighting‐for‐free‐expression/.  
46
 Jared Malsin, “Portrait of an Activist: Razan Ghazzawi, the Syrian Blogger Turned Exile,” Time, April 2, 2013, 
http://world.time.com/2013/04/02/portrait‐of‐an‐activist‐meet‐razan‐ghazzawi‐the‐syrian‐blogger‐turned‐exile/.  
47
 An interview with Syrian blogger via Skype. February 2013, name is hidden.  
686
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
C#.NET edit PDF bookmark, C#.NET edit PDF metadata, C#.NET C#.NET read barcodes from PDF, C#.NET OCR scan PDF. C# ASP.NET Document Viewer, C# Online Dicom Viewer
pdf metadata editor; add metadata to pdf programmatically
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
Create PDF Online. Convert PDF Online. WPF PDF Viewer. View Image to PDF. Image: Remove Image from PDF Page. Edit URL. Bookmark: Edit Bookmark. Metadata: Edit, Delete
acrobat pdf additional metadata; extract pdf metadata
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
S
YRIA
Syrian  regime.
48
The  organization’s  founder  and  director,  Mazen  Darwich,  remained  in 
incommunicado detention as of March 2013.
49
Once  in  custody,  citizen  journalists,  bloggers,  and  other  detainees  reportedly  suffered  severe 
torture  on  behalf  of  government  authorities.  Although  the  precise  number  is  unknown,  it  is 
estimated that dozens of individuals have been tortured to death for filming protests or abuses and 
then uploading them to YouTube.
50
In some cases, the Syrian army appeared to deliberately target 
online activists and photographers all across the country. In one high-profile case from February 
2012, Anas al-Tarsha, a videographer who documented unrest in the besieged city of Homs, was 
killed by a mortar round while filming the bombardment of the city's Qarabees District.
51
At least 
five of the citizen journalists who worked for the Damascus-based Shaam News Network, whose 
videos have been used extensively by international news organizations, were killed during 2012 and 
early 2013. Among them were Ghaith Abd al-Jawad and Amr Badir al-Deen Junaid, both from 
Qaboun  Media  Center,  a  group  of  opposition  citizen  journalists  who  film  clashes  in  the 
neighborhood  of  Qaboun  and  publish  the  unattributed  videos  online.
52
In  response  to  such 
brutality, hundreds of activists have gone into hiding and dozens have fled the country, fearing that 
arrest may not only mean prison, but also death under torture.
53
Attacks on activists and citizen journalists were not limited to Syrian government forces. The Free 
Syrian  Army  (FSA),  the  opposition  armed  movement,  have  committed  many  attacks  on 
videographers and citizen journalists, mainly in the suburbs of Aleppo. Since the “liberation” of 
Aleppo province, activists and photographers were targeted by FSA fighters more than they were 
targeted by the Syrian government.
54
Further, “Al Nusra Front” (Jabhat al Nusra), a group of armed 
extremists, have arrested tens of young citizen journalists for weeks, and in one incident, opened 
fire on them for filming a protest in Bostan al Qaser in Aleppo.
55
Competition among activists has also led to violations against each other. In one case, a citizen 
journalist used armed thugs to kidnap the administrator of a competing Facebook page for media 
groups, aiming to shut it down. The victim sought help from another armed group, who, in turn, 
abducted the first individual. Both of the kidnapped group administrators were beaten to provide 
passwords of their Facebook accounts. Eventually, both men were released.
56
Anonymous communication is possible online but increasingly restricted. Registration is required 
upon purchasing a cell phone, though over the past year, activists have begun using the SIM cards of 
48
 “Syrian free speech advocates face terrorism charges,” Index on Censorship, May 17, 2013, 
http://www.indexoncensorship.org/2013/05/syria‐there‐are‐not‐enough‐prisons‐for‐the‐free‐word/.  
49
 Skype interview with Syrian activist, March 2013. The name is hidden. 
50
 Interview via Skype with A.A, Human Rights Lawyer in Damascus, December 12, 2011. Name is hidden. 
51
 Committee to Protect Journalists, Anas al‐Tarsha, February 24, 2012. http://www.cpj.org/killed/2012/anas‐al‐tarsha.php , 
visited on December 2012. 
52
 Committee to Protect Journalists, Ghaith Abd al‐Jawad, March 10, 2013, available at http://www.cpj.org/killed/2013/ghaith‐
abd‐al‐jawad.php, visited March 31, 2013. 
53
 Interviews with two photographers who have taken refuge in Turkey, December 2011. 
54
 Interview with activist from Aleppo, via Skype, January 2013. Name is hidden.  
55
 Interview with lawyer from Aleppo. Istanbul, Turkey. January 2013. Name is hidden.  
56
 The author helped mediate this case, which occurred in the Damascus suburban area in February 2013. Names are hidden. 
687
VB.NET PDF - WPF PDF Viewer for VB.NET Program
C#.NET edit PDF bookmark, C#.NET edit PDF metadata, C#.NET C#.NET read barcodes from PDF, C#.NET OCR scan PDF. C# ASP.NET Document Viewer, C# Online Dicom Viewer
pdf remove metadata; change pdf metadata creation date
VB.NET PDF - Create PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
C#.NET edit PDF bookmark, C#.NET edit PDF metadata, C#.NET C#.NET read barcodes from PDF, C#.NET OCR scan PDF. C# ASP.NET Document Viewer, C# Online Dicom Viewer
endnote pdf metadata; pdf xmp metadata editor
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
S
YRIA
friends and colleagues killed in clashes with security forces in order to shield their identities. Cell 
phones of neighboring countries like Turkey and Lebanon have been widely used during 2012 and 
2013, notably  by Free  Syrian  Army  fighters.  Meanwhile,  activists and bloggers  released from 
custody reported being pressured by security agents to provide the passwords of their Facebook, 
Gmail, Skype, and other online accounts.
57
The “Law for the Regulation of Network Communication against Cyber Crime,” passed in February 
2012, requires websites to clearly publish the names and details of the owners and administrators.
58
The owner of a website or online platform is also required “to save a copy of their content and 
traffic data to allow verification of the identity of persons who contribute content on the network” 
for a period of time to be determined by the government.
59
Failure to comply may cause the 
website to be blocked and is punishable by a fine of between SYP 100,000 and 500,000 ($1,700 to 
$8,600). If the violation is found to have been deliberate, the website owner or administrator may 
face punishment of three months to two years imprisonment as well as a fine of SYP 200,000 to 1 
million ($3,400 to $17,000).
60
As of April 2013, however, the authorities were not vigorously 
enforcing these regulations. 
Surveillance  is  widespread  in  Syria,  as the  government  capitalizes  on  the  centralized  internet 
connection to intercept user communications. In early November 2011, Bloomberg reported that in 
2009 the Syrian government had contracted Area SpA, an Italian surveillance company, to equip 
them with an upgraded system that would enable interception, scanning, and cataloging of all e-
mail, internet, and mobile phone communication flowing in and out of the country. According to 
the report, throughout 2011, employees of Area SpA had visited Syria and began setting up the 
system  to monitor user  communications  in  near  real-time,  alongside graphics mapping  users’ 
contacts.
61
The exposé sparked protests in Italy and, a few weeks after the revelations, Area SpA 
announced that it would not be completing the project.
62
No update is available on the project’s 
status or whether any of the equipment is now operational. 
In a potential indication that the Syrian authorities were seeking an alternative to the incomplete 
Italian-made surveillance system, in March 2012 reports emerged of sophisticated phishing and 
malware attacks targeting online activists. The U.S.-based Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) 
reported that malware called “Darkcomet RAT” and “Xtreme RAT” had been found on activists’ 
computers and were capable of capturing webcam activity, logging keystrokes, stealing passwords, 
57
 Interviews with released bloggers, names were hidden.  
58
 “Law of the rulers to communicate on the network and the fight against cyber crime” [in Arabic], Articles 5‐12, accessed 
March 8, 2012, http://www.sana.sy/ara/2/2012/02/10/pr‐399498.htm (site discontinued). Informal English translation: 
https://telecomix.ceops.eu/material/testimonials/2012‐02‐08‐Assad‐new‐law‐on‐Internet‐regulation.html.  
59
 “Law of communicating on the network and fighting against cyber crime” [in Arabic], Article 2, accessed March 8, 2012, 
http://www.sana.sy/ara/2/2012/02/10/pr‐399498.htm
60
 “Law of communicating on the network and fighting against cyber crime” [in Arabic], Article 8, accessed March 8, 2012, 
http://www.sana.sy/ara/2/2012/02/10/pr‐399498.htm. English translation: 
https://telecomix.ceops.eu/material/testimonials/2012‐02‐08‐Assad‐new‐law‐on‐Internet‐regulation.html.  
61
 Ben Elgin and Vernon Silver, “Syria Crackdown Gets Italy Firm’s Aid With U.S.‐Europe Spy Gear,” Bloomberg, November 3, 
2011, http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2011‐11‐03/syria‐crackdown‐gets‐italy‐firm‐s‐aid‐with‐u‐s‐europe‐spy‐gear.html
62
 Vernon Silver, “Italian Firm Said To Exit Syrian Monitoring Project,” Bloomberg, November 28, 2011, 
http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2011‐11‐28/italian‐firm‐exits‐syrian‐monitoring‐project‐repubblica‐says.html
688
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to create PDF document from other file
C#.NET edit PDF bookmark, C#.NET edit PDF metadata, C#.NET C#.NET read barcodes from PDF, C#.NET OCR scan PDF. C# ASP.NET Document Viewer, C# Online Dicom Viewer
adding metadata to pdf files; edit pdf metadata online
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view, annotate, create and convert PDF
This online HTML5 PDF document viewer library component offers reliable and excellent functionalities. C#.NET users and developers
remove pdf metadata; batch update pdf metadata
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
S
YRIA
and more. Both applications sent the data back to the same IP address in Syria and were circulated 
via e-mail and instant messaging programs.
63
Later, EFF reported the appearance of a fake YouTube 
channel carrying Syrian opposition videos that requested users’ login information and urged them 
to download an update to Adobe Flash, which was in fact a malware program that enabled the 
stealing of data from their computer. Upon its discovery, the fake site was taken down.
64
Cyberattacks have become increasingly common in Syria since February 2011, responding to the 
growing circulation of anti-Assad videos and other content online. Most notable has been the Syrian 
Electronic Army (SEA), a hacktivist group that emerged in April 2011. Though the group’s precise 
relationship to the regime is unclear, evidence exists of government links or at least tacit support. 
These include the SEA registering its domain
65
in May 2011 on servers maintained by the Assad-
linked Syrian Computer Society,
66
a June 2011 speech in which the president explicitly praised the 
SEA and its members,
67
and positive coverage of the group’s actions in state-run media.
68
The SEA’s key activities include hacking and defacing Syrian opposition websites and Facebook 
accounts, as well as targeting Western or other news websites perceived as hostile to the regime. 
However, some foreign websites from the academic, tourism, or online marketing sectors have also 
been targeted.
69
On March 17,
2013, the SEA hacked the website and Twitter feed of Human 
Rights Watch, redirecting to the SEA homepage.
70
The Mondaseh website was also hacked by the 
SEA in early January 2012.
71
The SEA is known to post private information, such as the phone 
numbers and addresses of anti-government activists, onto its Facebook pages.
72
Most of these pages 
have  subsequently  been  closed  by  Facebook  for  violating  its  terms  of  use.  However,  pro-
government media outlets continued to publish hacked e-mails from opposition figures. 
63
 Eva Galperin and Morgan Marquis‐Boire, “How to Find and Protect Yourself Against the Pro‐Syrian‐Government Malware on 
Your Computer,” Electronic Frontier Foundation, March 5, 2012, http://bit.ly/xsbmXy.  
64
 Eva Galperin and Morgan Marquis‐Boire, “Fake YouTube Site Targets Syrian Activists With Malware,” Electronic Frontier 
Foundation, March 15, 2012, https://www.eff.org/deeplinks/2012/03/fake‐youtube‐site‐targets‐syrian‐activists‐malware.  
65
 The Syrian Electronic Army, http://syrian‐es.com/
66
 Haroon Siddique and Paul Owen, “Syria: Army retakes Damascus suburbs,” Middle East Live (blog), The Guardian, January 30, 
2012, http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/middle‐east‐live/2012/jan/30/syria‐army‐retakes‐damascus‐suburbs
67
 “Speech of H.E. President Bashar al‐Assad at Damascus University on the situation in Syria,” official Syrian news agency 
(SANA), June 21, 2011, http://www.sana.sy/eng/337/2011/06/21/353686.htm . 
68
 See positive coverage on state‐run websites [in Arabic]: Thawra.alwedha.gov.sy, May 15, 2011, 
http://thawra.alwehda.gov.sy/_print_veiw.asp?FileName=18217088020110516122043; Wehda.alwedha.gov.sy, May 17, 2011, 
http://wehda.alwehda.gov.sy/_archive.asp?FileName=18235523420110517121437.  
69
 Helmi Noman, “The Emergence of Open and Organized Pro‐Government Cyber Attacks in the Middle East: The Case of the 
Syrian Electronic Army,” OpenNet Initiative, accessed August 14, 2012, http://opennet.net/emergence‐open‐and‐organized‐
pro‐government‐cyber‐attacks‐middle‐east‐case‐syrian‐electronic‐army. 
70
 Max Fisher, “Syria’s pro‐Assad hackers infiltrate Human Rights Watch Web site and Twitter feed”, The Washington Post, 
March 17, 2013. http://wapo.st/1eU9nKI.  
71
  See YouTube video by SEA celebrating the hacking: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=48q34HlIBOk.  
72
 Zeina Karam, “Syrian Electronic Army: Cyber Warfare From Pro‐Assad Hackers,” Huffington Post, September 27, 2011, 
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/09/27/syrian‐electronic‐army_n_983750.html
689
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to view, annotate, convert and print PDF in
Create PDF Online. Convert PDF Online. WPF PDF Viewer. View Image to PDF. Image: Remove Image from PDF Page. Edit URL. Bookmark: Edit Bookmark. Metadata: Edit, Delete
online pdf metadata viewer; edit pdf metadata
VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images
zonal information, metadata, and so on. Extract image from PDF free in .NET framework application with trial SDK components for .NET. Online source codes for
embed metadata in pdf; remove metadata from pdf acrobat
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
T
HAILAND
T
HAILAND
 Thai courts issued 161 orders to block 21,000 URLs in 2012, many for criticizing the
monarchy (see L
IMITS ON 
C
ONTENT
).
 A court fined Chiranuch Premchaiporn and gave her a suspended jail term for failing to
delete anti-royal user comments from her news website Prachatai (see V
IOLATIONS OF
U
SER 
R
IGHTS
).
 Sexagenarian Ampol Tangnopakul died in May 2012 while jailed for anti-royal texting
after a court denied medical parole (see V
IOLATIONS OF 
U
SER 
R
IGHTS
).
 A cabinet directive implemented in mid-2012 put Computer-related Crimes Act cases
under the jurisdiction of the Department of Special Investigation, which can intercept
electronic communications without a court order (see V
IOLATIONS OF 
U
SER 
R
IGHTS
).
 Activists petitioned lawmakers to reform lèse-majesté laws via social media, sparking
unprecedented public debate (see L
IMITS ON 
C
ONTENT
).
 Free government-sponsored Wi-Fi hotspots helped improve  access nationwide (see
O
BSTACLES TO 
A
CCESS
).
2012 
2013 
I
NTERNET 
F
REEDOM 
S
TATUS
N
OT 
F
REE
P
ARTLY 
F
REE
Obstacles to Access (0-25) 
11 
10 
Limits on Content (0-35) 
21 
21 
Violations of User Rights (0-40) 
29 
29 
Total (0-100) 
61 
60 
*0=most free, 100=least free
K
EY 
D
EVELOPMENTS
:
M
AY 
2012
A
PRIL 
2013 
P
OPULATION
70 million
I
NTERNET 
P
ENETRATION 
2012: 
27 percent
S
OCIAL 
M
EDIA
/ICT
A
PPS 
B
LOCKED
No
P
OLITICAL
/S
OCIAL 
C
ONTENT 
B
LOCKED
Yes
B
LOGGERS
/ICT
U
SERS 
A
RRESTED
No
P
RESS 
F
REEDOM 
2013
S
TATUS
Not Free
690
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
T
HAILAND
Thai citizens have been posting online commentary since the internet was commercialized in 1995,
1
but digital communication took on a particularly significant role after the 2006 military coup. Since 
then, both the red-shirt supporters of former Prime Minister Thaksin Shinawatra and their royalist, 
yellow-shirt opponents have utilized online resources to mobilize constituents, contributing to the 
democratic election of the Pheu Thai Party and Thaksin’s sister, Yingluck Shinawatra, as prime 
minister in July 2011.  
Thailand’s worst limitations on content and violations of user rights occur under computer crimes 
laws  enacted  after the  coup,  and  oppressive lèse-majesté provisions  in  the penal code,  which 
criminalize criticism of the nation’s revered monarchy. The state has blocked tens of thousands of 
individual  websites  and  social  media  pages,  and  imprisoned  several  people  for  disseminating 
information and opinion online or via mobile phone under these laws. Anyone can lodge a lèse-
majesté complaint against anyone else in Thailand, opening the door for various actors to use the 
charges  against  political  opponents  or  to  curb  civic  advocacy  in  a  highly  polarized  political 
environment.   
Those  expecting  that  Shinawatra  would  loosen  internet  restrictions  have  been  disappointed. 
Censorship has continued and even become more institutionalized since she took office. Vaguely-
worded  legislation  and  lax  adherence  to  due  process  has  led  to  disproportionately  harsh 
punishments given to ordinary users based on questionable evidence. In May 2012, news website 
administrator Chiranuch Premchaiporn was fined and given a suspended jail term for failing to 
delete comments left by readers in a verdict even the judge called unfair. She was luckier than 
Ampol Tangnopakul, who died in prison the same month. A court imprisoned him for 20 years in 
2011 for sending anti-royal text messages from his mobile phone—though the 61-year-old denied 
knowing how to use SMS.   
While  content  restrictions  and legal  harassment—  particularly  in   these  two  widely-reported 
cases—increase  self-censorship  in  online  discussions,  they  also  serve  to  further  politicize  the 
monarchy in the eyes of many Thais, and sparked serious civic efforts to promote lèse-majesté 
reform in 2012 and 2013. They have also inspired a burgeoning movement of politically conscious 
internet users, who favor greater protections for internet freedom. 
Declining prices, increased demand for alternative sources of information, and social networking 
tools are enticing Thais to spend more time online, and internet penetration was at 27 percent in 
1
 Phansasiri Kularb, “Communicating to the Mass on Cyberspace: Freedom of Expression and Content Regulation on the 
Internet,” in State and Media in Thailand During Political Transition, ed. Chavarong Limpattanapanee and Arnaud Leveau 
(Bangkok: Institute de Recherche sur l’Asie du Sud‐Est Contemporaine, 2007). 
I
NTRODUCTION
O
BSTACLES TO 
A
CCESS
691
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
T
HAILAND
2012.
2
Mobile telephony is more widespread, with penetration topping 120 percent, indicating 
some citizens own more than one device.
3
In households with internet access, 56 percent used fixed broadband connections while 15 percent 
relied on a modem in 2012, official figures show. Thailand suffers from an urban-rural connectivity 
divide: nearly 40 percent of internet users are based in major cities, twice the percentage of users 
based in rural areas.
4
The government has been slow to improve the fixed-line infrastructure and boost the development 
of  ICTs, even though lessening the  digital divide was a notable part of  the Pheu Thai party’s 
platform ahead of the July 2011 elections. This was due in part to the extensive flooding that struck 
Thailand in October 2011, the worst in decades. Internet penetration rose by only 2 percent in 
2011 and 3 percent in 2012.
5
This is expected to change in 2013 under the government’s “Smart 
Network” policy, which aims to expand access to 95 percent of the population by 2020.
6
The 
National Broadcasting and Telecommunications Commission (NBTC) has approved a THB 950 
million  ($31,980,000)  budget  for  a  Ministry  of  Information  and  Communication  Technology 
(MICT) project, “ICT Free Wi-Fi,” to add 300,000 internet access points across Thailand in 2013 
in cooperation with service providers.
Northern Chiang Mai province is undergoing a similar pilot 
scheme sponsored by telecommunications giant TRUE.
8
The government also plans to implement 
free hi-speed internet access in public places such as schools and hospitals. Internet users can get 
online for free at many public access points by registering for an account through a website run by 
government agencies in cooperation with telecommunications companies.
9
Partly as a result of efforts like this, official 2012 figures state 44 percent of Thai internet users paid 
nothing for access, and another 25 percent paid less than THB 200 ($6.73) a month.
10
These figures 
counted individuals using free public access; in households paying for monthly service, most paid 
THB  600-799  ($19-26).  Connections  reportedly  function  at  speeds  around  12  Mbps,
11
most 
reliably in the greater Bangkok area. In past years, users complained that connections were slower 
2
 International Telecommunication Union, “Percentage of Individuals Using the Internet, 2000‐2012,” 
http://www.itu.int/en/ITU‐D/Statistics/Pages/stat/default.aspx
International Telecommunication Union,” Mobile‐Cellular Telephone Subscriptions, 2000‐2012.” See also, National 
Broadcasting and Telecommunications Commission, “Thailand ICT Info,” accessed January 13, 2013, 
http://www2.nbtc.go.th/TTID/mobile_market/subscribers/
4
 National Statistical Office, “ Information and Communication Technology Survey in Household, 2012,” 
http://web.nso.go.th/en/survey/ict/ict_house12.htm
5
 National Broadcasting and Telecommunications Commission, “Thailand ICT Info,” accessed January 2013, 
http://www2.nbtc.go.th/TTID/mobile_market/subscribers/
6
 Asina Pornwasin, “‘Smart Thailand’ Project on Track,” The Nation, February 28, 2012, 
http://www.nationmultimedia.com/technology/SMART‐THAILAND‐PROJECT‐ON‐TRACK‐30176841.html
7
  “NBTC Issues Funds for Free Wi‐Fi,” Bangkok Post, January 17, 2013, 
http://www.bangkokpost.com/breakingnews/331263/nbtc‐issues‐funds‐for‐free‐wifi
8
 “ICT Free Wi‐Fi by TRUE With Up to 15 Hours Usage per Month,” Truemove, accessed January 2013, 
http://truemoveh.truecorp.co.th/activity/entry/632?ln=en http://truemoveh.truecorp.co.th/activity/entry/632?ln=en 
“Register for Free Wi‐Fi by TOT and MICT,” accessed April, 2013, http://vip.totwifi.com/ict‐nakhonratchasima/regis.php.  
10
 National Statistical Office, “Information and Communication Technology Survey.” A second official survey of nearly 24,000  
internet users found 35 percent of respondents using free service. See, “Thailand's Internet Users to Double,” Bangkok Post, 
July 4, 2013, http://www.bangkokpost.com/breakingnews/358289/thailand‐internet‐users‐to‐double‐to‐52‐million‐in‐2013
11
 “Download Index,” Net Index, accessed June 21, 2012, http://www.netindex.com/download/2,23/Thailand/.  
692
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
T
HAILAND
than advertised. However, in late 2012 and early 2013, there was no official information about user 
complaints, and anecdotally, speeds appeared to have improved.  
Mobile  phone  ownership  is  also  more  common  in  municipalities,  with  penetration  higher  in 
Bangkok and other cities than in rural areas.
12
The NBTC regulated maximum service rates for 
inland voice service via mobile phone in 2011. As of April 2012, service providers are not allowed 
to charge more than an average THB 0.99 ($0.03) per minute; existing contracts had to be adjusted 
to match these rates by January 1, 2013.
13
While SMS messaging is popular, the percentage of 
people accessing the internet via mobile phone is less than 10 percent.
14
Smartphone use is expected to change this. By late 2011, sales of smartphones surpassed those of 
feature phones for the  first  time and an estimated four million people subscribed to internet-
capable third-generation (3G) services. Declining costs—smartphones averaged THB 3,000 ($100) 
each in early 2012—are accelerating this trend.
15 
While political and legal disputes have repeatedly 
delayed the licensing process for 3G mobile phone service and wireless broadband, the NBTC 
granted  three  corporations, Advanced  Info  Service, DTAC Network and Real Future, 15-year 
licenses to provide users with 2.1GHz and 3G service in December 2012,
16
which is expected to 
drive mobile phone penetration to 130 percent in 2016.
17
The licenses are conditional on providers 
reducing service costs by 15 percent, increasing geographical coverage to 80 percent in 4 years, 
maintaining connection speeds specified by the NBTC, and protecting the rights of consumers.
18
The government has also tried to improve access to devices and hardware through projects like the 
MICT’s  “One Tablet per  Child,”  which  aims  to  distribute  free  tablets  loaded  with  education 
software to all first-year primary school students.
19
Critics argue the program distracted public 
attention away from other factors affecting education, such as poor teacher performance.
20
In recent years, the Thai telecommunications market has liberalized and diversified. Out of nine 
National  Internet  Exchanges  that  connect  to  the  international  internet,  the  government-run 
Communication  Authority  of  Thailand  (CAT)  Telecom  operates  two,  including  the  country’s 
12
 National Statistical Office, “Information and Communication Technology Survey.” 
13 
“How Will the Adjustment in Mobile Phone Service Fee in Thailand Affect the Service Provider?,” Phoenix Capital Group, 
January 29, 2013, http://www.thephoenixcapitalgroup.com/how‐will‐the‐adjustment‐in‐mobile‐phone‐service‐fee‐in‐thailand‐
affect‐the‐service‐providers/
14
 National Statistical Office, “Information and Communication Technology Survey.” 
15
 Suchit Leesa‐nguansuk, “Smartphones to Rule the Roost,” Bangkok Post, May 15, 2012, 
http://www.bangkokpost.com/business/telecom/293824/smartphones‐to‐rule‐roost.  
16
 Sirivish Toomgum, “NBTC clears legal hurdle, ready to issue 3G licences,” The Nation, December 4, 2012, 
http://www.nationmultimedia.com/business/NBTC‐clears‐legal‐hurdle‐ready‐to‐issue‐3G‐licence‐30195554.html
17
 Business Monitor International, “Thailand Telecommunications Report Q4 2012”,  
http://www.marketresearch.com/Business‐Monitor‐International‐v304/Thailand‐Telecommunications‐Q4‐7147954/; and 
“Thailand Telecommunications Report Q3 2012,” June 12, 2012, http://www.marketresearch.com/Business‐Monitor‐
International‐v304/Thailand‐Telecommunications‐Q3‐7027556/
18
 Komsan Tortermvasana, “3G Rules Simplified, N‐1 Rule Scrapped,” Bangkok Post, April 11, 2012, 
http://www.bangkokpost.com/lite/topstories/288345/3g‐rules‐simplified‐n‐1‐rule‐scrapped 
19
 International Telecommunication Union, “One Tablet per Child Policy: Stepping Up Education Reform in Thailand,” January 
18, 2013, http://bit.ly/1azRf3G.  
20
 “Let Them Eat Tablets,” Economist, July 16, 2012, http://www.economist.com/node/21556940.  
693
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
T
HAILAND
largest.
21 
As of mid-2012, there were over 100 ISPs with active licenses, though 10 provided most 
of  the  connection  services  for  individual  consumers  and  households.
22 
Among  them,  True 
Internet—a subsidiary of the communications conglomerate True Corporation, which also controls 
Thailand's third-largest mobile phone operator True Move—had a 40 percent share of the high-
speed  internet market by March  2013;
23
the state-owned Telephone Organization of Thailand 
controlled 33 percent in late 2012,
24
while the private 3BB controlled 28 percent.
25 
The three main 
mobile phone service providers are the Singaporean-owned Advanced Info Service, the Norwegian-
controlled DTAC, and True Corporation’s True Move. The first two operate under concessions 
from TOT and CAT, an allocation system that does not entirely enable free-market competition. 
Legislation creating a single regulatory body for both the broadcast and telecommunications sectors 
passed  parliament  in  late  2010.  After  a  long  and  dispute-filled  selection  process,  the  senate 
appointed the members of the new NBTC in September 2011. From among the 11 commissioners, 
5 are from the military, reflecting the army’s deep interests in the communications sector. The 
remaining members are three former bureaucrats, two civil society representatives, and one police 
officer.
26
Some  observers have complained  that  the  NBTC  lacks  commissioners with industry 
experience that the regulatory structure is incapable of dealing with converging communications 
platforms, and that coordination across different parts of the commission is weak.
27
Despite these 
shortcomings, the NBTC’s decisions and proposed plans regarding the telecommunications sector 
thus far are largely viewed as fair.
28 
In 2012, Thai courts blocked almost 21,000 URLs, including thousands for anti-royal content. Just 
5,000  URLs  had  been  blocked  the  previous  year.  In  a  new  development,  however,  activists 
effectively used digital tools to drive public debate on lèse-majesté. While petitions demanding 
reform have  yet to  see  concrete results,  the  support and  media  coverage they  attracted were 
unprecedented.  Manipulation  of online  debate by paid commentators declined, a sign that the 
activity observed in 2011 was probably tied to the election campaigns.  
Restrictions on content have expanded in recent years in both scale and scope, although the Thai 
government has been blocking some internet content since 2003, when it implemented controls on 
21 
Internet Information Research Network Technology Lab [in Thai], National Electronics and Computer Technology, accessed 
July 2013, http://internet.nectec.or.th/webstats/internetmap.current.iir?Sec=internetmap_current
22 NBTC, “List of Licensed Telecommunications Businesses” [in Thai], accessed July 2013, http://apps.nbtc.go.th/license/
23
 “TRUE Invest Ten Thousand Million to Increase Market Share” [in Thai],  Jasmine, March 30, 2013, 
http://www.jasmine.com/news_industry_detail_th.asp?ID=2805
24
 Both CAT Telecom and TOT are supervised by the MICT. 
25 
NBTC, “Telecommunication Market Report Q3 2012” [in Thai], http://bit.ly/19NLMEi.    
26
 Usanee Mongkolporn, “Strong Military Role in NBTC,” The Nation, September 6, 2011, 
http://www.nationmultimedia.com/home/Strong‐military‐role‐in‐NBTC‐30164583.html
27
 Don Sambandaraksa, “Thai Regulator Lacks Unity,” Telecomasia (blog), October 7, 2011, 
http://www.telecomasia.net/blog/content/thai‐regulator‐lacks‐unity
28
 Komsan Tortermvasana, “NBTC Approves Spectrum, Broadcasting Master Plans,” Bangkok Post, March 22, 2012, 
http://www.bangkokpost.com/business/telecom/285448/nbtc‐approves‐spectrum‐broadcasting‐master‐plan
L
IMITS ON 
C
ONTENT
694
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested