download pdf file on button click in asp.net c# : Change pdf metadata Library application component .net html windows mvc FOTN%202013_Full%20Report_07-part1576

F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
A
RMENIA
launched in advance of the May 2012 parliamentary elections.
28
The website received more than 
1,000 reports from citizens, NGOs, and political parties, mostly related to bribes, problems with 
the activities of local electoral commissions, violations of advertisement laws, and mistakes in 
electoral  lists.  The  police  and  the  Central  Electoral Commission  officially  responded  to some 
reports and claimed that others were not confirmed or were misinformed. In contrast, mobile 
phones (bulk SMS or voice messages) are not used during political campaigns due to the limited 
peak capacity of networks. 
Article  27  of  the  Constitution  of  the  Republic  of  Armenia  guarantees  freedom  of  speech 
irrespective of the source, person, and place. The  right  to freedom of speech declared in the 
constitution is universal and applicable to both individuals and media editorials. In 2005, Armenian 
media legislation changed significantly with the adoption of the Law of the Republic of Armenia on 
Mass Media
29
(also referred to as the Media Law). One the most positive changes in Armenian 
media legislation was the adoption of unified regulation for all types of media content irrespective 
of  audience,  technical  means,  and  dissemination  mechanisms.  The  Television  and  Radio  Law 
contains additional requirements toward content delivery, but it does not regulate news delivery 
and only addresses the issues of broadcasting erotic and horror programs, as well as the time frame 
for  advertising, the mandatory broadcast  of official communications, and  the rules on election 
coverage and other political campaigns. Content delivered thorough a mobile broadcasting platform 
or the internet are not subject to specific regulation.  
Armenian criminal legislation grants journalists protection of their professional rights. According to 
Article 164 of the Criminal Code of the Republic of Armenia, “hindrance to the legal professional 
activities of a journalist, or forcing the journalist to disseminate information or not to disseminate 
information, is punished with a fine in the amount of 50-150 minimal salaries, or correctional labor 
for up to 1 year. The same actions committed by an official abusing one’s official position, is 
punished with correctional labor for up to 2 years, or imprisonment for the term of up to 3 years, 
by deprivation of the right to hold certain posts or practice certain activities for up to 3 years.”
30
However, neither criminal law nor media legislation clearly defines who qualifies as a journalist, 
whether he or she must be an employee of a media outlet, or if he or she could be an individual or 
freelance reporter or a blogger.  
In 2010, Armenia abolished criminal liability for insult and slander
31
and introduced the concept of 
moral damage compensation for public defamation.
32
However, even before these amendments, no 
28
 “Armenian elections monitoring: Crowdsourcing + public journalism + mapping,” Internews, August 28, 2012, 
https://innovation.internews.org/blogs/armenian‐elections‐monitoring‐crowdsourcing‐public‐journalism‐mapping. 
29
 The Law of the Republic of Armenia on Mass Media. Adopted by National Assembly on December 13, 2003. Official Bulletin 
29 January 2004 No 29/6(25).   
30
 Article 164, Criminal Code of the Republic of Armenia as amended on January 6, 2006.  
31
 Official Bulletin of the Republic of Armenia 2 May 2003, No 25(260). 
32
 Concept of compensation for moral damage caused by defamation was introduced by adding Article 1087.1 to the Civil Code 
of the Republic of Armenia. Official Bulletin of the Republic of Armenia 23 June 2010 No 28(762).  
V
IOLATIONS OF 
U
SER 
R
IGHTS
65
Change pdf metadata - add, remove, update PDF metadata in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Allow C# Developers to Read, Add, Edit, Update and Delete PDF Metadata
google search pdf metadata; view pdf metadata
Change pdf metadata - VB.NET PDF metadata library: add, remove, update PDF metadata in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Enable VB.NET Users to Read, Write, Edit, Delete and Update PDF Document Metadata
c# read pdf metadata; pdf metadata
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
A
RMENIA
criminal cases against journalists were recorded since the adoption of a new criminal code in 2003. 
Defamation  is  widely  used  by Armenian  politicians  to restrict  public  criticism, but  it has not 
necessarily been used to combat oppositional viewpoints or media independence. However, the 
principle of requiring politicians to be more tolerant of public criticism is not a widely adopted 
legal practice in Armenia.  
Since 2003, when the concept of cybercrime was first introduced in the Armenian criminal code,
33
criminal  prosecution for crimes such as illegal pornography or  copyright infringements on the 
internet demonstrates that Armenian law enforcement authorities follow the best practices of the 
European legal system, and neither service providers nor hosting service owners have been found 
liable  for  illegal  content  stored  on  or  transmitted  through  their  system  without  their  actual 
knowledge of such content. Armenia is a signatory to the Council of Europe’s Convention on 
Cybercrime  and  further  development  of  Armenian  cybercrime  legislation  has  followed  the 
principles declared in the Convention. 
Armenian criminal legislation  also prohibits the dissemination  of expressions calling  for  racial, 
national, or religious enmity, as well as calls for the destruction of territorial integrity or the 
overturning of legitimate government or constitutional order.
34
Libeling or insulting an official has 
not been criminally prosecuted since 2008, when the relevant provision of the criminal code was 
excluded.  As  mentioned  previously,  the  Armenian  legal  system  is  based  on  the  principle  of 
universality,  meaning  that laws  are applicable online as they are offline. Therefore,  all crimes 
conducted  on  the  internet  are  prosecuted  similarly  to  those  that  are  conducted  elsewhere. 
Regarding liability for content published on websites hosted in other jurisdictions, Armenian legal 
theory and practice follows the principle of “place of presence,” meaning that the person is liable if 
he or she acts on the territory of that country. 
So far no cases have been recorded of imprisonment or other criminal sanctions or punishments for 
individuals accessing or disseminating information online. However, cases of civil liability, such as 
moral damages compensation for defamation, have been recorded several times.
35
The downloading 
of illegal materials or copyrighted publications is not prosecuted under Armenian legislation unless 
it is downloaded and stored for further dissemination, and the intention to disseminate must be 
proved.   
Anonymous  communication  is  not  prohibited  in  Armenia;  however,  it  is  up  to  the  website 
administrator  to  allow  or  prohibit  anonymous  communication  to  or  from  a  resource.  No 
registration is required for bloggers and online media outlets, though tax authorities may question 
bloggers or media outlets on revenue-related issues (advertisements or paid access). The use of 
encryption software by individuals or corporate users is not prohibited. However, the use of proxy 
33
 Cybercrime was defined under the new Criminal Code of the Republic of Armenia, adopted on April 18, 2003. The first 
prosecution case for the dissemination of illegal pornography via the internet was recorded in 2004.  
34
 Articles 226 and 301 of the Criminal Code of the Republic of Armenia.  
35
 “Demanding Financial Compensation from Armenian News Outlets is Becoming Trendy,” Media.am, March 3, 2011, 
http://media.am/en/media‐attacks.  
66
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
Document and metadata. outputFilePath = Program.RootPath + "\\" 3_optimized.pdf"; 'create optimizing TargetResolution = 150.0F 'to change image compression
edit pdf metadata acrobat; pdf metadata editor online
How to C#: Modify Image Metadata (tag)
Merge PDF Files; Split PDF Document; Remove Password from PDF; Change PDF Permission Settings. in PDF, C#.NET edit PDF bookmark, C#.NET edit PDF metadata, C#.NET
modify pdf metadata; batch pdf metadata editor
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
A
RMENIA
servers is not that common, due to the fact that since 2008, internet users have not faced significant 
problems with website blocking and traffic filtering.  
The collection of an individual’s personal data by the government is allowed only in accordance 
with a court decision in cases proscribed by the law. The monitoring and storing of customers’ data 
is illegal unless it is required for the provision of services. Personal data can be accessed by law 
enforcement bodies only in accordance with a court decision; however, in most cases courts usually 
support requests from law enforcement bodies for data retention. Law enforcement bodies usually 
file motions on data retention while investigating crimes; however, motions must be justified, and 
if not, the defense attorney may insist on the exclusion of evidence obtained as a result of such 
action.  
Armenian legislation does not require access and hosting service providers to monitor transmitted 
traffic or hosted resources. Moreover, the Law on Electronic Communication allows operators and 
service providers to store only data required for correct billing. Cybercafes and other access points 
are not required to identify clients, or to monitor or store their data and traffic information.  
Cases of physical violence towards online journalists or other staff have not been recorded, though 
such cases have happened with journalists from traditional media outlets.  
DDoS attacks were not prevalent in Armenia until the start of the campaign period for the 2012 
parliamentary elections. Blognews.am, an Armenian blogosphere aggregator, was attacked on the 
morning of April 20, 2012. Later, the iDitord.org website that covered election violations suffered 
from a DDoS attack. As a result, iDitord.org went down for several hours on the day of polling; 
however, as a result of external DDoS mitigation services, the website was able to resume normal 
functioning after four hours of inaccessibility while attacks continued. The culprits of the DDoS 
attack are still unknown. Interestingly, during election day, iDitord was the only Armenian web 
site which came under DDoS attack.
36
Additionally, during the presidential election on February 
18, 2013, the opposition media website Galatav.am suffered from a DDoS attack.
37
36
 “DDoS attacks becoming customary in Armenia?” Media.am, May 8, 2012, http://m.media.am/en/DDos‐attacks‐on‐websites.   
37
 “Website of Gala TV undergoes DDoS attack,” ArmInfo, February 18, 2013, http://arminfo.am/index.cfm?objectid=A313ACE0‐
79EA‐11E2‐83EBF6327207157C. 
67
VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
PDF Metadata Edit. Offer professional PDF document metadata editing APIs, using which VB.NET developers can redact, delete, view and save PDF metadata.
pdf metadata reader; pdf metadata viewer
C# PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net
Document and metadata. All object data. Program.RootPath + "\\" 3_optimized.pdf"; // create optimizing TargetResolution = 150F; // to change image compression
clean pdf metadata; remove pdf metadata online
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
A
USTRALIA
A
USTRALIA
 Broadband  access continued to  expand  for  online  users as  the  National  Broadband
Network reached more rural and remote communities (see O
BSTACLES TO 
A
CCESS
).
 Concerns over ISP filtering practices continued, as it was revealed that a number of
legitimate websites were accidentally blocked by ISPs who were trying to limit access to
a fraudulent website with the same IP address (see L
IMITS ON 
C
ONTENT
).
 Australia’s accession to the Council of Europe’s Convention on Cybercrime in 2012
raised concerns about additional requirements in the Australian legislation for ISPs to
monitor and store user data, especially in regard to the requirement to comply with
foreign preservation notices (see V
IOLATIONS OF 
U
SER 
R
IGHTS
).
2012 
2013 
I
NTERNET 
F
REEDOM 
S
TATUS
F
REE
F
F
REE
Obstacles to Access (0-25) 
Limits on Content (0-35) 
Violations of User Rights (0-40) 
10 
11 
Total (0-100) 
17
18 
*0=most free, 100=least free
K
EY 
D
EVELOPMENTS
:
M
AY 
2012
A
PRIL 
2013 
P
OPULATION
22 million
I
NTERNET 
P
ENETRATION 
2012: 
82 percent
S
OCIAL 
M
EDIA
/ICT
A
PPS 
B
LOCKED
No
P
OLITICAL
/S
OCIAL 
C
ONTENT 
B
LOCKED
No
B
LOGGERS
/ICT
U
SERS 
A
RRESTED
No
P
RESS 
F
REEDOM 
2013
S
TATUS
Free
68
C# PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file for C#
accordingly. Multiple metadata types of PDF file can be easily added and processed in C#.NET Class. Capable C#.NET: Edit PDF Metadata. PDF SDK
change pdf metadata; remove metadata from pdf online
C# TIFF: TIFF Metadata Editor, How to Write & Read TIFF Metadata
C# TIFF - Edit TIFF Metadata in C#.NET. Allow Users to Read and Edit Metadata Stored in Tiff Image in C#.NET Application. How to Get TIFF XMP Metadata in C#.NET.
delete metadata from pdf; batch edit pdf metadata
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
A
USTRALIA
Australia enjoys affordable, high-quality access to the internet and other digital media, and this 
access has continued to expand over the past few years with the rollout of the National Broadband 
Network. However, recent amendments to surveillance legislation and proposals to implement 
censorship  through  directives  to  internet  service  providers  (ISPs)  have  raised  concerns  about 
privacy and freedom of expression.
1
Although not currently law, there have been a number of 
proposals put forward on data retention, surveillance, and filtering in the course of the last two 
years.  
Additionally, in late 2012 Australia acceded to the Council of Europe’s Convention on Cybercrime, 
which brought into effect a number of obligations for ISPs to monitor, preserve, and store user 
data. However, the Australian legislation goes beyond the requirements set out in the Convention 
by requiring longer retention timelines for foreign preservation notices, and requiring ISPs to 
cooperate with any serious crime being investigated in Australia or overseas. 
In 1989, Australia’s Academic and Research Network (AARNet) made the country’s first internet 
connection with a 56 Kbps satellite link between the University of Melbourne and the University of 
Hawaii.
2
Today, the same connection to the United States is 200,000 times faster, and with the 
development of the high-speed National Broadband Network  (NBN)  in 2012,
3
all Australians, 
including those in more remote areas, will soon have access to an internet connection with a peak 
speed of at least 12 Mbps for its mixed network (fiber, wireless and satellite technology), while the 
fiber product will offer speeds from 100 Mbps to 1 Gbps.
4
Australia  has an internet penetration rate  of  approximately 82 percent as  of December 2012, 
according  to  the  International  Telecommunication  Union.
5
There  were  12.2  million  internet 
subscribers in Australia in December 2012 (excluding internet connections enabled through mobile 
phone handsets) and 17.4 million mobile handset subscribers.
6
The internet penetration rate is 
 
The 2012 rating for Australia was adjusted on the basis of updated scoring guidelines to best convey changes over time. 
1
 For a comprehensive overview of the legislative history of censorship in Australia see Libertus.net, “Australia’s Internet 
Censorship System,” accessed June 2010, http://libertus.net/censor/netcensor.html.  See also Australian Privacy Foundation, 
accessed June 2010, http://www.privacy.org.au
2
 Australia’s Academic and Research Network (AARNet), “AARNet Salutes the 20th Anniversary of the Internet in Australia,” 
news release, November 26, 2009, http://www.aarnet.edu.au/Article/NewsDetail.aspx?id=173
Roger Clarke, “A Brief History of the Internet in Australia,” May 5, 2001, http://www.rogerclarke.com/II/OzIHist.html;  
Roger Clarke, “Origins and Nature of the Internet in Australia,” January 29, 2004, http://www.rogerclarke.com/II/OzI04.html
3
 Australian Government, Department of Broadband, Communications and the Digital Economy, “National Broadband 
Network,” accessed March 2012, http://www.dbcde.gov.au/broadband/national_broadband_network.  
4
 NBN Co., “National Broadband Network,” accessed January 10, 2013, http://bit.ly/16U3Qvt.  
5
 International Telecommunication Union, “Percentage of Individuals Using the Internet,” accessed July 15, 2013, 
http://www.itu.int/en/ITU‐D/Statistics/Pages/stat/default.aspx  
6
 Australian Bureau of Statistics, “Internet Activity, Australia,” December 2012, http://bit.ly/18eYL3I.  
I
NTRODUCTION
O
BSTACLES TO 
A
CCESS
69
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
Able to change password on adobe PDF document in C#.NET. To C# Sample Code: Change and Update PDF Document Password in C#.NET. In
edit multiple pdf metadata; get pdf metadata
C# PDF Annotate Library: Draw, edit PDF annotation, markups in C#.
Able to edit and change PDF annotation properties such as font size or color. Abilities to draw markups on PDF document or stamp on PDF file.
batch pdf metadata; add metadata to pdf
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
A
USTRALIA
expected to  steadily  increase  with  the  implementation  of  the NBN,  which  includes  expanded 
wireless and satellite services in rural communities. Although internet access is widely available in 
locations such as libraries, educational institutions, and internet cafes, Australians predominantly 
access the internet from home, work, and increasingly through mobile phones. 
Access to the internet and other digital media is widespread in Australia. Australians have a number 
of internet connection options, including ADSL, ADSL 2+, wireless, cable, satellite, and dial-up.
7
Wireless systems can reach 99 percent of the population, while satellite capabilities are able to 
reach 100 percent. While the internet service provided by these systems can be slow, the expansion 
of the NBN means that all Australians will have access to high internet speeds.  Major ISPs such as 
Telstra offer financial assistance for internet connections to low-income families.
8
The phasing out 
of dial-up continues, with nearly 90 percent of internet connections now provided through other 
means. Once implemented, the NBN will eliminate the need for any remaining dial-up connections 
and make high-speed broadband available to Australians in remote and rural areas.
9
Age is a significant indicator of internet use, with 69 percent of Australians between the ages of 18 
and 24 accessing the internet at home on a daily basis and 75 percent of people 15 years or over 
reporting having used the internet over a 12 month period.
10
By contrast, only 31 percent of those 
65 years and over had used the internet in the same 12 months.
11
Approximately 50 percent of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders living in discrete indigenous 
communities (i.e. not major cities) have access to the internet, with 36 percent having internet 
access in the home.
12
In remote indigenous communities, 63 percent of the population had taken up 
mobile phone services in 2004.
13
However, not all indigenous communities have mobile phone 
coverage; the overall mobile phone penetration rate in Aboriginal communities is unknown.   
Australia has a mobile phone penetration rate of 106 percent, with many consumers using more 
than one SIM card or mobile phone.
14
Third generation (3G) mobile services are the driving force 
behind the recent growth, with 24.3 million mobile subscriptions operating in 2012.
15
7
 Australian Communications and Media Authority (ACMA), Communications Report, 2008–09 (Canberra: ACMA, 2009), 
http://www.acma.gov.au/webwr/_assets/main/lib311252/08‐09_comms_report.pdf
Australian Communications and Media Authority (ACMA), Communications Report, 2010‐11 (Canberra: ACMA, 2011), 
http://www.acma.gov.au/webwr/_assets/main/lib410148/communications_report_2010‐11.pdf
8
 Telstra, Telstra Sustainability Report 2011, accessed March 2013, http://bit.ly/1dPRUQw.  
9
 Australian Government National Broadband Network, “NBN Key Questions and Answers,” accessed June 2010. 
http://www.nbn.gov.au/content/nbn‐key‐questions‐and‐answers‐faqs
10
 Australian Bureau of Statistics, “Online @ Home,” accessed March 2012, http://bit.ly/mnrJiG.  
11
 Ibid. 
12
 Australian Bureau of Statistics, “Internet Access at Home,” accessed October 2010, 
http://www.abs.gov.au/AUSSTATS/abs@.nsf/Lookup/4102.0Chapter10002008. For a comprehensive report on indigenous 
internet use and access, see ACMA, Telecommunications in Remote Indigenous Communities (Canberra: ACMA, 2008), 
accessed June 2010, http://www.acma.gov.au/WEB/STANDARD/pc=PC_311397
13
 Australian Communications and Media Authority (ACMA), Communications Report, 2008‐2009 (Canberra: ACMA, 2008‐2009),  
http://www.acma.gov.au/webwr/_assets/main/lib311252/08‐09_comms_report.pdf. There is no equivalent data on 
indigenous communities in the more recent 2011‐2012 report. 
14
 International Telecommunication Union, “Mobile‐cellular telephone subscriptions,” accessed July 15, 2013, 
http://www.itu.int/en/ITU‐D/Statistics/Pages/stat/default.aspx  
70
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
A
USTRALIA
Internet access is affordable for most Australians. The government subsidizes satellite phones and 
internet connections for individuals and small businesses in remote and rural areas, where internet 
affordability is not comparable to that in metropolitan areas.
16
The government has adopted a strong policy of technological neutrality, also referred to as net 
neutrality.  There  are  no limits to  the  amount  of  bandwidth  that  ISPs can  supply.  While  the 
government does not  place  restrictions  on  bandwidth,  ISPs are  free to  adopt  internal  market 
practices of traffic  shaping.  Some  Australian  ISPs  and  mobile service providers practice traffic 
shaping (also known as data shaping) under what are known as fair-use policies. If a customer is a 
heavy peer-to-peer user, the internet connectivity for those activities will be slowed down to free 
bandwidth for other applications.
17
Like most other industrialized nations, Australia hosts a competitive market for internet access, 
with 81 medium-to-large ISPs as of June 2012, as well as a number of smaller ISPs.
18
Many of the 
latter are  “virtual”  providers,  maintaining only a retail  presence and offering  end users access 
through the network facilities of other companies; these providers are carriage service providers 
and  do  not  require  a  license.
19
Larger  ISPs,  which  are referred  to  as  carriers, own  network 
infrastructure and are required to obtain a license from the Australian Communications and Media 
Authority  (ACMA)  and  submit  to  dispute  resolution  by  the  Telecommunications  Industry 
Ombudsman (TIO).
20
Australian ISPs are co-regulated under Schedule 7 of the 1992 Broadcasting 
Services Act (BSA), meaning there is a combination of regulation by the ACMA and self-regulation 
by the telecommunications industry.
21
The industry’s involvement consists of developing industry 
standards and codes of practice.
22
The ACMA is the primary regulator for the internet and mobile telephony, and is responsible for 
enforcing Australia’s anti-spam law.
23
Its oversight is generally viewed as fair and independent, 
though there are some transparency concerns with regard to the classification of content. Small 
businesses and residential customers may file complaints about internet, telephone, and mobile-
phone services with the TIO,
24
which operates as a free and independent dispute-resolution service.  
15
 Australian Communications and Media Authority (ACMA), Communications Report, 2011‐2012 (Canberra: ACMA, 2001‐2012), 
http://www.acma.gov.au/webwr/_assets/main/lib550049/comms_report_2011‐12.pdf .  The Report was tabled to Parliament 
and released on Dec. 1, 2012. 
16
 Rural Broadband, “Welcome,” accessed June 2010, http://www.ruralbroadband.com.au
 
17
 Telstra, 19. 
18
 Australian Bureau of Statistics, “Internet Activity, Australia, June 2012,” http://bit.ly/R9RsDo.  
19
 Australian Bureau of Statistics, “Internet Activity, Australia, Dec. 2009.”, http://bit.ly/1fRWQpZ.  
20
 Australia Communications and Media Authority, “Carriage & Service Provider Requirements, accessed March 2013, 
http://www.acma.gov.au/WEB/STANDARD..PC/pc=PC_1622
21
 Australian Communications and Media Authority Act 2005, http://bit.ly/16U44mm ;  
Broadcasting Services Act 1992, http://www.austlii.edu.au/au/legis/cth/consol_act/bsa1992214/
ACMA, “Service Provider Responsibilities,” accessed June 2010, http://www.acma.gov.au/WEB/STANDARD/1001/pc=PC_90157.  
22
 Chris Connelly and David Vaile, “Drowning in Codes: An Analysis of Codes of Conduct Applying to Online Activity in Australia,” 
Cyberspace Law and Policy Centre, March 2012, http://cyberlawcentre.org/onlinecodes/report.pdf
23
 ACMA, “The ACMA Overview,” accessed March 2012, http://www.acma.gov.au/WEB/STANDARD/pc=ACMA_ORG_OVIEW ; 
ACMA, “About communications & media regulation,” accessed March 2012, 
http://www.acma.gov.au/WEB/STANDARD/pc=PUB_REG_ABOUT
24
 Telecommunications Industry Ombudsman, accessed March 2012, http://www.tio.com.au
71
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
A
USTRALIA
Australian law does not currently provide for mandatory blocking or filtering of websites, blogs, 
chat rooms, or platforms for peer-to-peer file sharing. Access to online content is far-reaching, and 
Australians are able to explore all facets of political and societal discourse, including information 
about human rights violations. The ability to openly express dissatisfaction with politicians and to 
criticize government policies is not hindered by the authorities, and complaints may be sent directly 
to the Telecommunications Industry Ombudsman.
25
However, the legal guidelines and technical 
practices by which ISPs filter illegal material on websites have raised some concerns in the past 
year. 
In 2010, the government proposed implementing a mandatory filtering system run through ISPs.
26
Draft legislation was proposed under the Rudd Labour government, and then put aside during the 
election in August 2010 when a minority government with Julia Gillard of the Labour Party came 
to power. While the Gillard government had stated that they might introduce legislation on this 
topic, there have been no formal proposals, bills, or further discussion on the matter since the 
election. Another election was planned for September 2013, but has been cancelled due to Kevin 
Rudd winning the Labour Party leadership vote, after which Gillard resigned and Rudd was sworn 
in as Prime Minister. So far, there have not been any claims by either party to introduce mandatory 
filtering. Despite the lack of mandatory filtering, ISPs still voluntarily block content from websites 
that are on Interpol’s blacklist and that contain child pornography. 
Controversy struck, however, in May 2013 when it  was revealed that a number of legitimate 
Australian websites not hosting any type of illegal or even controversial material had been blocked.  
Investigations  revealed  that  the  Australian  Security  and  Investment  Commission  was  using  an 
obscure provision (section 313) of the Telecommunications Act to request that a fraudulent website 
be blocked.
27
The notice by ASIC to the ISPs specified an IP address that contained the fraudulent 
website along with a number of legitimate websites, including that of Melbourne Free University. 
This is the first known incident of ASIC using s.313 to issue notices to ISPs to block non-Interpol 
material.  The use of section 313 in this matter is highly contentious. 
In  addition,  there  are  two  systems  in  place  that  regulate  internet  content  and  place  some 
restrictions on what can be viewed online. Under the first system, material deemed by the ACMA 
to be “prohibited content” is subject to take-down notices. The relevant ISP is notified by the 
ACMA  that  it  is  hosting  illicit  content,  and  it  is  then  required  to  take  down  the  offending 
material.
28
Under the Broadcasting Services Act, the following categories of online content are 
prohibited: 
25
 Ibid.    
26
 Alana Maurushat, Renee Watt, “Australia’s Internet Filtering Proposal in the International Context,” Internet Law Bulletin 12, 
no. 2 (2009); ACMA, “Service Provider Filtering”,  http://www.acma.gov.au/scripts/nc.dll?WEB/STANDARD/1001/pc=PC_90157 
27
 LeMay, R., “Interpol Filter Scope Creep:  ASIC Ordering Unilateral Website Blocks” (May, 15, 2013), accessed July 16, 2014,  
http://delimiter.com.au/2013/05/15/interpol‐filter‐scope‐creep‐asic‐ordering‐unilateral‐website‐blocks/  
28
 Internet Society of Australia, “Who Is an Internet Content Host or an Internet Service Provider (and How Is the ABA Going to 
Notify Them?” accessed June 2010, http://www.isoc‐au.org.au/Regulation/WhoisISP.html; 
L
IMITS ON 
C
ONTENT
72
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
A
USTRALIA
Any online content that is classified Refused Classification (RC) by the Classification Board, 
including  real  depictions  of  actual  sexual  activity;  child  pornography;  depictions  of 
bestiality; material containing excessive violence or sexual violence; detailed instruction in 
crime, violence, or drug use; and material that advocates the commission of a terrorist act. 
Content that is classified R 18+ and not subject to a restricted access system that prevents 
access by children, including depictions of simulated sexual activity; material containing 
strong, realistic violence; and other material dealing with intense adult themes.  
Content that is classified MA 15+, provided by a mobile premium service or a service that 
provides audio or video content upon payment of a fee and that is not subject to a restricted 
access system, including material containing strong depictions of nudity, implied sexual 
activity, drug use, or violence; very frequent or very strong coarse language; and other 
material that is strong in impact.
29
To date, there have not been any problems with this system of take-down notices being applied to 
videos, films, literature, or similar material with information of political or social consequence. In 
addition,  the government’s  general  disposition  is  to allow  adults  unfettered  access  to R  18+ 
materials while protecting children from exposure to inappropriate content. 
Under the second system, the ACMA may direct an ISP or content service provider to comply with 
the Code of Practice developed by the Australian Internet Industry Association (IIA) if the regulator 
decides that the provider is not already doing so. Failure to comply with such instructions may 
draw a maximum penalty of AUD 11,000 (approximately USD 11,500) per day. Other regulatory 
measures require ISPs to offer their customers a family-friendly filtering service.
30
This practice is 
known as voluntary filtering, since customers must select it as an option. 
RC content, including many forms of adult pornography, is generally not unlawful to use, access, 
possess, or create in Australia merely by virtue of its RC status. Only material that is otherwise 
legislatively  criminalized,  such  as  material  depicting  child  abuse  and  certain  terrorism-related 
content, is unlawful. Moreover, Australia has no X 18+ or R 18+ category for video and computer 
games. This means that extremely violent video games beyond the MA 15+ classification level are 
necessarily categorised as RC.
31
The 1995 Classification Act and the 1992 Broadcasting Services Act 
were amended in 2012 to now include an R 18+ category for video games.  The laws entered into 
force on January 1, 2013.  In the past, the lack of an R 18+ classification for video games led to 
some peculiar results with games such as Aliens vs. Predators initially given an RC classification which 
Internet Industry Association, “Guide for Internet Users,” March 23, 2008, http://bit.ly/1hfYKP7.  
29
 ACMA, “Prohibited Online Content,” accessed June 2010, http://www.acma.gov.au/WEB/STANDARD/pc=PC_90102.  
30
 Internet Industry Association (IIA), Internet Industry Code of Practice: Content Services Code for Industry Co‐Regulation in the 
Area of Content Services (Pursuant to the Requirements of Schedule 7 of the Broadcasting Services Act 1992), Version 1.0, 2008,  
http://www.acma.gov.au/webwr/aba/contentreg/codes/internet/documents/content_services_code_2008.pdf  
31
 Libertus.net, “Australia’s Internet Censorship System,” http://libertus.net/censor/netcensor.html
73
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
A
USTRALIA
was later amended to M 15+.
32
When a game is classified as RC, often the developer will slightly 
modify the game to ensure it receives either an R 18+or an M 15+ ranking.
33
The classification system suffers from a lack of transparency; the ACMA does not inform Australian 
content owners when it issues a take-down notice, and there is no mechanism available for owners 
or creators to challenge the classification of RC content. Only the ISP or similar intermediary 
hosting  the  material  may bring a challenge  to  the  Administrative  Appeals Tribunal  (AAT).  In 
February 2012, the Australian Law Reform Commission released their report on the introduction 
of a new classification scheme, with recommendations as to how the classification scheme should be 
amended and clarified.
34
However,  none  of the report’s recommendations are currently being 
considered by Parliament, and legislation is not expected to be introduced in 2013. 
There are no examples of online content manipulation by governments or partisan interest groups. 
Journalists, commentators, and ordinary users are not subject to censorship so long as their content 
does not amount to defamation or breach criminal laws, such as those against hate speech or racial 
vilification.
35
Nevertheless, the need to avoid defamation and, to a lesser extent, contempt of court 
has been a driver of self-censorship by both the media and ordinary users (see “Violations of User 
Rights”). For example, narrowly-written suppression orders are often interpreted by the media in 
an overly broad fashion so as to avoid contempt of court charges.
36
Aside from the restrictions on prohibited content, the incitement of violence, racial vilification, and 
defamation, Australians have access to a broad choice of online news sources that express diverse, 
uncensored  political  and  social  viewpoints.  Individuals  are  able  to  use  the  internet and other 
technologies both as sources of information and as tools for mobilization. In August and September 
of 2012, Australians vocalized their opinions about the Attorney-General’s proposal regarding data 
retention  and the  introduction  of  surveillance  mechanisms  that  would  store  users’ online  and 
mobile phone communications for two years.  The proposal was immensely unpopular with the 
industry,  civil  liberties  groups,  and  general  consumers.  Groups  such  as  Getup!  encouraged 
Australians to send e-mails and twitter messages to Nicola Roxon, the Attorney-General, to voice 
their concerns over the proposal.  As a result of the immense unpopularity of the data retention 
proposal, Roxon released a video on YouTube in which she attempted to clarify some of the key 
aspects of the proposal that had been criticized.
37
32
 Australian Government – Classification Review Board 2009, Alien vs. Predator – Review Board Decision Reasons, accessed 
March 2013,  http://www.classification.gov.au/About/Documents/Review%20Board%20decisions/DecisionReasons‐
AliensvsPredator‐Final‐4January2010.pdf
33
 See generally Andy Chalk, “OFLC reveals changes to Australian Fallout 3,”The Escapist, 13 August 2000, 
http://www.escapistmagazine.com/news/view/85646‐OFLC‐Reveals‐Changes‐To‐Australian‐Fallout‐3
34
 Australian Law Reform Commission Report 118, “Classification‐Content Regulation and Convergent Media” February 2012, 
http://www.alrc.gov.au/sites/default/files/pdfs/publications/final_report_118_for_web.pdf
35
 Jones v. Toben [2002] FCA 1150 (17 September 2002), http://www.austlii.edu.au/au/cases/cth/FCA/2002/1150.html
36
 Nick Title, “Open Justice – Contempt of Court” (paper presentation, Media Law Conference Proceedings, Faculty of Law, The 
University of Melbourne, February 2013). 
37
 Delimiter, “Roxon Makes Plea on YouTube,” September 11, 2012, http://delimiter.com.au/2012/09/11/data‐retention‐roxon‐
makes‐youtube‐plea/
74
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested