F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
T
UNISIA
|
In May 2012, the collective blog Nawaat launched a campaign to criticize the military after an army 
general confiscated two cameras belonging to Ramzi Bettibi, an investigative journalist working for 
the blog.  Bettibi  was  covering a military  court hearing  regarding protesters  killed  during the 
revolution.  Nawaat  criticized  the  military’s  lack  of  transparency  and  the  slow  pace  of  the 
investigation.  The  blog  also  reported  that  some  army  units  might  have  been  involved  in  the 
repression of protesters during the uprising, signaling a strong willingness to take on this powerful 
institution in Tunisian society.
48
While Tunisia has taken significant steps to promote internet access and halt online censorship, the 
country’s legal framework remains a significant threat to internet freedom. Delays in drafting a 
new constitution and establishing a new legal framework based on international norms continue to 
hold Tunisia back. Under laws from the Ben Ali era, the judiciary has continued to prosecute users 
over online expression. 
The National Constituent Assembly (NCA), elected in October 2011, is scheduled to adopt a new 
constitution over the summer of 2013. According to a draft released in April 2013, free speech is 
protected and “prior censorship” is prohibited. However, there is no explicit mention of the right 
to  access  the  internet,  despite  numerous  calls  from  activists  and  organizations.
49
Following 
negotiations with its coalition partners, Ennahda agreed to drop a clause criminalizing blasphemy in 
the constitution.
50
Concerns remain, however, over the possible insertion of clauses relating to the 
protection of  religion  or  “the  sacred.”  If  adopted,  such  a  clause  could  act  as a  constitutional 
restriction to freedom on the internet, where religious issues are currently debated more openly 
than in the mainstream media or on the streets.  
In a move that consolidated freedom of expression online, the Tunisian government finally moved 
to implement Decree-law 115 on Press, Printing and Publishing of 2011,
51
following a nationwide 
strike  by  journalists  in  October  2012.
52
The  law  recognizes  web  journalists  as  “professional 
journalists” and entitles them to the same rights and legal protections granted to print and broadcast 
journalists.
53
When it comes to libel, the law abolished prison sentences for criminal defamation, 
48
 Global Voices Online, “Tunisia: Protesting the Military's Lack of Transparency and Censorship,” globalvoicesonline.org, June 2, 
2012 http://globalvoicesonline.org/2012/06/02/tunisia‐protesting‐the‐militarys‐lack‐of‐transparency‐and‐censorship/  
49
 Article 19, “Tunisia: Let's work together to formulate the Constitution,” article19.org, April 4, 2012, 
http://www.article19.org/resources.php/resource/3017/en/tunisia:‐let's‐work‐together‐to‐formulate‐the‐constitution  
50
 The Telegraph, “Tunisia plans to outlaw blasphemy dropped,” telegraph.co.uk, October 12, 2012, 
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/africaandindianocean/tunisia/9605965/Tunisia‐plans‐to‐outlaw‐blasphemy‐
dropped.html  
51
 http://www.inric.tn/D%C3%A9cret‐loi2011_115Arabe.pdf 
52
 France 24, “Tunisian journalists strike over press freedom”, france24.com, October 17, 2012, 
http://www.france24.com/en/20121017‐tunisian‐journalists‐strike‐over‐threats‐press‐freedom‐islamist‐led‐government  
53
 Reporters Without Borders, “Analysis of Law No. 2011‐115 dated 2 November 2011, relating to freedom of the press, printing 
and publication,” en.rsf.org, February 14, 2012, http://en.rsf.org/IMG/pdf/120214_observations_rsf_code_de_la_presse_gb_‐
_neooffice_writer.pdf  
V
IOLATIONS OF 
U
SER 
R
IGHTS
715
Pdf metadata editor - add, remove, update PDF metadata in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Allow C# Developers to Read, Add, Edit, Update and Delete PDF Metadata
change pdf metadata; read pdf metadata online
Pdf metadata editor - VB.NET PDF metadata library: add, remove, update PDF metadata in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Enable VB.NET Users to Read, Write, Edit, Delete and Update PDF Document Metadata
pdf xmp metadata editor; remove pdf metadata
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
T
UNISIA
|
places the burden of proof on the plaintiff, and excludes “statements of public interest.”
54
However, 
journalists  and  free  speech  advocates  have  criticized  the  implementation  of  the  decree  as 
incomplete. In some cases, such as that of Olfa Riahi discussed below, judges and prosecutors have 
ignored decree 115 and instead used  the  1975  press  law and  provisions  of the penal code to 
prosecute bloggers and online journalists lacking formal press qualifications. 
The repressive laws of the Ben Ali regime still remain the greatest threat to internet freedom. For 
example, Article 86 of the Telecommunications Code states that anyone found guilty of “using 
public communication networks to insult or disturb others” could spend up to two years in prison 
and may be liable to pay a fine. Articles 128 and 245 of the penal code also punish slander with two 
to five years imprisonment.
55
In addition, there has been no push on the part of the authorities to 
hold former regime members accountable for widespread offenses committed during the Ben Ali 
era.
.56
While censorship is no longer a significant issue, these laws continued to be employed to 
prosecute internet users throughout late 2012 and early 2013.  
In the gravest violation of user rights over the past year, on April 25, 2013, the Court of Cassation 
upheld Jabeur Mejri’s seven and half year prison sentence for publishing cartoons depicting the 
prophet Mohammad on his Facebook page. He was convicted of  “insulting others through public 
communication  networks”  under  Article  86  of  the  Telecommunications  Code  through  a  post 
deemed as offensive to Islam and “liable to cause harm to public order or public morals” under 
Article 121 (3) of the Tunisian Penal Code.
57
Having previously lost another appeal in June 2012,
58
Mejri’s defense team will now seek a presidential pardon for their client. Ghazi Beji, a friend of 
Mejri,  was  also  sentenced  after  publishing  an  essay  that  satirized  the  Prophet  Muhammad’s 
biography  on  Scribd.com,  a  free  social  publishing  website,  in  July  2011.  Beji, however,  was 
convicted in absentia since he has since fled the country.
59
In another disturbing case, in early January 2013, an investigative judge imposed a travel ban on 
blogger Olfa Riahi over a blog post she published in December 2012. In the post, Riahi claimed that 
then-foreign minister Rafik Abdessalam misused public money by spending several nights at the 
luxurious Sheraton hotel in downtown Tunis and implied that he might have been involved in an 
extra-marital affair. On March 9, 2013, a judge lifted the travel ban. Since Riahi has not benefitted 
from traditional protections allotted to journalists, the blogger still faces fines and up to five years 
54
 “Tunisia: Press, Printing, and Publication Code – Legal Analysis,” Article 19, November 2011, available at 
http://bit.ly/13Eova5.  
55 
“Code Penal,” Juriste Tunisie, 2009, http://www.jurisitetunisie.com/tunisie/codes/cp/cp1225.htm
56
 Nawaat, “Tunisia: Cyber‐Activists to Sue Interior Ministry over Web Censorship,” nawaat.org, August 21, 2012, 
http://nawaat.org/portail/2012/08/21/cyber‐activists‐to‐sue‐interior‐ministry‐over‐web‐censorship  
57
 Amnesty International, “Tunisia: upholding of blogger's seven‐year jail sentence for 'insulting Islam' condemned,” 
amnesty.org.uk, April 26, 2013, http://www.amnesty.org.uk/news_details.asp?NewsID=20753  
58
 Index on Censorship, “Verdict in Muhammad cartoon conviction upheld,” uncut.indexoncensorship.org, June 25, 2012, 
http://uncut.indexoncensorship.org/2012/06/verdict‐in‐muhammad‐cartoon‐conviction‐upheld  
59
 Nawaat, “Interview avec Ghazi Béji, un antithéiste en fuite de la Tunisie” [Interview with Ghazi Beji, an antitheist who fled 
Tunisia], Nawaat.org, June 29, 2012, http://nawaat.org/portail/2012/06/29/interview‐avec‐ghazi‐beji‐un‐antitheiste‐en‐fuite‐
de‐la‐tunisie  
716
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view, annotate, create and convert PDF
An advanced PDF editor enable C# users to edit PDF text, image and pages in Visual Studio .NET project. Use HTML5 PDF Editor to Edit PDF Document in ASP.NET.
rename pdf files from metadata; pdf metadata editor online
C# TIFF: TIFF Metadata Editor, How to Write & Read TIFF Metadata
C# TIFF - Edit TIFF Metadata in C#.NET. Allow Users to Read and Edit Metadata Stored in Tiff Image in C#.NET Application. How to Get TIFF XMP Metadata in C#.NET.
pdf remove metadata; pdf keywords metadata
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
T
UNISIA
|
imprisonment
60
for  criminal  defamation,
61
offending  others  through  public  communication 
networks,
62
publishing false news that could disturb public order,
63
and violating privacy.
64
On March 21, 2013, a Tunisian court sentenced rapper Ala Yacoubi (also known as “Weld El 15”) 
to two years in prison in absentia over an anti-police video clip he published on YouTube.
65
In the 
song, Yacoubi describes police officers as “dogs” and says “he would like to slaughter a police officer 
instead of sheep at Eid al-Adha.” Actress Sabrine Klibi, who appears in the video, and cameraman 
Mohamed Hedi Belgueyed both received six-month suspended jail sentences.
66
In a bid to reduce 
his sentence, Yacoubi turned himself in on June 13. Although the original verdict was initially 
confirmed,  he  was  subsequently  freed  on  July  4  and  given  a  reduced  six-month  suspended 
sentence.
67
In addition to government action, users must also be weary of extralegal attempts to silence online 
activists. Two days before the assassination of leftist opposition leader, Chokri Belaid, on February 
6,  2013,  a  list  of  activists  and  politicians  to  be  “slaughtered”  was published  on  an  extremist 
Facebook  page.  The  list  included  names  of  opposition  politicians,  activists,  and  journalists, 
including blogger Olfa Riahi. 
68
In March 2013, FEMEN activist Amina Tyler was threatened for 
posting topless pictures of herself on Facebook. Adel Almi, founder of Tunisia’s Commission for 
the Promotion of Virtue and Prevention of Vice, said the young woman “deserves to be stoned to 
death.”
69
Laws that limit online anonymity also remain a concern in the post-Ben Ali era. In particular, 
Article  11  of  the  Telecommunications  Decree  prohibits  ISPs  from  transmitting  encrypted 
information without prior approval from the Minister of Communications. Furthermore, under 
Articles 8 and 9 of the Internet Regulations, ISPs are required to submit lists of their subscribers to 
the ATI and to retain archives of content for up to one year.
70
While there have been no reports of 
these laws being enforced, their continuing existence underscores the precarious nature of Tunisia’s 
newfound and relatively open internet environment. 
There were no reports of extralegal government surveillance of online activity in the post-Ben Ali 
period. However, the deep-packet inspection (DPI) technology once employed to monitor the 
60
 Reporters Without Borders, “Sheratongate: Bloggers allegations against foreign minister land her in court,” en.rsf.org, 
January 17, 2013, http://en.rsf.org/tunisia‐sheratongate‐blogger‐s‐allegations‐17‐01‐2013,43926.html  
61
 Under Articles 128 and 245 of the Tunisian Penal Code, this charge carries two years imprisonment. 
62
 Article 86 of the Telecommunications code, up to two years imprisonment. 
63
 Article 121 (3) of the penal code, up to five years imprisonment and, under the new press law, a fine of up to 5000 dinars. 
64
 Law 63‐2004 on the Protection of Personal Data, up to two years imprisonment.     
65
 See https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6owW_Jv5ng4 
66
 Index on Censorship, “Free speech on hold in Tunisia as rapper faces jail,” uncut.indexoncensorship.org, March 28, 2013, 
http://uncut.indexoncensorship.org/2013/03/free‐speech‐on‐hold‐in‐tunisia‐as‐rapper‐faces‐jail/  
67
 Bill Chappell, “Jailed Tunisian Rapper is Freed; Song Called Police ‘Dogs’,” NPR, July 2, 2013, 
http://www.npr.org/blogs/thetwo‐way/2013/07/02/197997952/jailed‐tunisian‐rapper‐is‐freed‐song‐called‐police‐dogs.  
68
 ARTE, “Tunisie: la liste noire des salafistes” [Tunisia: Salafists’ black list], videos.arte.tv, March 17, 2013  
http://videos.arte.tv/fr/videos/tunisie‐la‐liste‐noire‐des‐salafistes‐‐7395644.html 
69
 The New Yorker, “How to Provoke National Unrest with a Facebook Photo,” newyorker.com, April 8, 2013, 
http://www.newyorker.com/online/blogs/elements/2013/04/amina‐tyler‐topless‐photos‐tunisia‐activism.html 
70
 “Tunisia: Background paper on Internet regulation,” Article 19, legal analysis, March 2011. 
717
VB.NET PDF- HTML5 PDF Viewer for VB.NET Project
ASP.NET PDF Viewer; VB.NET: ASP.NET PDF Editor; VB.NET to PDF. Image: Remove Image from PDF Page. Image Link: Edit URL. Bookmark: Edit Bookmark. Metadata: Edit, Delete
search pdf metadata; add metadata to pdf programmatically
C# PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file for C#
HTML5 PDF Editor enable users to edit PDF text, image, page, password and so on. C#.NET: WPF PDF Viewer & Editor. C#.NET: Edit PDF Metadata.
remove metadata from pdf online; extract pdf metadata
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
T
UNISIA
|
internet and intercept communications is still in place, sparking worries that the technology can be 
reinstated if desired. Confusion reigns over how surveillance is conducted in contemporary Tunisia, 
particularly in the absence of a new constitution and legal reforms that would protect citizens from 
mass surveillance. ICT minister Mongi Marzoug has, on several occasions, tried to reassure netizens 
that surveillance is being implemented “legally” and with court orders.
71
Tunisia’s Data Protection 
Authority (known by its French acronym INPDP) is set to amend the country’s 2004 privacy law in 
order to ensure the body’s independence from any government interference.
72
As it stands, the law 
exempts public authorities from obtaining the consent of the INPDP to access and process personal 
data. 
Since Ben Ali’s fall, there have been no reported incidents of cyberattacks perpetrated by the 
government to silence ICT users. However, other groups have been employing these methods to 
intimidate activists and organizations with whom they do not agree. In October 2012, the award-
winning collective blog Nawaat.org suffered distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attacks after it 
leaked a private conversation between then-Prime Minister Hamadi Jebali and his predecessor, Beji 
Caid Sebsi.
73
On December 11, 2012, the website of Tunisia’s largest labor union, the UGTT, 
suffered a DDoS attack. The attacks were allegedly perpetrated by a Tunisian hacking group called 
Fallega, believed to be a supporter of the Islamist party Ennahda, in protest of the union’s vow to 
stage a nationwide strike.
74
71
 African Manager, “Tunisie : L’Internet contrôlé ou censuré ?” [Tunisia : Is the internet monitored or censored ?], 
africanmanager.com, September 5, 2012, http://www.africanmanager.com/143050.html. 
72
 Index on Censorship, ‘’ New‐era privacy law drafted to protect Tunisians from the surveillance state’’, 
uncut.indexoncensorship.org, August 15, 2012, http://uncut.indexoncensorship.org/2012/08/tunisia‐drafts‐new‐era‐privacy‐
law. 
73
 Global Voices Advocacy, “MENA Netizen Report: Porn Edition,” advocacy.globalvoicesonline.org, November 14, 2012, 
http://advocacy.globalvoicesonline.org/2012/11/14/mena‐netizen‐report‐porn‐edition . 
74
 Tunisie Haut Débit, “Tunisie : Le site de l'UGTT piraté, mot de passe admin divulgué” [Tunisia : UGTT website hacked, admin 
password disclosed], thd.tn, December 11, 2012, http://www.thd.tn/websphere/news/websphere/tunisie‐le‐site‐de‐lugtt‐
pirate‐mot‐de‐passe‐admin‐divulgue . 
718
C# TIFF: TIFF Editor SDK to Read & Manipulate TIFF File Using C#.
1. Extract text from Tiff file. 2. Render text to text, PDF, or Word file. Tiff Metadata Editing in C#. Our .NET Tiff SDK supports editing Tiff file metadata.
edit multiple pdf metadata; google search pdf metadata
How to C#: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF for .NET
XDoc.PDF for .NET supports editing PDF document metadata, like Title, Subject, Author, Creator, Producer, Keywords, Created Date, and Last Modified Date.
batch pdf metadata editor; remove metadata from pdf
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
T
URKEY
T
URKEY
 Turkish authorities added several thousand websites to its blocking list, increasing the
total to almost 30,000 (See L
IMITS ON 
C
ONTENT
).
 Ruling in favor of a Turkish user, the European Court of Human Rights found Turkey
in violation of Article 10 of the European Convention on Human Rights for blocking
access to the hosting platform Google Sites (see L
IMITS ON 
C
ONTENT
).
 Several users received fines, prison time, or suspended sentences for comments made
on social media, including renowned pianist Fazil Say. Say was handed a 10-month
suspended  sentence  for  insulting  religious  values  on  Twitter  and  will  appeal.
Meanwhile,  a  Turkish-Armenian  linguist  and  columnist  was  handed  a  10-month
sentence on similar charges related to a blog post (see V
IOLATIONS OF 
U
SER 
R
IGHTS
).
2012 
2013 
I
NTERNET 
F
REEDOM 
S
TATUS
P
ARTLY 
F
REE
P
ARTLY 
F
REE
Obstacles to Access (0-25) 
12 
12 
Limits on Content (0-35) 
17 
18 
Violations of User Rights (0-40) 
17 
19 
Total (0-100) 
46 
49 
*0=most free, 100=least free
e
P
OPULATION
74.9 million
I
NTERNET 
P
ENETRATION 
2012: 
45 percent
S
OCIAL 
M
EDIA
/ICT
A
PPS 
B
LOCKED
Yes
P
OLITICAL
/S
OCIAL 
C
ONTENT 
B
LOCKED
Yes
B
LOGGERS
/ICT
U
SERS 
A
RRESTED
Yes
P
RESS 
F
REEDOM 
2013
S
TATUS
Partly Free
K
EY 
D
EVELOPMENTS
:
M
AY 
2012
A
PRIL 
2013 
719
C# PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net
Comments, forms and multimedia. Document and metadata. All object data. Detect and merge image fragments. Flatten visible layers. C#.NET DLLs: Compress PDF Document
preview edit pdf metadata; view pdf metadata in explorer
C# PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in C#.net
Convert PDF to HTML. |. C#.NET PDF SDK - Convert PDF to HTML in C#.NET. How to Use C# .NET XDoc.PDF SDK to Convert PDF to HTML Webpage in C# .NET Program.
pdf metadata editor; remove metadata from pdf file
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
T
URKEY
This report covers events between May 1, 2012 and April 30, 2013. In late May 2013, what started 
as a relatively small and peaceful protest at Gezi Park in the Taksim district of central Istanbul rapidly 
snowballed into the largest anti-government protests that Turkey has seen in years. Demonstrations 
spread from Istanbul to Ankara, Izmir, Adana, and other cities across the country. While the original 
protest called for the halt of a plan to transform Gezi Park into a shopping mall, public outrage grew 
over the disproportionate police response in which water cannons and tear gas were used in an excessive 
display of force. The dramatic events exposed the complicity of mainstream Turkish media, which 
largely failed to report the massive anti-government  protests that ensued. Instead, sites such as 
YouTube, Facebook, and Twitter arose as some of the few outlets for reliable coverage on the protests, 
leading Prime Minister Reçep Tayyip Erdo
ğ
an to describe social media as “the worst menace to society.” 
Dozens of people were arrested for their social media posts, and criminal investigations are expected 
under the use of Articles 214 and 217 of the Turkish Penal Code concerning incitement to commit a 
crime and disobey the law. The government also hinted that it may introduce further measures to 
exercise  greater  control  over  social  media,  with  ministers  calling  for  companies  to  assist  law 
enforcement agencies in identifying anonymous users so that they may be prosecuted for allegedly 
violating the country’s laws. 
Internet and mobile telephone use in Turkey has grown significantly in recent years, though access 
remains a challenge in some parts of the country, particularly in the southeast. Until 2001, the 
government pursued a hands-off approach to internet regulation but has since taken considerable 
legal steps to limit access to certain information, including some political content. In February 
2011, the Information and Communications Technologies Authority (BTK) announced plans to 
establish a countrywide mandatory filtering system with the aim of protecting citizens from so-
called  “harmful content,” which  included  but was  not limited to  sexually-explicit  content  and 
terrorist propaganda.
1
Subsequent to strong opposition from the public, street demonstrations, and 
 legal  challenge,  the  policy  was  made  optional  for  subscribers.
2
Nonetheless,  civil  society 
organizations have continued to criticize the system since it became operational in November 2011, 
and a legal challenge is ongoing at the Council of State level.  
According to  Engelliweb,  there  were over  29,000  blocked  websites as  of  April 2013,  almost 
10,000 more compared to February 2012.
3
Several domestic news websites and online streaming 
services, such as Last.fm and Metacafe, continue to be blocked in Turkey. Over the last three years, 
citizens have filed five separate applications to the European Court of Human Rights (ECHR) to 
challenge the government’s blocking of YouTube, music streaming site Last.fm, and the webpage 
1
 Decision No. 2011/DK‐10/91 of Bilgi Teknolojileri ve İletişim Kurumu, dated February 22, 2011. 
2
 Yesim Comert, “Marchers protest new Turkish Web filtering rule,” CNN, May 15, 2011, 
http://edition.cnn.com/2011/WORLD/meast/05/15/turkey.internet.protest/index.html.  
3
 Engelliweb.com is a website that documents information about blocked websites from Turkey. Site accessed April 30, 2013,  
I
NTRODUCTION
E
DITOR
N
OTE ON 
R
ECENT 
D
EVELOPMENTS
720
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
T
URKEY
creation tool Google Sites, after appeals before the local courts were rejected.
4
YouTube  was 
unblocked in 2010. In December 2012, ruling in the case of Ahmet Yildirim v. Turkey,
5
the ECHR 
unanimously held that there had been a violation of Article 10 of the European Convention of 
Human Rights in the case of the Turkish court’s blocking of the hosting platform Google Sites.
6
The 
verdict, however, did not result in any shift in government policy related to the problematic Law 
No. 5651, used often to block websites. In its 2012 Progress Report for Turkey's Accession to the 
European Union (EU), the European Commission stated that "frequent website bans are a cause for 
serious concern and there is a need to revise the law on the internet."
7
Over the past year, several social media users were prosecuted on charges related to terrorism, 
blasphemy, obscene content, and criticism of the state or its officials. In the most widely-covered 
case,  the  pianist  and  composer  Fazil  Say  was  given  a  suspended  sentence  of  10  months 
imprisonment for insulting religious values in a series of tweets he had posted to Twitter. A linguist 
and former columnist was handed 13 months for a similar offense related to a blog entry he had 
written on the offensive “Innocence of Muslims” video. Finally, a user was sentenced to nine years 
and seven months imprisonment for allegedly disseminating terrorist propaganda over Facebook. 
Many others received suspended sentences and fines. 
Despite an increasing penetration rate in the last few years, obstacles to internet access in Turkey 
remain. According  to the  International  Telecommunication  Union  (ITU),  internet  penetration 
stood at 45 percent in 2012, up from 29 percent in 2007.
8
Total broadband subscriptions stood at 
over  20  million  at  the  end  of  2012,  of  which  over  10  million  were  mobile  broadband 
subscriptions.
9
In  total,  mobile  penetration  was  at  91  percent  in  2012  and  all  mobile phone 
operators offer third-generation (3G) data connections.
10
Most users access the internet from workplaces, universities, and internet cafes. Poor infrastructure 
and a lack of electricity in certain areas, especially in the eastern and southeastern regions, have had 
a detrimental effect on citizens’ ability to connect to the internet, particularly from home. While 
prices have decreased, they do remain high. Bandwidth capping has become standard practice and a 
part of the broadband services offered by major providers since 2011. A lack of technical literacy, 
particularly among older Turks, also inhibits wider internet use.  
4
 The YouTube block was lifted in November 2010 only after disputed videos were made inaccessible from the country. 
5
 Application no.3111/10. 
6
 See further Turkish block on Google site breached Article 10 rights, rules Strasbourg at 
http://ukhumanrightsblog.com/2013/01/16/turkish‐block‐on‐google‐site‐breached‐article‐10‐rights‐rules‐strasbourg/ 
7
 European Commission, Turkey: 2012 Progress Report, COM(2012) 600, Brussels, 10.10.2012 SWD(2012) 336 
8
 International Telecommunication Union (ITU), “Percentage of individuals using the Internet, fixed (wired) Internet 
subscriptions, fixed (wired)‐broadband subscriptions,” 2007 & 2012, accessed July 11, 2013, http://bit.ly/14IIykM .  
9
 “Electronic Communications Market in Turkey – Market Data (2012 Q4),” Information and Communication Technologies 
Authority, March 15 2013, Slide 30, accessed July 11, 2013, http://eng.btk.gov.tr/dosyalar/2012‐4‐English_15_03_2013.pdf.  
10
 International Telecommunication Union (ITU), “Mobile‐cellular telephone subscriptions,” 2011, accessed July 13, 2012, 
http://www.itu.int/ITU‐D/ICTEYE/Indicators/Indicators.aspx#
O
BSTACLES TO 
A
CCESS
721
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
T
URKEY
There  are around  150  internet service  providers (ISPs) in Turkey, though  the  majority act as 
resellers  for  the  dominant,  partly  state-owned  Turk  Telekom,  which  provides  more  than  81 
percent of broadband access in the country through its subsidiary TTNET.
11
Turkcell is the leading 
mobile  phone provider,  with  51.9  percent of subscribers,  followed  by Vodafone  and  Avea.
12
Overall, delays in the liberalization of local telephony continue to undermine competition in the 
fixed-line and broadband markets. ISPs are required by law to submit an application for an “activity 
certificate” from the Telecommunications Communication Presidency (TIB), a regulatory body, 
before they can offer services. Internet cafes are also subject to regulation. Those operating without 
an activity certificate from a local municipality may face fines of TRY 3,000 to 15,000 ($1,900 to 
$9,600). Mobile phone  service providers are subject  to licensing through the Information and 
Communications Technologies Authority (BTK).  
The Computer  Center of Middle East Technical  University has been responsible for  managing 
domain  names  since  1991.  Furthermore,  the  Information  and  Communication  Technologies 
Authority (BTK) oversees and establishes the domain name operation policy and its bylaws. Unlike 
in many other countries, individuals in Turkey are not permitted to register and own “.com.tr” and 
“.org.tr” domain names unless they own a company or civil society organization with the same 
name as the requested domain. A new set of rules on domain names registration was published in 
the Official Gazette on November 7, 2010.  
The BTK and the TIB, which it oversees, act as the regulators for ICTs and are well staffed and self-
financed.
13
However, the fact that board members are government appointees is a potential threat 
to the authority’s independence, and its decision-making process is not transparent. Nonetheless, 
there have been no reported instances of certificates or licenses being denied. The TIB also oversees 
the application of the country’s website blocking law and is often criticized by pressure groups for a 
lack of transparency.   
Government censorship of the internet is relatively common and has increased steadily over recent 
years. Blocking orders related to intellectual property infringement continued in 2012 and in early 
2013,  particularly  for  file-sharing  and  streaming  websites.  In  total,  another  several  thousand 
websites were blocked over the past 12 months alone, including many sites that were blocked for 
political or social reasons. The prosecution of users for online posts has had a chilling effect on self-
censorship, which remains extensive in online media as in traditional media. Finally, it is becoming 
increasingly difficult to find alternative sources of information, particularly related to LGBT and 
minority issues.  
YouTube, Facebook, Twitter, and international blog-hosting services are freely available, although 
the government has routinely blocked access to these and other social media sites in the past. 
11
 “Electronic Communications Market in Turkey – Market Data (2012 Q4),” Slide 32. Figures do not include cable internet. 
12
 “Electronic Communications Market in Turkey – Market Data (2012 Q4),” Slide 38. 
13
 Information and Communication Technologies Authority, http://www.tk.gov.tr/Eng/english.htm
L
IMITS ON 
C
ONTENT
722
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
T
URKEY
Currently, access to the following services is blocked: Last.fm, Metacafe, Dailymotion, Google 
groups,  and  the photo-sharing website  Slide.  Access  to the  popular digital  documents  sharing 
website Scribd was also blocked in March 2013 by an Istanbul Court.
14
In most instances, large-
scale shutdowns of these websites have been blunt efforts to halt the circulation of specific content 
that is deemed undesirable or illegal by the government. YouTube, for example, was intermittently 
blocked multiple times in recent years to prevent users from accessing videos critical of Turkey’s 
founding father Mustafa Kemal Ataturk, although it has remained accessible since October 2010. 
Since October 2012, YouTube operates in the country under a local “com.tr” domain which, the 
authorities claim, makes it easier for them to ask Google to remove objectionable content.
15
The  responsibilities  of content providers, hosting companies, mass-use  providers, and  ISPs  are 
delineated in Law No. 5651, enacted in May 2007 and titled “Regulation of Publications on the 
Internet and Suppression of Crimes Committed by Means of Such Publication.”
16
The law’s most 
important  provision  calls  for  the  blocking  of  websites  that  contain  certain  types  of  content, 
including material that shows or promotes the sexual exploitation and abuse of children, obscenity, 
prostitution, or gambling. Also targeted for blocking are websites deemed to insult Mustafa Kemal 
Ataturk, the founding father of modern Turkey. Domestically hosted websites with proscribed 
content can be taken down, while websites based abroad can be blocked and filtered through ISPs. 
In  April 2011, the TIB sent  a letter  to hosting companies based in Turkey with a list  of 138 
potentially provocative words that may not be used in domain names and websites.
17
This raised 
strong national and international criticism, to which the TIB responded that the list of words was 
intended to help hosting companies identify and remove allegedly illegal web content.
18
According 
to Engelliweb.com, there were over 29,000 blocked websites as of May 2013.
19
Although  Law  No.  5651  was  designed  to  protect  children  from  illegal  and  harmful  internet 
content, its broad application to date has effectively restricted adults’ access to some legal content. 
In some instances, the courts have also made politically motivated judgments to block websites 
using other laws. For example, the courts have indefinitely blocked access to the websites of several 
alternative news sources that report news on southeastern  Turkey and  Kurdish issues, such as 
Atilim, Özgür Gündem, Azadiya Welat, Keditör, Günlük Gazetesi, and Firat News Agency. Access 
to the website of Richard Dawkins, a British etiologist, evolutionary biologist and popular science 
writer, was blocked in September 2008 after a pro-creationist Islamist claimed that the website 
14
 Istanbul 12th Criminal Court of Peace, Decision No 2013/209 D., 08.03.2013. 
15
 See further Reuters, “YouTube opens Turkish site, giving government more control,” 02 October, 2012 at 
http://www.reuters.com/article/2012/10/02/net‐us‐turkey‐youtube‐idUSBRE8910T420121002  
16
 Law No 5651 was published on the Turkish Official Gazette on 23.05.2007, No. 26030. A copy of the law can be found (in 
Turkish) at http://www.wipo.int/wipolex/en/details.jsp?id=11035.  
17
 Several “controversial words” appeared on the list of "banned words" including: Adrianne (no one knows who she is), Haydar 
(no one knows who he is), aayvan (animal), baldiz (sister‐in‐law), buyutucu (enlarger), ciplak (nude), citir (crispy), etek (skirt), 
free, girl, ateşli (passionate), frikik (freekick), gay, gizli (confidential), gogus (breast), hikaye (story), homemade, hot, İtiraf 
(confession), liseli (high school student), nefes (breath), partner, sarisin (blond), sicak (hot), sisman (overweight), yasak 
(forbidden), yerli (local), yetiskin (adult), and so on. 
18
 Ekin Karaca, “138 Words Banned from the Internet,” Bianet, April 29, 2011, http://www.bianet.org/english/freedom‐of‐
expression/129626‐138‐words‐banned‐from‐the‐internet; See also, Erisa Dautaj Senerdem, “TIB’s ‘forbidden words list’ 
inconsistent with law, say Turkish web providers,” Hurriyet Daily News, April 29, 2011, 
http://www.hurriyetdailynews.com/n.php?n=tibs‐forbidden‐words‐list‐inconsistent‐with‐law‐2011‐04‐29.  
19
 Engelliweb.com is a website that documents information about blocked websites from Turkey. Accessed May 8, 2013.  
723
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
T
URKEY
contents had insulted him, his work, and his religion. An Istanbul Court later lifted the blocking 
order and rejected the defamation claims in July 2011. As of January 2013, the case is on appeal at 
the Court of Appeal, but the website is currently accessible from Turkey.
20
Access to several Redhack-related websites has also been blocked over the past year.
21
The Marxist-
Socialist group is known for conducting cyberattacks on government websites in order to obtain 
and release sensitive and damaging information. In July 2012, there were also calls by the Ministry 
of Foreign Affairs to block access to the cloud-storage service Dropbox, which Redhack had used 
for disclosing the identities of hundreds of Turkish bureaucrats and diplomats working outside 
Turkey.
22
In  the past, there have been attempts to block websites that  allegedly defame individuals. On 
September  28,  2010,  the  Ankara  Third  Criminal  Court  of  Peace  ordered  the  blocking  of 
BugunKilicdaroglu.com, a website that assesses the policies and strategies of Kemal Kılıçdaro
ğ
lu, 
the leader of the Republican People’s Party (CHP), Turkey’s main opposition party. The injunction 
to  block  access  to  the  website  was  requested  by  Mr.  Kılıçdaro
ğ
lu’s  lawyers  for  reasons  of 
defamation. The Ankara 11
th
Criminal Court of First Instance overturned the blocking decision in 
January 2011.
23
Despite the fact that it is not illegal, sexually-explicit content is often blocked by the authorities 
under the guise of protecting minors. Access to 5Posta.org, a Turkish-language website which 
features writings of a sexual nature,  was blocked by two different decisions, and an  appeal  is 
ongoing.
24
Similarly, as of early 2013, an appeal is ongoing at the Council of State level with 
regards to the blocking of Playboy.com  in Turkey. The user-based  appeal was lodged by two 
university professors.  
The Turkish government has come under criticism from  a number of European bodies for  its 
blocking  practices.  Thomas  Hammarberg,  the Council  of  Europe’s  Commissioner  for  Human 
Rights, stressed the need to review Law No. 5651 to align the grounds for restricting access to a 
website with those accepted in the case law of the European Court of Human Rights.
25
Similarly, 
the European Commission, in its 2012 Progress Report for Turkey's Accession to the European 
Union, stated that "frequent website bans are a cause for serious concern and there is a need to 
revise the law on the internet."
26
20
 “RD.net no longer banned in Turkey!” The Richard Dawkins Foundation, July 8, 2011, 
http://richarddawkins.net/articles/642074‐rd‐net‐no‐longer‐banned‐in‐turkey.  
21
 Note the decision of the Ankara High Criminal Court No. 11, decision no 2012/1039 with regards to kizilhack.org, 
redhack.deviantart.com, redhackers.org and kizilhack.blogspot.com. 
22
 See http://bit.ly/R2s4NO.  
23
 Yaman Akdeniz, “Fighting Political Internet Censorship in Turkey: One Site Won back, 10,000 To Go,” Index on Censorship, 
March 4, 2011, http://bit.ly/dSxV9Z.  
24
 Ankara 8th Administrative  Court Decision No 2010/3103, dated 18 October 2012; Ankara 6th Criminal Court of Peace 
Decision No 2011/94 dated 24 January 2011. 
25
 Thomas Hammarberg, “Freedom of Expression and Media Freedom in Turkey,” Council of Europe, July 12, 2011, 
https://wcd.coe.int/ViewDoc.jsp?id=1814085
26
 European Commission, Turkey: 2012 Progress Report, COM(2012) 600, Brussels, 10.10.2012 SWD(2012) 336 
724
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested