download pdf file on button click in asp.net c# : Add metadata to pdf programmatically SDK application service wpf azure winforms dnn FOTN%202013_Full%20Report_077-part1584

F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
U
NITED 
A
RAB 
E
MIRATES
Khaled al-Nuiami, who has come under torture since being held in July 2012.
93
Al-Zumer faces 
charges for editing and uploading videos supportive of political detainees and has yet to be tried. 
According to  his mother,
94
the  blogger  has  been  held in solitary confinement, tortured,  and 
pressured into making a confession stating that Khalifa al-Nuiami, another UAE94 defendant, had 
encouraged him to edit and upload the videos.
95
For his part, in September 2012 Khalifa al-Nuiami 
had embarked on a hunger strike to protest against psychological and physical torture by police 
officers.
96
Saeed al-Shamsi was detained on December 14, 2012 over suspicions that he ran the anonymous 
Twitter account “Sout al-Haq” (@weldbudhabi). The account was targeted over allegations that it 
received  leaked  documents  from  the  Interior  Ministry,  although  the  documents  were  never 
published. After al-Shamsi’s arrest, the Sout al-Haq account sent a tweet in which he claimed the 
authorities had arrested the wrong person. Al-Shamsi’s lawyer said that his defendant appeared 
distressed and disoriented in court with signs of intimidation and torture.
97
He was reportedly 
released in March 2013. Two other users were also arrested for having messaged South al-Haq after 
authorities reportedly hacked into the account. Only days after, five more Twitter users were 
arrested for expressing political criticism and support for detainees.
98
On  April  8,  2013,  Abdulhamid  al-Hadidi  was  sentenced  to  ten  months  in  jail  for  allegedly 
“spreading  false  information”  about  the  trial  of  the  so-called  UAE94,  of  which  his  father, 
Abdulrahman al-Hadidi, is a member.
99
Al-Hadidi had been active on social media by sharing news 
from detainees and the details of their trials. He was also pushing detainees’ families to work 
together to demand fair and transparent trials for the accused, as well as an end to state violations 
against their rights to prison visits. He was charged under Article 46 of the cybercrime law and 
Article 265 of the penal code. 
By mid-2013, this had brought the total of number of political detainees to 94, including the 68 
mentioned  above.
100
Many of  the  detainees are  members of  the  Reform  and  Social  Guidance 
Association, better known as al-Islah, which seeks political reform and a greater adherence to Islam 
in society. As mentioned, Islah  members often engage in  political debates online  and seek to 
93
 David Hearst, “The UAE’s bizarre, political trial of 94 activists,” The Guardian, March 6, 2013, 
http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2013/mar/06/uae‐trial‐94‐activists.  
94
 “ANHRI Demands the Suspense of Al‐Zumer’s Trial,” June 3, 2013. http://www.anhri.net/?p=77914 
95
 Emirates Center for Human Rights, “Detained 19‐year‐old Emriati Activist Alleges Torture,” May 5, 2013, 
http://www.echr.org.uk/?p=701.  
96
 Emirates Center for Studies, “Al‐Nuaimi in bad health,” September 2, 2012. http://twitmail.com/email/533078805/4/false 
97
 Rori Donaghy, "Torture in the United Arab Emirates," Huffington Post, September 24, 2012. 
http://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/rori‐donaghy/torture‐in‐the‐united‐ara_b_1908919.html 
98
 Bill Law. “Eight online activists 'arrested in UAE'.” December 19, 2012. http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world‐middle‐east‐
20768205 
99
 “UAE: Son of defendant sentenced to 10 months in prison for reporting on ‘UAE94’ trial,” Alkarama, April 11, 2013, 
http://en.alkarama.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=1073:uae‐son‐of‐defendant‐sentenced‐to‐10‐
months‐in‐prison‐for‐reporting‐on‐uae94‐trial&catid=38:communiqu&Itemid=107.  
100
 “Current Political Prisoners,” Emirates Centre for Human Rights, August 1, 2013, http://www.echr.org.uk/?page_id=207.  
765
Add metadata to pdf programmatically - add, remove, update PDF metadata in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Allow C# Developers to Read, Add, Edit, Update and Delete PDF Metadata
remove metadata from pdf; remove metadata from pdf file
Add metadata to pdf programmatically - VB.NET PDF metadata library: add, remove, update PDF metadata in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Enable VB.NET Users to Read, Write, Edit, Delete and Update PDF Document Metadata
bulk edit pdf metadata; view pdf metadata
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
U
NITED 
A
RAB 
E
MIRATES
document  and  disseminate  information  on  human  rights  violations  on  social  media.
101
These 
detainees face up to 15 years in jail for being part of an organization with intent to overthrow the 
government  and  with  ties  to  Egypt’s  Muslim  Brotherhood.
102
Reacting  to  Egypt’s  2011 
parliamentary elections, in which the Muslim Brotherhood gained the most seats out of any other 
political party, Dubai’s chief of police tweeted that “since Muslim Brotherhood has ‘become a 
state,’ anyone advocating its cause [in the UAE] is considered a foreign agent.”
103
Aside from arbitrary detentions, unfair prosecutions, and torture, online activists also face a range 
of  extralegal  attacks  in  the  UAE.  In  October  2012,  blogger  Ahmed  Mansour  faced  media 
harassment and physical beatings. The actions were taken in response to a pre-recorded speech he 
made  that  was  later  broadcast  at  a  side  event  to  the  United  Nations  Human  Rights  Council 
regarding violations in the UAE, Oman, and Saudi Arabia.
104
The high amount of prosecutions and physical harassment of users in the UAE is, in part, due to the 
several obstacles they face in using ICT tools anonymously. In January 2013, the country’s two 
mobile phone providers gave a last warning to their users to register their SIM cards or have their 
lines cut for failing to comply.
105
The government had required every mobile user to re-register 
their information as part of the TRA’s “My Number, My Identity”
106
campaign launched in June 
2012.
107
Cybercafe customers are also required to provide their ID and personal information in 
order to surf the net.
108
Internet and mobile providers are not transparent in discussing the procedures taken by authorities 
to access their data and users’ information. Warnings from both the Abu Dhabi and Dubai police 
against  spreading  rumors  through  mobile  messages  may  indicate  the  government’s  overall 
surveillance on users.
109
Further proving this, as previously mentioned, Twitter users were arrested 
101
 “UAE: Unfair Mass Trial of 94 Dissidents,” Alkarama, April 3, 2013, 
http://en.alkarama.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=1070:uae‐unfair‐mass‐trial‐of‐94‐
dissidents&catid=38:communiqu&Itemid=107.  
102
 Lori Plotkin Boghardt, “Interpreting Muslim Brotherhood Verdicts in the UAE,” The Washington Institute, July 1, 2013, 
http://www.washingtoninstitute.org/policy‐analysis/view/interpreting‐muslim‐brotherhood‐verdicts‐in‐the‐uae.  
103
 Wafa Issa, “Muslim Brotherhood invading UAE social media: police chief,” March 9, 2012, 
http://www.thenational.ae/news/uae‐news/muslim‐brotherhood‐invading‐uae‐social‐media‐police‐chief.  
104
 Gulf Center for Human Rights, "UAE: Attacks and Smear Campaign against prominent human rights defender Ahmed 
Mansoor," October 5, 2013. http://gc4hr.org/news/view/250 
105
 Nadeem Hanif. “Du and Etisalat brace for UAE users last chance to re‐register Sim card.” January 16, 2013. 
http://www.thenational.ae/news/uae‐news/du‐and‐etisalat‐brace‐for‐uae‐users‐last‐chance‐to‐re‐register‐sim‐card 
106
 The TRA’s statement reads: “Your mobile phone number is an extension of your identity. Sharing or giving away your SIM‐
Card to others can cause unwanted consequences, including being held accountable for any improper conduct or misuse 
associated with the mobile phone subscription by the authorities as well as being liable for all charges by the licensees.
 
Telecommunications Regulatory Authority. “My Number My Identity.” Accessed April 28, 2013. 
http://www.tra.gov.ae/mynumber.php 
107
 Nadeem Hanif. “Every mobile phone user in the UAE must re‐register SIM card.” June 28, 2012. 
http://www.thenational.ae/news/uae‐news/every‐mobile‐phone‐user‐in‐the‐uae‐must‐re‐register‐sim‐card 
108
 Citizen Lab. “Planet Blue Coat: Mapping Global Censorship and Surveillance Tools.” January 15, 2013. 
https://citizenlab.org/2013/01/planet‐blue‐coat‐mapping‐global‐censorship‐and‐surveillance‐tools/ 
109
 
109
 Abdulla Rasheed, "Misuse of instant messaging services punishable by law," Gulf News, July 26, 2011 
http://gulfnews.com/news/gulf/uae/crime/misuse‐of‐instant‐messaging‐services‐punishable‐by‐law‐1.843047 
766
VB.NET PowerPoint: Read, Edit and Process PPTX File
How to convert PowerPoint to PDF, render PowerPoint to SVG and effective VB.NET solution to add desired watermark VB.NET PowerPoint: Read & Edit PPTX Metadata,
batch update pdf metadata; extract pdf metadata
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
Besides, using this PDF document metadata adding control, you can add some additional information to generated PDF file.
remove pdf metadata; edit pdf metadata acrobat
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
U
NITED 
A
RAB 
E
MIRATES
for exchanging private messages with a controversial account in December 2012.
110
Incidents of 
providers demanding warrants or legal permissions for security bodies to gain access to user data 
are not known. In 2009, the makers of BlackBerry devices alleged that a software update issued by 
the UAE telecommunications company Etisalat was actually spyware used to “enable unauthorized 
access to private or confidential information stored on the user's smartphone.”
111
The UAE remains one of the top countries facing hacking attempts worldwide. The country’s spam 
rate was recorded at 73 percent, and 46 percent of the country’s social networking users fell victim 
to cybercrimes, compared to the global average of 39 percent.
112
In July 2012, the TRA denied 
claims of the  hacktivist group Anonymous to “have penetrated the country's proxy server and 
extracted a list of blocked website addresses.”
113
Anonymous has posted a list of over 24,000 words 
and links blocked in the UAE.
114
Also that month, a group of UAE-based hackers defaced a website 
of the Human Rights Commission of Pakistan (HRCP), apparently to warn Pakistani hackers against 
engaging in cyberattacks against the UAE and other Gulf countries.
115
Emirati activists have also reported spyware and malware attacks against their computers. In one 
case from January 2013, a user received an e-mail purportedly containing a link to a video of the 
Dubai police chief. Instead, the link contained spyware that could monitor the victim’s screen, 
enable  the  computer’s  webcam, steal passwords,  and conduct keylogging. It was  believed the 
Emirati government was behind the attack.
116
110
 Bill Law. “Eight online activists 'arrested in UAE'.” December 19, 2012. http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world‐middle‐east‐
20768205 
111
 Tom Arnold, "BlackBerry patch was not for spying, claims Etisalat," Arabian Business, 23 July, 2009 
http://www.arabianbusiness.com/exclusive‐blackberry‐patch‐was‐not‐for‐spying‐claims‐etisalat‐15618.html 
112
 Arabian Gazetter, "UAE to Face Advanced Cybercrime in 2013," December 9, 2012. http://arabiangazette.com/uae‐face‐
advanced‐cybercrime‐2013/ 
113
 Martin Croucher, "Telecoms regulator denies Anonymous hacked UAE netfilter system," The National, July 8, 2012. 
http://www.thenational.ae/news/uae‐news/telecoms‐regulator‐denies‐anonymous‐hacked‐uae‐netfilter‐system 
114
 Anonymous, UAE list http://pastehtml.com/view/c336prjrl.rtxt 
115
 Alain Hacker, "HRCP website hacked, counter‐hacked By BozzErrOR & Gh()stH4x0r," February 28, 2013. 
http://www.alainhacker.com/2013/02/hrcp‐website‐hacked‐counter‐hacked‐by.html 
116
  Bill Marczak, “Hacked Website, Java Vulnerability Used to Target UAE Activist with Spyware,” Bahrain Watch, January 15, 
2013, https://bahrainwatch.org/blog/2013/01/15/hacked‐website‐java‐vulnerability‐used‐to‐target‐uae‐activist‐with‐spyware/.  
767
C# PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net
Document and metadata. All object data. Flatten visible layers. C#.NET DLLs: Compress PDF Document. Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll.
remove pdf metadata online; adding metadata to pdf files
C# PDF Text Search Library: search text inside PDF file in C#.net
Ability to search and replace PDF text in ASP.NET programmatically. C#.NET PDF DLLs for Finding Text in PDF Document. Add necessary references:
view pdf metadata in explorer; acrobat pdf additional metadata
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
U
NITED 
K
INGDOM
U
NITED 
K
INGDOM
 In an effort to protect children from harmful content, filtering on mobile phones is
enabled by default and has resulted in instances of over-blocking. In contrast, ISPs did
not  block politically orientated content on household connections (see  L
IMITS  ON
C
ONTENT
).
 Revisions to the Defamation Act provided greater legal protections for intermediaries
and reduced the scope for “libel tourism” (see L
IMITS ON 
C
ONTENT
and V
IOLATIONS
OF 
U
SER 
R
IGHTS
).
 The Protection of Freedoms Act of 2012 created new requirements to obtain judicial
approval prior to accessing online surveillance data, although revelations surrounding
the GCHQ’s Tempora program have since brought many of these protections into
doubt (see V
IOLATIONS OF 
U
SER 
R
IGHTS
).
Several web users were prosecuted or fined for breaking court injunctions, violating
the  privacy  of  crime  victims,  and  committing  libel  using  social  networks  (see
V
IOLATIONS OF 
U
SER 
R
IGHTS
).
2012 
2013 
I
NTERNET 
F
REEDOM 
S
TATUS
F
REE
F
REE
Obstacles to Access (0-25) 
Limits on Content (0-35) 
Violations of User Rights (0-40) 
16 
16 
Total (0-100) 
24
24 
*0=most free, 100=least free
e
P
OPULATION
63.2 million
I
NTERNET 
P
ENETRATION 
2012: 
87 percent
S
OCIAL 
M
EDIA
/ICT
A
PPS 
B
LOCKED
No
P
OLITICAL
/S
OCIAL 
C
ONTENT 
B
LOCKED
No
B
LOGGERS
/ICT
U
SERS 
A
RRESTED
No
P
RESS 
F
REEDOM 
2013
S
TATUS
Free
K
EY 
D
EVELOPMENTS
:
M
AY 
2012
A
PRIL 
2013 
768
.NET PDF Document Viewing, Annotation, Conversion & Processing
Extract images from PDF file. Read PDF metadata. Search text content inside PDF. Edit, remove images from PDF. Add, edit, delete links. Form Process.
pdf metadata online; pdf metadata extract
VB.NET PDF - How to Add Barcode on PDF Page
text in PDF, C#.NET edit PDF bookmark, C#.NET edit PDF metadata, C#.NET VB.NET PDF barcode creator add-on, which combines the PDF reading add-on with
adding metadata to pdf files; remove metadata from pdf file
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
U
NITED 
K
INGDOM
The following chapter covers developments in the United Kingdom from May 1, 2012 to April 30, 
2013. However, beginning in June 2013, British daily newspaper the Guardian published a series of 
revelations on secret  surveillance practices by the  British General  Communications Headquarters 
(GCHQ) and American National Security Agency (NSA). Under the GCHQ’s “Tempora” program, 
British authorities had entered into secret agreements with telecoms giants to install intercept probes on 
undersea cables landing on British shores. The content of this data was then filtered and stored, 
typically for three days, in order for GCHQ agents to comb through it for counterterrorism and law 
enforcement. User “metadata” was stored in a GCHQ facility for 30 days. Furthermore,  details 
emerged surrounding close collaboration between the NSA and the GCHQ, including payments of at 
least £100 million ($155 million) from the former to the latter. Since UK and U.S. laws place 
protections on the monitoring of citizens, UK agencies were able to pass on information related to 
American citizens—and vice versa—thereby bypassing legal restrictions. 
Given that this surveillance has been ongoing for a number of years—including during the period 
covered by this report—Freedom House has decided to include it in this edition of Freedom on the Net  
(see Violations of User Rights). 
The United Kingdom was an early adopter of new information and communication technologies 
(ICTs). The University of London was one of the first international nodes of the ARPAnet, the 
world’s introductory operational packet switching network that later came to compose the global 
internet, and the Queen sent her first ceremonial e-mail in 1976. Academic institutions began 
connecting to the network in the mid-1980s. By the beginning of the next decade, internet service 
providers (ISPs) emerged as more general commercial access became available. 
The United Kingdom has high levels of internet penetration and online freedom of expression is 
generally respected. During the past year, however, there has been an attempt by ministers to 
introduce a new framework for monitoring and collecting online communications as part of the 
Draft Communications Data Bill.
1
In addition, there has been widespread concern that government 
proposals to improve journalism co-regulation would result in new liability risks applying to blogs.
2
While ongoing concerns about web filtering and blocking have continued, particularly on mobile 
platforms, greater public concern has focused on surveillance of communications, particularly after 
the June 2013 revelations of mass surveillance of web use, e-mail, and mobile traffic data. The 
Communications Capabilities Development Programme was reintroduced in May 2012, which, if 
implemented, would require providers to retain data on phone calls, e-mails, text messages and 
 
The 2012 rating for the UK was adjusted on the basis of updated scoring guidelines to best convey changes over time. 
1
 See, Draft Communications Data Bill, http://www.parliament.uk/draft‐communications‐bill/.  
2
 Michael Savage, “Bloggers fear they could be savaged by press watchdog,” The Times, March 20, 2013, 
http://www.thetimes.co.uk/tto/news/medianews/article3717799.ece.  
I
NTRODUCTION
E
DITOR
N
OTE ON 
R
ECENT 
D
EVELOPMENTS
769
VB.NET PDF - Convert CSV to PDF
pages, C#.NET search text in PDF, C#.NET edit PDF bookmark, C#.NET edit PDF metadata, C#.NET VB.NET Demo Code for Converting RTF to PDF. Add necessary references
batch edit pdf metadata; remove metadata from pdf acrobat
VB.NET PDF Text Search Library: search text inside PDF file in vb.
Ability to search and replace PDF text programmatically in VB.NET. Our VB.NET PDF Document Add-On enables you to search for text in target PDF document
change pdf metadata; pdf keywords metadata
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
U
NITED 
K
INGDOM
communications on social-networking sites, in addition to expanding the real time surveillance 
capabilities of the security services in order to combat terrorism and organized crime.
3
However, 
following  the  recent  leaks by  former  NSA  contractor  Edward  Snowden,  it appeared  that the 
existing surveillance operations were already testing the boundaries of what was permissible. 
In  a positive development, the government passed a bill to revise the Defamation Act, which 
provides greater protections for ISPs through limiting their liability for user-generated content, as 
well as reducing “libel tourism.”
4
Additionally, the Protection of Freedoms Act of 2012 sets forth a 
requirement for local authorities to obtain a magistrate’s approval for access to communications 
data, thereby placing limits on their surveillance powers.
5
The draft Communications Data Bill 
keeps this requirement.
6
Access  to  the  internet  has  become  essential  to  citizenship  and  social  inclusion  in  the  United 
Kingdom. The share of homes with connected devices has increased from 53 percent in 2002 to 82 
percent in 2012,
7
and internet penetration grew from 70 in 2007 to 87 percent in 2012.
8
In 
December 2010, the government committed to promoting universal access to basic broadband, but 
progress  to  that  goal  remains  stalled.
9
The  government  set  a  further  objective  of  ensuring 
“superfast”  broadband  for  90  percent  of  households  by  2015.
10
The  Broadband  Delivery  UK 
program has made available £830 million ($1.32 billion) in funding for the project.
11
Although 
there remain significant numbers of people who for financial or literacy reasons are unable or 
disinclined to subscribe, broadband is widely available, with nearly 100 percent of all households 
within range of ADSL connections and 45 percent within reach of fiber optic cable.
12
Superfast 
connections are, for the most part, only available in major urban centers and not in rural areas. 
Even where access is  available, use and participation does not necessarily follow.  In 2012, 22 
percent of the UK adult population did not use the internet at home.
13
Research by the British 
3
 David Barrett, “Phone and email records to be stored in new spy plan,” The Telegraph, February 18, 2012, 
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/technology/internet/9090617/Phone‐and‐email‐records‐to‐be‐stored‐in‐new‐spy‐plan.html
4
 See, Parliamentary Joint Select Committee on Draft Defamation Bill, Defamation Bill 2012‐13 (HC Bill 51), 
http://services.parliament.uk/bills/2012‐13/defamation.html.  
5
 Protection of Freedoms Act 2012, http://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/2012/9/contents/enacted. 
6
 Draft Communications Data Bill, http://www.parliament.uk/draft‐communications‐bill/.  
7
 Ofcom, The Consumer Experience of 2012: Research Report (London: Ofcom, January 2013), 
http://stakeholders.ofcom.org.uk/binaries/research/consumer‐experience/tce‐12/Consumer_Experience_Researc1.pdf.    
8
 “Individuals Using the Internet,” International Telecommunication Union, 2000‐2012, accessed August 7, 2013, 
http://www.itu.int/en/ITU‐D/Statistics/Pages/stat/default.aspx
9
 See, Department for Culture, Media and Sport, Proposed Changes to Siting Requirements for Broadband Cabinets and 
Overhead Lines to Facilitate the Deployment of Superfast Broadband Networks, January 2013. 
https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/89449/CONDOC_fixed_bb.pdf.   
10
 Ibid.  
11
 Department for Culture, Media and Sport, Next Phase of Superfast Broadband Plans Announced, December 2010. 
https://www.gov.uk/government/news/next‐phase‐of‐superfast‐broadband‐plans‐announced‐‐4.  
12
 Ofcom, The Consumer Experience of 2012: Research Report. 
13
 Consumer Communications Panel, “Bridging the Gap: Sustaining Online Engagement,” May 2012, 
http://www.communicationsconsumerpanel.org.uk/smartweb/research/bridging‐the‐gap:‐sustaining‐online‐engagement
O
BSTACLES TO 
A
CCESS
770
VB.NET Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file
Load PDF from stream programmatically in VB.NET. VB.NET: DLLs for Creating PDF. Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll.
adding metadata to pdf; edit pdf metadata acrobat
C# PDF: PDF Document Viewer & Reader SDK for Windows Forms
without any dependency on Adobe products; Add PDF viewing and Support navigating, zooming, annotating and saving PDF in C# WinForms project programmatically;
extract pdf metadata; edit multiple pdf metadata
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
U
NITED 
K
INGDOM
Communications Consumer  Panel found that  citizens with  internet  access  may  choose not  to 
participate if they lack technical understanding, lack adequate equipment, or are reluctant to submit 
personal data.
14
Those  in  the lowest  income groups  are significantly less  likely  to have  home 
internet subscriptions, and the gap has remained the same for the past several years. The share of 
people over 65 with broadband access is significantly lower than that of all other age groups, but 
the gap has been narrowing rapidly.
15
Mobile telephone penetration is also universal, with a penetration rate of over 130 percent in 
2012.
16
Second-generation  (2G)  and  third-generation  (3G)  networks  are  available  in  over  99 
percent of all households. Overall household use of mobile broadband decreased from 17 percent 
to 12 percent in 2012, and 6 percent of households use mobile broadband as their main internet 
connection. From 2011 to 2012, the average cost of all mobile service packages increased 7 percent 
to just over £9 pounds ($14) per month for a basic package and £43 for ($66) for an advanced 
package that includes internet.
17
The price of broadband declined 13 percent in the past four years 
to about £16 ($24) per month
18
while increasing in speed from 3.6 Mbps to an average of 12.0 
Mbps.
19
The government does not place limits on the amount of bandwidth ISPs can supply, and the use of 
internet infrastructure is not subject to government control. ISPs regularly engage in traffic shaping 
or slowdowns of certain services, such as peer-to-peer (P2P) file sharing and television streaming, 
while mobile providers have cut back on previously unlimited access packages for smart phones, 
reportedly  because  of  concerns  about  network  congestion.  The  Office  of  Communications 
(Ofcom), the country’s telecommunications regulator, adopted a voluntary code of practice on 
broadband  speeds  in  2008,  which  it  updated  in  2010.
20
After  holding  a  consultation  on  the 
subject,
21
Ofcom released a report in 2011 that called for a self-regulatory approach to network 
neutrality focusing on information disclosure rather than enforceable rules.
22
It described blocking 
of services and sites by ISPs as “highly undesirable” but said that market forces will address possible 
problems. In July 2012, the major ISPs published a “Voluntary code of practice in support of the 
open internet.”
23
The code commits ISPs to transparency and confirms that traffic management 
practices will not be used to target and degrade the services of a competitor. 
Nominet, the domain registrar in the United Kingdom that manages access to newly introduced 
14
 Ibid. 
15
 Ofcom, The Consumer Experience of 2012: Research Report. 
16
 International Telecommunication Union (ITU), “Mobile‐cellular telephone subscriptions,” 2012, accessed August 7, 2013, 
http://www.itu.int/en/ITU‐D/Statistics/Pages/stat/default.aspx
17
 Ofcom, The Consumer Experience of 2012: Research Report. 
18
 Ibid. 
19
 Ofcom, “Overview of UK Broadband Speeds,” March 14, 2013.  
20
 Ofcom, “2010 Voluntary Code of Practice: Broadband Speeds,” July 27, 2010, 
http://stakeholders.ofcom.org.uk/telecoms/codes‐of‐practice/broadband‐speeds‐cop‐2010/code‐of‐practice/.  
21
 Ofcom, “Traffic Management and 'net neutrality,' A Discussion Document,” June 24, 2010, 
http://stakeholders.ofcom.org.uk/consultations/net‐neutrality/
22
 Ofcom, “Ofcom’s approach to net neutrality,” November 11, 2011, http://stakeholders.ofcom.org.uk/consultations/net‐
neutrality/statement/.  
23
 Broadband Stakeholder Group, “ISPs launch Open Internet Code of Practice,” July 25, 2012, 
http://www.broadbanduk.org/2012/07/25/isps‐launch‐open‐internet‐code‐of‐practice/.    
771
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
U
NITED 
K
INGDOM
.uk, .wales, and .cymru domains, consulted on a new policy regarding the suspension of web 
domains at the request of law enforcement bodies.
24
The registrar had suspended thousands of 
domains without a court order after receiving complaints from the police and other bodies for 
alleged criminal and civil violations.
25
Nominet was told that failure to remove the domains may 
result in them being found criminally liable. Civil rights groups and ISPs expressed concerned about 
a lack of due process and have demanded that court orders be required under any new policy.
26
The UK provides a competitive market for internet access, and prices for communications services 
compare favorably with those in other countries.
27
Through local loop unbundling, a large number 
of companies provide internet access on infrastructure provided mainly by British Telecom (BT) 
and Virgin. BT, as the sole choice for many consumers, is dominant in the provision of wholesale 
access. This is likely to continue with the rise of “fiber to the cabinet” and “fiber to the home” 
services, which currently amount to around 40 percent of subscriptions. Four major ISPs—BT, 
Virgin, TalkTalk, and Sky—control around 87 percent of the total market.
28
ISPs are not subject to 
licensing but must comply with the general conditions set by Ofcom, such as having a recognized 
code of practice and being a member of an alternative dispute-resolution scheme.
29
Ofcom’s duties 
include regulating competition among communications industries, including telecommunications 
and  wireless  communications  services.  It  is  generally  viewed  as  fair  and  independent  in  its 
oversight.  
There is no general law authorizing internet censorship in the UK. At the same time, the UK does 
operate a filtering system to block unlawful content, such as child pornography. Additionally, laws 
such as the Protection of Children Act are used to prosecute individuals suspected of accessing or 
circulating content relating to child abuse.
30
Over the past years, these filtering tools have expanded 
to include the blocking of content related to intellectual property violations and sites that promote 
extremism and terrorism. Most recently, there have also been new developments to strengthen 
parental controls in order to prevent children from viewing adult-oriented sites. These measures 
24
 “UK police may be given domain name‐suspension powers,” Out‐Law.com, September 5, 2011. http://www.out‐
law.com/en/articles/2011/september/uk‐police‐may‐be‐given‐domain‐name‐suspension‐powers/; Nominet, “Dealing with 
domain names used in connection with criminal activity,” accessed May 21, 2013, http://www.nominet.org.uk/how‐
participate/policy‐development/current‐policy‐discussions‐and‐consultations/dealing‐domain‐names.   
25
 According to Open Rights Group, Nominet has said that the takedowns are for “counterfeit goods sites (83%), phishing 
(9.6%), drugs (6.3%) and fraud (0.8%)”; Jim Killock, “Domain seizures,” Open Rights Group (blog), May 20, 2011, 
http://www.openrightsgroup.org/blog/2011/domain‐seizures.   
26
 Nominet, “Nominet direct.uk Consultation: Response Analysis,” accessed May 21, 2013, 
http://www.nominet.org.uk/sites/default/files/NomensaAnalysisFinal.pdf; Jim Killock, “ISPA, LINX and ORG insist on Court 
Orders for domain suspensions,” Open Rights Group (blog), November 23, 2011, 
http://www.openrightsgroup.org/blog/2011/ispa,‐linx‐and‐org‐insist‐on‐court‐orders‐for‐domain‐suspensions.  
27
 Ofcom, The Consumer Experience of 2012: Research Report.  
28
 Ofcom, “The Communications Market 2012,” July 18, 2012, pp. 313, available at 
http://stakeholders.ofcom.org.uk/binaries/research/cmr/cmr12/UK_5.pdf.  
29
 Ofcom, “General Conditions of Entitlement,” accessed May 21, 2013, http://stakeholders.ofcom.org.uk/telecoms/ga‐
scheme/general‐conditions/.  
30
 See, Protection of Children Act 2009, http://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/1999/14/contents
L
IMITS ON 
C
ONTENT
772
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
U
NITED 
K
INGDOM
have  been  most controversial  in  the  realm  of  mobile  devices,  where  filtering  criteria can  be 
subjective and often result in the blocking of content that poses little threat to those under the age 
of 18. Since these child filters are turned on by default, many mobile users navigate a web in which 
some legitimate websites, such as those belonging to political groups or civil society organizations, 
are blocked. 
Under a voluntary code of practice adopted by the Internet Services Providers’ Association (ISPA) 
in January 1999, British ISPs block sites flagged as harmful by the Internet Watch Foundation 
(IWF), a British charity funded by ISPs and the European Union (EU).
31
The IWF generates a 
blacklist of unlawful content through a citizen hotline and investigations into allegedly criminal 
content.
32
Previously, the IWF also received reports on materials inciting hatred, but that has since 
been moved to TrueVision, a new police-run website.
33
The CleanFeed filtering system, developed 
by BT and the IWF, blocks access to any images or websites listed in the IWF database. While ISPs 
are not required to implement the IWF blocking list,
34
the overwhelming majority of ISPs do so. 
Furthermore,  in  2010  the  Home  Office  adopted  rules  that  prohibit  government  bodies  from 
procuring services from ISPs that do not use the list.
35
Consumer awareness of CleanFeed remains 
very low and the list of blocked sites remains secret in order to deter access to unlawful materials. 
In addition to child pornography and hate sites, the government has also taken a proactive approach 
in limiting access to websites that have been found in violation of copyright protections. There have 
been a number of cases in which courts have ordered websites, such as Newzbin and the Pirate Bay, 
to be blocked for copyright infringement
36
and to have their domain names seized based on the 
Copyright, Designs and Patents Act and other laws.
37
The CleanFeed system has been adapted to 
enable ISPs to enforce the blocks and the list of URLs is steadily growing.
38
The Digital Economy 
Act (DEA) of 2010 stipulates that websites found to have “substantial” violations of copyright can be 
blocked by a court order. However, a review mandated by the government and conducted by 
Ofcom determined that those particular blocking provisions are unlikely to be effective.
39
31
 Internet Services Providers’ Association, “ISPA Code of Practice,” accessed August 20, 2012, http://www.ispa.org.uk/about‐
us/ispa‐code‐of‐practice/.  
32
 The Internet Watch Foundation (IWF) website is located at http://www.iwf.org.uk/.  
33
 Homepage: http://www.report‐it.org.uk/home. See, IWF, “Incitement to racial hatred removed from IWF’s remit,” April 11, 
2011, http://www.iwf.org.uk/about‐iwf/newss/post/302‐incitement‐to‐racial‐hatred‐removed‐from‐iwfs‐remit.  
34
 Chris Williams, “Home Office Backs Down on Net Censorship Laws,” The Register, October 16, 2009, 
http://www.theregister.co.uk/2009/10/16/home_office_iwf_legislation/
35
 Ben Leach, “Ban for internet providers failing to block child sex sites,” The Daily Telegraph, March 10, 2010. 
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/technology/facebook/7411020/Ban‐for‐internet‐providers‐failing‐to‐block‐child‐sex‐sites.html.  
36
 Dramatico Entertainment Ltd and others v. British Sky Broadcasting Ltd and others [2012] EWHC 1152 (Ch) (May 2, 2012); 
Twentieth Century Fox Film Corporation and others v. British Telecommunications plc [2011] EWHC 2714 (Ch) (October 26, 
2011). 
37
 Matt Warman, “Serious Organised Crime Agency closes down rnbxclusive.com filesharing website,” The Telegraph, February 
15, 2012, http://www.telegraph.co.uk/technology/internet/9084540/Serious‐Organised‐Crime‐Agency‐closes‐down‐
rnbxclusive.com‐filesharing‐website.html
38
 The UK’s High Court has also ordered ISPs to block Kickass Torrents, H33T, and Fenopy, 
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology‐21601609
39
 Ofcom, “‘Site Blocking’ to reduce online copyright infringement,” May 27, 2011, 
https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/78095/Ofcom_Site‐Blocking‐
_report_with_redactions_vs2.pdf
773
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
U
NITED 
K
INGDOM
A new initiative to revise the Communications Act of 2003 is expected to be announced later in 
2013, which may result in substantial changes to these and other provisions that were adopted 
through the DEA. The government also initiated a review of intellectual property law in 2011, 
releasing  a  report  which  recommended  significant  changes  to  the  law,  including  an  explicit 
exemption for parody, which only partially exists in case law now.
40
The government endorsed the 
review’s conclusions and has consulted on and passed laws to implement its recommendations.
41
In 
March 2013, the Intellectual Property Office also launched a mediation service to assist in resolving 
intellectual  property disputes.
42
(See “Violation of User Rights”  for more information on laws 
related to the prosecution of users). 
In addition, the government has increased its efforts to limit access to “extremist” materials on the 
internet.
43
The Terrorism Act of 2006 allows for the takedown of terrorist material hosted in the 
United  Kingdom  if  it  “glorifies  or  praises”  terrorism,  is  information  that  could  be  useful  to 
conducting terrorism, or urges people to commit or help with terrorism.
44
ISPs reportedly take 
down material when contacted by the authorities, though statistics released by ISPs appear to be 
unverifiable and informal.
45
A new Counter Terrorism Internet Referral Unit (CTIRU) was set up 
in 2010 to investigate internet materials, and as of March 2013, the unit reported that it had 
successfully taken  down  4,000 URLs  that breach UK  terrorism legislation.
46
The  government 
released a revised  Prevent Anti-Terrorism Strategy  in 2011, which  calls  for limiting access to 
“extremist” materials in schools and public libraries and more efforts to remove “harmful content” 
from  the  internet.
47
The  strategy  also  involves  “sharing  unlawful  websites  for  inclusion  in 
commercial filtering products.”
48
There has also been increased public debate about imposing measures that would more effectively 
prevent children from accessing adult-oriented material  on the internet. The four  largest ISPs 
announced in 2011 that they were offering systems allowing users to filter “adult” materials at the 
40
 Intellectual Property Office, “Digital Opportunity:  A review of Intellectual Property and Growth,” May 2011, 
http://www.ipo.gov.uk/ipreview; See also, “Parody, pastiche & caricature Enabling social and commercial innovation in UK 
copyright law,” Consumer Focus, July 2011,  http://www.consumerfocus.org.uk/files/2012/11/Consumer‐Focus‐Parody‐
briefing.pdf.  
41
 See, Intellectual Property Office, “Implementing the Hargreaves review”, accessed May 25, 2013, 
http://www.ipo.gov.uk/types/hargreaves.htm
42
 Intellectual Property Office, “Mediation of Intellectual Property Disputes and IPO Mediation Service,” March 2013, 
http://www.ipo.gov.uk/ipenforce/ipenforce‐dispute/ipenforce‐mediation.htm
43
 See, Home Affairs Committee, “MPs urge internet providers to tackle on‐line extremism,” February 6, 2012. 
http://www.parliament.uk/business/committees/committees‐a‐z/commons‐select/home‐affairs‐committee/news/120206‐rvr‐
rpt‐publication/.  
44
 Terrorism Act 2006 (c. 11), §3, available at Office of Public Sector Information, 
http://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/2006/11/contents; See, “Reporting extremism and terrorism online,” DirectGov, 
http://www.direct.gov.uk/en/CrimeJusticeandtheLaw/CounterTerrorism/DG_183993.  
45
 See, e.g., Google Transparency Report, Removal Requests, accessed May 27, 2013, 
http://www.google.com/transparencyreport/removals/government/
46
 Home Office, “CONTEST: The United Kingdom’s Strategy for Countering Terrorism: Annual Report,” March 2013, 
https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/contest‐annual‐report‐2012.  
47
 Home Office, “Prevent Strategy,” June 2011, http://www.homeoffice.gov.uk/publications/counter‐
terrorism/prevent/prevent‐strategy/prevent‐strategy‐review?view=Binary
48
 Home Office, “CONTEST: The United Kingdom’s Strategy for Countering Terrorism: Annual Report.” 
774
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested