download pdf file on button click in asp.net c# : Read pdf metadata java Library SDK system azure winforms wpf console FOTN%202013_Full%20Report_08-part1587

F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
A
USTRALIA
Advanced  web  applications  like the social-networking  sites Facebook  and MySpace,  the  Skype 
voice-communications  system,  and  the  video-sharing  site  YouTube  are  neither  restricted  nor 
blocked in Australia. Digital media such as blogs, Twitter feeds, Wikipedia pages, and Facebook 
groups have been harnessed for a wide variety of purposes ranging from elections, to campaigns 
against government corporate activities, to a channel for safety-related alerts where urgent and 
immediate updates were required.
38
While online users in Australia are generally free to access and distribute materials online, free 
speech is limited by a number of legal obstacles, such as broadly applied defamation laws and a lack 
of  codified  free speech  rights.  Australia’s  accession  to  the  Council  of  Europe  Convention  on 
Cybercrime on November 30, 2012, while putting the country in line with international legal 
standards, also raised concerns because of the broader requirements under the Australian legislation 
for ISPs to monitor user activities.  
Australians’ rights to access internet content and freely engage in online discussions are based less in 
law than in the shared understanding of a fair and free society. Legal protection for free speech is 
limited to the constitutionally-implied freedom of political communication, which only extends to 
the limited context of political discourse during an election.
39
There is no bill of rights or similar 
legislative instrument that protects the full range of human rights in Australia, and the courts have 
less ground to strike down legislation that infringes on civil liberties. Nonetheless, Australians 
benefit  greatly  from a culture  of  freedom  of  expression  and  freedom  of  information,  further 
protected  by  an  independent  judiciary.  The  country  is  also  a  signatory  to  the  International 
Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (ICCPR).  
The Australian press, however, has consistently expressed concerns about a “culture of secrecy” 
that continues to inhibit reporting.
40
A 2007 report commissioned by Australia’s Right to Know 
(ARTK), a coalition of media companies formed to examine free press issues, found that there 
were over 350 pieces of legislation containing “secrecy” provisions to restrict media publications.
41
There are two significant secrecy laws that have a far-reaching impact on the media.  The first is a 
lack of federal legislation to protect whistleblowers. The second is a lack of shield laws in many 
Australian states, which means that journalists are not shielded from having to disclose their sources 
in a court proceeding. In cases where journalists do not disclose their sources, they are subject to 
38
 Digital media, for example, is readily used for political campaigning and political protest in Australia.  See Terry Flew, “Not Yet 
the Internet Election: Online Media, Political Content and the 2007 Australian Federal Election,”(2008) Media International 
Australia Incorporating Culture and Policy, pp. 5‐13. Also available at http://eprints.qut.edu.au/39366/1/c39366.pdf 
39
 Alana Maurushat, Renee Watt, “Australia’s Internet Filtering Proposal in the International Context,” Internet Law Bulletin 12, 
no. 2 (2009). 
40
 David Rolph, Matt Vitins, and Judith Bannister, Media Law: Cases, Materials and Commentaries (South Melbourne: Oxford 
University Press, 2010): 44. 
41
 Australia’s Right to Know, “Submission to the Australian Law Reforms Commission’s Review of Secrecy Laws” (2007) 
http://www.australiasrighttoknow.com.au/files/docs/ALRC‐Secrecy‐Submission.pdf
V
IOLATIONS OF 
U
SER 
R
IGHTS
75
Read pdf metadata java - add, remove, update PDF metadata in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Allow C# Developers to Read, Add, Edit, Update and Delete PDF Metadata
pdf metadata editor online; remove metadata from pdf
Read pdf metadata java - VB.NET PDF metadata library: add, remove, update PDF metadata in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Enable VB.NET Users to Read, Write, Edit, Delete and Update PDF Document Metadata
remove metadata from pdf online; clean pdf metadata
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
A
USTRALIA
liability and possible criminal sanction.
42
In October 2012, Independent Member of Parliament 
Andrew Wilke introduced the Public Interest Disclosure (Whistleblower Protection) Bill.  The bill 
is  consistent  with  past  recommendations  and  committee  outcomes  recommending  that 
whistleblower protection be introduced at the federal level. The bill, if enacted, provides much 
needed protection for those federal public sector employees who leak information about corrupt 
practices. At this time there is no evidence to support whether leaking information occurs more 
often via online communication as opposed to traditional media such as print or broadcast. 
The Anti-Terrorism Act 2005 (Cth) revived laws against sedition and unlawful association. The 
unlawful  association  provisions  have  been  used  widely  since  their  enactment  to  ban  several 
organizations perceived to be potentially dangerous in terms of their links to violent acts.
43
The 
sedition provisions, however, have not been used. Further, insults against government institutions 
or officials would not fall within the sedition provisions.
44
Australian defamation law has been interpreted liberally and is governed by legislation passed by the 
states as well as common law principles.
45
Civil actions over defamation are common and form the 
main impetus for self-censorship,
46
though a number of cases have established a  constitutional 
defense when the publication of defamatory material involves political discussion.
47
Court costs and 
stress  associated with defending against suits under Australia’s expansive defamation laws have 
caused organizations to leave the country and blogs to shut down.
48
Under Australian law, a person may bring a defamation case to court based on information posted 
online by someone in another country, providing that the material is accessible in Australia and that 
the  defamed  person  enjoys  a  reputation  in  Australia.  In  some  cases,  this  law  allows  for  the 
possibility of libel tourism, in which individuals may take up legal cases in Australia because of the 
more favorable legal environment regarding defamation suits. The right to reputation is generally 
afforded greater protection in countries like Australia and the United Kingdom than the right of 
freedom of expression. In Australia this is especially so as freedom of expression is limited to 
political speech. While the United States and the United Kingdom have recently enacted laws to 
restrict libel tourism, Australia is not currently considering any such legislation. 
Social-networking companies such as Twitter and Facebook are finding themselves in Australian 
courts under Australia’s defamation laws. Recently, television actress and producer Marieke Hardy 
42
 Irene Moss, Report of the Independent Audit into the State of Free Speech in Australia (Surry Hills, New South Wales: 
Australia’s Right to Know Coalition, 2007), http://www.smh.com.au/pdf/foIreport5.pdf.. See also LexMedia Australia, 
“Journalist Shield Laws in Australia” (2010) http://www.lexmedia.com.au/2010/10/journalist‐shield‐laws.html#.UTfUOHnh2F8
43
 Andrew Lynch and George Williams, What Price Security? (UNSW Press: Sydney, 2006), 41‐59. 
44
 Ibid. 
45
 Principles of online defamation stem from the High Court of Australia, Dow Jones & Company Inc v. Joseph Gutnick, [2002] 
HCA 56.   
46
 Moss, 42.  
47
 Human Rights Constitutional Rights, “Australian Defamation Law,” http://www.hrcr.org/safrica/expression/defamation.html
accessed June 2010. 
48
 Asher Moses, “Online Forum Trolls Cost me Millions: Filmmaker,” Sydney Morning Herald, July 15, 2009, 
http://www.smh.com.au/technology/technology‐news/online‐forum‐trolls‐cost‐me‐millions‐filmmaker‐20090715‐dl4t.html
76
.NET PDF SDK | Read & Processing PDF files
of text, hyperlinks, bookmarks and metadata; Advanced document provides royalty-free .NET Imaging PDF Reader SDK Document Imaging SDK and Java Document Imaging
rename pdf files from metadata; edit pdf metadata online
DocImage SDK for .NET: Document Imaging Features
viewer application Enable users to add metadata in the TIFF Type 6 (OJPEG) encoding Image only PDF encoding support. Add-on: Able to decode and read 20+ barcode
remove pdf metadata; pdf metadata reader
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
A
USTRALIA
wrongly named Melbourne resident Joshua Meggitt as the author of a hate blog.
49
Hardy tweeted 
the defamatory comment, which was then retweeted by some of Hardy’s followers. In 2011, 
Meggitt sued Hardy for defamation and reached a confidential settlement out of court. Then in 
2012, Meggitt took further legal action against Twitter as the publisher of Hardy’s defamatory 
tweet. Hardy has reached a confidential settlement out of court.  There is no reported outcome yet 
in the Twitter matter. 
Users do not need to register to use the internet, nor are there restrictions placed on anonymous 
communications.  The  same  cannot  be  said  of  mobile  phone  users,  as  verified  identification 
information is required to purchase any prepaid mobile service. Additional personal information is 
required for the service provider before a phone may be activated. All purchase information is 
stored  while  the  service  remains  activated,  and  it  may  be  accessed  by  law  enforcement  and 
emergency agencies providing there is a valid warrant.
50
Law enforcement agencies may search and seize computers, and compel an ISP to intercept and 
store data from those suspected of committing a crime. Such actions require a lawful warrant. The 
collection  and  monitoring  of  the  content of a communication  falls within  the  purview of the 
Telecommunications (Interception and Access) Act 1979 (TIAA). Call-charge records, however, 
are regulated by the Telecommunications Act 1997 (TA).
51
It is prohibited for ISPs and similar 
entities, acting on their own, to monitor and disclose the content of communications without the 
customer’s consent.
52
Unlawful collection and disclosure of the content of a communication can 
draw  both  civil  and  criminal  sanctions.
53
The  TIAA  and  TA  expressly  authorize  a  range  of 
disclosures, including to specified law enforcement and tax agencies, all of which require a warrant. 
ISPs are currently able to monitor their networks without a warrant  for “network protection 
duties,” such as curtailing malicious software and spam.
54
On August 22, 2012, the Australian Senate passed the Cybercrime Legislation Amendment Bill, 
allowing Australia to accede to the Council of Europe Convention on Cybercrime.
55
Unlike that of 
many other countries that have already ratified the convention, Australia’s legislation goes beyond 
the treaty’s terms by calling for greater monitoring of all internet communications by ISPs. Under 
the Convention, an ISP is only required to monitor, intercept, and retain data when presented with 
a warrant, and only in conjunction with an active and ongoing criminal investigation restricted to 
the areas in the Convention: child pornography, online copyright (intellectual property), online 
49
 Michelle Griffin, “Man Sues Twitter over Hate Blog” Sydney Morning Herald, February 17, 2012, 
http://www.smh.com.au/technology/technology‐news/man‐sues‐twitter‐over‐hate‐blog‐20120216‐1tbwg.html.  
50
 ACMA, “Pre‐paid Mobile Services—Consumer Information Provision Fact Sheet,” accessed June 2010, 
http://www.acma.gov.au/WEB/STANDARD/pc=PC_9079
51
 Telecommunications Act 1997, Part 13, http://www.austlii.edu.au/au/legis/cth/consol_act/ta1997214/
52
 Part 2‐1, section 7, of the Telecommunications (Interception and Access) Act 1979 (TIAA) prohibits disclosure of an 
interception or communications, and Part 3‐1, section 108, of the TIAA prohibits access to stored communications. See 
Telecommunications (Interception and Access) Act 1979, http://www.austlii.edu.au/au/legis/cth/consol_act/taaa1979410/
53
 Criminal offenses are outlined in Part 2‐9 of the TIAA, while civil remedies are outlined in Part 2‐10. See Telecommunications 
(Interception and Access) Act 1979, http://www.austlii.edu.au/au/legis/cth/consol_act/taaa1979410/
54
 Alana Maurushat, “Australia’s Accession to the Cybercrime Convention: Is the Convention Still Relevant in Combating 
Cybercrime in the Era of Obfuscation Crime Tools?” (2010) University of New South Wales Law Journal 16, no. 1. 
55
 Council of Europe, Convention on Cybercrime, 
http://conventions.coe.int/Treaty/Commun/QueVoulezVous.asp?NT=185&CL=ENG
77
PDF Image Viewer| What is PDF
Promote use of metadata; Used on independent devices and processing SDK, allowing developers to read, write, view and convert word document without need for PDF.
edit pdf metadata; pdf xmp metadata
.NET DICOM SDK | DICOM Image Viewing
new style; Ability to read patient metadata from the guide and sample codings; Ability to read DICOM images NET Document Imaging SDK and Java Document Imaging
acrobat pdf additional metadata; pdf xmp metadata viewer
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
A
USTRALIA
fraud and forgery, and computer offenses. The new Australian legislation compels ISP cooperation 
for any serious crime being investigated in Australia or overseas; it is not limited to the crimes set 
out in the Convention.  
The  Convention  also requires expeditious preservation of data by the person in possession or 
control of data, which means ISPs will often be the ones called upon to preserve data. Articles 16 
and 17 of the Convention state that ISPs can be compelled to preserve internet traffic data logs for a 
maximum period of 90 days, whereas the Australian legislation mandates that ISPs store data for 
180 days for foreign preservation notices.  However, the Convention does not compel ISPs to 
monitor stored communications, only traffic data. In the case of an active criminal investigation, the 
Convention obligates an ISP to preserve the data that is already stored but would otherwise be 
deleted.  This  could  include  preservation  of  what  IP  addresses  connect to  and from  other  IP 
addresses, or what phone numbers connect to a Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP) number. This 
may also include information about what types of protocols a customer uses, the size and use of 
packets, and so forth. Data preservation remains a controversial point but most notably in relation 
to the obligation to provide mutual assistance to a foreign entity. 
In July  2012, the Commonwealth  Attorney-General’s Department released  a discussion paper 
titled “Equipping Australia against emerging and evolving threats.”
56
Under the proposal, Australian 
ISPs  would  be  required  to  monitor,  collect,  and  store  information  pertaining  to  all  users’ 
communications, including storing communications for a period of two years. This activity would 
be done without a warrant and enforced against all users regardless of whether there is a criminal 
investigation.
57
 similar  data  retention  law  is  in  place  in  Europe.
58
Many  European  courts, 
however, have struck down the data retention provisions on the grounds that they are a gross 
violation of privacy, inconsistent with domestic law, and unconstitutional.
59
The Attorney-General 
has failed to discuss the significant differences between the EU and Australian legal environments. 
In EU countries, including the United Kingdom, citizens’ human rights are protected under a Bill 
of Rights or a Charter of Human Rights and Freedoms. Like the U.S. courts, European courts can 
strike down laws or directives which offend these guarantees of fundamental human rights and civil 
liberties. There is no Bill of Rights or Charter of Human Rights and Freedoms in Australia. As such, 
the courts have no effective means to strike down proposals that violate civil liberties. Once a 
proposal is enacted, the only way to have it changed is through legislation, which often requires a 
change  of  government. This  compulsory  data-retention  policy,  if  enacted,  could  become  a 
significant threat to online freedom in Australia. The proposal is not yet official policy in Australia, 
nor has it evolved to a bill. At this point in time it remains a proposal only.  
56
 Commonwealth Attorney‐General’s Department’s Discussion Paper, Equipping Australia against emerging and evolving 
threats, 2012, accessed February 1, 2013, 
http://www.aph.gov.au/Parliamentary_Business/Committees/House_of_Representatives_Committees?url=pjcis/nsl2012/additi
onal/discussion%20paper.pdf
57
 Asher Moses, “Web Snooping Policy Shrouded in Secrecy,” The Age, June 17, 2010,  
http://www.theage.com.au/technology/technology‐news/web‐snooping‐policy‐shrouded‐in‐secrecy‐20100617‐yi1u.html.  
58
 Directive 2006/24/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 15 March 2006 
59
 Countries that have annulled, modified, or ruled the provisions unconstitutional include: Germany, Czech Republic, Romania, 
Bulgaria, and the Republic of Cypress. Constitutional challenges continue in Ireland, Hungary, and Slovakia. 
78
.NET PDF Generator | Generate & Manipulate PDF files
delete any pages in PDFs; Add metadata of a RasterEdge provides royalty-free .NET Imaging PDF Generator of NET Document Imaging SDK and Java Document Imaging
google search pdf metadata; delete metadata from pdf
.NET JPEG 2000 SDK | Encode & Decode JPEG 2000 Images
Able to customize compression ratios (0 - 100); Support metadata encoding and decoding com is professional .NET Document Imaging SDK and Java Document Imaging
read pdf metadata; pdf xmp metadata editor
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
A
USTRALIA
There have been several cases in the states of New South Wales and Victoria of individuals being 
sentenced to jail terms for publishing explicit photos of women, typically former girlfriends or 
boyfriends.  By way of example, Australian citizen Ravshan Usmanov pled guilty to publishing an 
indecent article and was originally sentenced to six months of home detention after he posted nude 
photographs  of  an  ex-girlfriend  on  Facebook.
60
 The  sentence  was  appealed  and  the  court 
commuted the original sentence in favor of a suspended sentence.    
The  group Anonymous has commenced a series of “hacktivist” attacks in response to the data 
retention proposal put forth by the Attorney-General.  In July 2012, the movement took down a 
number of government websites as a form of protest after a Q&A session with Julia Gillard in which 
details of many cybersecurity initiatives were outlined.  
60
 Heath Astor, “Ex‐Lover Punished for Facebook Revenge,” April 22, 2012, Sydney Morning Herald, 
http://www.smh.com.au/technology/technology‐news/exlover‐punished‐for‐facebook‐revenge‐20120421‐1xdpy.html
79
.NET Multipage TIFF SDK| Process Multipage TIFF Files
upload to SharePoint and save to PDF documents. Support for metadata reading & writing. com is professional .NET Document Imaging SDK and Java Document Imaging
pdf metadata editor; get pdf metadata
.NET Annotation SDK| Annotate, Redact Images
Automatically save annotations as the metadata of the document. Want to Try RasterEdge.com is professional .NET Document Imaging SDK and Java Document Imaging
batch pdf metadata; read pdf metadata online
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
A
ZERBAIJAN
A
ZERBAIJAN
 Some websites were  temporarily blocked during protests  or other  anti-government
events (see L
IMITS ON 
C
ONTENT
).
 In addition to the dominance of state-owned media outlets, the government further
manipulated the online sphere through intimidation tactics like requiring students to
“like”  government  policies  on  Facebook,  and  threatening  those  who  support  anti-
government political causes online (see L
IMITS ON 
C
ONTENT
).
 New regulations were  implemented in 2013 that required all  mobile phones to be
registered  according  to  their  IMEI  identification  code  (see  V
IOLATIONS  OF 
U
SER
R
IGHTS
).
 Authorities broadly applied existing laws to prosecute journalists and citizens for their
online activities (see V
IOLATIONS OF 
U
SER 
R
IGHTS
).
2012 
2013 
I
NTERNET 
F
REEDOM 
S
TATUS
P
ARTLY 
F
REE
P
ARTLY 
F
REE
Obstacles to Access (0-25) 
13 
13 
Limits on Content (0-35) 
16 
17 
Violations of User Rights (0-40) 
21 
22 
Total (0-100) 
50 
52 
*0=most free, 100=least free
K
EY 
D
EVELOPMENTS
:
M
AY 
2012
A
PRIL 
2013 
P
OPULATION
9.3 million
I
NTERNET 
P
ENETRATION 
2012: 
54 percent
S
OCIAL 
M
EDIA
/ICT
A
PPS 
B
LOCKED
Yes
P
OLITICAL
/S
OCIAL 
C
ONTENT 
B
LOCKED
Yes
B
LOGGERS
/ICT
U
SERS 
A
RRESTED
Yes
P
RESS 
F
REEDOM 
2013
S
TATUS
Not Free
80
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
A
ZERBAIJAN
Over the course of the last few years, Azerbaijan has acquired a vibrant and rapidly growing online 
community. The internet in Azerbaijan has not only become a platform for information sharing, but 
as the country’s traditional media outlets continue to fall under strict government control, it has 
become a medium for alternative voices and popular political dissent. Its limited, though growing, 
community of users has yet to see any major restrictions imposed on the technical level, given the 
country’s ongoing commitment and eagerness to promote itself as a leader of information and 
communication technology (ICT) innovation in the region.  
When it comes to the internet, the Azerbaijani government is practicing what some have called 
“networked authoritarianism”
1
—a middle path between open access and censorship, where online 
content remains relatively uncensored, and most often the state lets users discuss the country’s 
problems and sometimes openly call for action. On the surface, such an approach generates a 
relatively democratic image for the country at home and abroad. However, behind the scenes, 
those who speak out on the internet are more likely to face intimidation, threats, arrests, and fines 
from the state.  
Exemplifying this model, Azerbaijani authorities engage little in filtering and direct censorship. 
Nonetheless, they discourage the use of online technology in three ways: demonizing technology 
through the practice of media framing, as in the case with the state psychiatrist who called users of 
social media mentally ill;
2
gradually instilling a sense of fear and inevitably self-censorship in users 
of online media through constant monitoring and surveillance; and putting online activists behind 
bars, such as the case in 2009 of the arrests of two prominent bloggers, Emin Milli and Adnan 
Hajizade.
3
While the internet was first introduced in Azerbaijan in 1994 and became available for all citizens in 
1996, it was not until the late 2000s that the internet became a more widely-used tool. Despite an 
increase in internet penetration, the lowering of costs, and the growth of various internet service 
providers (ISPs), the overall quality of internet access has remained low, especially outside the 
capital, where many users still rely on dial-up services. Since 2005, authorities have sporadically 
blocked  access  to  certain  antigovernment  websites  (including  satirical  ones).  The  crackdown 
intensified in 2011 with bloggers and online activists joining the usual group of targeted suspects—
outspoken journalists and opposition party members. The uprisings of the Arab Spring created 
further  grounds  for  fear,  turning  the  government’s  attention  to  social  networks  in  search  of 
“violators” of public order.  
1
 Katy E. Pearce, Sarah Kendzior, “Networked Authoritarianism and Social Media in Azerbaijan,” Journal of Communication ISSN 
0021‐9916, 2013, http://www.academia.edu/1495626/Networked_Authoritarianism_and_Social_Media_in_Azerbaijan  
2
 “Social network users have ‘mental problems’,” trend.az, March 7, 2011, http://en.trend.az/news/society/1841409.html  
3
 Adam Hug, “Spotlight on Azerbaijan,” Information and Communication Technology in Azerbaijan, The Foreign Policy Center, 
2012, fpc.org.uk/fsblob/1462.pdf 
I
NTRODUCTION
81
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
A
ZERBAIJAN
In 2012, Azerbaijan hosted two major international events: the Eurovision Song Contest in May and 
the Internet Governance Forum in November. In the wake of these events, once international 
attention had been diverted, the government continued to crack down on protestors and suppress 
antigovernment media coverage. From 2012-2013, the number of attacks on opposition websites 
and arrests of online activists increased, alongside an increase in the use of ICTs to mobilize protests 
against the government. 
Indicators for Azerbaijan’s internet penetration  vary based on available  sources, although most 
would agree that  the  number  of  internet users has risen significantly in  recent  years.  Figures 
reported by the Ministry of Communication and Information Technologies (MCIT) indicate an 
internet penetration rate of 70 percent for 2012; these statistics include mobile internet users as 
well  as  anyone  who  has  accessed  the  internet,  including  one-time  users.
4
The  International 
Telecommunication Union (ITU), on the other hand, estimates Azerbaijan’s internet penetration 
rate at 54 percent for 2012,
5
while research conducted by academics suggest that the penetration 
figure could be as low as 25 percent.
6
Despite a growing penetration rate, diversifying ISPs, and gradually declining costs, access to the 
internet  remains highest in  the capital  and  lowest in  rural  areas, where  there is  a  scarcity  of 
providers. The quality of access also remains low, with paid prices not corresponding to advertised 
speeds and with many users still relying on slow dial-up connections. An ambitious state program 
(worth $131 million in total) is underway to build a broadband internet infrastructure, particularly 
in rural regions. The plan intends to provide users across the country with 10 Mbps speed and 
generate an internet penetration rate of 85 percent by 2017. 
At present, the cost of internet access at an average speed of 1 Mbps is a minimum of AZN 12 
(approximately $15.30), which is equivalent to 3 percent of the average monthly wage, according 
to official data distributed by the Ministry of Communication and Information Technologies.
7
The 
ministry intends to further decrease prices; however, no specific amounts were mentioned in any of 
the recent statements that the ministry issued.
8
Privately owned but government controlled Delta Telecom (previously known as AzerSat) is the 
primary ISP in the country, holding an 88 percent share of the overall internet market and selling 
4
 “Internet penetration rate reaches 70% in Azerbaijan,” ann.az, January 16, 2013, http://ann.az/en/?p=109281 
5
 International Telecommunications Union (ITU), “Percentage of Individuals Using the Internet, 2012,” accessed July 3, 2013, 
http://www.itu.int/en/ITU‐D/Statistics/Pages/stat/default.aspx  
6
 İşdən sonra‐ Azərbaycanda internet statistikası, azadliq.org, November 7, 2012, 
http://www.azadliq.org/audio/broadcastprogram/635687.html [in Azerbaijani/English] 
7
 “Minister: In Azerbaijan, the cost of connection to the Internet at speeds of 1Mbit/s is about 3% of the average monthly 
wage”, apa.az, January 16, 2013, http://en.apa.az/news/186053 
8
 “Azərbaycanda mobil danışıq qiymətləri və internet tarifləri ucuzlaşacaq”, Kanal13AZ via youtube.com, January 9, 2013, 
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nCtwmMv0CRo [in Azerbaijani] 
O
BSTACLES TO 
A
CCESS
82
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
A
ZERBAIJAN
traffic to almost all other ISPs.
9
It was the first company to implement a WiMAX technology 
project in the country in February 2010, laying the foundation for the use of wireless, broadband, 
and  unlimited  internet  access.  The  largest  ISP  operating  outside  of  Baku  is  the  state-owned 
AzTelekom, with ownership ties to the Ministry of Communication and Information Technologies 
(MCIT).
10
Azertelecom, owned by Azerfon, completed its fiber-optic network in 2011 and is now 
competing for Delta Telecom’s business.
11
Up until 2000, ISPs in Azerbaijan were required to obtain a license; however, in 2000 this licensing 
procedure  was no longer  required.  As a result, according  to the information provided by the 
Ministry of Communication and Information Technologies, today there are over 40 ISPs operating 
in the country with only three—Aztelekomnet, Bakinternet, Azdatakom—being state owned.
12
Delta Telecom and Azertelecom are two private companies that provide access to the international 
internet.  
With Azertelecom’s growing  role in the internet business,  government  control  over ICTs  has 
become more apparent, particularly after it was uncovered in 2011 that Azerfon is largely owned 
by President Ilham Aliyev’s daughters.
13
Furthermore, there is a lack of transparency over the 
ownership  of  other  ICT  resources.  While  there  are  no  specific  legal  provisions  or  licensing 
requirements for ISPs in Azerbaijan, the MCIT refuses to answer inquiries regarding the ownership 
of license holders.
14
According to  clause  4.2(a)  of  the “Rules  for  Using  Internet  Services,”  internet  providers  can 
unilaterally suspend services provided to subscribers in cases that violate the rules stipulated in the 
law  “On  Telecommunications.” Furthermore,  a  provider  can  suspend  the delivery  of  internet 
services in certain circumstances including in times of war, events of natural disasters, and states of 
emergency, though none of these legal provisions were employed in 2012-2013.
15
Usage of mobile phones in Azerbaijan has continued to grow steadily. There are three mobile 
service providers using the Global System for Mobile Communications (GSM) standard: Azercell, 
Azerfon, and Bakcell. In 2009, Azerfon, in a partnership with Britain’s Vodafone, was the only 
company with a license for 3G service; however, in response to a number of critical media reports, 
Azercell and Bakcell  were issued licenses in 2011,  breaking  Azerfon’s monopoly over  the  3G 
market. Azercell and Bakcell reduced prices to increase demand for mobile internet when they 
launched 3G services.
16
As a result, the number of mobile internet users on the Azercell network—
9
 “Azerbaijan country profile,” Open Net Initiative, November 17, 2010, http://opennet.net/research/profiles/azerbaijan.  
10
 Yashar Hajiyev, “Azerbaijan,” European Commission, accessed August 30, 2012, http://bit.ly/1fz6jF9.  
11
 “Azerbaijan Network,” Azertelecom.az, accessed September 5, 2012, http://www.azertelecom.az/en/aznetwork/
12
 Ministry of Communications and Information Technologies of the Republic of Azerbaijan, 
http://www.mincom.gov.az/activity/information‐technologies/internet/ 
13
 Khadija Ismayilova, “Azerbaijani President’s Daughter’s Tied to Fast‐Rising Telecoms Firm,” Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty, 
June 27, 2011, http://www.rferl.org/content/azerbaijan_president_aliyev_daughters_tied_to_telecoms_firm/24248340.html
14
 Response of the Ministry of Communication to a written request for information. 
15
 “Searching for Freedom: Online Expression in Azerbaijan”, The Expression Online Initiative, November 2012, 
http://www.irfs.org/wp‐content/uploads/2012/12/Report_EO_1.pdf  
16
 “Azercell reduces prices for mobile internet services (Azerbaijan),” Wireless Federation, November 28, 2011, 
http://wirelessfederation.com/news/90875‐azercell‐reduces‐prices‐for‐mobile‐internet‐services‐azerbaijan/
83
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
A
ZERBAIJAN
the country’s largest mobile communication provider with 55 percent of the market
17
—increased 
300 fold in 2011, according to a company representative.
18
Introduction of 3G services and changes in mobile phone data packages provided by the phone 
companies brought down the average costs of mobile internet from AZN 40.5 (approximately $50) 
in 2011 to AZN 7.75 (approximately $10) in 2012. The connection speed improved significantly in 
2011, increasing from 3.48 Mbps to 7.05 Mbps.
19
Azerbaijan does not have an independent regulatory body for the telecommunications sector, and 
the  MCIT  performs  the  basic  regulatory  functions  pursuant  to  the  2005  Law  on 
Telecommunications. The MCIT also has a monopoly over the sale of the “.az” domain, which 
cannot  be  obtained  online  and  requires  an  in-person  application  and  Azerbaijani  citizenship, 
subjecting the process to bureaucratic red tape and possible corruption.   
On  February  14,  2013,  the  Azerbaijani  Press  Council  established  a  commission  under  the 
government-controlled National Television and Radio Council to handle citizen’s complaints about 
ethical violations online, hacking attacks on web pages, and other issues related to online media.
20
This is another alarming development, as the Press Council is known for its progovernment stance. 
Already last year, the council restricted the activities of several critical newspapers by describing 
them as “rackets” and putting them on a “black list.”
21
As a result, these papers are banned from 
publishing. Aflatun Amashov, chair of the Press Council, argues that since the number of internet 
news outlets is growing, the situation calls for the council to take concrete action in this direction.
22
In another worrisome development, on February 20, 2013, the National Television and Radio 
Council announced the introduction of possible licensing measures for online television channels, 
seeing free operation  of these outlets as “unfair”  when compared to traditional TV channels.
23
Proponents of free speech and free access to information describe this move as the government’s 
attempt to “gag freedom of expression and deprive people of alternative sources of information” 
through new forms of control.
24
17
 “About us,” Azercell, accessed September 5, 2012, http://company.azercell.com/en/
18
 Nijat Mustafayev, “Number of mobile internet users of Azercell increased sharply over the past year,” APA‐Economics, 
November 18, 2011, http://en.apa.az/news.php?id=159794
19
 “Mobile internet tariffs in Azerbaijan and explanations”, mobiz.az, October 2012, http://mobiz.az/n909/Azerbaycanda‐mobil‐
internet‐tarifleri‐+‐tehlil [in Azerbaijani] 
20
 “Press Council created commission for internet media,” mediaforum.az, February 14, 2013, http://bit.ly/18eZnGI [in 
Azerbaijani] 
21
 “Statement: The Online Expression is Under Assault in Azerbaijan,” Expressiononline.net, 
http://expressiononline.net/pressreleases/statement‐the‐online‐expression‐is‐under‐assault‐in‐azerbaijan‐2  
22
 “Aflatun Amasov: commission on internet portals is not censorship”, proses.az, February 21, 2013, 
http://proses.az/?m=xeber&id=8014 [in Azerbaijani] 
23
 “Nushirvan Maharramli: ‘We should license Internet TV’,” contact.az, February 20, 2013, 
http://contact.az/docs/2013/Economics&Finance/011000024138en.htm#.USyg‐uhhNAD 
24
 “Statement: Expression Online Demands Azerbaijani Government Keep Hands Off the Internet,” irfs.org, February 15, 2013, 
http://expressiononline.net/pressreleases/statement‐expression‐online‐demands‐azerbaijani‐government‐keep‐hands‐off‐the‐
internet‐5 
84
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested