download pdf file on button click in asp.net c# : Read pdf metadata control software system azure winforms wpf console FOTN%202013_Full%20Report_080-part1588

F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
U
NITED 
S
TATES
the company complied with a court order to produce the user’s posts. The defendant pled guilty to 
disorderly conduct charges in late 2012.
50
Aggressive prosecution under the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act (CFAA) has fueled growing 
criticism of that law’s scope and application. Under CFAA, it is illegal to access a computer without 
authorization, but the law fails to define the term “without authorization,” leaving the provision 
open to interpretation in the courts.
51
In one prominent case, programmer and internet activist 
Aaron Swartz secretly used Massachusetts Institute of Technology servers to download millions of 
files from  a service providing academic articles.  Prosecutors sought  harsh  penalties for  Swartz 
under CFAA, which could have resulted in up to 35 years imprisonment.
52
Swartz committed 
suicide in early 2013. Shortly after his death, a bipartisan group of lawmakers introduced “Aaron’s 
Law,” draft legislation that would prevent the government from using CFAA to prosecute terms of 
service  violations  and  stop  prosecutors  from  bringing  multiple redundant  charges  for  a  single 
crime.
53
In another case of prosecution under CFAA, online activist Andrew Auernheimer was convicted 
and sentenced to three and a half years in prison in March 2013. In 2010, Auernheimer found a 
security breach in AT&T’s website that allowed him to access thousands of customers’  e-mail 
addresses, which he claims he then turned over to a journalist at Gawker in order to expose the 
company’s security flaws.
54
Prosecutors used CFAA to convict Auernheimer of identity fraud and 
conspiracy  to  access  a  computer  without  authorization.  In  addition  to  the  prison  sentence, 
Auernheimer was ordered to pay over $73,000 in damages to AT&T. 
In August 2011, public transit authorities in San Francisco suspended cell phone service in several 
underground stations of the Bay Area Rapid Transit (BART) system in an effort to impede planned 
demonstrations regarding the fatal shooting of a man by BART police the month prior. Numerous 
digital rights advocates and First Amendment scholars called the decision a violation of BART 
passengers’  First  Amendment  rights  and  pointed  to  the  international  implications  of  BART’s 
actions.
55
Following the incident, various civil liberties groups filed an emergency petition with the 
FCC requesting that the agency declare the BART shutdown a violation of the Communications 
50
 Russ Buettner, “A Brooklyn Protestor Pleads Guilty After His Twitter Posts Sink His Case,” The New York Times, December 12, 
2012, http://www.nytimes.com/2012/12/13/nyregion/malcolm‐harris‐pleads‐guilty‐over‐2011‐march.html
51
 “Computer Fraud and Abuse Act Reform,” Electronic Frontier Foundation, accessed August 8, 2013, 
https://www.eff.org/issues/cfaa
52
 “Deadly Silence: Aaron Swartz and MIT,” The Economist, August 3, 2013, 
http://www.economist.com/news/international/21582578‐campaigner‐academic‐openness‐gains‐partial‐posthumous‐
vindication‐deadly‐silence
53
 “Rep Zoe Lofgren Introduces Bipartisan Aaron’s Law,” website of Representative Zoe Lofgren, June 20, 2013, 
http://www.lofgren.house.gov/images/stories/pdf/aarons law ‐ lofgren ‐ 061913.pdf
54
 Karen McVeigh, “US hacker Andrew Auernheimer given three‐year jail term for AT&T breach,” The Guardian, March 18, 2013, 
http://www.theguardian.com/technology/2013/mar/18/us‐hacker‐andrew‐auernheimer‐at‐t.  
55
 David Streitfeld, “Bay Area Officials Cut Cell Coverage to Thwart Protestors,” Bits Blog, NYTimes.com, August 12, 2011, 
http://bits.blogs.nytimes.com/2011/08/12/bay‐area‐authorities‐cut‐cell‐coverage‐to‐thwart‐protestors/. See also, Cynthia 
Wong, “Welcome to San Francisco – Next Stop, Cairo?” Center for Democracy and Technology PolicyBeta Blog, August 23, 2011, 
http://cdt.org/blogs/cynthia‐wong/238welcome‐san‐francisco‐next‐stop‐cairo.  
795
Read pdf metadata - add, remove, update PDF metadata in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Allow C# Developers to Read, Add, Edit, Update and Delete PDF Metadata
pdf metadata viewer; edit multiple pdf metadata
Read pdf metadata - VB.NET PDF metadata library: add, remove, update PDF metadata in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Enable VB.NET Users to Read, Write, Edit, Delete and Update PDF Document Metadata
remove metadata from pdf acrobat; change pdf metadata creation date
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
U
NITED 
S
TATES
Act.
56
In early 2012, the FCC issued a call for public comment on the issue, but as of mid-2013 the 
agency had not yet taken further action on the subject.
57
In December 2011, BART adopted a 
policy outlining the circumstances under which it could shut down service; the policy did not 
require prior judicial approval but, had it been in place, it would not have allowed for the August 
2011 shutdown.
58
In 2012, the California State Assembly and Senate approved a bill that would 
require a court order before allowing for cell network interruption. Governor Jerry Brown vetoed 
the  bill  in  September  2012,  citing  concerns  that  requiring  law  enforcement  to  make  certain 
decisions within six hours of interrupting service could divert attention away from resolving the 
emergency situation.
59
Although some of the most popular social media platforms in the United States require users to 
register and create accounts using their real names through Terms of Service or other contracts,
60
there are no legal restrictions on user anonymity on the internet. Constitutional precedents protect 
the right to anonymous speech in many contexts. There are also state laws that stipulate journalists’ 
right to withhold the identities of anonymous sources, and at least one such law has been found to 
apply to bloggers.
61
In April 2011, the Obama administration launched the National Strategy for 
Trusted Identities in Cyberspace (NSTIC). The stated goal of the effort is to ensure the creation of 
an “identity ecosystem” in which internet users and organizations can more completely trust one 
another’s  identities  and  systems  when  carrying  out  online  transactions  requiring  assurance  of 
identity.
62
The plan specifically endorses anonymous online speech.
63
Laws that protect internet communications from government monitoring are complex. While in 
transit,  the  contents  of  internet  communications  are  generally  protected  from  government 
intrusion by constitutional rules against unreasonable searches and seizures,
64
although  there  is 
more  legal  ambiguity  with  data  stored  in  “the  cloud.”  The  courts,  however,  have  held  that 
transactional data about communications—data showing who is communicating with whom and 
56
 Mike Masnick, “FCC Asked For Declaratory Ruling That BART Shutting Off Mobile Phone Service Was Illegal,” TechDirt (blog), 
August 31, 2011, http://www.techdirt.com/blog/wireless/articles/20110830/11591515740/fcc‐asked‐declaratory‐ruling‐that‐
bart‐shutting‐off‐mobile‐phone‐service‐was‐illegal.shtml.  
57
 “Commission Seeks Comment on Certain Wireless Interruptions,” Federal Communications Commission, March 1, 2012, 
http://www.fcc.gov/document/commission‐seeks‐comment‐certain‐wireless‐service‐interruptions.   
58
 Michael Cabanatuan, “BART Cellphone Shutdown Rules Adopted,” SF Gate, December 2, 2011, 
http://www.sfgate.com/bayarea/article/BART‐cell‐phone‐shutdown‐rules‐adopted‐2344326.php. See also Gabe Rottman,  
“Shutting Down Cell Service During Protests: The Constitutional Dimension,” ACLU of Northen California, May 1, 2012, 
http://bit.ly/16Am4bd.  
59
 Brian Heaton, “California Governor Vetos Cell Service Shutdown Bill,” Government Technology, October 1, 2012, 
http://www.govtech.com/policy‐management/California‐Governor‐Vetoes‐Cell‐Service‐Shutdown‐Bill.html  
60
 Erica Newland, Caroline Nolan, Cynthia Wong, and Jillian York, “Account Deactivation and Content Removal: Guiding 
Principles and Practices for Companies and Users,” Global Network Initiative, September 2011, 
http://cyber.law.harvard.edu/node/7080.  
61
 “Apple v. Does,” Electronic Frontier Foundation, accessed August 1, 2012, http://www.eff.org/cases/apple‐v‐does.   
62
 “About NISTIC,” National Strategy for Trusted Identities in Cyberspace, accessed April 23, 2013, 
http://www.nist.gov/nstic/about‐nstic.html
63
 Jay Stanley, “Don’t Put Your Trust in ‘Trusted Identities,’” Blog of Rights (blog), American Civil Liberties Union, January 7, 
2011, http://www.aclu.org/blog/technology‐and‐liberty/dont‐put‐your‐trust‐trusted‐identities. See also, Jim Dempsey, “New 
Urban Myth: The Internet ID Scare,” Policy Beta (blog), Center for Democracy and Technology, January 11, 2011, 
http://www.cdt.org/blogs/jim‐dempsey/new‐urban‐myth‐internet‐id‐scare.   
64
 Paul Ohm, “Court Rules Email Protected by Fourth Amendment,” Freedom to Tinker, December 14, 2010, 
http://www.freedom‐to‐tinker.com/blog/paul/court‐rules‐email‐protected‐fourth‐amendment.   
796
VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images
Get image information, such as its location, zonal information, metadata, and so on. Extract image from PDF free in .NET framework application with trial SDK
batch edit pdf metadata; pdf metadata extract
How to C#: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF for .NET
XDoc.PDF for .NET supports editing PDF document metadata, like Title, Subject, Author, Creator, Producer, Keywords, Created Date, and Last Modified Date.
remove pdf metadata online; analyze pdf metadata
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
U
NITED 
S
TATES
when—is not protected by the Constitution.
65
Under a set of complex statutes, law enforcement 
and intelligence agencies can monitor communications and access stored information under varying 
degrees of oversight as part of criminal or national security investigations. In criminal probes, law 
enforcement authorities can monitor the content of internet communications in real time only if 
they have obtained an order, issued by a judge, under a standard that is actually a little higher than 
the one established by the Constitution for searches of physical places. The order must reflect a 
finding that there is probable cause to believe that a crime has been, is being, or is about to be 
committed.  
The status of stored communications is more uncertain. One federal appeals court has ruled that 
the  Constitution  applies  to  stored  communications,  so that  a  judicial  warrant  is  required  for 
government  access.
66
 Currently,  the  Electronic  Communications  Privacy  Act  states  that  the 
government can obtain  access  to e-mail  or other  documents stored in the cloud with a mere 
subpoena  issued  by a  prosecutor or  investigator  without  judicial  approval.
67
As  of mid-2013, 
Congress was considering a proposed reform to ECPA that would require government officials to 
obtain a warrant before accessing any private communications through online service providers.
68
The requirement would cover e-mail and documents stored using cloud services.
69
The Securities 
and  Exchange  Commission  (SEC),  a  civil  regulatory  agency,  has  complicated  the  issue  by 
attempting to amend the bill to secure the authority to obtain stored e-mail and other documents 
directly from service providers.
70
Following the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, Congress passed the USA PATRIOT Act, 
which expanded some of the government’s surveillance and investigative powers in cases involving 
terrorism as well as in ordinary criminal investigations. Three expiring provisions of the PATRIOT 
Act—including the government’s broad authority to conduct roving wiretaps of unidentified or 
“John Doe” targets, to wiretap “lone wolf” suspects who have no known connections to terrorist 
networks, and to secretly access a wide range of private business records with court orders issued 
on a broad standard (Section 215)—were renewed for an additional four years in May 2011.
71
In mid-2013, The Guardian and the Washington Post revealed a series of secret documents
72
leaked by 
a former National Security Agency (NSA) contractor that provide new information (and raise many 
new questions) about surveillance activities conducted by the United States government.  
65
 “A Brief History of Surveillance Law,” Center for Democracy & Technology, accessed August 17, 2011, 
https://www.cdt.org/issue/wiretap‐ecpa.  
66
 United States v. Warshak, 09‐3176, United States Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit. 
67
 Ibid. 
68
 Greg Nojeim, “Senate ‘Dream Team’ Introduced ECPA Reform Bill,” Center for Democracy and Technology PolicyBeta Blog, 
March 19, 2013, https://www.cdt.org/blogs/greg‐nojeim/1903senate‐dream‐team‐introduces‐ecpa‐reform‐bill
69
 “ECPA: About the Issue,” Digital Due Process, accessed April 23, 2013, 
http://digitaldueprocess.org/index.cfm?objectid=37940370‐2551‐11DF‐8E02000C296BA163
70
 Leslie Harris, “The SEC’s Power Grab Threatens to Distort the US Justice System,” Center for Democracy & Technology, July 
31, 2013, https://www.cdt.org/commentary/sec’s‐power‐grab‐threatens‐distort‐us‐justice‐system . 
71
 “Patriot Act Excesses,” New York Times, October 7, 2009, http://www.nytimes.com/2009/10/08/opinion/08thu1.html.   
72
 e.g. Glenn Greenwald, “NSA Collecting Phone Records of Millions of Verizon Customers Daily,” The Guardian, June 5, 2013, 
http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2013/jun/06/nsa‐phone‐records‐verizon‐court‐order
797
VB.NET PDF: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF
XDoc.PDF for .NET supports editing PDF document metadata, like Title, Subject, Author, Creator, Producer, Keywords, Created Date, and Last Modified Date.
embed metadata in pdf; add metadata to pdf programmatically
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
Scan image to PDF, tiff and various image formats. Get image information, such as its location, zonal information, metadata, and so on.
endnote pdf metadata; remove metadata from pdf file
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
U
NITED 
S
TATES
Leaked documents  indicate that the  Foreign  Intelligence Surveillance  Court (FISA  Court)  has 
interpreted Section 215 of the PATRIOT Act to permit the FBI to obtain orders that compel the 
largest telephone carriers in the U.S. (Verizon, AT&T, Sprint, and presumably others) to provide 
the NSA with records of all phone calls made to, from, and within the U.S. on an ongoing basis. 
These billions of call records include numbers dialed, length of call, and other “metadata.”
73
Data 
are gathered in bulk, without any particularized suspicion about an individual, phone number, or 
device. NSA analysts may conduct queries on this data without approval from the FISA Court or an 
independent magistrate.
74
Leaks also reveal that under a program code-named “PRISM” the NSA has been compelling at least 
nine large U.S. companies, including Google, Facebook, Microsoft and Apple, to disclose content 
and metadata relating to e-mails, web chats, videos, images, and documents.
75
PRISM activities 
occur under Section 702 of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act, which permits the NSA to 
target the communications of non-U.S. persons who are reasonably believed to be located outside 
the United States in order to collect “foreign intelligence information.”
76
Although the program is 
targeted at persons abroad, the NSA is able to retain and use information “incidentally” collected 
about U.S. persons. 
Critics have raised concern that the secret NSA programs may violate the 4
th
Amendment of the 
United States Constitution, which protects people inside the U.S. (citizens and non-citizens alike) 
from  unreasonable  search  and  seizure,  as  well  as  human  rights  enshrined  in  international 
agreements. In June 2013, a diverse coalition of prominent NGOs and companies submitted a 
letter  to Congress urging  lawmakers to  explicitly prohibit  the blanket collection of metadata, 
investigate  actions  of  the  NSA,  and  hold  public  officials  accountable  for  unconstitutional 
surveillance.
77
Legislators have introduced proposals to narrow the scope of NSA activities.
78
In  another  concerning  case  regarding government  access to  information,  the  Associated Press 
reported  in  May  2013  that,  as part of a national  security  leak  investigation, the  U.S. Justice 
Department subpoenaed and gained access to two months of phone records for several reporters 
following AP coverage of a failed bomb plot in Yemen.
79
Justice Department guidelines specify 
that, in the course of an investigation, requests for journalists’ records should be “as narrowly 
drawn as possible,” and that investigators should attempt to obtain records directly from journalists 
73
 For more information on privacy and metadata, see Aubra Anthony, “When Metadata Becomes Megadata: What 
Government Can Learn,” Center for Democracy and Technology PolicyBeta Blog, June 17, 2013, 
https://www.cdt.org/blogs/1706when‐metadata‐becomes‐megadata‐what‐government‐can‐learn‐metadata
74
 “Comparing Two Secret Surveillance Programs,” The New York Times, June 7, 2013,  
http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2013/06/07/us/comparing‐two‐secret‐surveillance‐programs.html. 
75
 “NSA Slides Explain the PRISM Data Collection Program,” Washington Post, June 6, 2013, 
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp‐srv/special/politics/prism‐collection‐documents/.  
76
 H.R. 6304 Sec. 702. 
77
 Coalition Letter to Congress on U.S. Spying, June 11, 2013, https://www.cdt.org/files/pdfs/CDT‐Coalition‐NSA‐Spying.pdf
78
 Spencer Ackerman and Paul Lewis, “Congress Eyes Renewed Push for Legislation to Rein in the NSA,” The Guardian, August 2, 
2013, http://www.theguardian.com/world/2013/aug/02/congress‐nsa‐legislation‐surveillance
79
 Carrie Johnson, “Justice Department Secretly Obtains AP Phone Records,” National Public Radio, May 14, 2013, 
http://www.npr.org/2013/05/14/183810320/justice‐department‐secretly‐obtains‐ap‐phone‐records
798
C# PDF - Read Barcode on PDF in C#.NET
Bookmark: Edit Bookmark. Metadata: Edit, Delete Metadata. Watermark: Add Watermark to PDF. Form Process. Data: Read, Extract Field Data. Data: Auto Fill-in Field
bulk edit pdf metadata; view pdf metadata in explorer
C# TIFF: TIFF Metadata Editor, How to Write & Read TIFF Metadata
C#.NET. Allow Users to Read and Edit Metadata Stored in Tiff Image in C#.NET Application. C# Overview - View and Edit TIFF Metadata.
adding metadata to pdf; view pdf metadata
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
U
NITED 
S
TATES
on  a  voluntary  basis,  when  possible.
80
The  Associated  Press  has  since  reported  that  the 
government’s  actions  have  had  a  chilling  effect  on  sources,  discouraging  even  long-standing 
informants from speaking with the AP.
81
In July 2013, the Attorney General tightened the rules on 
getting reporters’ data, but did not prohibit the practice entirely.
82
The  Communications  Assistance  for  Law  Enforcement  Act  (CALEA)  requires  telephone 
companies, broadband carriers, and interconnected Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP) providers 
to  design  their  systems  so  that  communications  can  be  easily  intercepted  when  government 
agencies have the legal authority to do so.
83
The FBI suggested in late 2010 that the law should be 
expanded to impose design requirements on online communications tools such as Gmail, Skype, 
and  Facebook,
84
and while the FBI continued to  push  the  issue,
85
no  legislation has yet been 
proposed in Congress.  
In April 2013, the House of Representatives voted in favor of the Cyber Intelligence Sharing and 
Protection Act (CISPA), a proposed law that would allow ISPs and other corporations to share 
cyber threat information with one another and the government.
86
Civil liberties advocates warn 
that the bill, in its current form, would allow companies to share citizens’ private information with 
the government, including internet records and e-mail content, without first taking reasonable 
steps to remove material not related to the threat.
87
The Senate has since shelved the bill and 
President Obama has pledged to veto the legislation if it reaches his desk as written, citing concerns 
about privacy and civil liberties of internet users.
88
Law enforcement  agencies  have  also begun  to  use  open, public websites and social  media  to 
monitor  different  groups  for  suspected  criminal  activity.  One  notable  example  that  stoked 
controversy in February 2012 was an initiative by the New York Police Department (NYPD) to 
monitor  Muslim  student groups at various universities  in the northeastern  United  States. The 
Associated  Press  reported  that,  from  2006  onward,  the  NYPD  Cyber  Intelligence  unit  had 
monitored blogs, websites, and online forums of Muslim student groups and produced a series of 
secret “Muslim Student Association” reports describing group activities, religious instruction, and 
80
 “Look Who’s Talking: The Administration Seems to Have Trampled on Press Freedom,”The Economist, May 18, 2013,  
http://econ.st/YN4N8n.  
81
 Lindy Royce‐Bartlett, “Leak Probe Has Chilled Sources, AP Exec Says,” The Associated Press, June 19, 2013,  
http://www.cnn.com/2013/06/19/politics/ap‐leak‐probe
82
 Charlie Savage, “Holder Tightens Rules on Getting Reporters’ Data.” The New York Times, July 12, 2013, 
http://www.nytimes.com/2013/07/13/us/holder‐to‐tighten‐rules‐for‐obtaining‐reporters‐data.html?pagewanted=all&_r=0
83
 The FCC does not classify Skype as an “interconnected VoIP” service. 
84
 Charlie Savage, “U.S. Tries to Make it Easier to Wiretap the Internet.” The New York Times, September 27, 2010, 
http://www.nytimes.com/2010/09/27/us/27wiretap.html?pagewanted=all. 
85
 Declan McCullagh, “FBI: We Need Wiretap‐Ready Websites – Now,” CNET, May 4, 2012, http://news.cnet.com/8301‐1009_3‐
57428067‐83/fbi‐we‐need‐wiretap‐ready‐web‐sites‐now
86
 “Rogers‐Ruppersberger Cyber Bill (CISPA) Passes House,” U.S. House of Representatives Permanent Select Committee on 
Intelligence, Press Release, April 18, 2013, http://1.usa.gov/18Aoi6v.  
87
 “House Passes CISPA,” Center for Democracy and Technology PolicyBeta Blog, April 18. 2013, 
https://www.cdt.org/pr_statement/house‐passes‐cispa; Michelle Richardson “CISPA Explainer #1: What Information Can Be 
Shared?” ACLU Blog, April 2, 2013, http://www.aclu.org/blog/national‐security‐technology‐and‐liberty/cispa‐explainer‐1‐what‐
information‐can‐be‐shared. 
88
 “Statement of Administration Policy: H.R. 624 – Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act,” Executive Office of the 
President, Office of Management and Budget, April 16, 2013, http://1.usa.gov/110RWxH.  
799
VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
PDF Metadata Edit. Offer professional PDF document metadata editing APIs, using which VB.NET developers can redact, delete, view and save PDF metadata.
add metadata to pdf; pdf metadata online
VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF
PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Extract PDF Text. VB.NET PDF - Extract Text from PDF Using VB. How to Extract Text from PDF with VB.NET Sample Codes in .NET Application.
pdf metadata viewer online; modify pdf metadata
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
U
NITED 
S
TATES
the frequency of prayer by the groups.
89
The New York City mayor defended the practice by 
stating that the NYPD did not break any laws by monitoring websites and online activity that was 
already publicly available, although others pointed to the religious-profiling nature of the activity. 
Muslim students from across the nation have expressed concern about this type of surveillance and 
in late 2012 told Freedom House that they often self-censor when conducting online activities. 
Like most other countries, the United States faces the growing challenge of addressing cyberattacks 
conducted by both international and domestic actors. China is one focal point of the cybersecurity 
discussion, especially following a report by computer security firm Mandiant which stated that 
many  attacks  against  U.S.  organizations,  companies,  and  government  agencies  appear  to  have 
originated in an office of the Chinese People’s Liberation Army in Beijing.
90
The purpose of these 
attacks is presumably to gain information, but the United States faces other types of cybersecurity 
threats as well. For example, the Department of Homeland Security reported a wave of attacks in 
mid-2013  that  sought  to  reveal  vulnerabilities  in  infrastructure  managed  by  private  energy 
companies.  The  attacks  seem  to  have originated  in  the  Middle  East,  but  the  exact  source  is 
unknown.
91
In  response  to  growing  concern  about  cybersecurity  threats,  President  Obama 
produced an executive order in February 2013 recognizing the need for improved cybersecurity 
measures and calling for a new “Cybersecurity Framework” to address security threats.
92
At the 
same  time  the  U.S.  military  admitted  that  it  is  developing  the  ability  to  carry  out  offensive 
cyberattacks.
93
The documents leaked by Edward Snowden included a Presidential Policy Directive 
describing U.S. “Offensive Cyber Effects Operations (OCEO).”
94
89
 Al Baker and Kate Taylor, “Bloomberg Defends Police’s Monitoring of Muslim Student Web Sites,” New York Times, February 
22, 2012, http://www.nytimes.com/2012/02/22/nyregion/bloomberg‐defends‐polices‐monitoring‐of‐muslim‐student‐web‐
sites.html
90
 David E. Sanger, David Barboza, and Nicole Perlroth, “Chinese Army Unit is Seen as Tied to Hacking Against the U.S.” The New 
York Times, February 18, 2013, http://www.nytimes.com/2013/02/19/technology/chinas‐army‐is‐seen‐as‐tied‐to‐hacking‐
against‐us.html?pagewanted=all&gwh=24BE5E3C317441D6CAB213658308303F&_r=0
91
 David E. Sanger and Nicole Perlroth, “Cyberattacks Against U.S. Corporations Are on the Rise,” The New York Times, May 12, 
2013, http://www.nytimes.com/2013/05/13/us/cyberattacks‐on‐rise‐against‐us‐corporations.html?pagewanted=all
92
 “Executive Order – Improving Critical Infrastructure Cybersecurity,” February 12, 2013, http://www.whitehouse.gov/the‐
press‐office/2013/02/12/executive‐order‐improving‐critical‐infrastructure‐cybersecurity
93
 Mark Mazzetti and David E. Sanger, “Security Leader Says U.S. Would Retaliate Against Cyberattacks,” The New York Times, 
March 12, 2013, http://www.nytimes.com/2013/03/13/us/intelligence‐official‐warns‐congress‐that‐cyberattacks‐pose‐threat‐
to‐us.html?pagewanted=all
94
 Glenn Greenwald and Ewen MacAskill, “Obama Orders U.S. to Draw Up Overseas Target List for Cyberattacks,” The Guardian, 
June 7, 2013, http://www.theguardian.com/world/2013/jun/07/obama‐china‐targets‐cyber‐overseas.  
800
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
U
ZBEKISTAN
U
ZBEKISTAN
 The government established  a new  telecommunications regulator with  consolidated
powers to control the internet and other information and communications technologies
(ICTs) (see O
BSTACLES TO 
A
CCESS
).
 Judges declared the leading mobile phone operator, Uzdunrobita (partially owned by
Russian telecoms company MTS), bankrupt, in a case involving potential bribes from
the ruling family and confirming the hostility of the environment for foreign investment
in the telecommunications sector (see L
IMITS ON 
C
ONTENT
).
 Criminal investigations using trumped-up charges were opened against a popular news
site, Olam.uz, which had been reporting on the corruption allegations surrounding the
Uzdunrobita case (see V
IOLATIONS OF 
U
SER 
R
IGHTS
).
2012 
2013 
I
NTERNET 
F
REEDOM 
S
TATUS
N
OT
F
REE
N
OT
F
REE
Obstacles to Access (0-25) 
19 
20 
Limits on Content (0-35) 
28 
28 
Violations of User Rights (0-40) 
30 
30 
Total (0-100) 
77 
78 
*0=most free, 100=least free
K
EY 
D
EVELOPMENTS
:
M
AY 
2012
A
PRIL 
2013 
P
OPULATION
29.8 million
I
NTERNET 
P
ENETRATION 
2012: 
37 percent
S
OCIAL 
M
EDIA
/ICT
A
PPS 
B
LOCKED
Yes
P
OLITICAL
/S
OCIAL 
C
ONTENT 
B
LOCKED
Yes
B
LOGGERS
/ICT
U
SERS 
A
RRESTED
No
P
RESS 
F
REEDOM 
2013
S
TATUS
Not Free
801
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
U
ZBEKISTAN
In the period of May 2012 to April 2013, internet regulation in Uzbekistan did not improve and the 
country remains one of the most restrictive in Central Asia. The Uzbek government has adopted 
several programs aimed at stimulating the development of the telecommunications infrastructure 
and raising awareness about computer technologies, especially among rural populations. However, 
as reported by the International Telecommunications Union (ITU) in 2011, Uzbekistan is on the 
verge of being excluded from the global information society due to the still prohibitively high prices 
for broadband internet access.
1
In the fall of 2012, the government consolidated regulatory authority over the ICT industry in 
Uzbekistan through the establishment of a new telecommunications regulator. The action was taken 
after the former telecom regulator, UzACI, was involved in the unlawful termination of the leading 
GSM  operator,  Uzdunrobita  (MTS-Uzbekistan)  beginning  in  July  2012.  All  media  regulatory 
bodies were integrated into the structure of the new telecommunications regulator.  
In 2012–2013, the state-owned telecommunications carrier Uztelecom retained centralized control 
over the country’s connection to the international internet, facilitating nationwide censorship and 
surveillance. The Uzbek authorities block access to a wide range of international news websites, 
human rights groups, and exile publications, while at educational and cultural institutions, access is 
strictly limited to the national intranet system, or ZiyoNet. A popular online news site, Olam.uz, 
which reported extensively about the Uzdunrobita case, was shut down in January 2013 due to the 
politically motivated charges against its owner and editor-in-chief. Additionally, two journalists 
reporting for online media are serving long sentences on trumped-up charges. 
Direct  access  to  the  internet  backbone  via  the  Trans  Asia  Europe  fiber-optic  cable  became 
operational in Uzbekistan in 1998.
2
Despite extensive state investments in telecommunications 
infrastructure and internet connectivity since 1999, internet penetration reached a mere 9 percent 
of the population by 2009.
3
In January 2013, according to the government, the number of internet 
users reached 9.8 million, comprising 33 percent of the population—a small increase from 31 
1
 International Telecommunication Union (ITU), "Measuring the Information Society: 2012," accessed July 30, 2013, 
http://www.itu.int/en/ITU‐D/Statistics/Documents/publications/mis2012/MIS2012_without_Annex_4.pdf.  
2
 Trans Asia Europe, "Historical reference 2005," accessed July 30, 2013, http://taeint.net/en/about/company_history/.  
3
 United Nations Development Program (UNDP), "Review of Information and Communication Technologies Development in 
Uzbekistan: 2005," Tashkent 2006, http://www.undp.uz/en/publications/publication.php?id=19. Also see ITU, "Key 2000 – 2011 
country data: Percentage of individuals using the Internet," http://www.itu.int/ITU‐D/ict/statistics/.  
I
NTRODUCTION
O
BSTACLES TO 
A
CCESS
802
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
U
ZBEKISTAN
percent in April 2012.
4
Estimates by the International Telecommunication Union calculated the 
internet penetration rate slightly higher at 37 percent for 2012.
5
Digital divides are found across urban, rural, and remote areas of the country, where factors such as 
computer literacy and income affect the likelihood that individuals have access to the internet. 
Problems with the electrical grid limit the usefulness of the telecommunications infrastructure, 
especially in rural and remote areas.
6
A digital divide also exists between the capital, Tashkent, and 
the country's 12 regions (viloyati), with the lowest internet penetration rate registered in the semi-
autonomous republic of Karakalpakstan—a home to the Karakalpak, Kazakh, and Uzbek ethnic 
groups.
7
Only 8 percent of households were connected to the internet in Uzbekistan by the end of 2011, the 
second lowest  estimate in the region of the Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS) after 
Turkmenistan.
8
Though work seems to be a primary place to access the internet, "collective" or 
public access points such as internet cafes remain popular as well. Since December 2010, minors 
are officially prohibited from visiting internet cafes without parents or adults between 10:00 p.m. 
and  6:00  a.m.
9
Reportedly,  since  2011,  students  are  also  not  allowed  to  visit  internet  cafes 
between 8:30 a.m. and 7:00 p.m.
10
Public  libraries,  museums,  nearly  all  of  the  country’s  educational,  scientific  and  cultural 
institutions, and youth organizations connect to the internet exclusively via the “unified information 
network ZiyoNet,” or intranet, initiated by the government in September 2005.
11
ZiyoNet requires 
user identification and employs software protecting against “aggressive internet content.”
12
Given 
the role of those institutions in Uzbek society,
13
online resources on the intranet consist mainly of 
government sources of information, including state educational but also ideological materials.
14
As 
4
 State Committee for Communications, Information and Telecommunications Technologies (SC for CITT), "Показатели 
развития отрасли: Актуальные статистические данные о состоянии внедрения и развития ИКТ в Республике 
Узбекистан,"accessed April 25, 2013, http://ccitt.uz/ru/indicators/.  
5
 International Telecommunication Union (ITU), “Percentage of Individuals Using the Internet,” 2012, accessed July 30, 2013, 
http://www.itu.int/en/ITU‐D/Statistics/Pages/stat/default.aspx.  
6
 International Telecommunication Union, “Sustainable electricity supply of telecommunications objects in rural and remote 
areas,” accessed September 21, 2012, http://www.itu.int/ITU‐D/projects/display.asp?ProjectNo=2UZB11003. 
7
 UzACI and UNDP Uzbekistan, "Анализ состояния и перспектив развития Интернет в Республике Узбекистан" [Analysis of 
the Internet Development and its Prospects in Uzbekistan], 2009, accessed July 30, 2013, http://infocom.uz/wp‐
content/files/otchet.pdf.  
8
 ITU, “Measuring the Information Society: 2012,” accessed July 30, 2013, http://www.itu.int/en/ITU‐
D/Statistics/Documents/publications/mis2012/MIS2012_without_Annex_4.pdf.  
9
 "O poriadke predostavlenia dostupa k seti Internet v obschestvennikh punktakh pol’zovania" [On Adoption of the Terms of 
Provision of Access to the Internet Network in Public Points of Use], promulgated by Order of the Communications and 
Information Agency of Uzbekistan No. 216, July 23, 2004, SZ RU (2004) No. 30, item 350, at Art. 17 (e). 
10
 "Lyceum students banned from e‐cafes," Uznews.net, May 31, 2012, 
http://www.uznews.net/news_single.php?lng=en&sub=top&cid=4&nid=19973.  
11
 Resolution of the President RU "О создании общественной образовательной информационной сети Республики 
Узбекистан" [On the Establishment of the Public, Educational, and Information Network of the Republic of Uzbekistan], No. ПП‐ 
191, 28 September 2005, SZRU (No. 40), item. 305, at Art. 4.  
12
 Ibid., at Art. 5. 
13
 Resolution of the President RU "О государственной программе "Год гармонично развитого поколения"" [On the State 
Program "The Year of Harmoniously Developed Generation"], No. ПП‐1271, January 27, 2010, SZRU (2010) No. 5, item 37. 
14
 "Библиотека" [Library], ZiyoNet.uz, accessed July 30, 2013, http://www.ziyonet.uz/ru/library/.  
803
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
U
ZBEKISTAN
of January 2013, there were 41,541 of these “approved” online information resources, some of 
which are knock-offs of popular social media platforms such as Utube.uz.  
Internet connectivity is available via dial-up, ADSL broadband, and WiMax, but no longer via 
satellite. Dial-up connections are more common in rural areas than urban areas.
15
In 2011, the 
government made a commitment to expand the number of users with a dial-up connection from 3 
million  to  3.5  million.
16
By  2012,  147,760  users  had  a  fixed-broadband  subscription  in  the 
country,
17
which is significantly higher than the national target of 100,000 set by President Karimov 
to  be  achieved  by  the  end  of  2011.
18
Given  this  target,  Uztelecom  and  the  Chinese 
telecommunications equipment supplier ZTE launched the mass production of ADSL modems and 
DSLAM  network  devices  in  August  2011.
19
As  of  February  2013,  Uztelecom  offered  FTTB 
broadband internet to 837 buildings in Tashkent. WiMAX broadband is available only in Tashkent 
and six regions since it was first introduced on the Uzbek market by a private operator in 2008.
20
As described below, the ban on private ISPs to access the internet via satellite has been in force 
since February 2011.  
The  state-owned  JSC Uzbektelecom, established in 2000 and re-branded  as  “national operator 
Uztelecom” in 2011, operates Uzbekistan's telecommunications infrastructure under a state license 
renewable  every  15  years.  In  August  2005,  Uztelecom  took  over  the  internet  connectivity 
functions  from  the  state  data  transfer  network  company,  “UzPAK,”  which  later  became  its 
subsidiary.
21
The latter is claimed to have been only partially successful in maintaining a monopoly 
and  centralized state  control  over international  internet connectivity since  its establishment in 
1999.
22
By  contrast, due  to  a  favorable  regulatory environment,  Uztelecom  has  succeeded  in 
becoming a pure monopoly over the country's connection to the internet and an upstream ISP, with 
private ISPs required to have their international internet traffic routed and transmitted through a 
single Uztelecom network gateway (the International Centre for Packet Switching, abbreviated as 
MZPK in Russian).  
15
 Sarkor Telekom, Press Release, December 16, 2011, http://www.sarkor.com/ru/press/news/.  
16
 Uztelecom, "Рассмотрены перспективы развития телекоммуникационных сетей" [The Prospective for the Development 
of Telecommunications Networks Has Been Analyzed], February 21, 2011, 
http://www.uztelecom.uz/ru/press/media/2011/141/.  
17
 ITU, "Key 2000 – 2011 country data: Fixed (wired)‐broadband subscriptions," http://www.itu.int/ITU‐D/ict/statistics/.  
18
 Report of the President RU to the Government, "Все наши устремления и программы – Вo имя дальнейшего развития 
родины и повышения благосостояния народа" [All our aspirations and programs – in the name of the further development of 
the motherland and improvement of the welfare of the people], February 21, 2011, http://www.press‐
service.uz/ru/news/archive/dokladi/#ru/news/show/dokladi/vse_nashi_ustremleniya_i_programmyi___1/. 
19
 Uztelecom, "Запущена в эксплуатацию технологическая линия по производству DSLAM оборудования и ADSL модемов" 
[A Technological Production of DSLAM Equipment and ADSL modems Has Been Launched], August 31, 2011, 
http://www.uztelecom.uz/ru/press/news/2011/187/.  
20
 See UzACI and UNDP Uzbekistan, note 9 above. 
21
 Decree of the President RU "On measures for development of data transfer services and preparation for privatization of JSC 
"Uzbektelecom", No. PP‐149, August 8, 2005. 
22
 Josh Machleder, "Struggle over Internet Access Developing in Uzbekistan," December 3, 2002, 
www.eurasianet.org/departments/rights/articles/eav031202.shtml.  
804
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested