download pdf file on button click in asp.net c# : Remove metadata from pdf file software control cloud windows web page html class FOTN%202013_Full%20Report_082-part1590

F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
U
ZBEKISTAN
Although there were no significant cases of political mobilization via social media, these tools have 
been important for exposing and disseminating information related to human rights abuses. In May 
2005, for example, videos documenting Uzbek security forces opening fire on unarmed protesters 
in  Andijan  were  uploaded  to  YouTube  and  regular  updates  were  posted  on  Arbuz.com, 
contributing to international condemnation of the incident.  
The environment for internet users’ rights in Uzbekistan is already one of the most restrictive in 
the region, with the government employing extensive surveillance measures to monitor online 
activity, as well as frequently using trumped-up charges to target individuals who publish material 
online that is deemed counter to the government’s interests. In September 2012, Uztelecom began 
systematically blocking access to proxy servers. In January 2013, the editors of Olam.uz, a popular 
news website, chose to take the site offline after Uzbek authorizes charged them with various 
crimes, reflecting the degree to which the government continues to exert control over outlets that 
report on sensitive topics. 
The constitution of Uzbekistan guarantees the right to freedom of expression (Article 29) and 
freedom of  the mass media (Article  62). It also prohibits censorship (Article 62).  In practice, 
however,  these  constitutional  rights  are  not  fulfilled  and  severely  restricted  by  laws  and 
governmental regulations. Judges lack  the independence and impartiality needed to ensure the 
constitutional protection of speech.
100
The 1997 law “On Mass Media” was amended in 2007 with the purpose of altering the definition of 
“the press” to include “websites in generally accessible telecommunication networks.”
101
This law 
neither defines nor establishes  clear criteria for what is a news-oriented  website;  a website  is 
described  as  an  electronic  means  of  disseminating  information  to  the  general  public  not  less 
frequently than once a period of six months.
102
In order to be regarded as part of news media, 
websites are required to obtain an official registration certificate in a procedure similar to that 
required for traditional news media outlets.
103
This procedure is generally known to be content-
based, arbitrary, and inhibits editors and readers from exercising their freedom of expression.
104
Applications for press certificates are supposed to include details such as the website's digital media 
title, founder(s), language, aims and purposes, content specialization, domain name, sources of 
100
 Joint Resolution of the Plenums of the Supreme Court and Higher Economic Court RU "О судебной власти" [On the Judicial 
Branch of Power] No. 1, 20 Dec. 1996, as amended on December 22, 2006 (No. 14/151), at para. 3 (justifying the rule that all 
judges are appointed by the President of Uzbekistan). 
101
 Law RU "О средствах массовой информации" ["On the Mass Media"] No. 541‐I, adopted December 26, 1997, as amended 
on January 15, 2007, SZRU (2007) No. 3, item 20, at Art. 4. 
102
 Ibid. 
103
 Resolution of the Cabinet of Ministers RU "О дальнейшем совершенствовании порядка государствен ной регистрации 
средств массовой информации в Республике Узбекистан" [On the Further Development of the Procedure for State 
Registration of the Mass Media in the Republic of Uzbekistan] No. 214, October 11, 2006, in SP RU (2007) No. 14, item 141, at 
Art. 8. 
104
 UN Human Rights Committee, Mavlonov and Sa'di v. the Republic of Uzbekistan, Communication No. 1334/2004, Views 
adopted on April 29, 2009, UN Doc. CCPR/C/95/D/1334/2004, at paras. 2.6, 2.11 and 8.3.  
V
IOLATIONS OF 
U
SER 
R
IGHTS
815
Remove metadata from pdf file - add, remove, update PDF metadata in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Allow C# Developers to Read, Add, Edit, Update and Delete PDF Metadata
add metadata to pdf; acrobat pdf additional metadata
Remove metadata from pdf file - VB.NET PDF metadata library: add, remove, update PDF metadata in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Enable VB.NET Users to Read, Write, Edit, Delete and Update PDF Document Metadata
batch pdf metadata editor; edit pdf metadata
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
U
ZBEKISTAN
financing, editor(s), address of an editorial office, as well as affiliation of the founder(s) or editor(s) 
with other mass media outlets.
105
Journalists or non-media professionals affiliated with registered 
online news media outlets are awarded certain rights and must abide by statutory conditions that 
are applicable to professional journalists, arguably creating, in practice, an environment where 
journalists' key responsibility is "loyalty to the regime."
106
As of December 2011, there were about 
160 private websites registered as mass media in Uzbekistan.
107
The legislation regulating the exercise of freedom of expression applies equally to traditional news 
media outlets and the internet. Due to the 2007 amendments, the law "On the Mass Media" is 
applicable to overseas news media outlets whose content is accessible from within the territory of 
Uzbekistan.
108
No cases of this law being invoked by Uzbek courts against foreign websites have 
been reported so far. In addition, some laws have been used to punish individuals for posting or 
accessing content deemed to violate vague information security rules.
109
Under the criminal code, 
slander  (Article  139)  and  insult  (Article  140)—including  of  the president  (Article  158)—are 
criminal offenses that also apply to online content, as do provisions that punish activities such as 
“dissemination of materials posing a threat to public safety.” Both slander and insult are punishable 
with fines ranging from 50 to 100 times the minimum monthly wage, correctional labor of two to 
three years, arrest of up to six months, or detention for up to six years.
110
Beginning in 2010, online journalists have been prosecuted under charges of libel, defamation, and 
insult,
111
as well as for the production, storage, and propagation of materials inciting national, 
racial, or religious animosity.
112
However, no such incidents took place in the reported period. 
On January 19, 2013, Olam.uz, which at the time was Uzbekistan's second most-visited news site, 
chose  to  go  offline  for  "technical  reasons,"  according  to  its  Facebook  page.  However,  as 
independent sources report, the Uzbek authorities had opened up proceedings against its editor-in-
chief and the website owner, the Tashkent-based LLC Mobile Mass Media.
113
Charges included 
such offences as the infringement of copyright and patent law, high treason, encroachment upon the 
constitutional  order, espionage,  subversive  act, loss  of  documents  containing  state or  military 
secrets, and robbery. At the time of its disconnection, Olam.uz was reporting extensively about the 
Uzdunrobita (MTS-Uzbekistan) case and was allowing readers to leave comments on every article 
published. 
105
 Resolution of the Cabinet of Ministers RU No. 214, note 109 above, at Annex II. 
106
 Olivia Allison, "Loyalty in the New Authoritarian Model: Journalistic Rights and Duties in Central Asian Media Law," in Eric 
Freedman and Richard Schafer (eds.), After the Czars and Commissars: Journalism in Authoritarian Post‐Soviet Central Asia (The 
Eurasian Political Economy and Public Policy Studies Series, Michigan State University Press, April 2011), 143‐160, at 154‐155. 
107
 Parliament RU, "Меры поддержки негосударственных СМИ" [Measures Supporting Independent Mass Media], December 
28, 2011, http://www.parliament.gov.uz/ru/analytics/5051?sphrase_id=12000.  
108
 Law RU "On the Mass Media," at Art. 2. 
109
 Zhanna Kozhamberdiyeva, “Freedom of Expression on the Internet: A Case Study of Uzbekistan.” 
110
 Article 139 and Article 140, Criminal Code of the Republic of Uzbekistan, http://bit.ly/1aA516n.  
111
 For the cases of Vladimir Berezovsky, Abdumalik Boboyev, and Viktor Krymzalov, see Freedom of the Net 2012: Uzbekistan. 
112
 For the case of Elena Bondar, see Freedom of the Net 2012: Uzbekistan. Elena Bondar was given refugee status in Kyrgyzstan 
in May 2013. 
113
 Uznews.net, "Uzbek olam.uz news site shut down, staff accused of high treason," January 29, 2013, http://bit.ly/19KDiic; Id., 
"Is olam.uz trying to hide its criminal charges?", February 1, 2013,  http://bit.ly/18eYayZ.  
816
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
C# Sample Code: Remove Password from PDF File in C#.NET. These C# demos will help you to delete password for an encrypted PDF file. // Define input file path.
pdf metadata editor; remove pdf metadata
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
Remove bookmarks, annotations, watermark, page labels and article threads from PDF Document and metadata. NET Demo Code to Optimize An Exist PDF File in Visual
view pdf metadata; remove metadata from pdf acrobat
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
U
ZBEKISTAN
As of April 2013, two Uzbek online journalists remained in jail, ostensibly on fabricated criminal 
charges. Solidzhon Abdurakhmanov, a reporter for the independent news website Uznews.net, 
continues to serve a 10-year sentence imposed in October 2008 for allegedly selling drugs. Prior to 
his arrest, he had reported on human rights and economic and social issues, including corruption in 
the Nukus traffic police office, which fueled suspicions that the drug charges were trumped-up and 
in retaliation for his reporting.
114
Dilmurod Saiid, a freelance journalist and human rights activist, is 
serving a 12.5 year sentence imposed in July 2009 on extortion charges. Before his detention, he 
had reported on government corruption in Uzbekistan's agricultural sector for local media and 
independent  news  websites.
115
No  new  cases  of  prison  sentences  were  documented  between 
January 2011 and April 2013. 
The authorities have also used various forms of arbitrary detention and intimidation to silence 
online critics. In  November 2011, the government released Jamshid Karimov, an independent 
journalist and nephew of the president, from a psychiatric hospital where he had been kept against 
his will since September 2006. Prior to his detention, he regularly published articles on online 
websites, including about human rights abuses in Uzbekistan. He is widely believed to have been 
detained in retaliation for his journalistic activity. In January 2012, he suddenly disappeared again 
and his whereabouts remain unknown as of April 2013.
116
While there have been no reports of government agents physically attacking bloggers or online 
activists, the National Security Service (NSS) has been known to employ various intimidation tactics 
to restrict freedom of expression online. For example, in June 2011, there were reports of NSS 
officers  confiscating  electronic  media  devices  at  the  airport,  checking  browsing  histories  on 
travelers’ laptops, and interrogating individuals with a record of visiting websites critical of the 
government.
117
The use of proxy servers and anonymizers remains a very important tool and the only way to access 
content blocked in Uzbekistan. However, in September 2012, Uztelecom started a centralized and 
permanent blocking of proxy servers and websites enlisting free proxies without a web interface.
118
At the same time, the use of both proxies and anonymizers require computer skills beyond the 
capacity of many ordinary users in Uzbekistan.  
114
 “Government increases pressure on Uzbek journalists,” Committee to Protect Journalists, February 17, 2010, 
http://cpj.org/2010/02/government‐increases‐pressure‐on‐uzbek‐journalists.php. 
115
 “Uzbek appeals court should overturn harsh sentence,” Committee to Protect Journalists, September 3, 2009, 
http://cpj.org/2009/09/uzbek‐appeals‐court‐should‐overturn‐harsh‐sentence.php; See also, "Дождется ли Дильмурад Сайид 
справедливости?" [Will Dilmurad Saiid receive justice?], Uznews.net, April 2, 2010, 
http://www.uznews.net/news_single.php?lng=ru&cid=3&nid=13210. 
116
 “Jamshid has the rights to live freely!” Human Rights Society of Uzbekistan, January 20, 2012, 
http://en.hrsu.org/archives/1367; “Uzbekistan: UPDATE – Human rights defender released from forcible detention in 
psychiatric hospital,” Front Line Defenders, November 30, 2011, http://www.frontlinedefenders.org/node/16704. 
117
 “Farg‘ona aeroportida yo‘lovchilar noutbuki tekshirilmoqda” [At the Ferghana Airport, the Laptop Computers of Passengers 
Are Being Checked], Ozodlik.org, June 2, 2011, 
http://www.ozodlik.org/content/fargona_aeroportida_yolovchilar_noutbuki_tekshirilmoqda/24212860.html.  
118
 Uznews.net, "Интернет‐цензура Узбекистана стала еще жестче," 10 October 2013, 
http://www.uznews.net/news_single.php?lng=ru&cid=30&nid=20962
817
VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
Ability to remove consecutive pages from PDF file in VB.NET. Enable specified pages deleting from PDF in Visual Basic .NET class.
modify pdf metadata; extract pdf metadata
VB.NET PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in
Image: Insert Image to PDF. Image: Remove Image from PDF Page. Image Link: Edit URL. Bookmark: Edit Bookmark. Metadata: Edit, Delete Metadata. Form Process.
pdf xmp metadata editor; pdf keywords metadata
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
U
ZBEKISTAN
The space for anonymous online communication in Uzbekistan is steadily shrinking. As mentioned 
above, the year 2011 saw the closure of Arbuz.com, one of the country’s most important online 
forums for anonymous discussion, after the arrest of several users. The site’s founder told media 
that several people who had been active contributors to a forum about Kyrgyz-Uzbek ethnic clashes 
in 2010 had been detained.
119
According to some reports, the NSS had tracked them through their 
internet  protocol  (IP)  addresses.
120
Increasingly,  few  options  remain  for  posting  anonymous 
comments on other online forums—such as Uforum.uz,
121
which is administered by the state-run 
Uzinfocom Center—as individuals are increasingly encouraged to register with their real names to 
participate in such discussions.
122
Individuals must also provide a passport to buy a SIM card.
123
There  are  no  explicit  limitations  on  encryption,  though  in  practice,  the  government  strictly 
regulates the use of such technologies.
124
Although Article 27 of the constitution guarantees the secrecy of “written communications and 
telephone conversations,” there is no data protection legislation in Uzbekistan. The government 
employs systematic surveillance of internet and ICT activities, including the e-mail correspondence 
of Uzbek political activists and comments in online forums. A 2006 Resolution of the President 
authorizes the NSS to conduct electronic surveillance of the national telecommunications network 
by employing a “system for operational investigative measures” (SORM), including for the purposes 
of  preventing  terrorism  and  extremism.
125
The  state-owned  telecommunications  carrier 
Uztelecom, private ISPs, and mobile phone companies are required to aid the NSS in intercepting 
citizens’ communications and accessing user data. This includes a requirement to install SORM 
equipment in order to obtain an ISP license.
126
ISPs face possible financial sanctions or license 
revocation if they fail to design their networks to accommodate electronic interception. 
The scope of violations against digital media users’ privacy is difficult to evaluate amid government 
secrecy and a provision in the Law on Telecommunications that prohibits service providers from 
disclosing details on surveillance methods.
127
Moreover, there is no independent oversight to guard 
against  abusive  surveillance,  leaving  the  NSS  wide  discretion  in  its  activities.
128
Adopted  on 
119
 “Uzbek chat room closes political topics after government pressure,” Uznews.net, February 9, 2011, 
http://www.uznews.net/news_single.php?lng=en&cid=3&sub=&nid=16297. 
120
 IWPR “Web Use Spirals in Uzbekistan Despite Curbs,” news briefing, January 3, 2012, http://bit.ly/sqYKRF.  
121
 UForum.uz, "Правила форума" [Terms of Use], at http://uforum.uz/misc.php?do=cfrules. 
122
 U.S. Department of State, “Uzbekistan,” Counter Reports on Human Righst Practices for 2011, p 16, 
http://www.state.gov/documents/organization/186693.pdf. 
123
 MTC Uzbekistan, “How to subscribe,” http://www.mts.uz/en/join/. 
124
 Resolution of the President RU "О mерах по организации криптографической защиты информации в Rеспублике 
Узбекистан" [On Organizational Measures for Cryptographic Protection of Information in the Republic of Uzbekistan] No. ПП‐
614, April 3, 2007, SZ RU (2007) No 14, item 140, at Art. 1. 
125
 Resolution of the President RU "О мерах по повышению эффективности организации оперативно‐розыскных 
мероприятий на сетях телекоммуникаций Республики Узбекистан" [On Measures for Increasing the Effectiveness of 
Operational and Investigative Actions on the Telecommunications Networks of the Republic of Uzbekistan] No. ПП‐513, 
November 21, 2006, at Preamble and Arts. 2‐3. 
126
 Ibid., at Art. 5.8. Infra., note 110. Also, tax and custom exemptions apply for import of the SORM equipment by domestic 
ISPs, see Tax Code of RU, at Arts. 208, 211, 230 part 2, and 269. 
127
 Law RU, "On Telecommunications," at Art. 18. 
128
 Resolution of the President RU, note 108 above. See, Criminal Procedural Code of RU, Vedomosti Oliy Mazhlisa RU (1995) 
No. 12, item 12, at Art. 339 part 2, "Tasks of Investigation," and Art. 382, "Competences of the Prosecutor." Resolution of the 
President RU No. ПП‐513, note 87 above, at Art. 4. 
818
C# PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
Ability to remove a range of pages from PDF file. Free trial package for quick integration in .NET as well as compatible with 32 bit and 64 bit windows system.
clean pdf metadata; pdf xmp metadata
C# PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net
Remove bookmarks, annotations, watermark, page labels and article threads from PDF while compressing. Document and metadata. C#.NET DLLs: Compress PDF Document.
read pdf metadata online; read pdf metadata
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
U
ZBEKISTAN
December 26, 2012, a long-awaited law on "Operational and Investigative Activity" failed to give 
more guarantees against abusive state surveillance of telecommunications networks.
129
According to 
Articles 16 and 19 of this law, content intercepted via surveillance of telecommunications networks 
is admissible as evidence in court.  
Since July 2004, cybercafes and other providers of public internet access have been required to 
monitor their users and cooperate with state bodies, an obligation that is generally enforced. Uzbek 
security agents stepped up surveillance of cybercafes after violent clashes between ethnic Kyrgyz 
and Uzbeks took place in Kyrgyzstan during the summer of 2010.
130
In March 2012, the president signed a resolution “On measures for the further implementation and 
development of modern information-communication technologies,” which outlines a stage-by-stage 
plan for the establishment of a national information system integrating the information systems of 
state bodies as well as individuals between 2012 and 2014.
131
The announcement raised concerns 
that the integrated system might enable greater state surveillance of user activities. 
A  few  distributed denial-of-service  (DDoS)  attacks  were  reported in  January  2013. First, the 
official website of the National Movement of Uzbekistan, Uzxalqharakati.com, was attacked for the 
third time since its registration in May 2011.
132
The attack paralyzed the website for several days. 
Second, there were two DDoS attacks against the website of the Uzbek national radio and television 
company, Mtrk.uz. The hacker group Clone-Security claimed to be behind the DDoS attacks for 
politically motivated reasons, and launched the attacks from within Uzbekistan.
133
In 2005, the government established the Computer Emergency Readiness Team (UZ-CERT) as an 
operational arm  of the  State  Committee  on  the  CITT  dealing  with  cybercrime.
134
UZ-CERT 
cooperates  with  law  enforcement  bodies  to  prosecute  cybercriminals,  and  the  criminal  code 
contains several provisions addressing these issues in a section dedicated to information technology 
crimes.
135
129
 Law RU "Oб оперативно‐розыскной деятельсности" [On Operational and Investigative Activity] No. ЗРУ – 344, December 
26, 2012, SZ RU (2012) No. 52 (552), item 585, at Arts. 16, 19. 
130
 “Attacks on the Press 2010: Uzbekistan,” Committee to Protect Journalists, February 15, 2011, 
http://www.cpj.org/2011/02/attacks‐on‐the‐press‐2010‐uzbekistan.php. 
131
 Resolution of the President RU "О мерах по дальнейшему внедрению и развитию современных информационно‐
коммуникационных технологий"  [On Measures on the Further Impelmentation and Development of Modern Information 
and Communication Technologies], No. ПП‐1730, 21 March 2010, SZRU (2012), 13 (513), item 139, at Annex II. 
132
 Ozodlik.org, "Атака на сайт Народного Движения Узбекистана," January 27, 2013, 
http://www.ozodlik.org/content/article/24884770.html.  
133
 Ozodlik.org, "В Узбекистане сайт МТПК подвергся хакерской атаке," January 31, 2013, 
http://www.ozodlik.org/content/article/24888716.html.  
134
 Resolution of the President RU "О дополнительных мерах по обеспечению компьютерной безопасности национальных 
информационно‐коммуникационных систем" [On Further Measures Supporting the Maintenance of Information Security of 
the National Information and Communication Systems], No. 167, September 5, 2005, at Preamble and Arts. 2 and 7. 
135
 Ibid., at Annex II, Art. 8. See, Criminal Code Article 278‐1 "Violation of the Rules of Informatization"; Article 278‐2 "Illegal 
(Unsanctioned) Access to Computer Information"; Article 278‐3 "Production and Dissemination of Special Tools for Illegal 
(Unsanctioned) Access to Computer Information"; Article 278‐4 "Modification of Computer Information"; and Article 278‐5 
"Computer Sabotage." 
819
VB.NET PDF File Permission Library: add, remove, update PDF file
Image: Insert Image to PDF. Image: Remove Image from PDF Page. Image Link: Edit URL. Bookmark: Edit Bookmark. Metadata: Edit, Delete Metadata. Form Process.
rename pdf files from metadata; search pdf metadata
C# PDF bookmark Library: add, remove, update PDF bookmarks in C#.
Help to add or insert bookmark and outline into PDF file in .NET framework. Ability to remove and delete bookmark and outline from PDF document.
metadata in pdf documents; pdf metadata viewer online
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
V
ENEZUELA
V
ENEZUELA
 Disruptions of internet service occurred at crucial times in Venezuela during 2012 and
2013, most notably during  the  April  14
th
presidential  election and  the  subsequent
count of electoral votes (see L
IMITS ON CONTENT
).
 The  websites  of  key  opposition  candidate  Henrique  Capriles  Radonsky  and
independent news sites were blocked during the October 7
th
presidential election (see
L
IMITS ON CONTENT
).
 In 2012 and 2013, the Venezuelan government increased its efforts to identify social
media users who had posted objectionable information online, especially concerning
social and political issues (see V
IOLATIONS OF 
U
SER 
R
IGHTS
).
 Bloggers  and  journalists  writing  about  President  Chavez’s  health—or  subsequent
death—were  subject  to  increasing  harassment  and  intimidation  by  government
supporters in 2012 and 2013 (see V
IOLATIONS OF 
U
SER 
R
IGHTS
).
 Politically-motivated cyberattacks and hijackings of social media accounts increased in
2012 and 2013 (see V
IOLATIONS OF 
U
SER 
R
IGHTS
).
2012 
2013 
I
NTERNET 
F
REEDOM 
S
TATUS
P
ARTLY 
F
REE
P
ARTLY 
F
REE
Obstacles to Access (0-25) 
15 
16 
Limits on Content (0-35) 
14 
16 
Violations of User Rights (0-40) 
19 
21 
Total (0-100) 
48 
53 
*0=most free, 100=least free
K
EY 
D
EVELOPMENTS
:
M
AY 
2012
A
PRIL 
2013 
P
OPULATION
29.7 million
I
NTERNET 
P
ENETRATION 
2012: 
44 percent
S
OCIAL 
M
EDIA
/ICT
A
PPS 
B
LOCKED
No
P
OLITICAL
/S
OCIAL 
C
ONTENT 
B
LOCKED
Yes
B
LOGGERS
/ICT
U
SERS 
A
RRESTED
Yes
P
RESS 
F
REEDOM 
2013
S
TATUS
Not Free
820
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
V
ENEZUELA
In a country where all government branches act in compliance with the interests of the ruling party, 
ensuring a hegemonic ICT system characterized by informational opacity,
1
the Venezuelan people 
widely use the internet to participate in social networks.
2
Recent tensions regarding the death of 
President  Hugo  Chávez  and  the  opposition’s  contestation  of  newly  elected  President  Nicolas 
Maduro have resulted in increased use of digital media in Venezuela.
3
In response to the popularity 
of  such  technology  among  the  general  population  as  well  as  the  political  opposition,  the 
government has begun to expand its control of the internet.
4
As government opponents have made their opinions known via global platforms, Chávez’s ruling 
United Socialist Party of Venezuela (PSUV) has increased its efforts to influence online discussions 
and  to restrict  online content. In  2012 and  early  2013, harassment increased,  targeting  those 
critical of government. Sporadic blocking of opposition and independent news websites, as well as 
cyberattacks and hackings that temporarily disabled such sites, became a problematic trend. Such 
actions  witnessed  a  surge  at  times  of  heightened  political  sensitivity  and  were  particularly 
pronounced surrounding presidential elections and speculation over the health of President Chavez.  
Among the most disturbing developments of 2012 and 2013 were incidents of cyberattacks focused 
on  critical  media,  the  usurpation  of  the  Twitter  profiles of political activists,  and  the rise of 
anonymous Twitter accounts. Such accounts have emerged as a new tool by which to pursue legal 
action  against  government  critics.  Although  there  is  often  no  evidence  that  members  of  the 
opposition are, in fact, the authors of such sites, objectionable content posted online is attributed to 
them and used to justify their arbitrary detention.
5
The internet arrived in Venezuela in 1992. The first commercial internet service providers (ISPs) 
were granted licenses by the National Telecommunications Committee (CONATEL) in 1996.
6
While  the  1999  constitution  obligates  the  State  to  provide  the  public  with  access  to  new 
information and communication technologies (ICTs),
7
the Organic Law of Telecommunications 
1
 Information regarding President Chávez’s health has been sporadic and has come only from Vice President Maduro and 
Minister of Communication Ernesto Villegas rather than from an independent team of physicians. See: Access to Health 
Information from the Heads of State (Regional Alliance for Free Expression and Information), http://transparencia.org.ve/wp‐
content/uploads/2013/01/Salud‐y‐Presidentes‐Alianza‐Regional‐LDE.pdf. In the days between his return to Venezuela and his 
death, the only evidence that President Chavez was alive consisted of an official report and three tweets allegedly sent by 
Chavez on the day he returned to his country. See: Ultimas Noticias, “Chávez Tuitea,” [Chávez Tweets], Últimas Noticias online, 
Feb 18, 2013, http://www.ultimasnoticias.com.ve/noticias/actualidad/politica/chavez‐ya‐tuitea.aspx. 
2
 Tendencias Digitales, “Internet Statistics in Venezuela 2012,” presented in the framework of the event ‘State of the Internet in 
Venezuela and its Impact on Business,’ Caracas, May 2012. 
3
 Laura Vidal, “Venezuela Tuits y Etiquetas Electorales,” [Venezuela Election Tweets and Tags] Global Voices online, October 8, 
2012, http://es.globalvoicesonline.org/2012/10/07/venezuela‐tuits‐y‐etiquetas‐electorales/
4
 Espacio Público, “Ataques Informáticos Sacuden las Redes Sociales en el País,” [Hacking Shakes Social Networks in the 
Country] October 16, 2012, http://bit.ly/15Az8pL.  
5
 “Investigan Presunta Instigación al Terrorismo en Twitter,” [Investigation into Alleged Incitement to Terrorism on Twitter] 
Últimas Noticias online, January 8, 2013, http://bit.ly/WtJ3IH.  
6
 UNDP, Las Tecnologías de Información y Comunicación al Servicio del Desarrollo [Information and Communication 
Technologies for Development] (Caracas: UNDP, 2002), 249. 
7
 See: Article 108 and Article 110 of the Venezuelan Constitution: http://www.tsj.gov.ve/legislacion/constitucion1999.htm . 
I
NTRODUCTION
821
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
V
ENEZUELA
(reformed in December 2010) declares ICT an area of state interest.
8
Although privately owned 
companies do  exist,  the  state  dominates  the internet  market through the  National  Telephone 
Company  of Venezuela (CANTV).  Investment in  and expansion  of the private ICT sector  are 
complicated by disadvantageous competition with CANTV, foreign currency exchange control, and 
the difficulty private companies face when they attempt to repatriate their earnings.
9
By  the  end of 2012,  internet penetration  in Venezuela had reached  44  percent.
10
This figure 
excludes internet connections mediated by mobile phones, for which there are no official numbers, 
indicating that penetration may be even higher.
11
Over 95 percent of the approximately 3.7 million 
internet subscriptions in Venezuela were broadband, evidence of a substantial shift from dial-up to 
broadband technology.
12
According to data provided by the consultancy firm Tendencias Digitales 
(Digital Tendencies), more than 50 percent of internet users in Venezuela are under 25 years old. 
The majority of internet connections come from households (71 percent), followed by internet 
cafes (30 percent) and mobile phones (21 percent).
13
Venezuelans use the internet primarily to visit 
social  networks—there  are  nearly  10  million  Venezuelan  Facebook  users  and  over  3  million 
Twitter users
14
—to read the news, and to search for information. Key topics disseminated and 
debated through this medium include politics and news.
15
There are no special restrictions on the 
opening of cybercafés in Venezuela. 
The most substantial obstacles to internet access in Venezuela are lack of service availability, slow 
connection speed, geographic isolation in rural areas, low computer literacy, and the expense of 
necessary equipment. The cost of access itself is likely a less significant obstacle, however service 
remains  poor.  The  regional divide  in internet  access  in Venezuela is noteworthy. Penetration 
exceeds  90 percent  in the  Capital  District  and  Miranda State,  while  in poorer  states  such  as 
8
 In July 2008, a plan to reform the law was met with great opposition. As a result, the measure was not introduced or approved 
in the National Assembly until December 2010. 
9
 The repatriation of capital is subject to authorization by the Currency Administration Commission (Cadivi), which in most cases 
either does not process it or does so with significant delay. 
10
 ITU, Time Series by Country (2000‐2012) “Percentage of Individuals Using the Internet,” ITU World Data – Statistics, 
http://www.itu.int/en/ITU‐D/Statistics/Pages/stat/default.aspx 
11
 Vicepresidencia de la Republica Bolivariana Venezuela, “Estadistica de Telecommunicaciones al Cierre del IV Trimestre de 
2012” [Telecommunication Sector Statistics at the End of 2012], Accessed February 27, 2013, 
http://conatel.gob.ve/#http://conatel.gob.ve/index.php/principal/presentacionresultados. In some areas traders also resell 
individual connections through routers, indicating that the percentage of the population accessing the internet may be even 
higher than official figures suggest, although the incidence of resold connections would be impossible to measure. See also: La 
Nación, “Venezuela: ¿Medalla de Oro en Uso de Internet?” [Venezuela: Gold Medal in Internet Use?], La Nación online, August 
7, 2012, http://www.lanacion.com.ve/tecnologia/venezuela‐medalla‐de‐oro‐en‐uso‐de‐internet/
12
 Vicepresidencia de la Republica Bolivariana Venezuela, “Estadistica de Telecommunicaciones al Cierre del IV Trimestre de 
2012” [Telecommunication Sector Statistics at the end of 2012], Accessed February 27, 2013, http://bit.ly/1azPe7A.  
13
 Tendencias Digitales, “Internet Statistics in Venezuela 2012,”  Presented in the framework of “State of the Internet in 
Venezuela and Its Impact on Business,” Caracas, May 2012. 
14 
Social Bakers, “Facebook Statistics by Country,” Accessed January 13, 2013, http://www.socialbakers.com/facebook‐
statistics/; See also: Twven, “Facebook y Twitter en Venezuela,” Twven (blog), http://twven.com/twitter‐venezuela/facebook‐y‐
twitter‐en‐venezuela/
15
 El Universal, “Facebook y Twitter en Venezuela,” El Universal online, June 25, 2012, http://bit.ly/Q2TOBj.  
O
BSTACLES TO 
A
CCESS
822
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
V
ENEZUELA
Amazonas, Yaracuy, and Apure, penetration hovers around 15 percent.
16
Connectivity in rural 
areas has been further compromised by a severe electricity crisis that has led to rationing in every 
city  but  the  capital,  Caracas.  Regional  disparities  are  also  evident  in  the  expansion  plans  of 
telecommunications  companies,  which  typically  focus  new  investments  on  the  capital  and 
surrounding areas.
17
By the end of 2012, mobile phone penetration in Venezuela had exceeded 100 percent.
18
This 
figure does not necessarily reflect a population saturated with mobile technology, however. Some 
Venezuelans have as many as three phones, each associated with a different mobile provider, in 
order to  ensure countrywide coverage. Over one third of Venezuela’s mobile  subscribers  use 
CDMA technology. Although the number of users with smart phones and data plans is growing, 
currency exchange control and the devaluation of the Venezuelan bolivar have resulted in high 
prices and a limited supply of advanced mobile phones.
19
Those who do have smartphones typically 
live in urban areas and have higher than average income levels. 
Following its 2007 re-nationalization, a move that benefited CANTV significantly in regard to 
currency controls, the company increased the country’s fiber-optic backbone infrastructure by 48 
percent.
20
While this figure reflects significant growth in broadband internet access, quality of 
service  remains  poor. Venezuela’s  fixed  broadband penetration and  speed are lower  than the 
regional average and less than would be expected based on GDP per capita, which is higher in 
Venezuela than in Latin America as a whole.
21
Despite growth in internet and mobile phone use in recent years, development in the ICT sector 
has slowed overall, and in some respects  has slid backward since CANTV’s re-nationalization. 
Instead of being reinvested to improve ICT services, the earnings obtained by CANTV are reserved 
for  social  programs  in  the  health  and  education  sectors.
22
With  51.92  percent  of  internet 
subscribers and a monopoly on ADSL service, CANTV dominates the fixed, mobile, and broadband 
markets.
23
The company’s dominant position stifles competition, some of which comes from cable 
16
 Vicepresidencia de la Republica Bolivariana Venezuela, “Estadistica de Telecommunicaciones al Cierre del IV Trimestre de 
2012” [Telecommunication Sector Statistics at the end of 2012], Accessed February 27, 2013, http://bit.ly/18zRVXl.  
17
 Inside Telecom, Vol. III No. 95, December 19, 2012 (Excerpted from company newsletter; not available online). 
18
 Vicepresidencia de la Republica Bolivariana Venezuela, “Estadistica de Telecommunicaciones al Cierre del IV Trimestre de 
2012” [Telecommunication Sector Statistics at the end of 2012], p.6, Accessed February 27, 2013, http://bit.ly/18zRVXl.  
19
 Heberto Alvarado Vallejo, “Mercado Móvil Venezolano Tendrá Sabor Agridulce en 2013” [2013 Mobile Market in Venezuela 
Will be Bittersweet], Hormiga Analítica, Accessed May 13, 2013, http://bit.ly/1azPe7A.  
20
As a state company, CANTV enjoys preference for Cadivi’s currency approvals. See: Casetel Chamber of Business 
Telecommunications Services, “Oswaldo Cisneros Sigue Apostandole a Venezuela: Digitel Busca Vías para Consolidarse en 3G,” 
[Oswaldo Cisneros Keeps Betting on Venezuela: Digitel Seeks Ways to Consolidate  in 3G] June 23, 2010, 
http://www.casetel.org/detalle_noticia.php?id_noticia=509
21
 Budde.com, “Venezuela ‐ Telecoms, Mobile, Broadband and Forecasts,” Budde.com, July 2012 Publication, 
http://www.budde.com.au/Research/Venezuela‐Telecoms‐Mobile‐Broadband‐and‐Forecasts.html
22 
Ministerio de Ciencia y Tecnología, “Gobierno Nacional Honra Pagos de Prestaciones con Dividendos de CANTV” [National 
Government Honors Benefit Payments with Dividends from CANTV], April 4, 2012, http://www.mcti.gob.ve/Noticias/14031
See also: Luigino Braci, “¿Las Peores Velocidades de Internet Están en Venezuela? Sí, pero...” [Venezuela has the Worst Internet 
Speeds? Yes, but…], May 31, 2013, http://lubrio.blogspot.com/2012/05/las‐peores‐velocidades‐de‐internet.html
23
 According to a Google Analytics study, in South America, only Paraguay and Bolivia have slower connection speeds than 
Venezuela. See: Google Analytics, Global Site Speed Overview, April 2012, http://analytics.blogspot.com.es/2012/04/global‐
site‐speed‐overview‐how‐fast‐are.html; See also: (1) International Telecommunications Union (ITU), Measuring the Internet 
823
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
V
ENEZUELA
modems, mobile broadband, and satellite connections.
24
Inter, the company that places a distant 
second  in  the  market,  offers  a  triple  pack  that  includes  cable  television,  cable  modem,  and 
telephony.
25
Although CANTV’s connections are slow, its relatively low prices have given the company an edge 
in the market. Private providers have had difficulty competing with CANTV’s rates, a reality that 
accounts in large part for the decline of the ICT sector’s contribution to GDP.
26
The  lack of 
competition has also reduced incentives for providers to retain high quality service or to expand 
their offerings.
27
In several recent cross-country studies assessing ICT trends over the past five 
years, Venezuela is among the countries that have fallen farthest in the rankings relative to its 
peers.
28
While more people are now connected to the internet, the majority of the population has access 
only  to  narrowband  service.
29
Nationally,  CANTV  offers  a  prepaid  plan  with  a  minimum 
connection speed of 512 Kbps at a cost of about $10.50 per month, compared to a minimum wage 
of about $324.
30
The most popular plan, called “ABA Para Todos” (broadband for everyone) offers 
a connection speed of 1.5 Mbps at a cost of $22.81 per month.
31
In April, the president of CANTV 
announced a new 4 Mbps plan at a cost of $79.20 per month, which represents nearly a quarter of 
the minimum wage. In a May 2013 announcement, President Maduro announced that connection 
speed would increase to 6Mbps, but this advancement has not yet come to fruition.
32
The policies developed by CANTV to massively increase subscription rates have been detrimental 
to quality of service, a development that has generated online campaigns from users.
33
In early May 
Society 2011, March 2012, http://www.itu.int/net/pressoffice/backgrounders/general/pdf/5.pdf; (2) Inside Telecom, “Los Tres 
Potentes Liderazgos de Cantv” [The Three Powerful Leaders of CANTV], November 1, 2012, http://bit.ly/U4OSRO.  
24
 Hernan Galperin, “Precios y Calidad de la Banda Ancha en America Latina: Benchmarking y Tendencias” [Prices and Quality of 
Broadband in America: Benchmarking and Trends], Universidad de San Andrés (Argentina), 2012,  
http://bit.ly/PsBDoY.  
25
 Budde.com, Venezuela ‐ Telecoms, Mobile, Broadband and Forecasts, Accessed January 7, 2013, http://bit.ly/1dPLzoe.  
26
 Inside Telecom, Volume 7 No. 86 (2011): In late 2012, after 14 months of request, Movistar was given the authority to 
increase its rates from 9%‐17% for annual inflation. Movilnet, for its part, increased 32.6% (excerpt from newsletter; not 
available online). 
27
 Jorge Espinoza, Argumentos in Situ de Las Operadoras Móviles Privadas: Smartphones e Internet Móvil Suplen Carencias Fijas 
[Arguments in Situ of Private Mobile Phone Operators: Smartphones and Mobile Internet Fized Unfilled Gaps], Inside Telecom, 
May 25, 2012. 
28
 Kai Bucher, “Las Economias Latinoamericanas Todavia Estan Atrasadas en el Aprovechamiento de las Tecnologias de la 
Informacion...” [The Latin American Economies are Still Behind in the Use of Information Technologies], World Economic 
Forum, 2010‐2011 Report, 
http://bit.ly/gnrzob; Venezuela dropped from #74 to #77 on ITU’s 2012 Index. See: ITU, Measuring 
the Information Society 2012 (Geneva: ITU, 2012), http://bit.ly/1fyOEgO.  
29
 Raisa Urribarrí: “La Comunicación Alternativa es Antihegemónica” [Alternative Communication is Hegemonic], Diario Tal Cual, 
August 11, 2012, Reproduced online at: http://bit.ly/1bRqJXb.  
30
 El Universal, “Cantv Mejora Velocidad de Conexión a Internet” [Cantv Improves Internet Speed], El Universal online, 
September 3, 2012, http://bit.ly/REHRjy; CANTV, Planes y Servicios del Servicio de Banda Ancha (ABA) [Service Plans and 
Broadband Services], January 2013, http://bit.ly/qlCVIQ; See also: El Universal, “A partir de hoy el salario mínimo es de 2047,48 
Bs” [Starting Today, the Minimum Wage is 2047.48 Bs] S El Universal online, September 1, 2012,  http://bit.ly/TIwBEy.  
31
 See: CANTV´s Connection Plans, Accessed May 27, 2013, http://bit.ly/f42m4R.  
32
 Radio Mundial, “Gobierno Nacional Anuncia Nueva Conexión ABA de 6 Megas” [Government Announces New ABA 
Connection of 6 Mbps], Radio Mundial online, May 21, 2013, http://bit.ly/13J2pRW .  
33
 Activism, “CANTV: Solicitamos Formalmente Mejorar Significativamente las Velocidades de Download y Upload del ABA en 
Venezuela” [CANTV: Formal Requests Significantly Improve the Download and Upload Speeds of ABA in Venezuela], Activism 
online, Accessed January 11, 2013, http://bit.ly/1biXwVW ; Netindex.com reports that internet connection in Venezuela is one 
824
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested