download pdf file on button click in asp.net c# : Get pdf metadata application Library tool html asp.net windows online FOTN%202013_Full%20Report_084-part1592

F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
V
ENEZUELA
Pasa  (What’s  Up),  a  digital  newspaper  critical  of  the  Chávez  regime,  was  attacked  with  a 
grenade.
106
The perpetrators are still unknown. 
In March 2013, a group of renowned journalists, writers, and humorists, such as Milagros Socorro, 
Rayma  Supriani,  Leonardo  Padrón,  and  Laureano  Márquez—all  of  whom  had  recently  been 
attacked on social networks—began experiencing harassment and threats over their cell phones, via 
press publications, and on national television programs.
107
Naibet Soto and Luis Carlos Díaz, two 
bloggers who are well known in the cybersphere for their creation of Google pages dedicated to 
discussing  the  political  situation  in  Venezuela,  have  also  suffered  harassment  by  government 
supporters following Chavez’s death.
108
In recent years, journalists and opposition figures have been subject to periodic waves of hacking 
and impersonation attacks. In August 2011, the blogs and Twitter accounts of at least two-dozen 
government critics and other prominent figures were hacked, hijacked, and used to disseminate 
progovernment messages. Among those targeted in the waves of cyberattacks occurring in late 
2011 and 2012 were journalists, artists, economists, activists, and opposition politicians, including 
the Miranda State governor and presidential candidate Henrique Capriles Radonsky.
109
In some 
cases, the pro-government nature of the messages was palpable and immediately raised suspicions 
that a particular account had been compromised. But in other instances, the hackers’ approach was 
more cunning.  
Examples included a statement by the usually critical economist Jose Guerra suddenly praising the 
president’s price control policy; supposed criticism by the opposition-linked pollster Luis Vicente 
Leon regarding one of the opposition’s own presidential candidates; and threatening comments 
towards  other  users  wrongfully  attributed  to  political  activist  Luis  Trincado  and  journalist 
Marianela Balbi, Executive Director of the Press and Society Institute of Venezuela. Email accounts 
associated with activists’ Twitter feeds or blogs have also been compromised, and the contents of 
several blogs have been erased.
110
In February 2013, the Twitter account @radaremergencia and 
the blog “Radar de los Barrios,” both of which belong to Venezuelan journalist Jesús Torrealba, 
were hacked for the second time. The accounts were commandeered to issue tweets with a strong 
political bent and to insult Torrealba.
111
106
 Natalia Mazzote, “Periódico Digital Venezolano es Atacado con una Granada,” [Digital Venezuelan Newspaper is Attacked 
with a Grenade], Knight Center, Journalism in the Americas (blog), June 6, 2012, http://bit.ly/LjmTJi.  
107
 “Continuan las Agresiones a Periodistas” [Attacks on Journalists Continue], Espacio Público online, March 19, 2013, 
http://bit.ly/WJpXnV.  
108
 Naibet Parra, “Estado General de Sospecha” [General state of suspicion], Zaperoqueando (blog), March 26, 2013. 
http://zaperoqueando.blogspot.com/2013/03/estado‐general‐de‐sospecha.html
109
 Adriana Prado, “Pro‐Chávez Hackers Steal Twitter Passwords from Venezuelan Journalists,” Knight Center for Journalism in 
the Americas, Journalism in the Americas (blog) September 13, 2011, 
http://bit.ly/qi7g8J; Natalia Mazotte, “More Venezuelan 
Opposition Journalists' Twitter Accounts Hacked,” Knight Center for Journalism in the Americas, Journalism in the Americas 
(blog) February 1, 2011, http://bit.ly/xoOTNS; “Hackean la Página Web de la Gobernación de Miranda” [Web Page of the 
Government of Miranda Hacked], La Patilla online, February 12, 2012, http://bit.ly/yGiaIZ.  
110
 “Continuan los Ataques Informaticos en Twitter y Gmail,” [Cyber Attacks Continue on Twitter and Gmail], Espacio Público 
online, November 25, 2011, 
http://bit.ly/uLN8JL.  
111
 Espacio Público “Hackean La Cuenta @radaremergencia y El Blog Radar de Los Barrios,”[@ radaremergencia Twitter Account 
and Radar de Los Barrios Blogs Hacked], Espacio Público online, February 21, 2013, http://bit.ly/1bRpwiO.  
835
Get pdf metadata - add, remove, update PDF metadata in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Allow C# Developers to Read, Add, Edit, Update and Delete PDF Metadata
online pdf metadata viewer; endnote pdf metadata
Get pdf metadata - VB.NET PDF metadata library: add, remove, update PDF metadata in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Enable VB.NET Users to Read, Write, Edit, Delete and Update PDF Document Metadata
get pdf metadata; batch edit pdf metadata
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
V
ENEZUELA
In February 2012, online activists took matters into their own hands in response to the Twitter 
hackings, launching what they called Operation BAS (short for  Operation Block and Spam).
112
Complaints to Twitter resulted in the suspension of several dozen allegedly compromised accounts. 
Observers  noted,  however,  that  accounts  belonging  to  genuine  Chávez  supporters,  not  paid 
commentators,  were among those targeted, and that the campaign thus posed a restriction to 
freedom of expression.
113
It remains unclear whether the government is directly behind Twitter usurpations and other forms 
of  cyberattack.  Although  a group of hackers calling itself N33 has taken  responsibility  for the 
attacks, some also suspect government involvement.
114
N33, which has been given air time on 
state-run TV, claims that it supports the president but does not act at the behest of the government. 
Editor of opposition news site Codigo Venezuela (and recent victim of hacking) Milagros Socorros, 
however,  received  an  e-mail  from  an  anonymous  sympathizer  who  claimed  otherwise.  The 
informant, who claimed to work at the Ministry of Science and Technology, reported that an entire 
floor  of  the  ministry  is  devoted  to  following  and  hacking  opposition  activists’  online 
communications.  To  date,  the  allegation  remains  unconfirmed  and  prosecutors  have  ignored 
requests from victims to launch an investigation.
115
Several web pages of governmental organizations also suffered cyberattacks in 2012 and 2013.
116
Ernesto Villegas, Minister of Communication and Information, denounced the creation of fake 
accounts on the social network Twitter, one allegedly belonging to him and others created by 
hackers  impersonating  president  Chávez’s  daughter,  President  of  the  Central  Bank  Nelson 
Merentes,  and  popular  progovernment  TV  star  Winston  Vallenilla.
117
Villegas  called  on  his 
followers to block the accounts and report them as spam.
118
In May 2012, the N33 hacking group named Alberto Federico Ravell, editor of popular news portal 
La Patilla, as an important future target.
119
A few weeks later,  La Patilla  reported that it had 
112
 6toPoder, “Operación BAS ha Suspendido un Centenar de Usuarios que Violan las Normas de Twitter” [Operation BAS Has 
Suspended a Hundred Users who Violate the Rules of Twitter], 6toPoder online, March 11, 2012, 
http://bit.ly/AtIKYy.  
113
 Luis Carlos Díaz, “El Descubrimiento de la Multitud,” [The Discovery of the Crowd] Periodismo de Paz (blog), April 3, 2012, 
http://www.periodismodepaz.org/index.php/2012/03/04/el‐descubrimiento‐de‐la‐multitud/
114
 Laura Vidal, “Venezuela: Government opponents' twitter accounts hacked” Global Voices Online (blog), December 5, 2011, 
http://globalvoicesonline.org/2011/12/06/venezuela‐government‐opponents‐twitter‐accounts‐hacked/
115
 Francisco Toro, “Hack a Mole,” International Herald Tribune, Latitude (blog), November 28, 2011, http://nyti.ms/tUajph.  
116
 “Páginas Web de Diversos Organismos Gubernamentales Sufren Ataque Informático” [Websites of Various Government 
Agencies Suffer Hacking Attacks], Espacio Público online, August 28, 2012, http://bit.ly/OtNDb0.  
117
 “Villegas Denuncia Cuenta Falsa de Nelson Merentes” [Villegas Denounces False Twitter Account of Nelson Merentes], 
Últimas Noticias online, February 10, 2013, http://bit.ly/15BPtko; “Hackean Cuenta Twitter de Winston Vallenilla con Mensaje 
Falso Sobre la Salud del Presidente Chávez” [Winston Vallenilla Twitter Account Hacked with False Message about the Health of 
President Chavez], Globovisión, February 13, 2013, http://bit.ly/WnPi4l.  
118
 “Ministro Villegas Denuncia Falsa Cuenta suya en Twitter” [Minister Villegas Denounces False Report on his Twitter 
Account], Últimas Noticias online, January 9, 2013, http://bit.ly/1bhtYo8.  
119
 Adriana Prado, “Pro‐Chávez Hackers Steal Twitter Passwords from Venezuelan Journalists,” Knight Center for Journalism in 
the Americas, September 13, 2011, 
http://bit.ly/qi7g8J; Juan Carlos Figueroa, “Hacker del n33 Advierte: La Joya de la Corona es 
Alberto Ravell” [Hacker warns of N33: The jewel in the Crown is Alberto Ravell], El Tiempo, September 7, 2011, 
http://bit.ly/oZIKxe.   
836
C# TIFF: TIFF Metadata Editor, How to Write & Read TIFF Metadata
TIFFDocument doc = new TIFFDocument(@"c:\demo1.tif"); // Get Xmp metadata for string. TagCollection collection = doc.GetTagCollection(0); // Get Exif metadata.
pdf xmp metadata viewer; google search pdf metadata
VB.NET PDF Annotate Library: Draw, edit PDF annotation, markups in
' Get PDF document. Dim fileInpath As String = "" Dim doc As PDFDocument = New PDFDocument(fileInpath) ' Get all annotations. ' Get PDF document.
pdf keywords metadata; pdf metadata
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
V
ENEZUELA
successfully  fended  off  an  intense  cyberattack,
120
however  during  the  October  2012  electoral 
weekend the site suffered continuous DDoS attacks.
121
Cyberattacks, impersonations, and blocking all intensified on the day of the presidential election. 
The  Twitter  accounts of political  activists Ricardo Ríos and  Carlos  Valero, as well  as  that of 
Humberto Prado (director of NGO Observatorio Venezolano de Prisiones), were all compromised 
on election day, as was the account of Ricardo Koesling, general secretary of political opposition 
party Piedra. The account of well-known singer Oscar De León was also appropriated and used to 
comment on voting abstention.
122
Problems accessing news sites such as Noticiero Digital (Digital 
News) and Globovisión (which registered a general failure of its servers) were also reported on the 
day of the election. Weekly newspaper 6to poder (Sixth Power) reported the blocking of its website 
by CANTV during the count of electoral votes; Ismael García, a well-known opposition deputy 
who runs a political show, also noted the disabling of his personal website.
123
Cyberattacks and blockings also gained vigor surrounding questions of President Chavez’s health. 
After  his  return  to  the  country  in  February  2013,  a  group  identifying  itself  as  "Anonymous 
Venezuela" and demanding to know the truth about the president´s health attacked the websites of 
several military branches.
124
In early 2013, Venezuelans accused state telecom CANTV of blocking 
access to Cuba Diary and Apporea in order to maintain secrecy surrounding the president’s health.
125
Several victims of cyberattacks and digital identity theft have filed complaints with the authorities, 
yet as of May 2013 state bodies have neither launched an official investigation nor condemned the 
attacks. The lack of response has led prominent civil society figures to take matters into their own 
hands, holding a press conference and publishing an open letter denouncing the attacks as part of a 
government-endorsed policy of “computer terrorism.”
126
Among the group’s complaints is that 
although the Committee for Scientific, Penal and Criminal Investigations (CICPC) had successfully 
identified several perpetrators, the investigation was halted and the lead investigator was relieved of 
his duties.
127
Illegal intrusion into computer systems is classified as a criminal offense according to the Special 
Law  Against  Cybercrime,  which  condemns  the  access,  interception,  destruction,  sabotage, 
modification, alteration, espionage and disclosure of any private information found in information 
120
 “La Patilla Informa a Sus Lectores sobre Ataque a Su Plataforma” [La Patilla Informs its Readers about Attack on its Platform], 
La Patilla online, October 1, 2011, 
http://bit.ly/o8Gd88.  
121
 Reference was collected by personal interview with a La Patilla source on condition of anonymity.  
122
 “Ataques Informáticos Sacuden las Redes Sociales en el País” [Hacking Shakes Social Networks in the Country], Espacio 
Público online, October 16, 2012, http://bit.ly/15Az8pL.  
123
 “Ataques Informáticos Sacuden las Redes Sociales en el País” [Hacking Attacks Shake Social Networks in the Country]. 
124
 “Hackean Páginas Militares Venezolanas y Exigen Saber qué Pasa con la Salud de Chávez,” [Venezuelan Military Websites  
Hacked; Demands To Know What is Happening with Chavez’s Health], La Patilla online, February 23, 2013, http://bit.ly/XvxAKr.  
125
Journalism in the Americas (blog), “Venezuela’s State Telecom Accused of Blocking Access to Site Reporting on Chávez’s 
Health,” Accessed February 5, 2013, http://bit.ly/11nCLUb; See also: Espacio Publico (blog), http://bit.ly/18zL9kl,  
and Harioff (blog): http://twitter.com/harioff/statuses/303668574671745024
126
 Liderazgo y Vision Asociacion Civil, “Hackeados e Indiganados Denunciaron el Terrorismo Informatico” [Hackers and 
Outraged Citizens Denounced Computer Terrorism], December 2, 2011, http://bit.ly/164lnod 
127
 “Denuncian ‘Terrorismo Informatico’ Impulsado por el Gobierno de Chávez” [Denouncing Computer Terrorism Driven by 
Chávez Government] Globovision online, December 2, 2011, http://www.globovision.com/news.php?nid=210517
837
C# PDF Annotate Library: Draw, edit PDF annotation, markups in C#.
Get PDF document. String fileInpath = @""; PDFDocument doc = new PDFDocument(fileInpath); // Get all annotations. Get PDF document.
remove pdf metadata; search pdf metadata
How to C#: Modify Image Metadata (tag)
VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET Excel How to C#: Modify Image Metadata (tag). With XImage.Raster, you can get the image tags and modify them rapidly
preview edit pdf metadata; read pdf metadata online
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
V
ENEZUELA
technology systems. Although the law specifies severe punishment for such crimes, extending to 
imprisonment  and  fines,  no  penalties  have  yet  been  imposed.
128
Taken  together,  these 
circumstances have led many observers to believe that the president or other top officials are either 
directly or implicitly supporting the attackers.
129
128
 “Espacio Público Exige al Estado Venezolano que Investigue y Sancione a los Responsables de los Ataques a Cuentas de 
Correo y Usurpación de Identidad en Redes Sociales,” [Espacio Público Demands that the Venezuelan State Investigate and 
Punish those Responsible for Attacks on Email Accounts and Identity Theft on Social Networks], Espacio Público online, 
February 1, 2012, http://bit.ly/1bRp5F2.  
129
 Natalia Mazzote, “Ataques Digitales Contra Periodistas se Convierten en una Nueva Forma de Censura en Venezuela” 
(Entrevista a Luis Carlos Díaz)” [Digital attacks against journalists become a new form of censorship in Venezuela (Interview with 
Luis Carlos Díaz)] Knight Center for Journalism in the Americas, January 2012. 
838
VB.NET PDF: Get Started with PDF Library
rotate PDF pages, C#.NET search text in PDF, C#.NET edit PDF bookmark, C#.NET edit PDF metadata, C#.NET VB.NET PDF: Get Started with .NET PDF Library Using VB.
edit multiple pdf metadata; pdf metadata editor online
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
Scan image to PDF, tiff and various image formats. Get image information, such as its location, zonal information, metadata, and so on.
adding metadata to pdf; acrobat pdf additional metadata
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
V
IETNAM
V
IETNAM
 Vietnam overtook Iran as the world’s second worst jailer of netizens after China in
2013, with more than 30 behind bars, according to Reporters Without Borders (see
V
IOLATIONS OF 
U
SER 
R
IGHTS
).
 A court sentenced blogger Nguyen Van Hai—already jailed since 2008—to another 12
years imprisonment on anti-state charges (see V
IOLATIONS OF 
U
SER 
R
IGHTS
).
 Decree 72, passed in July 2013, sought to compel international service providers to
comply with government censorship and surveillance (see L
IMITS ON 
C
ONTENT
).
 Anti-corruption blogger Le Anh Hung was committed to a mental institution without
an exam for 12 days in 2013 (see V
IOLATIONS OF 
U
SER 
R
IGHTS
).
 In 2013, propaganda officials acknowledged employing 1000 “public opinion shapers”
to manipulate online content (see L
IMITS ON 
C
ONTENT
).
2012 
2013 
I
NTERNET 
F
REEDOM 
S
TATUS
N
OT
F
REE
N
OT
F
REE
Obstacles to Access (0-25) 
16 
14 
Limits on Content (0-35) 
26 
28 
Violations of User Rights (0-40) 
31 
33 
Total (0-100) 
73 
75 
*0=most free, 100=least free
e
P
OPULATION
89 million
I
NTERNET 
P
ENETRATION 
2012: 
39 percent
S
OCIAL 
M
EDIA
/ICT
A
PPS 
B
LOCKED
No
P
OLITICAL
/S
OCIAL 
C
ONTENT 
B
LOCKED
Yes
B
LOGGERS
/ICT
U
SERS 
A
RRESTED
Yes
P
RESS 
F
REEDOM 
2013
S
TATUS
Not Free
K
EY 
D
EVELOPMENTS
:
M
AY 
2012
A
PRIL 
2013 
839
VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images
Capture image from whole PDF based on special characteristics. Get image information, such as its location, zonal information, metadata, and so on.
add metadata to pdf programmatically; edit pdf metadata
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
You can easily get pages from a PDF file, and then use these pages to create and output a new PDF file. Pages order will be retained.
clean pdf metadata; embed metadata in pdf
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
V
IETNAM
Decree 72 governing the management, provision, and use of internet services and information online 
was pending on April 30, 2013 when the coverage period for this report ended. Prime Minister 
Nguyen Tan Dung signed the decree on July 15, 2013, which subsequently took effect on September 
1. The decree stipulated that all service providers operating in the country—including news websites, 
social networks, mobile service providers, and game service providers—must have at least one domestic 
server for the purposes of “inspection, storage, and provision of information at the request of competent 
authorities.” This appears to demand intermediaries to cooperate with any authority in Vietnam 
conducting censorship or monitoring, though how it might be enforced is not clear; penalties for 
refusing to comply have not been specified. 
Other features of the decree were confusing, including sections that appeared to limit social media 
platforms from sharing externally-generated content, such as news reports. Vietnamese authorities have 
tried to ban political commentary from personal websites in the past, with mixed success, and debate on 
homegrown social networks leans towards non-controversial subjects like entertainment, so this far-
reaching interpretation is not outside the realm of possibility. However, some experts noted that this 
section was geared towards businesses complaining about copyright violations.  
The decree maintained other vaguely-worded bans on content “opposing Vietnam.” As many internet 
users know to their cost, however, this is not a dramatic departure from the status quo.   
The ruling Vietnamese Communist Party’s concern that the internet could be used to challenge its 
political  monopoly  has  resulted  in  contradictory  policies.  While  investing  in  information  and 
communication technologies (ICTs) through programs like its “Taking-Off Strategy 2011–2020,”
1
the government has intensified monitoring and censorship of online content. After a relative easing 
from 2004 to 2006 while Vietnam hosted an Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation summit and joined 
the World Trade Organization, internet freedom deteriorated, and a growing number of online 
activists face harassment and imprisonment.  
Reporters Without Borders counted more than 30 bloggers imprisoned in Vietnam on April 30, 
2013, making the country the second worst in the world among nations that jail internet users after 
China.
2
Many were political activists, and in some cases, it was difficult to assess to what extent 
their arrests were related to online, as opposed to offline, action and expression. Either way, the 
number of blogger imprisonments has dramatically increased over the past two years, and penalties 
are getting heavier. Several recent trials have resulted in sentences longer than a decade.  
1
 “‘Taking‐off Strategy,’ Does it Stepping Up the Development of the ICT Industry in Vietnam?” Business in Asia, accessed June, 
2012, http://www.business‐in‐asia.com/vietnam/vietnam_ict.html
2
 Reporters Without Borders, “2013: Netizens Imprisoned,” http://bit.ly/Wsi72Y.  
I
NTRODUCTION
E
DITOR
N
OTE ON 
R
ECENT 
D
EVELOPMENTS
840
C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
String inputFilePath = Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.pdf"; PDFDocument doc = new PDFDocument(inputFilePath); // get a text manager from the document object
pdf remove metadata; remove metadata from pdf online
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
V
IETNAM
While the effects of the oppressive Decree 72 on internet management passed in 2013 are yet to be 
seen, the decree’s drafting process was revealing. No timeframe for passing the decree was made 
public, and there was no open consultation with civil society, technology companies, or other 
stakeholders about the many contested provisions. However, both local and international service 
providers, as well as the international free expression community, objected to the drafts, and the 
final version contained fewer explicit demands on international service providers than many had 
feared—a possible sign that the state was willing to compromise to sustain foreign support for the 
developing ICT sector. Unfortunately, the implications for the Vietnamese people remain grave. 
The decree’s provisions on both content and rights are vague enough to allow free interpretation by 
a seemingly limitless number of “relevant organizations and individuals.” Though it did not impact 
the coverage period of this report, it bodes ill for internet freedom in the years to come.      
Internet penetration slowed in 2012 after years of phenomenal growth fuelled by decreasing costs 
and  improving  infrastructure  since  the  internet  was  introduced  in  1997.  Some  areas  reached 
saturation; others suffered from an economic downturn. Available bandwidth grew a modest 10 
percent from 2011 to 2012, after a 250 percent increase between 2010 and 2011, according to 
official figures.
3
Even so, by the end of 2012, internet penetration was above the global average at 
39 percent,
4
and Vietnam ranked 81 on the 2012 International Telecommunication Union’s index 
of ICT development, higher than neighboring countries with larger GDPs like Thailand, Indonesia, 
and the Philippines.
5
Vietnam does not report figures for computer literacy, but the 93 percent overall literacy rate has 
helped equip the adult population to use computers.
6
In large cities, the internet has surpassed 
newspapers as the most popular source for information.
7
Wi-Fi connections are free in many urban 
spaces such as airports, cafes, restaurants, and hotels. Cybercafés, though affordable for most urban 
dwellers,
8
provide access for just 36 percent of internet users, and almost 90 percent of citizens can 
access the internet in their homes and workplaces, 2012 research shows.
9
While access is more 
limited for the 70 percent of the population living in rural areas, with ethnic minorities and remote, 
impoverished  communities  especially  disadvantaged, the  research documented a remarkable 95 
percent of citizens aged 15 to 24 with internet access nationwide. In a country where 54 percent of 
the population is under 30 and 75 percent of all internet users are under 35, this is a promising 
trend. 
3
 Vietnam Internet Network Information Center, “Statistics on Internet Development.” 
4
 International Telecommunication Union, “Percentage of Individuals Using the Internet, 2000‐2012,” http://bit.ly/14IIykM .  
5
 International Telecommunication Union, “Measuring the Information Society,” 2012, http://bit.ly/QfIEtR.  
6
 UNICEF, “At a Glance: Vietnam,” accessed July 2013, http://www.unicef.org/infobycountry/vietnam_statistics.html.  
7
 “Tình hình sử dụng Internet tại Việt Nam 2011” [The Situation of Internet Use in Vietnam in 2011], VNVIC, August 3, 2011, 
http://vnvic.com/tin‐tuc‐cong‐nghe/140‐tinh‐hinh‐su‐dung‐internet‐tai‐viet‐nam‐2011.html
8
 “Việt Nam: 20% không tin tưởng thông tin trên Internet” [Vietnam: 20% Do Not Trust Information on the Internet], PA News, 
April 15, 2010, http://news.pavietnam.vn/archives/1547
9
 We Are Social, “Social, Digital and Mobile in Vietnam,” October 30, 2012, http://bit.ly/Stwb8z.  
O
BSTACLES TO 
A
CCESS
841
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
V
IETNAM
Mobile phone penetration was almost 150 percent in 2012, indicating that some subscribers have 
more than one device.
10
Fifty-six percent of users accessed the internet via a mobile device in 2012, 
almost double the number in 2011.
11
A third-generation (3G) network, which enables internet 
access via mobile phones, has been operating since the end of 2009, and the number of users is 
slowly expanding. By the first quarter of 2012, 3G users were estimated to account for 11 percent 
of the overall market.
12
The  three  biggest  internet  service  providers  (ISPs)  are  the  state-owned  Vietnam  Post  and 
Telecommunications (VNPT),  which dominates  63 percent of  the  market;  the military-owned 
Viettel (9 percent), and the privately owned FPT (22 percent).
13
VNPT and Viettel also own the 
three largest mobile phone service providers in the country (MobiFone, VinaPhone, and Viettel), 
which serve 93 percent of the country’s subscriber base, while three privately owned companies 
share the remainder.
14
While there is no legally-imposed monopoly for access providers, informal 
barriers still prevent new companies without political ties or economic clout from entering the 
market. Similarly, there is a concentration of internet-exchange providers, which serve as gateways 
to the international internet: Four out of six are state or military-owned.
15
The Vietnam Internet Center (VNNIC) allocates internet resources, such as domain names, under 
the Ministry of Information and Telecommunication. Three additional ministries—information and 
culture (MIC),  public  security  (MPS),  and  culture, sport, and tourism  (MCST)—manage  the 
provision  and usage  of  internet services. On paper,  the MCST regulates sexually  explicit  and 
violent  content,  while  the  MPS  oversees  political  censorship.  In  practice,  however,  all  such 
guidelines are issued to relevant bodies by the ruling Vietnamese Communist Party in a largely 
nontransparent  manner.  In  2008,  the  MIC  created  the  Administrative  Agency  for  Radio, 
Television, and Electronic Information. Among other duties, the agency is tasked with regulating 
online  content,  which  includes  drafting  guidelines  for  blogs  and  managing  licenses  for  online 
media.
16
The impact of the 2013 internet management decree, which introduced vaguely-worded content 
restrictions and sought to increase companies’ liability for implementing them, has yet to be seen. 
While its implications are potentially far-reaching, however, it was just the latest in a series of 
decrees that heavily restrict political commentary and instill self-censorship in an otherwise diverse 
10
 International Telecommunication Union, “Mobile‐Cellular Telephone Subscriptions, 2000‐2012;” Vietnam Post and Telecom 
Hanoi, “Việt Nam đã có 136 triệu thuê bao di động,” [Vietnam Has 136 Million Mobile Phone Subscribers], July 2, 2013, 
http://www.vnpt‐hanoi.com.vn/web/tintuc_chitiet.asp?news_id=5109
11
 Thankiu, “Cimigo Net Citizens Report 2012,” http://bit.ly/164vsBv.  
12
 GSMA Intelligence, “3G growth stalls in Vietnam”, April 2012, http://bit.ly/1azUNmE.  
13
 “Thị trường Internet cũng sẽ có những vụ sát nhập?”  [Will the Internet Market see Mergers?],  ICTNews, September 21, 
2012, http://ictnews.vn/home/Internet/77/Thi‐truong%C2%A0Internet‐cung‐se‐co‐nhung‐vu‐sap‐nhap/105064/index.ict.  
14
 GSMA Intelligence, “3G growth stalls in Vietnam.” 
15
 The four are: VNPT, Viettel, Hanoi Telecom, and VTC. 
16
 Geoffrey Cain, “Bloggers the New Rebels in Vietnam,” SFGate, December 14, 2008, http://bit.ly/1bhBy1W .  
L
IMITS ON 
C
ONTENT
842
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
V
IETNAM
and lively blogging community. What’s more, while content limits are nothing new in Vietnam, 
online content was increasingly subject to manipulation in the past year, and officials acknowledged 
paying commentators for the first time, a sign that information authorities are diversifying their 
tactics for controlling popular discourse.  
While the Vietnamese government has fewer resources to devote to online content control than its 
counterpart in China, the  authorities have nonetheless established an  effective and increasingly 
sophisticated  content-filtering  system.  Censorship  is  implemented  by  ISPs  rather  than  at  the 
backbone or international gateway level. No real-time filtering based on keywords or deep-packet 
inspection has been documented. Instead, specific URLs are identified in advance as targets for 
censorship and placed on blacklists; ISPs are legally required to block them or lose their license. 
Some users report being notified that a censored site has been deliberately blocked, while others 
receive a vague error message saying the browser was unable to locate the website’s server.  
Censorship ostensibly limits sexually explicit content. In practice, however, it primarily targets 
topics with the potential to threaten the VCP’s political power, including political dissent, human 
rights and democracy. Websites criticizing the government’s reaction to border and sea disputes 
between  China and Vietnam are subject to blocking. Content promoting organized Buddhism, 
Roman Catholicism, and the Cao Dai religious group is blocked to a lesser but still significant 
degree.
17
Vietnamese sites critical of the government are generally inaccessible, whether they are 
hosted overseas, such as Talawas, Dan Luan, and Dan Chim Viet, or domestically, like Dan Lam Bao 
and Anh Ba Sam.  
Censors largely focus on Vietnamese-language content, so the New York Times and Human Rights 
Watch websites are accessible, while the U.S.-funded Radio Free Asia’s Vietnamese-language site is 
not; BBC websites are accessible in English but not Vietnamese. Blocking is not consistent across 
ISPs. A 2012 OpenNet Initiative test of 1,446 sites found Viettel blocked 160 URLs, while FPT 
blocked 121, and VNPT only 77.
18
There is no avenue for managers of blocked websites to appeal 
censorship decisions. 
The unpredictable and nontransparent ways in which topics become forbidden make it difficult for 
users  to  know  where  exactly  the  “red  lines”  lie,  and  many  self-censor.  Bloggers  and  forum 
administrators commonly disable commenting functions to prevent controversial discussions.  
Online media outlets and internet portals are state-owned and subject to VCP censorship. The 
party’s Department for Culture and Ideology and the MPS regularly instruct online newspapers or 
portals to remove content they perceive as critical of the government. Editors and journalists who 
post such content risk disciplinary warnings, job loss, or imprisonment.  
17
 “Vietnamese Government Expands Internet Censorship to Block Catholic Websites,” Catholic News Agency, August 6, 2009, 
http://bit.ly/15BVkX4.  
18
 OpenNet Initiative, “Update on Threats to Freedom of Expression Online in Vietnam”, September 10, 2012,  
http://opennet.net/blog/2012/09/update‐threats‐freedom‐expression‐online‐vietnam
843
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
V
IETNAM
Since 2008, a series of regulations have extended controls on traditional media content to the 
online sphere. In December of that year, the state passed Decree 97 and MIC Circular 7 ordering 
blogs to refrain from political or social commentary and barred internet users from disseminating 
press  articles,  literary  works,  or  other  publications  prohibited  by  the  Press  Law.
19
Blogging 
platforms were instructed to remove this “harmful” content, report to the government every six 
months, and provide information about individual bloggers upon request.
20
Censorship of anti-
government content increased, though blogs hosted overseas were unaffected. A decree followed in 
2011,  giving  authorities  power  to  penalize  journalists  and  bloggers  for  a  series  of  ill-defined 
infractions, including publishing under a pseudonym. The decree differentiated sharply between 
journalists accredited by the government and independent bloggers, who are allowed far fewer 
rights and protections.
21
The Decree on the Management, Provision, Use of Internet Services and Internet Content Online, 
introduced by the MIC in May 2012 and passed just over a year later, extends this repressive 
trajectory  by  further  regulating  domestic  internet  use  and  replacing  “blogs”  with  a  broader 
definition of “social networks” to encompassing a range of online platforms.
22
Article 5 limited 
overbroad categories of online activity including “opposing the Socialist Republic of Vietnam,” 
inciting violence, revealing state secrets, and providing false information.  
The decree sought to force intermediaries—including those based overseas—to regulate third-
party contributors in cooperation with the state. Vietnamese authorities have acknowledged this 
goal in the past. The deputy minister of information and communications said he would request 
Google and Yahoo cooperate with censors as early as 2008;
23
yet the new decree asks all social 
network  operators  to  “eliminate  or  prevent  information”  prohibited  under  Article  5.  It  also 
mandated that companies maintain at least one domestic server “serving the inspection, storage, 
and provision of information at the request of competent authorities.” Social networks were further 
instructed to “provide personal information of the users related to terrorism, crimes, and violations 
of law” on request. It did not outline what penalties non-compliant companies could face, and how 
the decree might be enforced remains unclear. It came into effect after the coverage period of this 
report.  
19
 OpenNet Initiative, “Vietnam,” August 7, 2012, https://opennet.net/research/profiles/vietnam; The Government, “Decree No 
97/2008/ND‐CP of August 28, 2008,” Official Gazette 11‐12, August 2008, 
http://english.mic.gov.vn/vbqppl/Lists/Vn%20bn%20QPPL/Attachments/6159/31236373.PDF; Ministry of Information and 
Communications, “Circular No. 07/2008/TT‐BTTTT of December 18, 2008,” Official Gazette 6‐7, January 2009, 
http://english.mic.gov.vn/vbqppl/Lists/Vn%20bn%20QPPL/Attachments/6145/23434370.pdf.  
20
 Karin Deutsch Karlekar, ed., “Vietnam,” Freedom of the Press 2009 (New York: Freedom House, 2009).  
21
 Article 19, “Comment on the Decree No. 02 of 2011 on Administrative Responsibility for Press and Publication Activities of 
the Prime Minister of the Socialist Republic of Vietnam,” June 2011, 
http://www.article19.org/data/files/pdfs/analysis/comment‐on‐the‐decree‐no.‐02‐of‐2011‐on‐administrative‐responsibility‐
for‐pr.pdf; “Decree 02/2011/ND‐CP”  [in Vietnamese], January 6, 2011, available at Committee to Protect Journalists, 
http://cpj.org/Vietnam%20media%20decree.pdf
22
 “Decree No. 72/2013/ND‐CP, dated July 15, 2013 of the Government on Management, Provision and Use of Internet Services 
and Online Information,” Luật Minh Khuê, http://luatminhkhue.vn/copyright/decree‐no‐72‐2013‐nd‐cp.aspx.
 
23
 Ann Binlot, “Vietnam’s Bloggers Face Government Crackdown,” Time, December 30, 2008, 
http://www.time.com/time/world/article/0,8599,1869130,00.html
844
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested