download pdf file on button click in asp.net c# : Batch edit pdf metadata Library application class asp.net html azure ajax FOTN%202013_Full%20Report_085-part1593

F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
V
IETNAM
Tools  for  circumventing  censorship,  such  as  proxy  servers,  are  relatively  well-known  among 
younger, technology-savvy internet users in Vietnam, and many can be found with a simple Google 
search. The authorities are not known to have instituted restrictions on content transmitted via e-
mail or mobile phone text messages. 
Besides expanding censorship, the government has adopted new measures to manipulate public 
opinion online, acknowledging their deployment of up to 1000 “public opinion shapers” to produce 
and spread progovernment content in early 2013.
24
Hanoi’s Propaganda and Education Department 
revealed that it runs at least 400 online accounts—what kind was not specified—and 20 microblogs 
to fight “online hostile forces,” according to international news reports. Also in 2012, some blogs, 
such as Quan Lam Nao, established themselves as populist voices criticizing high-profile members of 
the party. Their critics counter that these platforms reflect the party’s internal power struggles and 
are not objective measures of increasing freedom online. 
Despite government restrictions, Vietnam’s internet is vibrant and offers a diversity of content in 
the Vietnamese  language.  The  Vietnamese  blogosphere  started  around  2006  with  Yahoo!  360 
attracting  about  15  million  Vietnamese  users  at  the  height  of  its  popularity.
25
Since  Yahoo 
terminated  the  service  in  mid-2009,  some  stayed  with its  replacement  360Plus,  while  others 
migrated  to  Blogger,  WordPress,  or  local  networks  such  as  YuMe,  which  are  popular  for 
entertainment content.    
YouTube,  Twitter,  and  international blog-hosting  services  are  freely  available  and growing  in 
popularity. Facebook, which faced sporadic—and officially unacknowledged—blocks in 2010 and 
2011, was generally accessible on all types of devices in early 2013. Users of the service surged 
from 4 million in 2011 to 8.5 million by Oct 2012, overtaking local competitor Zing—with 8.2 
million  subscribers—as  the  top  social  network  in  Vietnam.
26
In  2010,  the  MIC  launched  a 
government-backed social network called Go.VN, which requires users to register with their real 
name and government-issued identity number when creating an account. The initial response to the 
new initiative was limited.
27
By early 2013, Go.VN had morphed into a mere entertainment portal.  
Although most blogs address personal and nonpolitical topics, citizen journalism has emerged as an 
important source of information for many Vietnamese, particularly given the tightly controlled 
traditional media. People now recognize the parallel existence of official media and alternative 
counterparts operating exclusively online. Websites such as Anh Ba Sam, Que Choa or Bauxite Vietnam 
react quickly to socio-political events and have established themselves as influential opinion makers 
that were influential in mobilizing demonstrations on the streets of Hanoi and Ho Chi Minh City to 
protest China’s claim on the Paracel and Spratly Islands in 2011; the protests lasted several months 
24
 “Vietnam Admits Deploying Bloggers to Support the Government”, BBC, January 11, 2013,  
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world‐asia‐20982985
25
 Aryeh Sternberg, “Vietnam Online: Then and Now,” iMedia Connection, January 5, 2010, 
http://www.imediaconnection.com/content/25480.asp
26
 We Are Social, “Social, Digital and Mobile in Vietnam.” 
27
 James Hookway, “In Vietnam, State ‘Friends’ You,” Wall Street Journal, October 4, 2010, 
http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748703305004575503561540612900.html.  
845
Batch edit pdf metadata - add, remove, update PDF metadata in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Allow C# Developers to Read, Add, Edit, Update and Delete PDF Metadata
pdf xmp metadata; change pdf metadata
Batch edit pdf metadata - VB.NET PDF metadata library: add, remove, update PDF metadata in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Enable VB.NET Users to Read, Write, Edit, Delete and Update PDF Document Metadata
bulk edit pdf metadata; pdf metadata online
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
V
IETNAM
before the authorities shut them down and sent one of the organizers to an education camp.
28
In 
2012, blogs played an important role in rallying public opinion and providing evidence against the 
local  government  of some provinces such  as Hai Phong  and Hung Yen, after local authorities 
controversially  seized  agricultural  land  from  farmers,  whose  violent  resistance  shocked  the 
country.
29
Over  the  last  five  years,  Vietnam  has  subjected  bloggers  and  online  writers  to  extended 
interrogations, imprisonment, and physical abuse, a repressive trend that intensified in 2012 and 
2013. Vietnam was the world’s second biggest prison for netizens after China in 2013, with more 
than  30  bloggers  and  cyber-dissidents  detained,  according  to  Reporters  Without  Borders. 
Sentences handed down in cursory trials, which are often closed to the press, are getting longer. 
Blogger Nguyen Van Hai, already jailed since 2008, was sentenced to an additional 12 years in 
prison on anti-state charges in 2012, while at least three activists—who may have come to police 
attention in part because of their online activity—were sentenced to 13 years each.  
The constitution affirms the right to freedom of expression, but in practice, the VCP has strict 
control  over  the  media.  Legislation,  including  internet-related  decrees,  the  penal  code,  the 
Publishing Law, and the State Secrets Protection Ordinance, can be used to imprison journalists 
and bloggers. The penal code’s notorious Articles 79 and 88 are commonly used to prosecute and 
imprison  bloggers  and  online  activists  for  subversion  and  propaganda  against  the  state.
30
The 
judiciary is not independent but follows the party’s command, especially in trials related to free 
expression, which often last only a few hours. When detaining bloggers and online activists, the 
police routinely flout due process, arresting individuals without a warrant or retaining them in 
custody beyond the maximum period allowed by law.  
Reporters Without Borders counted 32 netizens imprisoned in Vietnam as of April 30, 2013, a 
figure which climbed to 35 in June.
31
The same group had documented 17 bloggers jailed in mid-
2011. This significant jump—which took Vietnam past Iran’s mid-2013 total of 25 bloggers behind 
bars—was fuelled by a January 2013 court ruling that found 14 Catholic students, bloggers, and 
human rights activists guilty of subversion under Article 79. The activists, who were mostly in their 
twenties and thirties, had been arrested after returning from training in Bangkok on non-violent 
struggle organized by the U.S.-based anti-communist party Viet Tan in 2011. At least five were 
regular contributors to the Catholic website Vietnam Redemptorist News;
32
other online activity was 
28
 “Người biểu tinh Thu Hằng bị đưa vào trại” [Demonstrator Thu Hang Sent to Camp], BBC Vietnamese, December 9, 2011, 
http://www.bbc.co.uk/vietnamese/vietnam/2011/12/111209_bui_hang_arrested.shtml
29
 Stuart Grudgings, “Web Snares Vietnam as Bloggers Spread Protests Over Land,” Reuters, August 19, 2013, 
http://www.reuters.com/article/2012/08/19/us‐vietnam‐bloggers‐idUSBRE87I09I20120819
30
 Reporters Without Borders, “Internet Enemies: Vietnam.”  
31
 Reporters Without Borders, “2013: Netizens Imprisoned,” http://en.rsf.org/press‐freedom‐barometer‐netizens‐
imprisoned.html?annee=2013.   
32
 Committee to Protect Journalists, “Bloggers imprisoned in mass sentencing in Vietnam,” news alert, January 9, 2013, 
http://www.cpj.org/2013/01/bloggers‐imprisoned‐in‐mass‐sentencing‐in‐vietnam.php
V
IOLATIONS OF 
U
SER 
R
IGHTS
846
C# PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in C#.net
Studio .NET project. Powerful .NET control to batch convert PDF documents to tiff format in Visual C# .NET program. Free library are
metadata in pdf documents; remove metadata from pdf acrobat
C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
Powerful components for batch converting PDF documents in C#.NET program. In the daily-life applications, you often need to use and edit PDF document content
view pdf metadata; pdf metadata extract
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
V
IETNAM
less well-documented, but may well have contributed to the charges against the group, which 
included participating in “propaganda against the Socialist Republic of Vietnam.”
33
The shortest 
sentence given was 3 years prison followed by 2 years house arrest, while at least three were jailed 
for 13 years with 3 years house arrest.
34
Arrests continued to be reported during the coverage period. In October 2012, police detained 
two students,  Nguyen  Phuong  Uyen,  21, and  Dinh  Nguyen  Kha,  25,  for  disseminating  anti-
governmental materials in public places and online; they were jailed for 6 and 10 years  respectively 
in May 2013.
35
Respected lawyer and blogger Le Quoc Quan was also arrested in December 2012, 
shortly after the BBC Vietnamese service published one of  his  articles on its  website; his trial 
remains pending.
36
The  longest-serving  blogger  in  prison  in  2013  was  Nguyen  Van  Hai,  a  vocal  critic  of  the 
government’s human rights record and an advocate for Vietnamese sovereignty over the Spratly 
Islands, also known by the title of his blog, Dieu Cay. He was sentenced in late 2008 to two and a 
half years in prison on tax evasion charges that observers viewed as politically motivated.
37
After 
completing that term, authorities kept him in detention until September 2012,
38
when a new trial 
court sentenced him to an additional 12 years in prison and 5 years under house arrest for “activities 
against the government.”
39
Two others were sentenced at the same trial: Phan Thanh Hai, who 
blogged  as  Anh Ba  Sai  Gon and was  arrested  in late 2010 on  the  charge of  distributing false 
information on his website, was sentenced to three years, while Ta Phong Tan, a former female 
police officer turned social justice blogger arrested in September 2011 for blog posts that allegedly 
“denigrated the state,” was jailed for ten.
40
Ta Phong Tan’s mother committed suicide by setting 
herself on fire outside of the local People’s Committee building to protest against her daughter’s 
trial. Others serving long term sentences in 2013 include one of Vietnam’s most vocal online 
dissidents, Cu Ha Huy Vu, who is serving a sentence of seven years in prison and three years house 
arrest handed down in a 2011 trial that barred access to the public and media.
41
In addition to imprisonment, bloggers and online activists have been subjected to physical attacks, 
job loss, termination of personal internet services, travel restrictions, and other violations of their 
33
 Seth Mydans, “Activists Convicted in Vietnam Crackdown on Dissent,” New York Times, January 9, 2013, 
http://www.nytimes.com/2013/01/10/world/asia/activists‐convicted‐in‐vietnam‐crackdown‐on‐dissent.html?_r=0
34
 “Long Prison Terms For “Dissident” Vietnam Bloggers,” Global Voices Online, January 12, 2013, 
http://globalvoicesonline.org/2013/01/12/long‐prison‐terms‐for‐dissident‐vietnam‐bloggers/.   
35
 “Nguyễn Phương Uyên bị phạt 6 năm tù, Đinh Nguyên Kha 10 năm tù” [Nguyen Phuong Uyen Sentenced to 6 Years, Dinh 
Nguyen Kha to 10 Years Prison], Thanh Nien, May 16, 2013, http://www.thanhnien.com.vn/pages/20130516/nguyen‐phuong‐
uyen‐bi‐phat‐6‐nam‐tu‐dinh‐nguyen‐kha‐10‐nam‐tu.aspx.  
36
 Human Rights Watch, “Vietnam: Drop Charges Against Le Quoc Quan,” July 8, 2013, 
http://www.hrw.org/news/2013/07/07/vietnam‐drop‐charges‐against‐le‐quoc‐quan
37
 Human Rights Watch, “Banned, Censored, Harassed and Jailed,” news release, October 11, 2009, 
http://www.hrw.org/en/news/2009/10/11/banned‐censored‐harassed‐and‐jailed
38
 Committee to Protect Journalists, “2012 Prison Census: Vietnam,” accessed May, 2013, http://cpj.org/imprisoned/2012.php
39
 “Y án với Điếu Cày và Tạ Phong Tần” [Sentences uphold for Dieu Cay and Ta Phong Tan], BBC Vietnamese, December 28, 
2012, www.bbc.co.uk/vietnamese/vietnam/2012/12/121228_xu_khang_an_dieu_cay.shtml+&cd=10&hl=vi&ct=clnk&gl=vn.  
40
 “An Odd Online Relationship,” Economist (Blog), August 9, 2012, 
http://www.economist.com/blogs/banyan/2012/08/internet‐freedom‐vietnam.  
41
 Reporters Without Borders, “Prime Minister Urged to Free All Imprisoned Bloggers and Journalists,” September 1, 2011, 
http://en.rsf.org/vietnam‐prime‐minister‐urged‐to‐free‐all‐01‐09‐2011,40879.html
847
VB.NET Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF
NET edit PDF metadata, C#.NET edit PDF digital signatures, C#.NET edit PDF sticky note Professional .NET PDF converter component for batch conversion.
read pdf metadata; view pdf metadata in explorer
VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.
C#.NET edit PDF digital signatures, C#.NET edit PDF sticky note Best and free VB.NET PDF to jpeg converter SDK for Visual NET components to batch convert adobe
pdf metadata editor; analyze pdf metadata
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
V
IETNAM
rights. Blogger Nguyen Hoang Vi reported that the police forcibly stripped and sexually assaulted 
her after she tried to attend Dieu Cay and his co-defendants’ December 2012 appeal hearing.
42
In 
February, Le Anh Hung, whose blog accused high-ranking Vietnamese leaders of corruption, was 
detained in a mental institution for 12 days, without a medical examination.
43
Vietnamese authorities monitor online communications and dissident activity on the web and in 
real time. Cybercafé owners are required to install special software to track and store information 
about their clients’ online activities,
44
and the 2013 internet management decree holds cybercafé 
owners  responsible  if  their  customers  are  caught  surfing  “bad”  websites.
45
Citizens  must  also 
provide ISPs with government-issued documents when purchasing a home internet connection. In 
late 2009, the MIC announced that all prepaid mobile phone subscribers would be required to 
register their ID details with the operator, and individuals are allowed to register only up to three 
numbers per carrier.
46
As of early 2013, however, the registration process is not linked to any 
central database and could be easily circumvented using fake ID numbers.
47
Real-name registration 
is not required to blog or post online comments, and many Vietnamese do so anonymously.  
Decree 72 may change that, and its privacy implications attracted concern throughout the year 
before it took effect. As outlined above, all providers and social networks in particular, are ordered 
to provide user information to “competent authorities” on request, but with no real procedures or 
oversight to discourage intrusive registration or data collection.
48
Users themselves were given the 
ambiguous right to “have their personal information kept confidential in accordance with law.” 
Other sections gestured in the direction of improved information security by encouraging providers 
of online information to “deploy technical systems and techniques.” Unfortunately, implementation 
of these nebulous provisions is left to the discretion of “ministers, heads of ministerial agencies, 
heads of governmental agencies, the presidents of people’s committees of central-affiliated cities 
and  provinces,  relevant  organizations  and  individuals”  under  the  guidance  of  the  minister  of 
information  and  communications,  leaving  anonymous  and  private  communication  subject  to 
invasion from almost any authority in Vietnam in the coming years.    
Blogger harassment has coincided with systematic cyberattacks targeting individual blogs as well as 
websites run by other activists in Vietnam and abroad that were first documented in September 
2009.
49
The worst of these occurred in 2010 and involved dozens of sites, including those operated 
42
 Nguyen Hoang Vi, “What happened on the day of the Appeal Hearing for the members of The Free Journalist Network,” Dan 
Lam Bao, January 2013, http://danlambaovn.blogspot.com/2013/01/what‐happened‐on‐day‐of‐appeal‐
hearing.html#.UgEGCJK1EwD
43
 “Blogger Le Anh Hung duoc tha ve nha” [Blogger Le Anh Hung released], BBC Vietnamese, February 5, 2013, 
www.bbc.co.uk/vietnamese/vietnam/2013/02/130205_leanhhung_released.shtml+&cd=2&hl=vi&ct=clnk&gl=vn.  
44
 “Internet Censorship Tightening in Vietnam,” Asia News, June 22, 2010, http://www.asianews.it/news‐en/Internet‐
censorship‐tightening‐in‐Vietnam‐18746.html
45
 OpenNet Initiative, “Update on Threats.” 
46
 Phong Quan, “Sim Card Registration Now Required in Vietnam,” Vietnam Talking Points, January 16, 2010, 
http://talk.onevietnam.org/sim‐card‐registration‐now‐required‐in‐vietnam/ 
47
 “Quản lý thuê bao di động trả trước: Chuyện không dễ,” [Managing Prepaid Mobile Subscribers Isn’t Easy], Vinhphuc, January 
14, 2013, http://www.vinhphuc.vn/ct/cms/Convert/thihanhpl/Lists/tintuc/View_Detail.aspx?ItemID=10.  
48
 “Decree No. 72/2013/ND‐CP.” 
49
 Human Rights Watch, “Vietnam: Stop Cyber Attacks Against Online Critics,” news release, May 26, 2010, 
http://www.hrw.org/news/2010/05/26/vietnam‐stop‐cyber‐attacks‐against‐online‐critics
848
C# PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in C#.net, ASP.
NET components for batch combining PDF documents in C#.NET class. Powerful library dlls for mering PDF in both C#.NET WinForms and ASP.NET WebForms.
adding metadata to pdf files; pdf metadata viewer online
VB.NET PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in vb.
NET control to batch convert PDF documents to Tiff format in Visual Basic. Qualified Tiff files are exported with high resolution in VB.NET.
remove metadata from pdf file; c# read pdf metadata
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
V
IETNAM
by Catholics who criticize government confiscation of church property, forums featuring political 
discussions, and a website raising environmental concerns about bauxite mining.
50
The attackers 
infected computers with malicious software disguised as a popular keyboard program  allowing 
Microsoft Windows to support the Vietnamese language. Once infected, computers became part of 
a “botnet,” or network whose command-and-control servers were primarily accessed from internet 
protocol (IP) addresses inside Vietnam. Hackers manipulated that network to carry out denial-of-
service (DoS) attacks, according to independent investigations by the internet security firm McAfee 
and Google. Google’s report estimated that “potentially tens of thousands of computers” were 
affected, most belonging to Vietnamese speakers.
51
McAfee stated that “the perpetrators may have 
political motivations, and may have some allegiance to the government of the Socialist Republic of 
Vietnam.”
52
The  Vietnamese  authorities—who  have proudly  advertised their ability to destroy 
“‘bad’ websites and blogs”
53
—took no steps to find or punish the attackers.  
In 2012 and 2013, hackers continued to target a handful important alternative blogs, including Anh 
Ba Sam and Que Choa.
54
It is now common practice for sites to post a list of alternative URLs in case 
the current one is hacked.  
50
 “Authorities Crush Online Dissent; Activists Detained Incommunicado,” Free News Free Speech (blog), June 2, 2010, 
http://freenewsfreespeech.blogspot.com/2010/06/authorities‐crush‐online‐dissent.html
51
 George Kurtz, “Vietnamese Speakers Targeted in Cyberattack,” CTO (Blog), March 30, 2010, 
http://siblog.mcafee.com/cto/vietnamese‐speakers‐targeted‐in‐cyberattack/; Neel Mehta, “The Chilling Effect of Malware,” 
Google Online Security Blog, March 30, 2010, http://googleonlinesecurity.blogspot.com/2010/03/chilling‐effects‐of‐
malware.html
52
 Kurtz, “Vietnamese Speakers Targeted in Cyberattack.”  
53
 Human Rights Watch, “Vietnam: Stop Cyber Attacks Against Online Critics.”  
54
 David Brown, “Mysterious Attack on a Vietnamese Blog,” Asia Sentinel, March 18, 2013, 
http://asiasentinel.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=5257&Itemid=188
849
VB.NET PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in vb.
project. Professional .NET library supports batch conversion in VB.NET. .NET control to export Word from multiple PDF files in VB.
batch pdf metadata; pdf metadata reader
C# PDF Print Library: Print PDF documents in C#.net, ASP.NET
C#.NET edit PDF metadata, C#.NET edit PDF digital signatures, C#.NET edit PDF sticky note, C# Quicken PDF printer library allows C# users to batch print PDF
remove metadata from pdf; batch pdf metadata editor
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
Z
IMBABWE
Z
IMBABWE
There were no reports of internet content being blocked or filtered during the coverage
period, though various ruling party officials publicly expressed the desire to increase
control over ICTs, particularly in the lead-up to the July 2013 general elections (see
L
IMITS ON 
C
ONTENT
).
An anonymous Facebook user with the pseudonym “Baba Jukwa” became a social media
sensation for  his posts exposing  supposed  secrets from  within the ZANU-PF ruling
party, in addition to his naming and shaming campaign against corrupt party officials
(see L
IMITS ON 
C
ONTENT
).
Two mobile phone users were arrested for allegedly sending text messages that insulted
the president (see V
IOLATIONS OF 
U
SER 
R
IGHTS
).
An investigative report in early 2013 uncovered evidence of a “massive” cyber training
program for Zimbabwean security agents facilitated by Iranian intelligence organizations
(see V
IOLATIONS OF 
U
SER 
R
IGHTS
).
2012 
2013 
I
NTERNET 
F
REEDOM 
S
TATUS
P
ARTLY 
F
REE
P
ARTLY 
F
REE
Obstacles to Access (0-25) 
17 
16 
Limits on Content (0-35) 
14 
14 
Violations of User Rights (0-40) 
23 
24 
Total (0-100) 
54 
54 
*0=most free, 100=least free
K
EY 
D
EVELOPMENTS
:
M
AY 
2012
A
PRIL 
2013 
P
OPULATION
12.6 million
I
NTERNET 
P
ENETRATION 
2012: 
17 percent
S
OCIAL 
M
EDIA
/ICT
A
PPS 
B
LOCKED
No
P
OLITICAL
/S
OCIAL 
C
ONTENT 
B
LOCKED
No
B
LOGGERS
/ICT
U
SERS 
A
RRESTED
Yes
P
RESS 
F
REEDOM 
2013
S
TATUS
Not Free
850
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
Z
IMBABWE
Zimbabwe’s 2013 internet freedom status
reflects
developments in the country from May 1, 2012 to 
April 31, 2013, which are covered in this report. However, the July 2013 general elections entailed a 
number of events that directly impacted the country’s internet freedom landscape.  
The 2013 political contestations in Zimbabwe were likely the most internet-fueled elections to date, as 
various parties took to social media to campaign and promote their platforms in advance of the general 
elections that occurred on July 31, 2013. All major political parties had a presence on Facebook and 
Twitter,
1
and leading political figures used the internet to engage with citizens both in Zimbabwe and 
the diaspora on a daily basis. Social media was also widely used to encourage citizens to vote and 
counter electoral corruption, among other issues, while numerous websites were launched to monitor 
election irregularities
2
At the time of writing in August 2013, there were no reports of internet content being blocked, or of 
online users arrested for their activities related to the elections, though the sensational popularity of 
the anonymous Facebook user, Baba Jukwa, elicited a desire by the ruling party to crackdown against 
individuals using social media to express criticism against the government (see “Limits on Content”).
3
Despite the  lack of internet censorship,  in  the week  leading  up to  the July  31 elections, the 
telecommunications regulator POTRAZ reportedly issued a directive to the private mobile phone 
provider, Econet, to block the dissemination of bulk SMS messages sent through its international 
gateway.
4
Meanwhile, the independent community radio station, Radio Dialogue, reported frequent 
internet disconnections in its office, and internet café owners reported slow internet connectivity.
5
While the government’s hand behind the disruptions could not be confirmed, state control over two of 
the country’s five international gateways, as well as the state’s ability to issue directives to private 
telecom providers, increase the likelihood of deliberate government interference.
Zimbabwe has witnessed an upsurge in internet use, and despite the country’s recent history of 
political instability and economic volatility, the past two years have seen a sizeable investment in 
the ICT sector, which had largely been stagnant over the previous decade. In 2012 and early 2013, 
access to ICTs remained nominally free from direct government interference with the exception of 
1
Free & Fair Zimbabwe Election’s Facebook page, accessed August 1, 2013, 
http://www.facebook.com/zimbabweelection?hc_location=stream
2
 “In Heavy Zimbabwe Voting, No Repeat of Disastrous 2008 Events,” New York Times, July 31, 2013, http://nyti.ms/1aFwwvn.  
3
Cris Chinaka, “Cat‐and‐Mouse in Zimbabwe’s Election Cyber War,” Reuters, July 26, 2013, 
http://www.reuters.com/article/2013/07/26/us‐zimbabwe‐elections‐internet‐idUSBRE96P0SU20130726.
4
Brandon Gregory, “Zimbabwe Authorities Block Award Winning SMS Service for ‘Political Reasons,’” Humanipo, July 30, 2013, 
http://www.humanipo.com/news/7611/Zimbabwe‐authorities‐block‐award‐winning‐SMS‐service‐for‐political‐reasons/.
5
George Mpofu and Nicolette Zulu, “FFZE: Zim Internet, Phones ‘Jammed’ Day Ahead of Vote,” Free & Fair Zimbabwe Election, 
July 30, 2013, http://zimbabweelection.com/2013/07/30/ffze‐zim‐internet‐phones‐jammed‐day‐ahead‐of‐vote/.
I
NTRODUCTION
E
DITOR
N
OTE ON 
R
ECENT 
D
EVELOPMENTS
851
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
Z
IMBABWE
the July  2013  elections period,  though  the relative  openness is more  likely  due  to  a  lack of 
resources to affect control than a lack of intention.  
As Zimbabwe’s internet community, both local and in the diaspora, has become more assertive in 
discussing socioeconomic and political issues online, the Zimbabwean African National Union–
Patriotic Front (ZANU-PF) ruling party under President Robert Mugabe has become increasingly 
concerned about the internet’s ability to mobilize political opposition, particularly the Movement 
for Democratic Change (MDC) under Morgan Tsvangirai. Accordingly, ZANU-PF officials made 
several  public  demands  to  stop  what  it  calls  the  “abuse”  of  information  and  communication 
technologies (ICTs) in 2012.
6
Meanwhile, two citizens were arrested in the past year for sending 
text messages on their mobile phones that allegedly insulted the president. 
Zimbabwe’s new constitution was enacted in May 2013, giving freedom of expression a boost both 
on and offline through its provisions on freedom of the press, access to government information, as 
well as protection for sources of information. Such guarantees, however, are likely to be nominal, 
given the ruling party’s trend of taking extralegal actions against Zimbabwean citizens. Further, 
state security officials continue to have the authority to monitor and intercept ICT communications 
at will, and an investigative report revealed in early 2013 that Zimbabwean security agencies have 
been receiving cyber training assistance from Iranian intelligence organizations since 2007.  
Internet access has continued to expand in Zimbabwe, growing from a penetration rate of nearly 16 
percent in 2011 to over 17 percent in 2012, according to the International Telecommunications 
Union  (ITU).
7
This  figure,  however,  may  not  reflect  the  growing  number  of  users  who  are 
accessing the web on their mobile  devices. Research from June 2012 indicated that  about 70 
percent of Zimbabwean internet users are logging online via mobile phones,
8
which likely accounts 
for the rapid spike in mobile phone penetration from 72 percent in 2011 to nearly 97 percent in 
2012.
9
Similar to most countries in Africa, Zimbabwe benefits from low-cost, internet-enabled imitation 
mobile phones from Asia. Internet access on mobile phones has been further facilitated by the 
introduction of 3G, 4G and EDGE technology in the past few years.
10
The decreasing price of 
mobile internet access—which dropped from $1.50 per megabyte (MB) in 2011 to $1 per MB as of 
May 2013—has also facilitated increased access. Subscription fees for 3G services have gone down 
6
 Everson Mushava, “Technology a Security Threat: Sekeremayi,” Newsday, May 9, 2013, 
http://www.newsday.co.zw/2013/05/09/technology‐a‐security‐threat/
7
 International Telecommunication Union, “Percentage of Individuals Using the Internet, 2000‐2012,” 
http://www.itu.int/en/ITU‐D/Statistics/Pages/stat/default.aspx.  
8
 Brian Gondo, “Insights into Zim Internet Usage,” Techzim, June 12, 2012, http://www.techzim.co.zw/2012/06/insights‐into‐
zim‐internet‐usage/
9
 International Telecommunication Union,”Mobile‐Cellular Telephone Subscriptions, 2000‐2012.” 
10
 EDGE is a faster version of the globally used GSM mobile standard. 
O
BSTACLES TO 
A
CCESS
852
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
Z
IMBABWE
to $30 per month for 10 GB, and other services providers are offering 3G services on a pay-as-you-
go basis for as little as $0.10 per MB. 
While  mobile  access  to  the  internet  has  become  increasingly  affordable,  fixed-line  internet 
subscriptions cost $30-$40 per month (including installation fees) and remain expensive for many 
Zimbabweans who earn an average monthly wage of approximately $180.
11
Nevertheless, market 
competition among service providers is slowly bringing down prices. For example, the cost of 
wireless 3G modems has decreased from $60 to $30 and is accessible on prepaid wireless access 
devices. Computer prices have also declined from an average of $600 in 2011 to between $350 and 
$450 in 2012.  
Although competition has decreased the cost of broadband internet access, effective broadband for 
home and individual users has not been realized due to the poor infrastructure of the state-owned 
fixed-line operator, TelOne. Nonetheless, both the public and private sectors have invested in 
expanding coverage to other parts of the country. Presenting the 2013 budget in late 2012, Finance 
Minister Tendai Biti stated that $26 million had been spent on Zimbabwe’s fiber-optic cable system 
since 2009, which included the Harare-Bulawayo fiber-optic link that was completed in 2012.
12
TelOne was also connected to Namibia Telcom’s fiber cable near the border towns of Victoria Falls 
and Katima Mulilo in 2012. Meanwhile, other licensed data carriers are continually rolling out 
fiber-optic networks across the country and establishing links  to international  undersea  cables, 
leading to expanding penetration.
13
By the end  of  2012,  Zimbabwe’s  largest private telecoms 
provider, Econet, reported that it had expanded its broadband customer base by 75 percent, with 
its GSM and WiMAX (voice and data) services covering nearly 80 percent of the country.
14
Most Zimbabweans access the internet in cybercafes, which have experienced a resurgence since 
2010 when the country’s economic situation began to improve. Recent ICT investments have also 
encouraged the reopening of cybercafes in the country’s urban centers, in addition to the rising 
demand  for  cheaper  communication  tools  such  as  Voice  over  Internet  Protocol  (VoIP) 
applications,
15
which has been fueled by the growing expatriate population of Zimbabweans seeking 
to stay in touch with friends and family back home.  
Despite the expanding penetration of ICTs across the country, there remains a significant urban-
rural divide in access to both internet and mobile technologies, particularly as a result of major 
infrastructural  limitations  in  rural  areas,  such  as  poor  roads  and  electricity  distribution.  A 
Zimbabwe All Media Products and Services Survey released in September 2012 found that 41 
11
 “Survey to Assist Policymakers: Zimstat,” The Herald via AllAfrica, April 19, 2013, 
http://allafrica.com/stories/201304190669.html
12
 Tonderai Rutsito, “Fibre Optic: 2012 Newsmaker,” The Herald, January 9, 2013, http://www.herald.co.zw/fibre‐optic‐2012‐
newsmaker/.  
13
 BuddeComm, “Zimbabwe – Telecoms, Mobile and Broadband,” accessed July 31, 2013, 
http://www.budde.com.au/Research/Zimbabwe‐Telecoms‐Mobile‐and‐Broadband.html
14
 Tawanda Karombo, “Econet Revenue and Broadband Users Surge,” ITWebAfrica, October 26, 2012, 
http://www.itwebafrica.com/telecommunications/154‐zimbabwe/230183‐econet‐revenue‐and‐broadband‐user‐numbersurge.  
15
 “Econet Wireless launches VoiP,” TeleGeography, January 26, 2012, 
http://www.telegeography.com/products/commsupdate/articles/2012/01/26/econet‐wireless‐launches‐voip/
853
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
Z
IMBABWE
percent of adults living in urban centers are using the internet,
16
with 83 percent of users accessing 
the web at least once a month. By contrast, an official government report estimates rural internet 
penetration to be 22 percent, though this figure is likely inflated given the national penetration rate 
of 17 percent according to the latest ITU data.  
The government has endeavored to transform rural postal centers into ICT access points where 
internet services would be provided, but this initiative has yet to be fully realized. Even in urban 
areas, electricity is regularly rationed for six to seven hours a day, leading to uneven access to the 
internet and mobile phone service. Power outages affect not only households but also business 
entities such as cybercafes, while prolonged power blackouts often affect mobile telephony signal 
transmission equipment, resulting in cut-offs of both mobile networks and internet connections.  
Zimbabwe currently has 28 licensed  internet access providers  (IAPs)  and 128 internet  service 
providers (ISPs),
17
the former of which offer only internet access while ISPs may provide additional 
services. However, ISP connections are constrained by the limited infrastructure of IAPs through 
which they must connect. As set by the telecoms regulator, the Postal and Telecommunications 
Regulatory Authority of Zimbabwe (POTRAZ), the license fees for IAPs and ISPs range from $2-4 
million, depending on the type of service to be provided, and must be vetted and approved by the 
regulator prior to installation.
18
Providers must also pay 3.5 percent of their annual gross income to 
POTRAZ. Application fees for operating a mobile phone service in Zimbabwe are also steep, and in 
2013, the regulator increased the license fees for mobile networks from $100 million to $180 
million.
19
There are no stringent fees or regulations that hinder the establishment of cybercafés.  
While POTRAZ handles the official licensing process for telecoms, insider reports have revealed 
that the Zimbabwean military may be involved in screening and approving license applications, 
demonstrating that ICTs are regarded as a security matter for the state. There nevertheless have 
been no reports of harassment or license denials on the basis of political affiliation. Otherwise, 
internet access prices in Zimbabwe are set by ISPs and cybercafe owners and have thus far been free 
from  state  intervention.  Individual  ISPs  submit  tariff  proposals  to  POTRAZ,  which  approves 
proposals on a per case basis.  
Zimbabwe currently has five international gateways for internet and voice traffic, two of which are 
operated by the state-owned fixed network, TelOne, and mobile network, NetOne. The private 
mobile  operators—Econet,  TeleCel  and  Africom—operate  the  other  three  international 
16
 Zimbabwe All Media Products Survey, Research International Bureau, Harare September, Third Quarter Report, 2012.  
17
 Zimbabwe Internet Service Providers Association membership list, http://www.zispa.org.zw/members.html
18
 L.S.M Kabweza, “Zimbabwe Raises Telecoms Licence Fees, Migrates to Converged Licensing,” TechZim, March 12, 2013, 
http://www.techzim.co.zw/2013/03/zimbabwe‐raises‐telecoms‐licence‐fees‐migrates‐to‐converged‐licencing/.  
19
 M. Kadzere, “Mobile License Fees Raised,” The Herald via AllAfrica, March 12, 2013, 
http://allafrica.com/stories/201303130892.html
854
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested