download pdf file on button click in asp.net c# : View pdf metadata control Library system azure .net asp.net console FOTN%202013_Full%20Report_087-part1595

F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
G
LOSSARY
 FTTH: Short for fiber-to-the-home, FTTH indicates the installation of internet-capable fiber
optic cables directly into a subscriber’s home. Variations include fiber-to-the-curb (FTTC)
and fiber-to-the-building (FTTB).
 Firewall: A system designed to prevent unauthorized access to or from a private network;
implemented in either hardware or software. A firewall blocks any messages entering or leaving
the protected network if they do not meet specific criteria. Companies can use them to prevent
employees from accessing select websites, and several countries—notably China and Iran—
employ firewalls on a national level to prevent citizens from accessing content from abroad.
 Forum: An online discussion group in which participants with common interests can exchange
open messages.
 GSM: Short  for  global  system for mobile communications,  GSM is a narrowband  mobile
standard widely used around the world.
 Hashtag:  A  word  or  phrase  pre-fixed  by  the  hash  symbol,  used  to  make  social  media
conversations searchable by topic. For example, Twitter users can follow the Freedom on the Net
2013 launch by searching for the hashtag #FOTN2013.
 Hosting service: A service provider that houses, or hosts, multiple websites on its server
computers in exchange for a fee.
 ICT: Information and communications technology, including computers and mobile devices.
 Instant  Messaging:  Real-time,  text-based  communication  between  individuals  in  what
amounts to a temporary private chat room.
 IP address: The numeric address of a computer on the internet. An IP address is used to
identify a computer and network in much the same way as a social security number is used to
identify a person.
 ISP: Internet service providers are companies that provide access to the internet for a fee,
supplying customers with a software package, a username, a password, and telephone numbers
to initiate a connection.
 IT: Information technology, the broad subject concerned  with all  aspects  of managing and
processing information.
 Local Area Network (LAN): A computer network that spans a relatively small area. Most
LANs are  confined to a single building or  group  of buildings. However, one LAN can be
connected to other LANs over any distance via telephone lines and radio waves.
865
View pdf metadata - add, remove, update PDF metadata in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Allow C# Developers to Read, Add, Edit, Update and Delete PDF Metadata
online pdf metadata viewer; batch pdf metadata
View pdf metadata - VB.NET PDF metadata library: add, remove, update PDF metadata in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Enable VB.NET Users to Read, Write, Edit, Delete and Update PDF Document Metadata
pdf remove metadata; edit multiple pdf metadata
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
G
LOSSARY
 Malware: Software designed to damage or disrupt a system, such as a virus. This includes
spyware, that may retrieve data about a computer user’s behavior without their knowledge.
 Microblog:  A  type  of  blog  that  allows  users  to  publish  short  text  updates  that  are
disseminated to a large number of followers. Twitter is an example of a microblogging site that
allows posts of up to 140 characters.
 Netizen: Citizen of the internet; a person actively involved in the online community.
 Packet sniffer: Computer software or hardware that can intercept and log traffic passing over
a network. Packet sniffers, often part of a firewall system, can be used to spy on users and
collect sensitive information such as passwords.
 Proxy server: A server or computer that sits between a user and a website to intercept
requests. Proxy servers have various uses. In Freedom on the Net 2013,  they typically refer to a
tool used to circumvent blocks on accessing certain websites.
 Real name registration: A system by which users who want to post a comment online have
to supply their real name, ID card number, contact phone or address.
 Secure Sockets Layer (SSL): A method for transmitting private documents and data over the
internet using two-layer encryption for security. SSL is most often used in websites that handle
private  or financial  data, and is denoted by the use of “https”  in the URL rather than the
standard “http.”
 SIM card: Short for subscriber identity module, SIM cards are used in phones on the GSM
network to store an individual’s phone number, authorize their connection, and encrypt their
data. SIM cards can be switched between phones.
 SMS/Text Messaging: Short message service or SMS messages are brief text messages of no
more than a few hundred characters, sent electronically between mobiles.
 Spyware: See Malware.
 Trolling: Maliciously disrupting conversations on a microblog, chat room, forum or BBS
with inflammatory or derogatory comments, is known as trolling, while the individual who
does so is identified as a troll. Lingering in chat rooms without participating, which may be a
sign of spying on other internet users, can also be described as trolling.
 URL: Short for uniform resource locator, a URL is the global address of a document or page on
the world wide web. The URL for Freedom House is http://www.freedomhouse.org/.
866
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
View PDF in WPF. Annotate PDF in WPF. Export PDF in to PDF. Image: Remove Image from PDF Page. Image Link: Edit URL. Bookmark: Edit Bookmark. Metadata: Edit, Delete
pdf metadata editor online; adding metadata to pdf
VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
Offer professional PDF document metadata editing APIs, using which VB.NET developers can redact, delete, view and save PDF metadata. PDF Document Protection.
view pdf metadata in explorer; remove pdf metadata
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
G
LOSSARY
 USB Modem: A portable USB or universal serial bus device that looks similar to a USB flash
drive (a data storage device) and can be plugged into any USB port on a computer to allow
broadband internet access.
 Value-added Network Service (VANS): A network provider hired to facilitate electronic
data interchange or provide other services such as data translation, encryption, or secure e-
mail.
 Virtual Private Network (VPN): VPNs offer a means to communicate privately through a
public network by creating an encrypted tunnel between two or more locations. This can be
used to circumvent national censorship, and corporations that operate in repressive internet
environments often purchase the right to use VPNs to connect to their home offices from the
government.
 VoIP: Voice over Internet Protocol is a category of hardware and software that enables users to
make telephone calls via the internet; these calls do not incur a surcharge beyond what the user
is paying for internet access.
 Wi-Fi:  Wireless technology that provides an  internet or network  connection for properly
equipped computers, mobile phones, and other devices within a given area.
 WiMAX: Scalable wireless technology that works over much longer distances than Wi-Fi,
providing  an  alternative  for  both  fixed  and  mobile  internet  access.  WiMAX  stands  for
worldwide interoperability for microwave access.
867
C# PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file for C#
RasterEdge WPF PDF Viewer provides C# users abilities to view, annotate, convert and create PDF in WPF application. C#.NET: Edit PDF Metadata.
rename pdf files from metadata; change pdf metadata creation date
VB.NET PDF - View PDF with WPF PDF Viewer for VB.NET
View PDF in WPF. Annotate PDF in WPF. Export PDF in to PDF. Image: Remove Image from PDF Page. Image Link: Edit URL. Bookmark: Edit Bookmark. Metadata: Edit, Delete
preview edit pdf metadata; analyze pdf metadata
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
M
ETHODOLOGY 
&
C
HECKLIST OF 
Q
UESTIONS
M
ETHODOLOGY
This fourth edition of Freedom on the Net provides analytical reports and numerical ratings for 60 
countries worldwide. The countries were chosen to provide a representative sample with regards 
to geographical diversity and economic development, as well as varying levels of political and media 
freedom. The ratings and reports included in this study particularly focus on developments that 
took place between May 1, 2012 and April 30, 2013. 
The Freedom on the Net index aims to measure each country’s level of internet and digital media 
freedom based on a set of methodology questions described below (see “Checklist of Questions”). 
Given increasing technological convergence, the index also measures access and openness of other 
digital means of transmitting information, particularly mobile phones and text messaging services.  
Freedom House does not maintain a culture-bound view of freedom. The project methodology is 
grounded in basic standards of free expression, derived in large measure from Article 19 of the 
Universal Declaration of Human Rights: 
“Everyone has the right to freedom of opinion and expression; this right includes freedom to hold 
opinions without interference and to seek, receive, and impart information and ideas through any 
media regardless of frontiers.” 
This standard applies to all countries and territories, irrespective of geographical location, ethnic or 
religious composition, or level of economic development.    
The project particularly focuses on the transmission and exchange of news and other politically 
relevant communications, as well as the protection of users’ rights to privacy and freedom from 
both legal and extralegal repercussions arising from their online activities. At the same time, the 
index acknowledges that in some instances freedom of expression and access to information may be 
legitimately restricted. The standard for such restrictions  applied in this  index is  that they be 
implemented only in narrowly defined circumstances and in line with international human rights 
standards, the rule of law, and the principles of necessity and proportionality. As much as possible, 
censorship and surveillance policies and procedures should be transparent and include avenues for 
appeal available to those affected. 
W
HAT 
W
M
EASURE
868
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document in C#.NET
WPF Viewer & Editor. WPF: View PDF. WPF: Annotate PDF. WPF: Export PDF. Bookmark: Edit Bookmark. Metadata: Edit, Delete Metadata. Watermark: Add Watermark to PDF
c# read pdf metadata; extract pdf metadata
How to C#: Modify Image Metadata (tag)
C#.NET edit PDF bookmark, C#.NET edit PDF metadata, C#.NET VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB VB.NET Barcode Read, VB.NET Barcode Generator, view less.
pdf metadata online; read pdf metadata online
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
M
ETHODOLOGY 
&
C
HECKLIST OF 
Q
UESTIONS
The index does not rate governments or government performance per se, but rather the real-world 
rights and freedoms enjoyed by individuals within each country. While digital media freedom may 
be  primarily  affected  by state  actions,  pressures  and  attacks  by  nonstate  actors,  including the 
criminal underworld, are also considered. Thus, the index ratings generally reflect the interplay of 
a variety of actors, both governmental and nongovernmental, including private corporations.  
The index aims to capture the entire “enabling environment” for internet freedom within each 
country through a set of 21 methodology questions, divided into three subcategories, which are 
intended to highlight  the vast array of relevant issues. Each  individual question is scored on a 
varying range of points. Assigning numerical points allows for comparative analysis among the 
countries surveyed and facilitates an examination of trends over time. Countries are given a total 
score from 0 (best) to 100 (worst) as well as a score for each sub-category. Countries scoring 
between  0  to  30  points  overall  are  regarded  as  having  a  “Free”  internet  and  digital  media 
environment; 31 to 60, “Partly Free”; and 61 to 100, “Not Free”. An accompanying country report 
provides narrative detail on the points covered by the methodology questions. 
The methodology examines the level of internet freedom through a set of 21 questions and nearly 
100 accompanying subpoints, organized into three groupings: 
 Obstacles  to  Access—including  infrastructural  and  economic  barriers  to  access;
governmental efforts to block specific applications or technologies; legal and ownership
control over internet and mobile phone access providers.
 Limits on Content—including filtering and blocking of websites; other forms of censorship
and self-censorship; manipulation of content; the diversity of online news media; and usage
of digital media for social and political activism.
 Violations of User Rights—including legal protections and restrictions on online activity;
surveillance  and  limits  on  privacy;  and  repercussions  for  online  activity,  such  as  legal
prosecution, imprisonment, physical attacks, or other forms of harassment.
The purpose of the subpoints is to guide analysts regarding factors they should consider while 
evaluating and assigning the score for each methodology question. After researchers submitted their 
draft scores, Freedom House convened five regional review meetings and numerous international 
conference calls, attended by Freedom House staff and over 70 local experts, scholars, and civil 
society  representatives  from  the  countries  under  study.  During  the  meetings,  participants 
reviewed, critiqued, and adjusted the draft scores—based on the set coding guidelines—through 
careful consideration of events, laws, and practices relevant to each item. After completing the 
regional and country consultations, Freedom House staff did a final review of all scores to ensure 
their comparative reliability and integrity. 
T
HE 
S
CORING 
P
ROCESS
869
C# TIFF: TIFF Metadata Editor, How to Write & Read TIFF Metadata
C#.NET. Allow Users to Read and Edit Metadata Stored in Tiff Image in C#.NET Application. C# Overview - View and Edit TIFF Metadata.
pdf xmp metadata viewer; delete metadata from pdf
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
Document and metadata. All object data. File attachment. Flatten visible layers. VB.NET Demo Code to Optimize An Exist PDF File in Visual C#.NET Project.
modify pdf metadata; pdf metadata viewer
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
M
ETHODOLOGY 
&
C
HECKLIST OF 
Q
UESTIONS
C
HECKLIST OF 
Q
UESTIONS 
1.
To what extent do infrastructural limitations restrict access to the internet
and other ICTs? (0-6 points)
Does poor infrastructure (electricity, telecommunications, etc) limit citizens’ ability to receive internet
in their homes and businesses?
To what extent is there widespread public access to the internet through internet cafes, libraries, schools
and other venues?
To what extent is there internet and mobile phone access, including via 3G networks or satellite?
Is there a significant difference between internet and mobile-phone penetration and access in rural
versus urban areas or across other geographical divisions?
To what extent are broadband services widely available in addition to dial-up?
2.
Is access to the internet and other ICTs prohibitively expensive or beyond
the reach of certain segments of the population? (0-3 points)
In countries where the state sets the price of internet access, is it prohibitively high?
Do financial constraints, such as high costs of telephone/internet services or excessive taxes imposed on
such services, make internet access prohibitively expensive for large segments of the population?
Do low literacy rates (linguistic and “computer literacy”) limit citizens’ ability to use the internet?
Is there a significant difference between internet penetration and access across ethnic or socio-economic
societal divisions?
To what extent are online software, news, and other information available in the main local languages
spoken in the country?
 Each country is ranked on a scale of 0 to 100, with 0 being the best and 100 being the worst.
 A combined score of 0-30=Free, 31-60=Partly Free, 61-100=Not Free.
 Under  each  question,  a  lower  number  of  points  is  allotted  for  a  more  free
situation,  while  a  higher  number  of  points  is  allotted  for  a  less  free
environment.
 Unless otherwise indicated, the sub-questions listed are meant to provide guidance as to
what issues should be addressed under each methodology question, though not all will apply
to every country.
A.
O
BSTACLES TO 
A
CCESS 
(0-25
POINTS
870
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
M
ETHODOLOGY 
&
C
HECKLIST OF 
Q
UESTIONS
3.
Does the government impose restrictions on ICT connectivity and access to
particular  social  media  and  communication  apps  permanently or  during
specific events? (0-6 points)
Does the government place limits on the amount of bandwidth that access providers can supply?
Does  the  government  use  control  over  internet  infrastructure  (routers,  switches,  etc.)  to  limit
connectivity, permanently or during specific events?
Does the government centralize telecommunications infrastructure in a manner that could facilitate
control of content and surveillance?
Does the government block protocols and tools that allow for instant, person-to-person communication
(VOIP, instant  messaging, text messaging, etc.), particularly those based outside the country (i.e.
YouTube, Facebook, Skype, etc.)?
Does  the  government  block  protocols,  social  media,  and/or  communication  apps  that  allow  for
information sharing or building online communities (video-sharing, social-networking sites, comment
features, blogging platforms, etc.) permanently or during specific events?
Is there blocking of certain tools that enable circumvention of online filters and censors?
4.
Are  there  legal,  regulatory,  or  economic  obstacles  that  prevent  the
existence  of  diverse  business  entities  providing  access  to  digital
technologies? (0-6 points)
Note:  Each of the following access providers are scored separately:
1a.
Internet service providers (ISPs) and other backbone internet providers 
(0-2 points) 
1b.
Cybercafes and other businesses entities that allow public internet access 
(0-2 points) 
1c.
Mobile phone companies (0-2 points) 
Is there a legal or de facto monopoly over access providers or do users have a choice of access provider,
including ones privately owned?
Is it legally possible to establish a private access provider or does the state place extensive legal or
regulatory controls over the establishment of providers?
Are registration requirements (e.g. bureaucratic “red tape”) for establishing an access provider unduly
onerous or are they approved/rejected on partisan or prejudicial grounds?
Does the state place prohibitively high fees on the establishment and operation of access providers?
5.
To what extent do national regulatory bodies overseeing digital technology
operate in a free, fair, and independent manner? (0-4 points)
Are there explicit legal guarantees protecting the independence and autonomy of any regulatory body
overseeing internet and other ICTs (exclusively or as part of a broader mandate) from political or
commercial interference?
Is the process for appointing members of regulatory bodies transparent and representative of different
stakeholders’ interests?
871
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
M
ETHODOLOGY 
&
C
HECKLIST OF 
Q
UESTIONS
Are decisions taken by the regulatory body, particularly those relating to ICTs, seen to be fair and
apolitical and to take meaningful notice of comments from stakeholders in society?
Are  efforts  by access providers and other  internet-related  organizations  to  establish self-regulatory
mechanisms permitted and encouraged?
Does the allocation of digital resources, such as domain names or IP addresses, on a national level by a
government-controlled body create an obstacle  to  access or  are they allocated in a discriminatory
manner?
1.
To what extent does the state or other actors block or filter internet and
other ICT content, particularly on political and social issues? (0-6 points)
Is there significant blocking or filtering of internet sites, web pages, blogs, or data centers, particularly
those related to political and social topics?
Is there significant filtering of text messages or other content transmitted via mobile phones?
Do  state authorities  block  or  filter  information  and  views from inside  the  country—particularly
concerning human rights abuses, government corruption, and poor standards of living—from reaching
the outside world through interception of e-mail or text messages, etc?
Are methods such as deep-packet inspection used for the purposes of preventing users from accessing
certain content or for altering the content of communications en route to the recipient, particularly
with regards to political and social topics?
2.
To what extent does the state employ legal, administrative, or other means
to force deletion of particular content, including requiring private access
providers to do so? (0-4 points)
To what extent are non-technical measures—judicial or extra-legal—used to order the deletion of
content from the internet, either prior to or after its publication?
To what degree does the government or other powerful political actors pressure or coerce online news
outlets to exclude certain information from their reporting?
Are  access  providers  and  content  hosts  legally  responsible  for the information transmitted  via the
technology they supply or required to censor the content accessed or transmitted by their users?
Are access providers or content hosts prosecuted for opinions expressed by third parties via the technology
they supply?
3.
To what extent  are restrictions on internet and ICT content  transparent,
proportional  to  the  stated  aims,  and  accompanied  by  an  independent
appeals process? (0-4 points)
Are there national laws, independent oversight bodies, and other democratically accountable procedures
in place to ensure that decisions to restrict access to certain content are proportional to their stated aim?
B.
L
IMITS ON 
C
ONTENT 
(0-35
POINTS
872
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
M
ETHODOLOGY 
&
C
HECKLIST OF 
Q
UESTIONS
Are state authorities transparent about what content is blocked or deleted (both at the level of public
policy and at the moment the censorship occurs)?
Do state authorities block more types of content than they publicly declare?
Do independent avenues of appeal exist for those who find content they produced to have been subjected
to censorship?
4.
Do  online  journalists,  commentators,  and  ordinary  users  practice  self-
censorship? (0-4 points)
Is there widespread self-censorship by online journalists, commentators, and ordinary users in state-run
online media, privately run websites, or social media applications?
Are there unspoken “rules” that prevent an online journalist or user from expressing certain opinions in
ICT communication?
Is there avoidance of subjects that can clearly lead to harm to the author or result in almost certain
censorship?
5.
To what extent is the content of online sources of information determined
or manipulated by the government or a particular partisan interest? (0-4
points)
To what degree do the government or other powerful actors pressure or coerce online news outlets to
follow a particular editorial direction in their reporting?
Do authorities issue official guidelines or directives on coverage to online media outlets, blogs, etc.,
including instructions to marginalize or amplify certain comments or topics for discussion?
Do government officials or other actors bribe or use close economic ties with online journalists, bloggers,
website owners, or service providers in order to influence the online content they produce or host?
Does  the government employ, or  encourage content providers to employ, individuals  to post pro-
government remarks in online bulletin boards and chat rooms?
Do  online  versions  of  state-run  or  partisan  traditional  media  outlets  dominate  the  online  news
landscape?
6.
Are  there  economic  constraints  that  negatively  impact  users’  ability  to
publish content online or online media outlets’ ability to remain financially
sustainable? (0-3 points)
Are  favorable  connections with  government  officials  necessary  for  online  media  outlets  or  service
providers (e.g. search engines, e-mail applications, blog hosting platforms, etc.) to be economically
viable?
Are service providers who refuse to follow state-imposed directives to restrict content subject to sanctions
that negatively impact their financial viability?
Does the state limit the ability of online media to accept advertising or investment, particularly from
foreign sources, or does it limit advertisers from conducting business with disfavored online media or
service providers?
873
F
REEDOM ON THE 
N
ET 
2013
M
ETHODOLOGY 
&
C
HECKLIST OF 
Q
UESTIONS
To what extent do ISPs manage network traffic and bandwidth availability to users in a manner that is
transparent, evenly applied, and does not discriminate against users or producers of content based on
the content/source of the communication itself (i.e. respect “net neutrality” with regard to content)?
To what extent do users have access to free or low-costs blogging services, webhosts, etc. to allow them
to make use of the internet to express their own views?
7.
To what  extent  are  sources  of  information  that  are  robust and  reflect a
diversity  of  viewpoints  readily  available  to  citizens,  despite  government
efforts to limit access to certain content? (0-4 points)
Are people able to access a range of local and international news sources via the internet or text
messages, despite efforts to restrict the flow of information?
Does the public have ready access to media outlets or websites that express independent, balanced views?
Does the public have ready access to sources of information that represent a range of political and social
viewpoints?
To what extent do online media outlets and blogs represent diverse interests within society, for example
through websites run by community organizations or religious, ethnic and other minorities?
To what extent do users employ proxy servers and other methods to circumvent state censorship efforts?
8.
To what extent have individuals successfully used the internet and other
ICTs as  tools for mobilization,  particularly regarding political  and  social
issues? (0-6 points)
To  what  extent  does  the  online  community  cover  political  developments  and  provide  scrutiny  of
government policies, official corruption, or the behavior of other powerful societal actors?
To what extent are online communication tools (e.g. Twitter) or social networking sites (e.g. Facebook,
Orkut) used as a means to organize politically, including for “real-life” activities?
Are mobile phones and other ICTs used as a medium of news dissemination and political organization,
including on otherwise banned topics?
1.
To  what  extent  does  the  constitution  or  other  laws  contain  provisions
designed to protect freedom of expression, including on the internet, and
are they enforced? (0-6 points)
Does the constitution contain language that provides for freedom of speech and of the press generally?
Are there laws or legal decisions that specifically protect online modes of expression?
Are  online journalists  and  bloggers  accorded the  same  rights and  protections given to  print and
broadcast journalists?
Is the judiciary independent and do the Supreme Court, Attorney General, and other representatives of
the higher judiciary support free expression?
C.
V
IOLATIONS OF 
U
SER 
R
IGHTS 
(0-40
POINTS
874
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested