The Advocates’ Society Paperless Trials Manual – May 2015 
10 
8.  If applicable, the means by which parties, court staff and the trial judge may 
access  the  e-trial  materials  (transcripts,  exhibits,  written  submissions,  etc.) 
remotely through the internet. 
Counsel should arrange access to the courtroom as early as practicable to set up the 
necessary hardware and to perform a dry run. 
Filing Documents with the Court 
Technically, Ontario’s Rules of Civil Procedure still require the filing of a paper copy of 
all documents to  be adduced at  trial.   Anecdotally, counsel  have  advised that trial 
judges  have  exercised  their  discretion  to  control  court  procedure  to  accept  only 
electronic documents.  Counsel should consult with the presiding judge prior to trial or 
as soon as practicable to seek an order permitting the filing of only electronic copies of 
documents. 
Counsel  should  also  be  aware  of  local  practice  directions  concerning  the  filing  of 
documents.  For example, the Commercial List (Toronto)
14
has developed an electronic 
filing protocol for “all large, multi-party or otherwise complex cases.”
15
Counsel will wish 
to consider these requirements early in the trial preparation process to ensure that they 
do not have to alter or revise their work product to comply with applicable practice 
directions. 
14
Ontario Court Superior Court of Justice Commercial List Users Committee, E-Filing and E-Service Protocol 
(http://www.courtcanada.com/ccdocs/dsf/0/9802224284271.pdf
).  See also Christopher W. Besant & Dina 
Mejalli, Canadian Bar Association, The E-Filing and E-Service Protocol (as Adopted by the Commercial List 
Users): A Quick Summary and Users Guide (http://www.cba.org/cba/newsletters/pdf/EFile.pdf
).  
15
Ontario Court Superior Court of Justice Commercial List Users Committee, E-Filing and E-Service Protocol 
(http://www.courtcanada.com/ccdocs/dsf/0/9802224284271.pdf
) at p.1. 
Pdf metadata viewer - add, remove, update PDF metadata in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Allow C# Developers to Read, Add, Edit, Update and Delete PDF Metadata
edit multiple pdf metadata; remove pdf metadata online
Pdf metadata viewer - VB.NET PDF metadata library: add, remove, update PDF metadata in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Enable VB.NET Users to Read, Write, Edit, Delete and Update PDF Document Metadata
add metadata to pdf; acrobat pdf additional metadata
The Advocates’ Society Paperless Trials Manual – May 2015 
11 
Small Document Trials (200 Documents or Fewer) 
Overview 
Recommendations below for “small” cases are premised on the following assumptions: 
1.  The  number  of  documents  involved is  low  enough  that document  database 
management software
16
is not required.
17
2.  The trial should not require any technology not already in use by the average 
law firm.
18
Technological Requirements 
Hardware 
Simplest / Lowest Cost
Secure USB keys
19
for the exchange / filing of documents 
Laptops for counsel, the witness and the judge,
20
provided by the  firms (i.e. 
already owned by firms) 
iPads
21
/ other tablets for display of documents, if preferred to laptops 
Extension cords and chargers for laptops / tablets and monitors 
Premium
Secure USB keys for the exchange / filing of documents 
16
For the purposes of this Manual, “document management software” refers to programs used to organize and 
search large collections of documents, primarily for the purposes of documentary exchange and examinations 
for discovery. 
17
Note, however, that the use of Microsoft Excel for a hyperlinked, electronic Schedule A is recommended). 
18
Note that some of the equipment listed under “Premium” may not already be owned by the average firm but 
is readily obtainable for minimal cost. 
19
These are available online and at most office supply and consumer electronics stores. It is recommended 
that USB keys with built-in encryption be used when storing client documents). 
20
As noted above, the judge may have a court-provided laptop. 
21
Apple iPads are widely available and modestly priced compared to conventional computers; these currently 
range $279 to $899 each, depending on screen size, storage space, and other features (e.g., built in cellular).  
See: http://store.apple.com/ca
for models and pricing. They, like other tablets, allow the user to organize, view 
and mark up PDF documents.  Users can also take notes by typing using an external keypad, or by hand using 
styluses and note-taking software downloadable from Apple’s App Store (e.g. Notability, available for US $3.49; 
see: https://itunes.apple.com/ca/app/notability/id360593530?mt=8
).  The authors are aware that (1) there are 
many other similar tablets available in Canada, some of which are even more affordably priced, and that (2) the 
use of iPads in trials other jurisdictions has been met with mixed results and that other tablets have been 
preferred for, e.g., their greater storage capacity or compatibility with Windows-based devices.  The authors 
focus on iPads in this Manual because they are, at present, the most ubiquitous of tablets and the most likely to 
already be owned by counsel and judges. 
VB.NET PDF - WPF PDF Viewer for VB.NET Program
C#.NET PDF Create, C#.NET PDF Document Viewer, C#.NET PDF Windows Viewer, C#.NET search text in PDF, C#.NET edit PDF bookmark, C#.NET edit PDF metadata, C#.NET
c# read pdf metadata; remove metadata from pdf acrobat
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
C#.NET PDF Create, C#.NET PDF Document Viewer, C#.NET PDF Windows Viewer, C#.NET search text in PDF, C#.NET edit PDF bookmark, C#.NET edit PDF metadata, C#.NET
pdf metadata viewer; remove metadata from pdf
The Advocates’ Society Paperless Trials Manual – May 2015 
12 
Laptops and external monitors for counsel, the witness and the judge,
22
provided 
by the firms 
VGA splitters and cabling to connect display monitors for witness and judge to 
laptop controlled by counsel 
Portable scanner for conversion of “last minute” documents from paper to PDF 
Control switch to switch control of display between counsel (optional) 
iPads / other tablet computers for display of documents, if preferred to laptops 
iPad / other tablet adapters
23
to connect tablets to monitors 
Portable scanner for conversion of “last minute” documents from paper to PDF 
Extension cords and chargers for laptops / tablets 
Gaffer tape or cable covers to prevent tripping over cables to monitors
24
Software 
Simplest / Lowest Cost
PDF management software such as Adobe Acrobat (not Reader)
25
Microsoft PowerPoint or other presentation software 
Premium
PDF management software such as Adobe Acrobat 
Microsoft PowerPoint, TrialPad
26
or other document display software 
Staffing Requirements 
Document Management 
Clerical support for the scanning, organizing of documents
27
22
As noted above, the judge may have a court-provided laptop. 
23
iPad adaptors, for example, are available in the Apple Store and other consumer electronics retail stores and 
range from $25-$60 depending on the type of adapter required for a given monitor. 
24
Much of the suggested hardware referenced throughout this Manual is drawn from Carolyn Anger’s article, 
“Modernizing the Courtroom One Step at a Time.” BCPA Paralegal Press, vol. 45, issue #2 
(http://www.bcparalegalassociation.com/uploads/news_details/a335d909de3aca8406b3f1c3fb54ec7a.pdf
). 
25
This program is in use in most business and law offices.  It allows the reader to create, organize, view, edit, 
and to render searchable pdf documents.  Note that the free version available online (Acrobat Reader) does not 
include most of the functions required by / discussed in this Manual. 
26
TrialPad is a relatively modestly-priced (US $99.99) app available from the Apple App Store that allows 
counsel to organize and display documents on monitors for the witness, judge and jury.  The user controls what 
the monitor viewer sees and can mark-up documents, call out portions of documents and images, and project 
videos.  See: https://itunes.apple.com/ca/app/trialpad-organize-present/id828542236?mt=8
.  
27
Note: with advanced preparation, this work need not be in addition to the work that would be normally 
required to take a case through the discovery process.  Rather than printing / copying documents provided by 
counsel, documents should either be obtained and then organized electronically or, if received as paper from 
the client, scanned rather than copied.  The same may be said for medium and large-size document cases as 
How to C#: Modify Image Metadata (tag)
C#.NET PDF Create, C#.NET PDF Document Viewer, C#.NET PDF Windows Viewer, C#.NET search text in PDF, C#.NET edit PDF bookmark, C#.NET edit PDF metadata, C#.NET
view pdf metadata in explorer; adding metadata to pdf
C# PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file for C#
RasterEdge WPF PDF Viewer provides C# users abilities to view, annotate, convert and create PDF in WPF application. C#.NET: Edit PDF Metadata.
preview edit pdf metadata; metadata in pdf documents
The Advocates’ Society Paperless Trials Manual – May 2015 
13 
Technical Support 
Simplest / Lowest Cost
Lawyer / student / clerk able to set up computers / tablets for counsel, judge and 
witness 
Premium
Firm technical support to connect judge / witness monitors to counsel-controlled 
laptops, control switch, etc. 
Courtroom Logistics 
Layout 
Simplest / Lowest Cost
Laptops or iPads / tablets set up for each counsel table, judge and witness, each 
containing a standalone copy of the Joint Book of Documents 
or 
Laptops at counsel table, and monitors for judge and witness connected by video 
splitter to a mobile controller switch plugged into laptop of counsel controlling the 
examination.   
Monitors at the counsel tables are also required in this version, to allow non-
examining counsel to observe what is presented by examining counsel. 
Exhibit Format 
Counsel agree on an index for an electronic Joint Book of Documents (“JBD”).   The 
Joint Book of Documents could take several forms, e.g.: 
1. A single PDF with bookmarks indicating the beginning of each document.
28
Place all PDF documents in a common folder with each file named according to a 
convention  agreed  to  by  counsel  (preferably,  using  the  unique  document 
identifier number described above).  Use the “Combine” feature in Acrobat to 
merge the documents into a single PDF,
29
with your index document as the first 
document.  Each document is automatically assigned a bookmark; the reader 
the cost saving of scanning rather than printing / copying increases in proportion to the number of documents in 
the case.  
28
This is the format many legal conference proceedings now use for materials. 
29
See Adobe’s online instructions for combining files: 
https://acrobatusers.com/assets/uploads/public_downloads/2217/adobe-acrobat-xi-merge-pdf-files-tutorial-
ue.pdf
 
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to view, annotate, convert and print PDF in
PDF Online. Convert PDF Online. WPF PDF Viewer. View PDF in Image to PDF. Image: Remove Image from PDF Page. Edit URL. Bookmark: Edit Bookmark. Metadata: Edit, Delete
modify pdf metadata; add metadata to pdf file
C# TIFF: TIFF Metadata Editor, How to Write & Read TIFF Metadata
C# TIFF - Edit TIFF Metadata in C#.NET. Allow Users to Read and Edit Metadata Stored in Tiff Image in C#.NET Application. How to Get TIFF XMP Metadata in C#.NET.
google search pdf metadata; remove metadata from pdf online
The Advocates’ Society Paperless Trials Manual – May 2015 
14 
may choose a document / tab by viewing the directory in the “Bookmarks” view 
and  clicking  on  the  appropriate  tab.    Counsel  may  wish  to  hyperlink  the 
documents listed in the index for greater ease of use.
30
2. A folder of PDFs accessible from a hyperlinked JBD index.   Where the 
combined file size might make a single PDF document unstable, counsel may 
wish to consider a folder of documents, labelled as described under option #1, 
and accessible from a single PDF or Excel index document in the same format 
as a paper index but with hyperlinks to the documents.
31
3. A folder of PDFs accessible from a hyperlinked case / document 
chronology.
32
 Where  counsel  anticipate  evidence  will  be  presented  in 
chronological order, they may wish to follow the steps under option #2, but to 
build the hyperlinks to a PDF or Excel index document with dates, descriptions of 
key events, and links to the relevant documents.
33
The JBD may be provided to the court and loaded onto laptops or tablets via USB key.
34
Working with Exhibits 
Simplest / Lowest Cost
Counsel direct the witness and judge to those tabs of the JBD to which they wish to 
refer the witness.  The witness and judge are able to access the appropriate tabs via 
laptops or on iPads provided by counsel (the judge may wish to use her own court-
provided laptop if available).  The JBD may be viewed on either type of device.  If using 
a tablet, many simple PDF reader programs are available;
35
the witness is given a tablet 
with only the viewer software and the JBD.  
Assuming there is no agreement among counsel that all documents in the JBD are 
admitted upon filing for the truth of their contents, judge (and counsel) keep track of 
those  documents  proven  by  witnesses  (i.e.,  by  having  the  court  clerk  mark  these 
documents as exhibits), and these documents comprise the evidentiary record on which 
the judge’s decision is made.   If deemed necessary, documents not proven may easily 
30
See Adobe’s online instructions for creating hyperlinks within bookmarked PDFs: 
http://blogs.adobe.com/acrolaw/2010/04/creating-hyperlinks-in-adobe-acrobat/
  
31
For instructions on adding hyperlinks to your Word or Excel index, see: https://support.office.com/en-
in/article/Create-format-or-delete-a-hyperlink-0c2f680d-5f61-48b9-9f6f-894c6f3cab55
. Either type of file may 
then be converted to PDF with its hyperlinks remaining intact. 
32
We are indebted to Belinda E. Shubert, Ellyn Law LLP, and to the Hon. Arthur M. Gans for this insight. 
33
Schubert, Belinda. E. Electronic Trials for Small Firms (presentation). 
34
Note: to add files to tablets, it will be necessary to either download the file / files to a stationary computer and 
either “synch” to the tablet or upload them to an upload site for wireless download to the tablet.  Many such 
sites are available.  Counsel should investigate such sites and choose carefully as some have known security 
issues and / or are hosted on servers outside of Ontario and / or Canada. 
35
One of the most popular of such programs is GoodReader, available for download from Apple’s App Store for 
US $5.79.  See: https://itunes.apple.com/ca/app/goodreader/id777310222?mt=8
.  
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
PDF Online. Convert PDF Online. WPF PDF Viewer. View PDF in Image to PDF. Image: Remove Image from PDF Page. Edit URL. Bookmark: Edit Bookmark. Metadata: Edit, Delete
pdf xmp metadata viewer; extract pdf metadata
VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
PDF Metadata Edit. Offer professional PDF document metadata editing APIs, using which VB.NET developers can redact, delete, view and save PDF metadata.
delete metadata from pdf; get pdf metadata
The Advocates’ Society Paperless Trials Manual – May 2015 
15 
be deleted from a copy of the JBD that may then be filed at the end of the trial to ensure 
there is  no confusion  as to  which  documents have  been proven.   This is  akin  to 
removing documents from binders or bound paper volumes filed at trial.
36
Otherwise, 
documents proven at trial may be marked using editing functions in the PDF reader 
program (most programs allow the user to type in additional text; the user may thus 
simply type “Exhibit “__” or some other agreed-upon shorthand to indicate a proven 
document, directly on the document) to indicate they were accepted as exhibits by the 
court. 
This process replicates the practice of filing a JBD in paper form and referring the 
witness to tabs in the paper document.  The witness’s ability to review documents other 
than those to which she is directed is no greater than with a paper JBD.   
Documents not included in the JBD that are filed in the course of the trial (e.g. new 
documents put to witnesses and proven in cross-examination) may be exchanged and 
provided to the judge as PDFs on USB keys.   
Read-ins from discovery transcripts may be exchanged and filed electronically via USB 
key, as all court reporters provide transcripts either in PDF form or in formats easily 
converted to PDF.  The Ontario E-Discovery Implementation Committee recommends
37
organizing  such  briefs  by  subject  matter  with  indexes  listing  subject  headings  and 
hyperlinks to relevant portions of the transcripts. 
Premium
Counsel wishing to control the witness by limiting their access to documents may wish 
to modify the protocol above by providing the witness with a monitor connected to a 
laptop controlled by examining counsel instead of a laptop / tablet.  They may also wish 
to  equip the judge  with a  similar monitor to  free  the judge from having  to  change 
documents.  While the judge could view the documents called up by counsel on the 
monitor, the judge would still have the ability to work with a local copy on her laptop or 
iPad, allowing her to highlight or annotate the documents as desired.  A separate, clean 
copy of the JBD would be filed via USB key for the court’s record. 
Counsel electing to provide monitors to the judge and witness as above may wish to 
augment their presentation of evidence by using moderately priced trial presentation 
software such as TrialPad, described above.
38
TrialPad allows examining counsel to 
show documents to the witness and judge, and to highlight or annotate documents, 
zoom in on documents or call out portions for emphasis while showing them to the 
36
This approach was taken in a recent jury trial in Ottawa.  Counsel (Joseph Obagi, Connolly Obagi LLP) 
estimated the cost of equipping counsel, the judge, and an 8-person jury with iPads was only $4,000, that the 
cost of doing so was substantially lower than the cost of printing / copying the same documents, and that the 
iPads are reusable for future proceedings.  Yamri Taddesse, “Tablets for Jurors touted for Civil Trials.”  Law 
Times, vol. 26, no. 5, p.1. 
37
Ontario E-Discovery Implementation Committee, What is an Electronic Trial? 
(http://www.oba.org/Advocacy/E-Discovery/Model-Precedents
) at p.3. 
38
See here for a video demonstration of the program’s features: https://vimeo.com/101072709
 
The Advocates’ Society Paperless Trials Manual – May 2015 
16 
witness and judge.  Counsel may take “screenshots” of the marked up pages and have 
these marked as exhibits using an exhibit marking tool built into the program, and can 
display two documents at once on the same screen (eliminating the need for multiple 
screens for comparing documents).  The software also allows counsel to mark proven 
documents as exhibits,
39
or play videos.
40
Counsel electing to use TrialPad or similar 
software would need to provide monitors for opposing counsel as well. 
As above, documents not included in the JBD that are filed in the course of the trial (e.g. 
documents put to witnesses and proven in cross-examination) may be exchanged and 
provided to the judge as PDFs on USB keys.  Counsel using only iPads may need to 
produce them to opposing counsel via upload to a cloud website or via email, as iPads 
do not have USB ports.   
The Final Court File 
Counsel should consider whether it is necessary or desirable, at the conclusion of the 
trial, to file with the court a copy of the JBD database containing only those documents 
proven by witnesses,
41
with exhibit numbers if individual exhibit numbers were assigned 
by the trial judge.   
Counsel may wish to consider preparing electronic compendia of key documents to 
which they intend  to refer  in  closing submissions.
42
This may  take  the  form of a 
collection of PDFs with a hyperlinked index as described above
  
Counsel should also wish to prepare a factum hyperlinked to compendium documents 
and case law.  Counsel preferring to submit factums as PDFs to the version submitted 
cannot accidentally be altered by the reader should also submit a copy to the court in 
Word to allow the judge to cut and paste portions into her judgment (with attribution). 
39
For ease of reference only; it would still be necessary for the judge to keep track of exhibits as the judge’s 
laptop / iPad would not be equipped with the presentation program. 
40
For example, counsel in personal injury cases may present accident recreation videos in this manner. 
41
This assumes that there is no agreement among counsel that all documents are admitted for the truth of their 
contents. 
42
Ontario E-Discovery Implementation Committee, What is an Electronic Trial? 
(http://www.oba.org/Advocacy/E-Discovery/Model-Precedents
) at p.4. 
The Advocates’ Society Paperless Trials Manual – May 2015 
17 
Medium-Sized Document Trials (200-1,000 Documents) 
Overview 
The recommendations below are based on the following assumptions: 
1.  The file is large enough to merit the use of document management software 
already owned by the firms. 
2.  The parties agree, at the documentary disclosure stage,  
a.  to use document management software for the production of Schedule A 
documents; 
b.  to use the same software where possible, and produce their documents 
to  each  other  in  that  software  format  and  following  an  agreed-upon 
protocol describing the database content and format
; or 
c.  where the parties cannot agree on using the same software, to at least 
follow  the  agreed-upon  protocol  describing  the  database  content  and 
format. 
3.  The file size does not merit the  hiring  of outside  consultants or  specialized 
equipment to provide internet connectivity or connectivity between computers in 
the courtroom. 
4.  The file size does not merit the purchase of more expensive trial presentation 
software. 
Cases of this size approach the upper limit of what can be achieved using only PDF 
readers  as  they  become  unwieldy  (counsel  may  quickly  skim  an  index  of  200 
documents; 1,0000 documents is time-consuming) and labour-intensive (i.e., the time 
required to manually label and organize 1,000 documents into a JBD is prohibitive).  
Document management software allows for greater automation and flexibility for cases 
of this size and is owned by most mid-size to large firms. 
Cases  using  document  management  software  complicate  the  use  of  tablet-based 
document readers and moderately-priced presentation software such as TrialPad as the 
document management software generally does not run on tablets (Relativity Binders, 
discussed  below,  being  an  exception);  counsel  must  export  documents  from  the 
document management software in PDF form and import them to the iPad.  This is 
possible assuming the file does not exceed the storage capacity of the iPad, but even 
so, the process of locating documents is slowed as the number of documents increases.  
Counsel may still take advantage of programs such as TrialPad by loading them with 
only those documents she intends to put to witnesses during a given examination.  This 
process requires selection and exporting of documents from the document management 
software  and  thus  requires  advanced  preparation  and  reduces  flexibility  during  an 
examination as counsel cannot have the entire record at her fingertips.  For cases of 
this size where the above assumptions apply, it is thus recommended that counsel use 
the document management software itself for the in-court presentation of documents.   
The Advocates’ Society Paperless Trials Manual – May 2015 
18 
Technological Requirements 
Hardware 
Secure  USB  keys  flash  drives  or  USB  drives  for  the  exchange  /  filing  of 
documents 
Laptops and  monitors for  counsel,  the podium,  the witness and the judge,
43
provided by the firms (optimally, 2 monitors each to allow for comparison of two 
documents at once) 
VGA splitters and cabling to connect display monitors for witness and judge to a 
laptop controlled by examining counsel 
Control switch to switch control of display between counsel 
Amplified speaker set for audio / video (audio / video evidence is contemplated) 
Portable scanner for conversion of “last minute” documents from paper to PDF 
Extension cords and chargers for laptops / tablets 
Gaffer tape or cable covers to prevent tripping over cables to monitors 
Backups equipment in the event of equipment failure 
Software 
Document  management  software
44
to  be  used  for  presentation  at  trial  and 
agreed upon by counsel, such as: 
 CaseLogistix
45
 iPro
46
 Relativity
47
 Ringtail
48
 Summation
49
Staffing Requirements 
Document Management 
Clerical support for the scanning and organizing of documents 
43
As noted above, the judge may have a court-provided laptop. 
44
The capabilities of these programs vary and an exhaustive comparison exceeds the mandate of this Manual. 
It is assumed, for the purposes of this Manual, that the firms involved already own such software.  Counsel 
considering purchasing such software should consult their manufacturers and / or litigation support consultants.  
The list of document management software is not exhaustive; programs listed here are among the more 
common programs used by Canadian firms, and are listed alphabetically.  
45
See the manufacturer’s site: http://legalsolutions.thomsonreuters.com/law-products/solutions/case-logistix
 
46
See the manufacturer’s site: https://iprotech.com/
.  
47
See the manufacturer’s site: https://www.kcura.com/relativity/
.  
48
See the supplier’s site: http://www.ftitechnology.com/Products-Services/Software-and-
Services/Ringtail/Ringtail.aspx
 
49
See the manufacturer’s site: http://accessdata.com/solutions/e-discovery/summation
 
The Advocates’ Society Paperless Trials Manual – May 2015 
19 
Technical Support 
Lawyer  /  student  /  clerk  or  litigation  support  specialist  capable  of  operating 
document management software while lead counsel examines witnesses 
Firm technical support to connect judge / witness monitors to counsel-controlled 
laptops, control switch, etc. 
Courtroom Logistics 
Layout 
Laptops  at  counsel  tables  and  for  judge,  containing  local  copies  of  JBD  in 
document management software 
Counsel laptops are connected to a control switch allowing them to switch control 
to examining counsel 
Monitors are set up at each counsel table and for the witness, podium and judge, 
to allow all to view documents presented by examining counsel 
Optimally: 
 2 monitors are set up for each of these stations, to allow for comparison of 
two documents simultaneously 
 2 laptops are set up for use by both sets of counsel, each controlling one 
of the monitors in front of counsel, witness and judge 
Exhibit Format 
Counsel should agree to the contents of a JBD consisting of a subset of the parties’ 
Schedule A documents.  A copy is provided to the judge.  Depending on the capabilities 
of the document management software chosen, this may take the form of, for example, 
(1) a “briefcased” standalone version of the database (typically, this consists of a folder 
of  PDF  document  files  accessible  via  an  html  index  page  with  hyperlinks  to  each 
document; a briefcased version may be accessed without the document management 
software as it consists only of html and PDF files); or (2) a searchable full version of the 
JBD database, accessible by using a local copy of the database on the judge’s laptop.  
(For  this  option,  counsel  should  assume  that  the  judge’s  laptop  will  not  have  the 
required software program and that it will be necessary for counsel to purchase the 
software / a licence for the software and arrange to have it installed on the judge’s 
computer.) 
Note  that,  of  the  document  management  software  programs identified  above,  only 
Summation  and  (with  some  effort)  CaseLogistix  are  available  in  a  mobile  version 
capable  of  operating  on  a  standalone  laptop  or  other  computer.    The  remaining 
programs require internet connectivity.  In the case of CaseLogistix, a party may export 
the document database from CaseLogistix into an Excel spreadsheet with hyperlinks to 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested