c# pdf library github : Edit pdf metadata SDK Library service wpf asp.net html dnn Wiley%20Advanced%20Modelling%20in%20Finance%20using%20Excel%20and%20VBA17-part588

Binomial Trees
169
standard normal distribution). In this way, we can model the share price change as the
continuous limit of a simpler discrete-time binomial random walk.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
Option1.XLS
Adapted JR Binomial Distribution
nstep
9
step size
0.33
p
0.50
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
9
3.00
8
2.67
2.33
7
2.33
2.00
1.67
6
2.00
1.67
1.33
1.00
5
1.67
1.33
1.00
0.67
0.33
4
1.33
1.00
0.67
0.33
0.00
-0.33
3
1.00
0.67
0.33
0.00
-0.33
-0.67
-1.00
2
0.67
0.33
0.00
-0.33
-0.67
-1.00
-1.33
-1.67
1
0.33
0.00
-0.33
-0.67
-1.00
-1.33
-1.67
-2.00
-2.33
0
0.00
-0.33
-0.67
-1.00
-1.33
-1.67
-2.00
-2.33
-2.67
-3.00
Figure 10.1 Terminal values for nine-step binomial tree in sheet JRBinomial
The layout of the tree has been compressed to fit within a square grid, thus allowing a
single formula in cell C18 to generate the remainder of the tree (given the initial value in
B18). Price increases correspond to diagonal moves in an upward direction, while price
decreases correspond to lateral moves along a particular row. Thus the values in row 18
decrease by 1/3 at each step, whereas each upward diagonal change is an increase of
1/3. The formula in cell C18 uses an IF condition to distinguish between ‘on’ and ‘off’
leading diagonal positions. If ‘on-diagonal’, the price one place lower on the diagonal is
incremented by one step; if ‘off-diagonal’, the price one place to the left is reduced by
one step. The relative aspect of the price cell is handled by the OFFSET function. The
formula in cell C18 is:
=IF($A18<C$8,OFFSET(C18,0,1)$C$5,OFFSET(C18,1,1)+$C$5)
After the IF condition, the first formula represents price falls as each cell has a value
lower than the cell to its immediate left (same row) by the step size (cell C5). For price
increases each cell on the leading diagonal has a value higher than the previous cell on the
diagonal by the same step size. The OFFSET command has the cell reference followed
by the number of rows then by the number of columns.
Since up and down moves in the tree are equally likely (and hence all individual
sequences of up and down moves equally likely), the probability distribution underlying
the binomial tree is directly related to the number of possible paths that can be taken
to reach a particular terminal position. The number of paths in cell G22 (in Figure 10.2)
uses the formula DCOMBIN($C$4,C22), where $C$4 is the number of steps and C22
is the number of up steps. The formula for the binomial probability in cell I22 uses the
formula DG22
Ł
($C$6O$C$4), where $C$6 is the probability of an up move, since each
Edit pdf metadata - add, remove, update PDF metadata in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Allow C# Developers to Read, Add, Edit, Update and Delete PDF Metadata
view pdf metadata in explorer; batch edit pdf metadata
Edit pdf metadata - VB.NET PDF metadata library: add, remove, update PDF metadata in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Enable VB.NET Users to Read, Write, Edit, Delete and Update PDF Document Metadata
google search pdf metadata; pdf xmp metadata
170
Advanced Modelling in Finance
path has the same probability of 1/2
9
D1/512. The distribution does indeed have zero
mean and variance one (see cells I33 and I34).
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
# of up steps
End price
# paths
Binomial probs
9
3.00
1
0.002
8
2.33
9
0.018
7
1.67
36
0.070
6
1.00
84
0.164
5
0.33
126
0.246
4
-0.33
126
0.246
3
-1.00
84
0.164
2
-1.67
36
0.070
1
-2.33
9
0.018
0
-3.00
1
0.002
mean
0.000
st dev
1.000
Figure 10.2 Probability distribution of the end price in sheet JRBinomial
This simple example is the foundation for the JR binomial tree in the next section
that models the share price process, which in turn determines option payoffs. There are
two main modifications: allowing the up and down moves to be incremented multiplica-
tively, not additively, and rescaling the range of terminal positions (here with mean 0 and
variance 1) to match the required mean and volatility of share price returns.
10.3 THE JR BINOMIAL TREE
In this section, we value an option using a nine-step binomial tree configured according
to the Jarrow and Rudd (JR) parameters. The process requires firstly the construction of
the share price tree to identify the terminal share values, the calculation of the associ-
ated option values and lastly the evaluation of the discounted value of their expectation.
The details of the option are given first, the choice of parameters underlying the tree is
discussed next and finally its construction with Excel formulas is described.
We assume that the current share price S is 100, its volatility  is 20% (on an annualised
basis), and that the option is a European call with an exercise price X of 95 and with
0.5 years to maturity. We also assume that the underlying share has a dividend yield
of 3% and that the continuously compounded risk-free rate r is 8% (equivalent to an
annual interest rate of 8.33%). Since there are nine steps, each time step has length
0.5/9 D 0.0556 years (υt say). To facilitate comparison of different binomial trees, we
will use this same example in later sections of the chapter. The upper part of the JREuro
sheet contains these details together with the parameters to generate the tree, as shown in
Figure 10.3.
As in the simplified binomial tree, up and down moves in the JR tree are equiprobable,
i.e. p D 0.5. The individual moves up and down at each step are determined by share
price multipliers u and d, chosen such that the mean and variance after n steps match
those required for share price returns.
How to C#: Modify Image Metadata (tag)
edit, C#.NET PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C#.NET rotate PDF pages, C#.NET search text in PDF, C#.NET edit PDF bookmark, C#.NET edit PDF metadata, C#.NET
embed metadata in pdf; get pdf metadata
C# TIFF: TIFF Metadata Editor, How to Write & Read TIFF Metadata
Tiff ›› C# Tiff: Edit Tiff Metadata. C# TIFF - Edit TIFF Metadata in C#.NET. Allow Users to Read and Edit Metadata Stored in Tiff Image in C#.NET Application.
online pdf metadata viewer; pdf xmp metadata viewer
Binomial Trees
171
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
Option1.XLS
JR European Option Value
Share price (S)
100.00
Jarrow & Rudd
BS
JR
Exercise price (X)
95.00
Int rate-cont (r)
8.00%
δt
0.0556
M
4.6202
4.6202
erdt
1.0045
V
0.0200
0.0199
Dividend yield - cont (q)
3.00%
u
1.0500
M1
102.532 102.531
Time now (0, years)
0.00
d
0.9555
M2
10725.1 10724.4
Time maturity (T, years)
0.50
p
0.5000
Option life (τ, years)
0.50
p*
0.5000
Volatility (σ)
20.00%
Steps in tree (n)
9
JR value
9.75
iopt
1
option type
Call
BS value
9.73
Figure 10.3 Option details and JR parameters for binomial tree (sheet JREuro)
The share price process in the JR tree superimposes a risk-neutraldrift term and a second
term based on volatility on the simple binomial tree. The drift term chosen by Jarrow and
Rudd, combined with equiprobable up and down moves, ensures that the share has an
expected rate of return of (r  q) when valued in the risk-neutral world. On each step, the
expected value of the price multiplier is exp[r  qυt], the up move no longer equalling
the down move. Since the annual volatility measure  is a standard deviation, the volatility
term 
p
υt incorporates the square root of the step size. The second term in the model
ensures that thevariance on anindividualstep is 
2
υt and henceafter n steps or over time T,
the variance of log share price is 
2
T. Expressed algebraically, the JR tree parameters are:
lnu D r  q  0.5
2
υt C 
p
υt or u D exp[r  q  0.5
2
υt C 
p
υt]
lnd D r  q  0.5
2
υt  
p
υt or d D exp[r  q  0.5
2
υt  
p
υt]
For log share prices, the up and down moves (lnu and lnd) are incremented additively,
leading to a log price tree. To get a share price tree, each move is incremented multi-
plicatively using factors u and d to scale the previous price up or down.
In Excel, the formula for the ‘up’ share price multiplier u in cell G9 uses the EXP
function:
=EXP((D6D80.5
D13O2)G6
+D13
SQRT(G6))
and includes the drift and volatility components for a step.
The ‘down’ price multiplier d in cell G10 has a negative sign instead of a positive sign
before the volatility component.
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
Share
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
9
155.16
8
147.77
141.20
7
140.73
134.47
128.49
6
134.02
128.07
122.37
116.93
5
127.64
121.96
116.54
111.36
106.41
4
121.56
116.15
110.99
106.06
101.34
96.84
3
115.77
110.62
105.70
101.01
96.51
92.22
88.12
2
110.25
105.35
100.67
96.19
91.92
87.83
83.93
80.20
1
105.00
100.33
95.87
91.61
87.54
83.65
79.93
76.38
72.98
0
100.00
95.55
91.31
87.25
83.37
79.66
76.12
72.74
69.50
66.41
Figure 10.4 Nine-step share price tree using JR parameters (sheet JREuro)
C# PDF bookmark Library: add, remove, update PDF bookmarks in C#.
|. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› C# PDF: Edit PDF Bookmark. C#.NET PDF SDK - Edit PDF Bookmark and Outline in C#.NET. Empower Your C#
add metadata to pdf file; pdf metadata
C# PDF Sticky Note Library: add, delete, update PDF note in C#.net
Note. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› C# PDF: Add Sticky Note. C#.NET PDF SDK - Add Sticky Note to PDF Page in C#.NET. Able to change font size in PDF comment box.
search pdf metadata; bulk edit pdf metadata
172
Advanced Modelling in Finance
In the share price tree of Figure 10.4, rows correspond to the number of ‘up’ moves
(denoted by state i where i goes from 0 to9) and columns tosteps (step j where jgoes from
0to 9). Algebraically, the share price for state i after j steps, S
i,j
,is modelled as a product
of the initial share price S and the up and down share price multipliers for the numbers
of up and down moves. For example, starting with S
0,0
DS D 100, one step later the two
possible prices are: S
0,1
DdS
0,0
D95.55, S
1,1
DuS
0,0
D105.00, etc. Hence after n steps:
S
i,n
Du
i
d
ni
S
The formula is essentially recursive, so that at each step the new prices depend only
on the previous price and a price multiplier, for example, S
i,jC1
DdS
i,j
. This can be
accomplished most efficiently in Excel, by copying the single formula in cell C30, which
is set out below:
=IF($A30<C$20,$G$10
OFFSET(C30,0,
1),IF($A30=C$20,$G$9
OFFSET
(C30,1,1),“”))
The cell formula is very similar to the formula used in the previous section, except that
multipliers G10 (‘down’) and G9 (‘up’) multiply the previous price. The condition on the
cell’s position is amplified by adding an additional nested IF statement to allow a third
possibility. Cells above the leading diagonal (for which $A30>C$20) are filled with the
empty cell formula “”. This cell formula in C30, when copied, generates the rest of the
tree (and can be extended to create larger trees). By looking at the share values in the
middle cells for an even number of time steps (D29, F28, ...) you can see that the modal
share price drifts up over time in the JR tree. [Strictly, this is only true if (r  q  0.5
2
)
is greater than zero, which it usually is.]
As the call option is European, we are only concerned with the share prices at the end
of step 9 in column K. From these terminal prices (S
i,9
)we derive the call payoffs for
each of the 10 prices from the relationship:
V
i,9
Dmax[S
i,9
X, 0] for i D 0, 1, ...,9
where X is the exercise price for the option. These are shown in cells K49 to K58 of the
JREuro sheet and range from 60.16 for nine up moves to 0. Note that non-zero payoffs
occur when four or more moves are up: with fewer than four, the option is not exercised.
The remaining task is to calculate the expected value of the call payoff and discount
it using the risk-free rate. For this, the binomial probabilities of each of the call payoffs
are required, and these are identical to those used in the simple binomial tree. They are
set out in cell range K35:K44, the general formula in K44 being:
=COMBIN($D$15,A44)
$G$11O$D$15
where the last two terms give the probability of any sequence of steps (1/2
9
)and the
Excel COMBIN function gives the number of paths for each payoff. The 10 terminal
payoff values and their probabilities taken from sheet JREuro are set out below:
State
9
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
Option payoff 60.16 46.20 33.49 21.93 11.41
1.84
0
0
0
0
Probability
0.002 0.018 0.070 0.164 0.246 0.246 0.164 0.070 0.018 0.002
The expected value of the option payoff involves weighting each call payoff with its
probability and then discounting back at the risk-free rate to ensure risk-neutral valuation.
C# PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file for C#
C#.NET: Edit PDF Metadata. PDF SDK for .NET allows you to read, add, edit, update, and delete PDF file metadata, like Title, Subject
view pdf metadata in explorer; pdf metadata reader
VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
PDF Metadata Edit. Offer professional PDF document metadata editing APIs, using which VB.NET developers can redact, delete, view and save PDF metadata.
remove metadata from pdf online; remove metadata from pdf acrobat
Binomial Trees
173
Thus, the formula in cell G15 for the call value after discounting is:
=EXP(D6
D12)SUMPRODUCT(K35:K44,K49:K58)
where EXP(D6
Ł
D12) is the discount factor for the risk-free rate over 0.5 years.
Thus the nine-step JR tree produces a call value of 9.75 (compared with the
Black–Scholes value of 9.73 in cell G17 of Figure 10.3). Hopefully, if the number of
steps increases, the tree valuation will converge to the Black–Scholes value. (This topic
will be discussed further in section 10.6.) In passing, note that the Black–Scholes value
in cell G17 is evaluated from the user-defined VBA function, BSOptionValue, the code
being stored in the Module1 sheet. Explanation of the coding is deferred until Chapter 11,
where the Black–Scholes formula is discussed in detail.
The JR share price tree that our option valuation is based on consists of the following
10 values, together with the probabilities of each price:
State
9
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
Share price 155.16 141.20 128.49 116.93 106.41 96.84 88.12 80.20 72.98 66.41
Probability
0.002
0.018
0.070
0.164
0.246 0.246 0.164 0.070 0.018 0.002
The above distribution of share returns is approximately lognormal. Using the table of
prices and probabilities, it is easy to calculate the first two moments of the distribution,
M1 and M2 (in cells K9 and K10). From M1 and M2, the mean and variance (M and V)
of the associated normal distribution of log share price are obtained from the formulas (in
section 7.7). These moments are shown in Figure 10.3, column K. M1 and M2 for the JR
tree are derived from the terminal share prices in range K21:K30, and M and V from the
formulas using M1 and M2. The JR tree summary values can be compared with the mean
and variance of log share price required by the Black–Scholes model. As can be seen,
the correspondence between the underlying theoretical values and the values produced by
the binomial tree mechanism is good.
You may like to confirm that M1, the mean share price, has grown from S D 100 by a
growth factor of 1.02531, which is equal to exp[r  qT].
The JREuro model can also be used to value a put. By entering 1 as the value for
the ‘iopt’ parameter in cell D16 (in Figure 10.3), the call can be changed into a put. The
share price tree is the same as for the call. However, the option payoffs have non-zero
values only when the share price falls below the exercise price X. By incorporating a
further parameter (iopt D 1 for a call, 1 for a put), we can use the general relationship
for payoffs for puts or calls:
V
i,9
Dmax[iopt
Ł
S
i,9
X, 0] for i D 0, 1, ..., 9
The JR tree is discussed in Wilmott et al. (1996).
10.4 THE CRR TREE
The next two sheets in OPTION1 use the CRR tree. As the CRREuro sheet shows, the
layout of the tree is identical to the JR tree, the difference being the share price values
in the tree and the probabilities below. The CRRTheory sheet illustrates the theory at the
heart of the binomial valuation method, showing the binomial distribution function that
approximates to the normal distribution function. The formulas in this sheet allow us to
examine how the CRR tree value for European options converges as the number of steps
in the tree is increased.
How to C#: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF for .NET
XDoc.PDF for .NET allows C# developers to edit hyperlink of PDF document Various PDF annotation features can be integrated into your C# project, such Metadata.
edit pdf metadata online; pdf xmp metadata
VB.NET PDF Annotate Library: Draw, edit PDF annotation, markups in
VB.NET PDF - PDF Annotation in VB.NET. Guide to Draw, Add and Edit Various Annotations on PDF File in VB.NET Programming. Annotation Overview.
embed metadata in pdf; extract pdf metadata
174
Advanced Modelling in Finance
Better known than the JR tree, Cox, Ross and Rubinstein (hereafter CRR) propose an
alternative choice of parameters that also create a risk-neutral valuation environment. The
price multipliers, u and d, depend only on volatility  and on υt, not on drift:
lnu D 
p
υt lnd D 
p
υt
These parameters reflect the volatility of the price change over the step of length υt, but
not any overall change in level. In Excel, the formula for u in cell G9 in Figure 10.5 is:
=EXP(D13
SQRT(G6))
In cell G10, the formula for d is simply 1/u.
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
CRR European Option Value
Share price (S)
100.00
Cox, Ross & Rubinstein
BS
CRR
Exercise price (X)
95.00
Int rate-cont (r)
8.00%
δ
t
0.0556
M
4.6202
4.6202
erdt
1.0045
V
0.0200
0.0199
Dividend yield - cont (q)
3.00%
ermqdt
1.0028
u
1.0483
M1
102.532 102.532
Time now (0, years)
0.00
d
0.9540
M2
10725.1 10723.5
Time maturity (T, years)
0.50
p
0.5177
Option life (τ, years)
0.50
p*
0.4823
Volatility (σ)
20.00%
Steps in tree (n)
9
CRR value
9.63
iopt
1
option type
Call
BS value
9.73
Figure 10.5 Option details and CRR parameters for CRR tree (in CRREuro sheet)
Focusing on the resultant share price tree in Figure 10.6, the absence of drift in the
share price is evident in the modal (central) values. Look at prices for an even number
of steps (D29, F28, ...). The CRR tree is centred on the current share price, S.
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
Share
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
9
152.85
8
145.81
139.09
7
139.09
132.69
126.58
6
132.69
126.58
120.75
115.19
5
126.58
120.75
115.19
109.89
104.83
4
120.75
115.19
109.89
104.83
100.00
95.40
3
115.19
109.89
104.83
100.00
95.40
91.00
86.81
2
109.89
104.83
100.00
95.40
91.00
86.81
82.81
79.00
1
104.83
100.00
95.40
91.00
86.81
82.81
79.00
75.36
71.89
0
100.00
95.40
91.00
86.81
82.81
79.00
75.36
71.89
68.58
65.43
Figure 10.6 Nine-step share price tree using CRR parameters (in CRREuro sheet)
To offset the absence of a drift component in u and d, the probability of an up move
in the CRR tree is usually greater than 0.5 to ensure that the expected value of the price
increases by a factor of exp[r  qυt] on each step. The formula for p is:
pD b  d/u  d where b D exp[r  qυt]
Binomial Trees
175
In our example, the probability of an up move is 0.5177 (cell G11) and hence of a
down move 0.4823 (in cell G12), the resultant expected price change factor being 1.0028
(in cell G8).
From the CRR price tree, the call payoffs can be evaluated as for the JR tree. In the
final call valuation step, the key formula in cell G15 for the discounted expected call
payoff uses the same formula as in the JR tree. The CRR tree with nine steps values the
call at 9.63 compared to 9.75 for the JR tree (and the Black–Scholes exact value of 9.73).
As for the JR tree, the CRR tree can be used to value a put by changing the iopt value
in cell D16 to 1. Notice that dividends affect only the probabilities in the CRR model,
not the share price values, whereas in the JR tree it is vice versa.
10.5 BINOMIAL APPROXIMATIONS AND BLACK–SCHOLES
FORMULA
In the spreadsheets so far we have seen the closeness of the option values derived using
binomial trees to the Black–Scholes values. The CRRTheory sheet tries to reinforce
the link by showing how the continuous normal distribution functions, Nd, in the
Black–Scholes result can be replaced by discrete binomial distribution functions. These
binomial approximations hold for European options. They involve the so-called ‘comple-
mentary’ binomial distribution function , which is one minus the usual distribution
function. Each of the Nd terms in the Black–Scholes formula can be replaced with a
term based on the complementary binomial distribution function .
Figure 10.7 shows the same call option from the previous section, with two new param-
eters defined. The quantity a (in cell E14) represents the minimum number of up moves
required for the call to end ‘in-the-money’, that is, for the terminal share value to exceed
X. Looking back to the CRR tree in Figure 10.6 and in particular at cell K26, it is clear
that four up moves produce a terminal share price of 95.40, just above the exercise price
of 95. In fact, the value of 4 in cell E14 has been generated by the formula given by Cox
and Rubinstein (1985).
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
Option1.XLS
Theory behind Binomial Trees
Share price (S)
100.00
Cox, Ross & Rubinstein
Black-Scholes
Exercise price (X)
95.00
Int rate-cont (r)
8.00%
δ
t
0.0556
erdt
1.0045
Dividend yield - cont (q)
3.00%
ermqdt
1.0028
u
1.0483
Time now (0, years)
0.00
d
0.9540
Time maturity (T, years)
0.50
p
0.5177
Option life (τ, years)
0.50
p’
0.5412
Volatility (σ)
20.00%
a
4
Steps in tree (n)
9
d1
0.6102
Φ [a:n,p’]
0.8202
N (d1)
0.7291
CRR Euro Value
9.63
d2
0.4688
via fn
9.63
Φ [a:n,p]
0.7797
N (d2)
0.6804
BS Call Value
9.73
Figure 10.7 CRRTheory sheet showing the binomial approximations for Nd
176
Advanced Modelling in Finance
The other new parameter, p
0
in cell E12, is a modified probability, given by the formula:
p
0
Dpu/ exp[r  qυt]
where the quantity exp[r  qυt] is in cell E8.
The concise CRR binomial option pricing formula is written as:
cD SexpqT[a:n,p
0
] XexprT[a:n,p]
Distribution functions are generally defined in terms of the probabilities in the left-
hand tail of the distribution, whereas the complementary distribution function refers to
the right-hand tail. Thus the formula in cell E16 of the CRRTheory sheet is calculated as
the complementary binomial distribution evaluated for (a  1), that is:
=1BINOMDIST(E141,B15,E12,TRUE)
To test this approximation, you can confirm that the call value of 9.63 in cell B17
(CRRTheory sheet), which uses the formula, agrees with that derived in cell G15 of
the CRREuro sheet.
10.6 CONVERGENCE OF CRR BINOMIAL TREES
So far the binomial trees considered have been limited to nine time steps (purely for space
considerations). However, it is of interest to explore the accuracy of option values derived
from binomial trees where the time to maturity remains fixed but where the number of
time steps used in the tree is increased. An easy way to do this, without the need to build
larger and larger trees, is to use the concise analytic option pricing formula introduced in
the previous section and illustrated in the CRRTheory sheet. This binomial formula can be
compared with the true Black–Scholes option value to explore the pattern of convergence
as the number of time steps in the tree increases.
One illuminating approach is to set up a Data Table which evaluates the concise CRR
option pricing formula (cell B17) and the Black–Scholes value (cell B20) for different
numbers of steps (cell B15) and to graph the results. See Figure 10.8.
To effect this, set up a Data Table in the range J4:L12 say. Put the formulas:
DB20 in K4 and DB17 in L4
to link these cells to the two formula cells. In cells J5 to J12, set out different numbers
of steps, say from 16 to 128 in increments of 16. From the Excel menu, specify the Data
Table range as J4:L12, and the Column input cell as B15 to get the table of values. Plot
the Data Table output as an XY chart. You should see the CRR-based value oscillating
around the Black–Scholes value as the number of steps increases.
The observed oscillation in values as the number of steps increases, which also applies
for valuations based on the JR tree, occurs because the tree parameters are not linked to
the option’s exercise price in any way. When the exercise price is the same as the initial
share price (i.e. the value in cell B5 is changed to 100), the oscillation is replaced by
uniform convergence. However, this is a special case.
Binomial Trees
177
Convergence of CRR formula
9.6900
9.7000
9.7100
9.7200
9.7300
9.7400
9.7500
9.7600
9.7700
9.7800
0
20
40
60
80
100
120
140
Binomial steps
Option value
BS
CRR
Figure 10.8 CRR tree call value relative to BS formula call value as number of steps increases
For a given number of steps there is a single binomial tree for the share price process.
As the number of steps in the tree increases, the relative position of the exercise price
changes with respect to the share price nodes. This changes the sign of the error term
between the binomial tree approximation and the true Black–Scholes value.
10.7 THE LR TREE
The third set of parameters for developing the share price tree is that proposed by Leisen
and Reimer. Their choice has two important advantages over the JR and CRR parameters.
Firstly, they suggest better and separate estimates for the Nd
1
and Nd
2
values in the
Black–Scholes formula. Secondly, by centring the share price tree at maturity around the
exercise price, the oscillation in convergence seen with the JR and CRR trees is removed.
The calculations involved in setting up the LR tree and the resulting option value are in
the LREuro sheet shown in Figure 10.9.
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
LR European Option Value
Leisen & Reimer
Share price (S)
100.00
δ
t
0.0556
BS
LR
Exercise price (X)
95.00
erdt
1.0045
Int rate-cont (r)
8.00%
ermqdt
1.0028
M
4.6202
4.6209
d1
0.6102
V
0.0200
0.0185
Dividend yield - cont (q)
3.00%
d2
0.4688
p
0.5755
M1
102.532 102.532
Time now (0, years)
0.0000
p*
0.4245
M2
10725.1 10708.5
Time maturity (T, years)
0.5000
p’
0.5979
Option life (τ, years)
0.5000
u
1.0418
a
5
Volatility (σ)
20.00%
d
0.9499
Φ [a:n,p’]
0.7290
N (d1)
0.7291
Steps in tree (n)
9
LR value
9.72
Φ [a:n,p]
0.6803
iopt
1
N (d2)
0.6804
option type
Call
BS value
9.73
Figure 10.9 Option details and LR parameters for binomial tree (sheet LREuro)
178
Advanced Modelling in Finance
In the LR model, the parameters are chosen in reverse order to the JR and CRR models,
the probabilities being decided first and then the share price moves. The probabilities
are derived using an inversion formula that provides accurate binomial estimates for the
normal distribution function. The probability p relates to the d
2
term and the probability
p
0
relates to the d
1
term in the Black–Scholes formula. For example, the formula for p
in cell G9 is:
=PPNormInv(G8,D15)
where G8 contains the actual Black–Scholes d
2
value. The accuracyof the term equivalent
to Nd
2
) (i.e. the [a:n,p] value in cell K15) can be seen by comparing it with the
Black–Scholes Nd
2
value in cell K16. A similar level of accuracy is achieved in the
estimation of Nd
1
. Note that parameter a takes value n C 1/2 in the LR tree to ensure
that the share price tree is centred around the exercise price.
The up and down price multipliers for the share price moves in the tree take the form:
uD bp
0
/p where b D exp[r  qυt]
dD b1  p
0
/1  p
By changing the exercise price in cell D5, you can confirm that the share price tree at
maturity remains centred on X by checking the revised tree in your spreadsheet.
With these parameter choices, valuation in the LR tree proceeds in exactly the same
way as in the other tree models (see Figure 10.10). The option payoff is calculated, and
its expected discounted value serves as the option’s value. Here, the LR tree gives the
European call a value of 9.724 (in cell G15), which is very close to its Black–Scholes
formula value of 9.726 (in cell G17).
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
Share
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
9
144.56
8
138.76
131.81
7
133.19
126.52
120.18
6
127.85
121.44
115.36
109.57
5
122.72
116.57
110.73
105.18
99.91
4
117.80
111.89
106.29
100.96
95.90
91.09
3
113.07
107.40
102.02
96.91
92.05
87.44
83.06
2
108.53
103.09
97.93
93.02
88.36
83.93
79.73
75.73
1
104.18
98.96
94.00
89.29
84.81
80.56
76.53
72.69
69.05
0
100.00
94.99
90.23
85.71
81.41
77.33
73.46
69.78
66.28
62.96
Figure 10.10 LR share price tree (sheet LREuro)
10.8 COMPARISON OF CRR AND LR TREES
The next sheet in the OPTION1 workbook uses VBA functions for option valuation to
compare call values from the CRR and LR trees with the Black–Scholes value as the
number of steps in the binomial trees is increased. Figure 10.11 shows the Compare sheet
with the valuation estimates for a call from binomial trees with from 16 up to 128 steps.
Column F contains the Black–Scholes value (evaluated from the user-defined function,
BSOptionValue). This has been used as a benchmark throughout the chapter and is, of
course, independent of the number of steps.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested