Other Numerical Methods for European Options
199
a sample payoff value. To effect this, a sample of uniform random numbers is chosen
using the Excel RAND function as shown in column B. These are converted into random
samples from the standard normal distribution using the NORMSINV function as shown
in column C. RAND gives random numbers uniformly distributed in the range [0, 1].
Regarding its outputs as cumulative probabilities (with values between 0 and 1), the
NORMSINV function converts them into standard normal variate values, mostly between
3 and C3. For example, in the first simulation trial the formula in cell C22 is:
=NORMSINV(B22)
which for an input of 0.1032 (or approximately 10%) evaluates as a standard normal
variate of 1.2634.
The random normal samples (values of ε) are then used to generate share prices at call
maturity from the formula:
S
T
DS exp[r  q  0.5
2
T C ε
p
T]
In converting this to a cell formula, it helps to calculate the risk-neutral drift and volatility
in time T, that is r  q  0.5
2
T and 
p
Tfirst (as in cells B16 and B17). Hence the
formula for share price in cell E22 is:
=$B$4
EXP($B$16
+C22
$B$17)
and the corresponding option payoff in cell H22 is:
=MAX($E$4
(E22-$B$5),0)
where E4 contains the iopt parameter denoting whether payoffs are for a call or a put.
The estimated call value is then calculated (in cell E9) as the discounted value of
the average of the 36 simulated option payoffs. The risk-neutral discount factor [simply
exprT] is in cell B18.
As Figure 12.1 shows, the Monte Carlo estimate of call value (12.85) is very different
from the Black–Scholes value. The standard error for the estimated call value in cell E10,
calculated as the standard deviation of the simulated payoffs divided by the square root of
the number of trials, is relatively large (which explains the discrepancy when comparing
the Monte Carlo value with the true Black–Scholes call value). To improve the precision
of the Monte Carlo estimate, the number of simulation trials must be increased.
Pressing the F9 (Calculate) key in Excel generates a further 36 trials and another Monte
Carlo option value and associated standard error for the estimate. The cell formulas also
adapt if the option is a put. Changing the value of the iopt parameter (in cell E4) to
1, produces the Monte Carlo estimate of a put, and this can be compared with its
Black–Scholes value.
12.2 SIMULATION WITH ANTITHETIC VARIABLES
As well as increasing the number of trials, another way of improving the precision of
the Monte Carlo estimate is to use so-called ‘antithetic’ variables. The antithetic variate
approach uses pairs of negatively correlated random numbers that in turn tend to produce
pairs of negatively correlated simulation results. If the results from each pair are averaged,
Pdf metadata editor - add, remove, update PDF metadata in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Allow C# Developers to Read, Add, Edit, Update and Delete PDF Metadata
acrobat pdf additional metadata; edit pdf metadata online
Pdf metadata editor - VB.NET PDF metadata library: add, remove, update PDF metadata in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Enable VB.NET Users to Read, Write, Edit, Delete and Update PDF Document Metadata
google search pdf metadata; batch edit pdf metadata
200
Advanced Modelling in Finance
the simulation results should be less variable than those produced by the ordinary random
sampling.
Figure 12.2 shows some of the simulation results in sheet MC2, where the random
normal sample (ε
1
in cell C22) is used to generate two share prices, the share price in
cell D22 being from the original N(0, 1) variate ε
1
in column C and the share price in
cell E22 from ε
1
, the negative of the normal variate. Since the share prices will be
perfectly negatively correlated, in turn the simulation values for payoff1 and payoff2 tend
to be negatively correlated. The two option payoffs are averaged to produce the value
in cell H22. The simulation trial results in column H should be less variable with this
technique.
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
simulation
rand
randns
S1
S2
payoff 1
payoff 2avg payoff
1
0.7065
0.5431
109.62
94.01
14.62
0.00
7.31
2
0.7676
0.7309
112.57
91.54
17.57
0.00
8.78
3
0.5329
0.0825
102.70
100.33
7.70
5.33
6.52
4
0.6434
0.3677
106.93
96.37
11.93
1.37
6.65
5
0.1782
-0.9221
89.10
115.65
0.00
20.65
10.33
Figure 12.2 Five simulation trials of option payoff using antithetic variables in sheet MC2
The call is valued by averaging all 36 payoffs in column H and discounted using the
risk-neutral discount-free rate in cell B18, as in the MC1 sheet.
Everything else in the MC2 sheet is the same as in ordinary Monte Carlo simulation.
You should notice that the standard error of the Monte Carlo estimate (with antithetic
variables) is substantially lower than that for the uncontrolled sampling approach used in
the MC1 sheet.
12.3 SIMULATION WITH QUASI-RANDOM SAMPLING
In practice, uncontrolled random numbers can prove to be too random. For example, a
sequence of uniform random numbers often has values clustering together. One way to
avoid this clustering is to generate a sequence of numbers that are distributed uniformly
across the unit interval instead. Quasi-random sequences preselect the sequence of
numbers in a deterministic (i.e. non-random) way to eliminate the clustering of points
seen in random numbers. The only trick in the selection process is to remember the
values of all the previous numbers chosen as each new number is selected. Using
quasi-random sampling means that the error in any estimate based on the samples
is proportional to 1/n rather than 1/
p
n, where n is the number of samples. In the
QMC sheet (where we use QMC as shorthand for Quasi-Monte Carlo), we illustrate
the result of generating the quasi-random sequence and also an improved method of
converting these into standard normal variates. The approach uses the Faur´e sequence
instead of the uniform random numbers, combined with a revised conversion method
due to Moro (1995). Moro suggested his improvement to the traditional Box–Muller
transform because some inverse normal distribution functions can scramble the even
spacing of the Faur´e sequence numbers. The generation of Faur´e sequences and their
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view, annotate, create and convert PDF
An advanced PDF editor enable C# users to edit PDF text, image and pages in Visual Studio .NET project. Use HTML5 PDF Editor to Edit PDF Document in ASP.NET.
analyze pdf metadata; edit pdf metadata acrobat
C# TIFF: TIFF Metadata Editor, How to Write & Read TIFF Metadata
C# TIFF - Edit TIFF Metadata in C#.NET. Allow Users to Read and Edit Metadata Stored in Tiff Image in C#.NET Application. How to Get TIFF XMP Metadata in C#.NET.
delete metadata from pdf; view pdf metadata
Other Numerical Methods for European Options
201
conversion to normal deviates are handled via user-defined VBA functions. The coding
of these functions is explained in section 12.7, together with that of the other user-
defined functions in Module1. One special point about Faur´e sequences is that, in line
with common practice, the Faur´e sequence begins from 2
4
(here 16) to avoid start-up
problems.
Looking at the first simulation trial in row 22 of Figure 12.3, the first quasi-random
number in cell B22 uses the FaureBase2 function with input 16. This is converted into
astandard normal variate in cell C22 with the MoroNormSInv function. The share price
and the option payoff in cells E22 and H22 respectively are generated exactly as in the
MC1 sheet, as is the option value labelled ‘QMC value’ in cell E9. The estimate 8.95
(with standard error of 1.69 in cell E10) is none too close to the Black–Scholes value of
9.73. However, as we shall see in section 12.4, the big advantage of using quasi-random
sampling is the much faster convergence to the underlying true value as the number of
simulation trials increases.
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
Using Monte Carlo Simulation to Value BS Call Option (Quasi-Random Numbers)
Share price (S)
100.00
iopt
1
Exercise price (X)
95.00
option
call
Int rate-cont (r)
8.00%
BS value
9.73
Dividend yield (q)
3.00%
Time now (0, years)
0.0000
QMC value
8.95
Time maturity (T, years)
0.5000
QMC stdev
1.69
Option life (τ, years)
0.5000
Volatility (σ)
20.00%
Simulations (nsim)
36
rnmut
0.0150
sigt
0.1414
Exp(-rτ)
0.9608
simulation
rand
randns
share price
payoff
16
0.0313
-1.8627
78.00
0.00
17
0.5313
0.0784
102.64
7.64
18
0.2813
-0.5791
93.53
0.00
19
0.7813
0.7764
113.29
18.29
20
0.1563
-1.0100
88.00
0.00
Figure 12.3 Option details and five (out of 36) simulations of option payoff in sheet QMC
Note that pressing the F9 Calculate key in Excel does not produce any change in the
spreadsheet. The Faur´e sequence is completely deterministic, not random at all, hence
the name ‘quasi-random’ is a misnomer. It is necessary to take a different number of
simulation trials to get a different QMC value and standard deviation.
VB.NET PDF- HTML5 PDF Viewer for VB.NET Project
ASP.NET PDF Viewer; VB.NET: ASP.NET PDF Editor; VB.NET to PDF. Image: Remove Image from PDF Page. Image Link: Edit URL. Bookmark: Edit Bookmark. Metadata: Edit, Delete
read pdf metadata; pdf metadata viewer online
C# PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file for C#
HTML5 PDF Editor enable users to edit PDF text, image, page, password and so on. C#.NET: WPF PDF Viewer & Editor. C#.NET: Edit PDF Metadata.
pdf xmp metadata; adding metadata to pdf
202
Advanced Modelling in Finance
As with the previous sheets, the cell formulas adapt if the option is a put. Changing
the value of the iopt parameter (in cell E4) to 1 produces the QMC estimate of a put,
and this can be compared with its Black–Scholes value.
Quasi-random sampling can be seen as a development of stratified sampling. For strati-
fied sampling the required interval would be subdivided into a number of smaller intervals,
with a small number of observations chosen randomly to lie within each interval. This
can lead to there being points clustered within each interval. There is no random element
in the sequence of quasi-random numbers, as each number in the sequence is fitted into
apre-ordained position in the required interval.
12.4 COMPARING SIMULATION METHODS
It is informative to examine the convergence of the call value estimates from the different
sampling methods described in the three previous sections as the number of simula-
tion trials increases. Figure 12.4 shows results in the Compare sheet as the number
of trials increases from 100 to 2000. The true Black–Scholes value (using the BSOp-
tionValue function) provides the benchmark in column F. In column G, the call values
from simulations with different numbers of trials using controlled sampling (via antithetic
variables) are evaluated from the MCOptionValue function. In column H, the equiva-
lent call values using quasi-random sampling are evaluated from the QMCOptionValue
function.
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
Comparing Monte Carlo Simulation Methods to Value BS Call Option 
Share price (S)
100.00
nsim
BS
MC
QMC
Exercise price (X)
95.00
Int rate-cont (r)
8.00%
100
9.73
10.23
9.34
200
9.73
9.68
9.50
Dividend yield (q)
3.00%
300
9.73
9.28
9.54
Time now (0, years)
0.0000
400
9.73
9.84
9.62
Time maturity (T, years)
0.5000
600
9.73
9.85
9.62
Option life (τ, years)
0.5000
800
9.73
9.48
9.65
Volatility (σ)
20.00%
1000
9.73
9.52
9.67
1200
9.73
9.71
9.68
1400
9.73
9.63
9.68
BS Call Option Value
9.73
1600
9.73
9.81
9.68
1800
9.73
9.65
9.69
2000
9.73
9.73
9.70
Figure 12.4 Monte Carlo random and quasi-random sampling estimates compared with BS
If the data in range E6:H17 is charted, as in Figure 12.5, the relatively erratic conver-
gence of the MC estimate can be compared with more systematic improvement in the
QMC value. The QMC values show convergence occurring at a ‘quadratic’ rate as the
number of trials increases, similar to the convergence behaviour shown by the LR binomial
tree estimate examined in Chapter 10.
C# TIFF: TIFF Editor SDK to Read & Manipulate TIFF File Using C#.
1. Extract text from Tiff file. 2. Render text to text, PDF, or Word file. Tiff Metadata Editing in C#. Our .NET Tiff SDK supports editing Tiff file metadata.
endnote pdf metadata; edit pdf metadata
How to C#: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF for .NET
XDoc.PDF for .NET supports editing PDF document metadata, like Title, Subject, Author, Creator, Producer, Keywords, Created Date, and Last Modified Date.
metadata in pdf documents; search pdf metadata
Other Numerical Methods for European Options
203
Convergence of MC estimates to BS value
9.2
9.3
9.4
9.5
9.6
9.7
9.8
9.9
10.0
10.1
10.2
10.3
0
500
1000
1500
2000
2500
Number of simulations
Call value
BS
MC
QMC
Figure 12.5 Convergence of MC and QMC sampling estimates of call value to BS value
12.5 CALCULATING GREEKS IN MONTE CARLO
SIMULATION
Most textbooks suggest that the best way to estimate hedge parameters is by using finite
difference approximations, each involving an additional simulation trial where the required
input parameter is varied by a small amount. However, this method produces biased
estimates and is unnecessarily time-consuming.
Broadie and Glasserman (1996) have shown how to derive direct pathwise estimates
within a single simulation run. These estimates are unbiased and rather quicker to obtain
than by using the finite difference approach. The user-defined function, QMCOption-
Greek135 with parameter ‘igreek’ contains the code for these formulas and is stored in
Module1. The function uses quasi-random normal variates (-qrandns) involving the Faure-
Base2 and MoroNormSInv functions. It returns delta (igreekD1), rho (igreekD3) or vega
(igreekD5).
12.6 NUMERICAL INTEGRATION
Numerical integration is another well-known mathematical method that can be adapted
to value options. Here we illustrate one of the very simplest integration routines, the
extended midpoint rule. This uses a set of intervals of equal width h say, with midpoints
(z
i
)at which the function to be integrated, S
T
,together with the associated option payoff is
evaluated. The probability of each value of S
T
is approximated by calculating the standard
normal probability density function for each midpoint and multiplying this by the width
of the interval, h. Weighting the option values by their probabilities produces the expected
payoff value. Expressed in this way, this form of numerical integration is very similar
C# PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net
Comments, forms and multimedia. Document and metadata. All object data. Detect and merge image fragments. Flatten visible layers. C#.NET DLLs: Compress PDF Document
online pdf metadata viewer; batch pdf metadata
C# PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in C#.net
Convert PDF to HTML. |. C#.NET PDF SDK - Convert PDF to HTML in C#.NET. How to Use C# .NET XDoc.PDF SDK to Convert PDF to HTML Webpage in C# .NET Program.
delete metadata from pdf; pdf metadata online
204
Advanced Modelling in Finance
to the expectation calculated in the binomial tree, except that the normal distribution is
retained.
Figure 12.6 shows an extract from the NI sheet. Here the range of possible values for
S
T
is divided into 36 equal intervals, spanning 6 to C6 standard deviations from the
mean, each one-third of the standard deviation wide (hence h D 0.33). The midpoints of
the intervals expressed as multiples of standard deviations away from the mean are in
column B and the corresponding risk-neutral share price at maturity is in column C, the
first one given by the formula in C21:
=$D$4
EXP($D$15
+$D$17
B21)
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
Using Numerical Integration to Value BS Options
Share price (S)
100.00
iopt
1
Exercise price (X)
95.00
option
call
Int rate-cont (r)
8.00%
BS value
9.73
Dividend yield (q)
3.00%
Time now (0, years)
0.00
NI value
9.71
Time maturity (T, years)
0.50
via fn
9.71
Option life (τ, years) 
0.50
Volatility (σ)
20.00%
msd
6
-msd
-6
µ τ
0.0150
n
36
σ Sqrt(τ)
0.1414
h
0.33
i
z
S
T
payoff  probability
calc
0
-5.83
44.49
0.00
0.0000
0.0000
1
-5.50
46.64
0.00
0.0000
0.0000
2
-5.17
48.89
0.00
0.0000
0.0000
3
-4.83
51.25
0.00
0.0000
0.0000
4
-4.50
53.72
0.00
0.0000
0.0000
Figure 12.6 Using the midpoint rule to perform numerical integration in sheet NI
The associated option payoff is in column E. Column F contains probabilities, the
formula in cell F21 being:
=$H$17
NORMDIST(B21,0,1,FALSE)
The FALSE parameter means that the function returns the probability density value, that
is, the height of the normal curve when a distance 5.83 standard deviations below the
mean. The cell formula gives an approximate probability because the normal probability
density function is multiplied by the interval width (h). These probabilities are used in
calculating the expected option payoff in exactly the same way as the nodal probabilities in
the binomial tree. In column H the product of the payoff and the probability is calculated,
and the sum of this column discounted by the risk-free discount factor provides the
option value. This ‘NI value’ in cell H9 is 9.71, which compares favourably with the
Black–Scholes value.
Other Numerical Methods for European Options
205
For the z-values shown in Figure 12.6, the probabilities shown are effectively zero
so the products in column H are also zero. However, when i is in the range 17 to 30,
contributions to the expectation are significantly different from zero. Figure 12.6 confirms
this, showing the probabilities of S
T
at differentdistances from the mean (in terms of i) and
also the corresponding option values, the product of these two components contributing
to the expected value.
Components of Expected Value
0%%
10%
15%
20%
25%
30%
35%
40%
45%
0
2
4
6
8
10
12
14
16
18
20
22
24
26
28
30
32
34
i
0
25
50
75
100
125
150
% prob
payoff
Figure 12.7 Component probability and payoff values, which produce the expected payoff
The example just outlined of applying numerical integration to value a simple option
is deliberately very simple. Numerical integration comes into its own when considering
the valuation of options with payoffs depending on many assets.
12.7 USER-DEFINED FUNCTIONS IN Module1
To ease spreadsheet computation, user-defined functions have been coded for the main
numerical methods discussed in this chapter. We have already met the MCOptionValue
and the QMCOptionValue functions in section 12.4, that compared their relative speeds
of convergence. The following paragraphs throw some light on their coding.
The MCOptionValue function shown on the MC2 sheet uses a loop structure to run the
series of simulation trials. The variable called ‘sum’ keeps a running total of the option
payoff, here derived from two share prices using antithetic variates. The share prices
depend on the drift in time ‘tyr’, a variable called ‘rnmut’, and another variable called
‘sigt’ representing the volatility in time tyr. It might be quicker to simulate the log share
price, but we retain the share price simulation for clarity. The crucial part of the code is
as follows:
rnmut = (r - q - 0.5
Ł
sigmaO2)
Ł
tyr
sigt = sigma
Ł
Sqr(tyr)
sum = 0
For i = 1To nsim
randns = Application.NormSInv(Rnd)
S1 = S
Ł
Exp(rnmut + randns
Ł
sigt)
S2 = S
Ł
Exp(rnmut - randns
Ł
sigt)
206
Advanced Modelling in Finance
payoff1 = Application.Max(iopt
Ł
(S1 - X), 0)
payoff2 = Application.Max(iopt
Ł
(S2 - X), 0)
sum = sum+ 0.5Ł (payoff1 + payoff2)
Next i
MCOptionValue= Exp(-r
Ł
tyr)
Ł
sum / nsim
The QMCOptionValue function has a similar format apart from the FaureBase2 and
MoroNormSInv functions, which replace the Excel and VBA functions used to generate
the random normal samples in MCOptionValue. Thus the main code is:
sum = 0
For i = 1 To nsim
qrandns = MoroNormSInv(Faure1Base2(i + iskip))
S1 = S
Ł
Exp(rnmut + qrandns
Ł
sigt)
sum = sum+ Application.Max(iopt
Ł
(S1 - X), 0)
Next i
QMCOptionValue = Exp(-r
Ł
tyr)
Ł
sum /nsim
Faur´e sequences involve the transformation of integers (base 10) into numbers of a
different prime base. Here we have chosen 2 as the base. The digits in the base 2 repre-
sentation are then reversed and finally expressed as a fraction using powers of
1
2
.
Function FaureBase2(n) As Double
’ returns the equivalent first Faure sequence number
Dim f As Double, sb As Double
Dim i As Integer, n1As Integer, n2As Integer
n1 = n
f= 0
sb = 1 / 2
Do While n1 > 0
n2 = Int(n1 / 2)
i= n1 - n2Ł 2
f= f + sb
Ł
i
sb = sb / 2
n1 = n2
Loop
FaureBase2 = f
EndFunction
The QMCOptionGreek135 function uses the Broadie and Glasserman formulas for three
of the greeks (delta, rho and vega). Gamma is not stochastic but deterministic and so can
be derived using the same formula as in the BSOptionGamma function in OPTION2.xls.
As previously mentioned, theta is best calculated from the simulated option value and the
delta and gamma estimates:
ert = Exp(-r
Ł
tyr)
rnmut = (r - q - 0.5
Ł
sigmaO2)
Ł
tyr
sigt = sigma
Ł
Sqr(tyr)
r1 = (r - q+ 0.5
Ł
sigmaO2)
Ł
tyr
iskip = (2O4) - 1
greek = 0
vg = -1
For i = 1 To nsim
qrandns = MoroNormSInv(Faure1Base2(i + iskip))
S1 = S
Ł
Exp(rnmut + qrandns
Ł
sigt)
If (igreek = 1And Sgn(iopt
Ł
(S1 - X)) = 1) Then greek = greek + S1
Other Numerical Methods for European Options
207
If (igreek = 3 And Sgn(iopt
Ł
(S1 - X)) >= 0) Then greek = greek + 1
If (igreek = 5 And Sgn(iopt
Ł
(S1 - X)) >= 0) Then greek = greek + S1
Ł
(Log(S1 / S) - r1)
Next i
If igreek = 1 Then vg = ert
Ł
(greek /S) / nsim
If igreek = 3 Then vg = ert
Ł
X
Ł
tyr
Ł
greek / nsim
If igreek = 5 Then vg = ert
Ł
(greek /sigma) / nsim
QMCOptionGreek135 = vg
The NIOption Value function sets up the share price process and collects the sum for
the numerical integration within a loop. Note how the common components (S and h) are
inserted after the loop:
Function NIOptionValue(iopt,S,X,r, q, tyr,sigma, msd, nint)
’ values optionusing numerical integration
Dim rnmut, sigt, h, sum, zi,payi
Dim i As Integer
rnmut = (r - q- 0.5
Ł
sigmaO2)
Ł
tyr
sigt = sigma
Ł
Sqr(tyr)
h= 2
Ł
msd/ nint
sum = 0
For i = 0 Tonint- 1
zi = -msd + (i + 0.5)
Ł
h
payi = Application.Max(iopt
Ł
(Exp(rnmut + zi
Ł
sigt ) - X/S), 0)
sum = sum + payi
Ł
Application.NormDist(zi, 0, 1, False)
Next i
NIOptionValue = Exp(-rŁ tyr)Ł hŁ SŁ sum
End Function
SUMMARY
In this chapter, we illustrate alternative ways of calculating the expectation of option
value, which underlies the Black–Scholes formula for European options.
Monte Carlo simulation consists of using random numbers to sample from the many
paths a share price might take in the risk-neutral world. An option payoff is calculated
for each path and the arithmetic average of the payoffs, discounted back at the risk-free
rate, used to estimate option value.
When compared with the binomial method of valuation, it produces estimates of option
value with more estimation error. Many more paths must be generated with Monte Carlo
sampling, because unlike the tree, paths do not recombine.
Controlling the random sampling by variance reduction techniques such as using anti-
thetic variables can reduce the estimation error. Quasi-random samples preselect the
sequence of numbers in a deterministic (i.e. non-random) way, eliminating the clustering
of values seen in random numbers. The samples are taken such that they always ‘fill in’
the gaps between existing samples. This means that the error of estimation is proportional
to 1/n rather than 1/
p
n, where n is the number of simulation samples.
Numerical integration is another method that can be adapted to value options. It is
especially useful for options whose payoffs depend on many assets.
REFERENCES
Broadie, M. and P. Glasserman, 1996, “Estimating Security Prices Using Simulation”, Management Science,
42(2), 269–285.
Hull, J. C., 2000, “Options, Futures and Other Derivatives”, Prentice Hall, New Jersey.
Moro, B. 1995, “The Full Monte”, Risk, 8(2), 57–58.
13
Non-normal Distributions and
Implied Volatility
The Black–Scholes formula for valuing options assumes that log share returns follow a
normal distribution. First, we emphasise this assumption by showing an alternative form
of the Black–Scholes formula expressed in terms of the mean and variance of the normal
distribution for log share returns. The Black–Scholes formula can also be expressed in
terms of the first two moments of the lognormal distribution for share prices.
In applying the Black–Scholes formula, all the input parameters are known apart from
the volatility of the share returns over the life of the option. For a chosen level of
volatility, we use the formula to generate an option value. This process works in the reverse
direction too. Starting from an observed option price in the market, we can calculate its
Black–Scholes implied volatility. The process of finding the implied volatility (or ISD for
implied standard deviation) can be carried out by manual trial-and-error. An improvement
is to automate the process. We discuss various methods of deciding an initial guess
followed by a Newton–Raphson search to provide a good estimate of the ISD.
Practitioners are interested to know how to allow for departures from strict normality
when valuing options. We look at two modifications, the first being an alternative analytic
formula and the second an alternative binomial tree. The first approach suggests that share
prices follow a reciprocal gamma (RG) distribution rather than the familiar lognormal
distribution. The second approach retains the lognormal distribution but instead allows
the higher moments (skewness and kurtosis) of log returns to differ from strict normality.
This reflects empirical findings that log share returns typically have fat-tails (kurtosis
above 3) and may be skewed as well.
Lastly in this chapter, we show how the implied volatility ‘smile’ seen in option prices
from the market may reflect different assumptions regarding the distribution of log returns
rather than differing forecasts of volatilities.
With the exception of Hull’s discussion of volatility smiles (in Chapter 17), the standard
texts do not cover the topics in this chapter. For further details, it is necessary to pursue
the individual papers for elucidation. However, most of the calculation routines illustrated
in the OPTION4.xls workbook have been coded into user-defined functions.
13.1 BLACK–SCHOLES USING ALTERNATIVE
DISTRIBUTIONAL ASSUMPTIONS
The Dist sheet in the OPTION4.xls workbook sheet illustrates alternative ways of gener-
ating Black–Scholes option values, stressing the part played by the distributional assump-
tions. First stressing the normal distribution of log share prices, the mean and variance
can be calculated and the Black–Scholes formula reworked from these moments.
Since M D lnS C r  q  0.5
2
T and V D 
2
T, and also since exp (M C 0.5V) can
be simplified to S exp[r  qT], the Black–Scholes formula for a European call can be
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested