c# pdf library mit license : Edit pdf metadata application SDK tool html wpf windows online Wiley%20Publishing%20-%20Adobe%20Acrobat%206%20PDF%20For%20Dummies%20%5B2003%5D25-part623

•To have the filenames changed in processing, select the Add to
Original Base Name(s) radio button, and then enter characters as a
prefix to the filename in the Insert Before text box and/or characters
to be appended as a filename extension in the Insert After text box.
•To prevent Acrobat from overwriting any filenames, select the Do
Not Overwrite Existing Files check box.
13. To have Acrobat save the processed files in another file format
besides Adobe PDF, select one of the supported file formats in the
Save File(s) As drop-down list. After changing all the file naming and
format options that you want modified, click OK.
The Output Options dialog box closes, and you return to the Batch Edit
Sequence dialog box.
14. Check your command sequence along with your Run Commands On
and Select Output Location settings. If everything looks okay, click the
OK button.
The Batch Edit Sequence dialog box closes, and you return to the Batch
Sequences dialog box, where the name of your new batch sequence now
appears selected in the list box. All batch sequences are run from the
Batch Sequences dialog box.
15. To run the new batch sequence and test it out (preferably on copies of
your PDF files, just in case something goes wrong), click the Run
Sequence button. To close the Batch Sequences dialog box without
running the new batch process, click the Close button instead.
You can share the batch sequences you create for Acrobat with others who
use Acrobat 6. Batch sequences that you create are saved as special
sequence files using the title name you give them as the filename (with a
.sequfile extension on Windows) and are stored in a folder called ENU on
your Windows hard drive. Here is the directory path for Windows users:
C:\Programs\Acrobat 6.0\Acrobat\Sequences\ENU. Macintosh users go to:
Macintosh HD\Library\Acrobat User Data\Sequences.
When you send copies of your sequence files to coworkers, they must be sure
to put them in the ENU folder on Windows machines or the Sequences folder
on Mac OS X computers. When they do, the names of the batch sequences you
share appear in the list in the Batch Sequences dialog box in Acrobat 6 on their
computers as though they created the batch sequences themselves.
If you use Acrobat for Windows, you might want to create a batch sequence
that uses the Make Accessible plug-in to convert a bunch of regular PDF files
to tagged PDF files so that they can take advantage of the Acrobat 6 and
Adobe Reader 6 Accessibility features (especially the Reflow button on the
Viewing toolbar — see Chapter 2 for details).
237
Chapter 10: Editing PDF Files
Edit pdf metadata - add, remove, update PDF metadata in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Allow C# Developers to Read, Add, Edit, Update and Delete PDF Metadata
add metadata to pdf programmatically; remove metadata from pdf online
Edit pdf metadata - VB.NET PDF metadata library: add, remove, update PDF metadata in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Enable VB.NET Users to Read, Write, Edit, Delete and Update PDF Document Metadata
edit pdf metadata online; pdf keywords metadata
238
Part III: Reviewing, Editing, and Securing PDFs 
How to C#: Modify Image Metadata (tag)
edit, C#.NET PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C#.NET rotate PDF pages, C#.NET search text in PDF, C#.NET edit PDF bookmark, C#.NET edit PDF metadata, C#.NET
batch pdf metadata; pdf metadata extract
C# TIFF: TIFF Metadata Editor, How to Write & Read TIFF Metadata
Tiff ›› C# Tiff: Edit Tiff Metadata. C# TIFF - Edit TIFF Metadata in C#.NET. Allow Users to Read and Edit Metadata Stored in Tiff Image in C#.NET Application.
pdf xmp metadata; edit pdf metadata acrobat
C
h
a
p
t
e
r
1
1
S
e
c
u
r
i
n
g
P
D
F
F
i
l
e
s
In This Chapter
Password-protecting PDF files
Using file permissions to limit changes to PDF files
Digitally signing PDF files with Certificate Security
Encrypting PDF files with Certificate Security
A
crobat 6 offers different types and different levels of security that
you can apply to PDF documents. At the most basic level, you can 
password-protect your documents so that only associates who know the pass-
word can open the files for viewing, editing, and printing. You can further set
file permissions that restrict the kind of user actions that can be performed
on the PDF documents without access to a second password. You can also
use theCertificate Security Digital Signatures feature to digitally sign a docu-
ment and to verify the signatures and integrity of PDF files that you receive as
part of your document review cycle. Finally, you can add the ultimate in secu-
rity by encrypting your PDF documents using the Certificate Security feature,
so that they can be shared only with a list of trusted associates. In this chapter,
you find out all about the different ways to protect your PDF documents from
unwarranted and unwanted access and editing.
Protecting PDF Files
You can password-protect the opening and editing of PDF documents at the
time you first distill them (as part of their Security Settings — see Chapter 4
for details) or at anytime thereafter in Acrobat 6. When you set the security
settings, you can choose between two different levels of encryption:
C# PDF bookmark Library: add, remove, update PDF bookmarks in C#.
|. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› C# PDF: Edit PDF Bookmark. C#.NET PDF SDK - Edit PDF Bookmark and Outline in C#.NET. Empower Your C#
remove metadata from pdf; read pdf metadata java
C# PDF Sticky Note Library: add, delete, update PDF note in C#.net
Note. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› C# PDF: Add Sticky Note. C#.NET PDF SDK - Add Sticky Note to PDF Page in C#.NET. Able to change font size in PDF comment box.
change pdf metadata creation date; view pdf metadata
40-bit RC4: Used for PDF files created when you set the encryption level
to 40-bit RC4 (Acrobat 3.x, 4.x)
128-bit RC4: Used when you set the encryption level to 128-bit RC4
(Acrobat 5.x, 6.0)
40-bit RC4 encryption offers a lower level of file security but is compatible
with Acrobat 3 and Acrobat 4. 128-bit RC4 offers a higher level of security (it’s
a lot harder to hack into) but is compatible only with Acrobat 5 and Acrobat
6. If you’ll be sharing secured PDF documents with coworkers who haven’t
yet upgraded to Acrobat 5 or 6, you’ll have to content yourself with the less-
secure, 40-bit RC4 encryption. However, if you’re dealing with highly sensi-
tive, “for-your-eyes-only” material, you may want to upgrade everybody to
Acrobat 6 as soon as possible, so that you can start taking advantage of the
more secure 128-bit RC4 encryption.
Checking a document’s security settings
You can check the security settings in effect for any PDF document you open
in Acrobat 6 or Adobe Reader 6 (of course, you can tell immediately if the file
requires a user password because you must supply this password before you
can open the document in Acrobat or Adobe Reader). To check the security
settings in effect, you choose Document➪Security➪Display Restrictions and
Security.
When you select this command in Acrobat, the program opens a Document
Properties dialog box with the security settings showing, where you can both
review and change the settings. When you select this command in Adobe
Reader (choose File➪Document Properties and click Security in the list box to
display the security settings), the program simply lists all the settings in effect.
The security settings in the Document Properties dialog box contain the
Security Method drop-down list that shows you the type of security in effect.
This list can contain one of these three options:
No Security: The document uses no protection at all.
Password Security: The document uses a user password and/or master
password and possibly restricts the type of edits.
Certificate Security: The document is encrypted so that only trusted
associates with digital certification can open and change it.
Beneath the Security Method drop-down list, you find a Document
Restrictions Summary area that lists all the security options in effect. To the
right of the Security Method drop-down list, you find the Change Settings
button that enables you to change the security settings when either the
Password Security or the Certificate Security option is selected in the
Security Method drop-down list.
240
Part III: Reviewing, Editing, and Securing PDFs 
C# PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file for C#
C#.NET: Edit PDF Metadata. PDF SDK for .NET allows you to read, add, edit, update, and delete PDF file metadata, like Title, Subject
pdf metadata reader; pdf metadata viewer
VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
PDF Metadata Edit. Offer professional PDF document metadata editing APIs, using which VB.NET developers can redact, delete, view and save PDF metadata.
remove pdf metadata; add metadata to pdf file
Securing files with low or high encryption
If you want to secure a PDF file that currently uses no security with the less-
secure, 40-bit RC4 level of encryption (compatible with versions 3 and 4 of
Acrobat and Adobe Reader), or with the more secure, 128-bit RC4 level of
encryption (compatible only with version 5 and 6 of Acrobat and Adobe
Reader), follow these steps in Acrobat 6:
1. Choose Document➪Security➪Display Restrictions and Security.
The Document Properties dialog box opens, as shown in Figure 11-1.
2. Select Password Security from the Security Method drop-down list, as
shown in the figure.
The Password Security - Settings dialog box opens, as shown in
Figure 11-2.
3. From the Compatibility drop-down list, select either Acrobat 3.0 and
Later or Acrobat 6.0 and Later.
If you select Acrobat 3.0 and Later, the Encryption Level automatically
changes to Low (40-bit RC4).
Figure 11-1:
Selecting
Password
Security as
the security
method
in the
Document
Properties
dialog box.
241
Chapter 11: Securing PDF Files
How to C#: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF for .NET
XDoc.PDF for .NET allows C# developers to edit hyperlink of PDF document Various PDF annotation features can be integrated into your C# project, such Metadata.
add metadata to pdf; endnote pdf metadata
VB.NET PDF Annotate Library: Draw, edit PDF annotation, markups in
VB.NET PDF - PDF Annotation in VB.NET. Guide to Draw, Add and Edit Various Annotations on PDF File in VB.NET Programming. Annotation Overview.
add metadata to pdf programmatically; analyze pdf metadata
If you select Acrobat 5.0 or 6.0 and Later, the Encryption Level automati-
cally changes to High (128-bit RC4). When you select this higher level of
encryption, the options in the Permissions area of the Standard Security
dialog box change, as shown in Figure 11-3.
4. To set a user password that the user must supply in order to open the
PDF document, select the Require a Password to Open the Document
check box and then carefully enter the password in the Document
Open Password text box.
Figure 11-3:
Setting the
security
options for
128-bit RC4
encryption
in the
Password
Security -
Settings
dialog box.
Figure 11-2:
Setting the
security
options for
40-bit RC4
encryption
in the
Password
Security -
Settings
dialog box.
242
Part III: Reviewing, Editing, and Securing PDFs 
5. To set a master password that the user must supply in order to change
the user password, allow printing, or modify the file permissions, select
the Use a Password to Restrict Printing and Editing of the Document
and Its Security Settings check box and then carefully enter the pass-
word in the Permissions Password text box.
This password must be different from the one you entered in the
Document Open Password text box, if you followed Step 4.
6. In the Printing Allowed drop-down list, choose the editing permis-
sions you wish to put into effect (the default is None).
If you selected the low (40-bit RC4) encryption level, your choices are
either None or High Resolution.
If you selected the high (128-bit RC4) encryption level, your choices are
None, Low Resolution (150 dpi), or High Resolution.
7. In the Changes Allowed drop-down list, choose the editing permis-
sions you wish to put into effect (the default is None).
Your choices are None; Filling in Form Fields and Signing; Commenting,
Filling in Form Fields, and Signing; and Any Except Extracting Pages.
8. If you selected high (128-bit RC4) encryption, the Enable Text Access
for Screen Reader Devices for the Visually Impaired is selected by
default, while the Enable Copying of Text, Images, and Other Content
and the Enable Plaintext Metadata check boxes are not selected, thus
preventing user access to these options. To enable these options,
select the appropriate check box.
Note that the last check box in the Password Security - Settings dialog
box that allows the ability to make changes to plaintext metadata is only
available when you choose Acrobat 6.0 and Later in the Compatibility
drop-down list.
9. Click OK.
If you set a user password, reenter your password in the Password
dialog box that appears, asking you to confirm the password to open the
document, and then click OK.
10. If you set a master password, reenter this password in the Password
dialog box that appears next, asking you to confirm the password to
change security options in the document, and then click OK.
11. Click the Close button in the Document Properties dialog box.
12. Choose File➪Save to save your security settings as part of the PDF file.
Note that if you mess up when attempting to confirm a user or master pass-
word in Steps 9 or 10, Acrobat displays an alert dialog box informing you of
this fact and telling you that you have to try reentering the original password
243
Chapter 11: Securing PDF Files
to confirm it. If you are unable to confirm the password successfully (no doubt
because you didn’t enter the password you had intended originally), you must
revisit the Document Open Password or the Permissions Password text box,
completely clearing out its contents and reenter the intended password.
After saving your security settings to the PDF document and closing the file,
thereafter you or whomever you send the PDF document to must be able to
accurately enter the user password assigned to the file in order to open it.
Further, you must be able to successfully enter the master password you
assigned the file if you ever need to change the user password or modify the
file permissions.
Signing Off Digital Style
The Certificate Security option in the Security Method drop-down list in the
Document Properties dialog box enables you to digitally sign a PDF document
or to verify that a digital signature in a PDF document is valid. Certificate
Security is what is known in the trade as a signature handler that uses a pri-
vate/public key (also known as PPK) system. In this system, each digital sig-
nature is associated with a profile that contains both a private key and a
public key.
The private key in your profile is a password-protected number that
enables you to digitally sign a PDF document. The public key, which is
embedded within your digital signature, enables others who review the 
document in Acrobat to verify that your signature is valid. Because others
must have access to your public key in order to verify your signature,
Acrobat puts your public key in what’s called a certificate that is shared.
The Certificate Security uses what is known as a direct trust system for shar-
ing certificates, because it doesn’t use a third-party agent (like VeriSign) to 
do this.
244
Part III: Reviewing, Editing, and Securing PDFs 
Everything you never wanted to know 
about Certificate Security
In Certificate Security, the private key encrypts
a checksum that is stored with your signature
when you sign a PDF document. The public key
decrypts this checksum when anyone verifies
the signature (by making sure that the checksum
checks out). In case you’re the least bit inter-
ested, Certificate Security uses the RSA algo-
rithm for generating private/public key pairs and
the X.509 standard for certificates.
Setting up your profile
The first step to be able to use Certificate Security for digitally signing PDF
documents is to set up your Digital ID. Your Digital ID contains your pass-
word, along with basic information about your role. You can set up multiple
profiles for yourself if you digitally sign documents in different roles.
To create a new user profile, follow these steps:
1. Choose Advanced➪Manage Digital IDs➪My Digital ID Files➪Select My
Digital ID File.
The Select My Digital ID dialog box opens.
2. Click the New Digital ID File button.
The Create Self-Signed Digital ID dialog box appears, as shown in
Figure 11-4.
3. Edit the Name, Organization Unit, Organization Name, E-mail Address,
and Country/Region text boxes, if necessary (only the Name text box
must be filled in), in the Digital ID Details section of the dialog box.
Note the profile name that appears in the Name text box is the name
that appears in the Signatures palette in Acrobat 6 and is used in the
naming of the Self-Signed Digital ID filename. If you select the Enable
Figure 11-4:
Selecting a
password in
the Create
Self-Signed
Digital ID
dialog box.
245
Chapter 11: Securing PDF Files
Unicode Support check box, Acrobat displays additional text boxes for
entering Unicode values for extended characters next to the ASCII ver-
sions you just entered.
4. Select an RSA algorithm (either 1024-bit or 2048-bit) in the Key
Algorithm drop-down list, and then select a purpose for your Digital
ID in the Use Digital ID For drop-down list.
Note that 2048-bit offers more security, but 1024-bit is more compatible
with current encryption technologies. Your choices are Digital Signatures,
Data Encryption, or the default Digital Signatures and Data Encryption.
5. Click in the Enter a Password text box and enter a password of six
characters or more.
6. Press Tab to jump to the Confirm Password text box and then reenter
the password.
7. Click the Create button to open the New Self-Sign Digital ID File
dialog box.
By default, Acrobat names the new profile file by combining the profile
name with the .pfx file extension in the Security folder within the Acrobat
6.0 folder in Windows, and the Acrobat 6.0 folder on the Macintosh. If you
wish, edit the filename before clicking the Save button to save the new
profile and close the Create Self-Signed Digital ID dialog box.
Modifying the user settings in a profile
You can modify the user settings in your Digital ID at any time. You might, for
instance, want to associate a graphic with your digital signature (especially one
that is actually a picture of your handwritten signature). You also might need
to change the password for a profile or want to back up the profile file or
change the password timeout options.
Before you can change any settings for your profile, you need to take these
steps:
1. Open your Digital ID file by choosing Manage Digital IDs➪My Digital
ID Files➪Select My Digital ID File.
The Select My Digital ID File dialog box opens.
2. Select the filename of your user Digital ID in the Digital ID File drop-
down list, enter your password in User Password text box, and click
the OK button.
Acrobat automatically opens your Digital ID file.
3. Choose Manage Digital IDs➪My Digital ID Files➪My Digital ID File
Settings to open your Digital ID File Settings dialog box.
246
Part III: Reviewing, Editing, and Securing PDFs 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested