c# pdf library mit license : C# read pdf metadata application control utility html web page wpf visual studio Wiley%20Publishing%20-%20Adobe%20Acrobat%206%20PDF%20For%20Dummies%20%5B2003%5D3-part628

As both a road warrior and Web enthusiast, you can use this feature to keep
up on the latest online information right from the comfort of your portable
computer at those times when you’re traveling or just waiting to travel.
If you work as a Web designer, the Web Capture feature provides a perfect
means for distributing your Web pages for approval to your client or cowork-
ers. If they have Adobe Reader or Acrobat 6 on their computers, they can even
annotate the pages with their suggestions in the form of notes and markups or
even give you that final nod of approval using the stamp feature. (See Chapter 7
for details on retrieving and converting Web pages to PDF.)
PDF files as slide shows and 
multimedia presentations
Another application for PDF files is to use them to create and distribute slide
shows and multimedia presentations (see Figure 1-6). Acrobat 6 enables you
to add interactivity to your slides in the form of hyperlinks, buttons, and
slide transitions. You can also use the program to add sound and/or digital
movie files to the slides that your users can play back for a true multimedia
experience. Note that Acrobat 6 now supports slide shows and greeting
eCards created in Adobe Photoshop Elements 2.0 and Photoshop Album 1.0.
Figure 1-5:
Acrobat 6
makes it a
snap to
capture
Web pages
as PDF files.
17
Chapter 1: The Ins and Outs of PDF Files
C# read pdf metadata - add, remove, update PDF metadata in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Allow C# Developers to Read, Add, Edit, Update and Delete PDF Metadata
batch pdf metadata editor; pdf metadata extract
C# read pdf metadata - VB.NET PDF metadata library: add, remove, update PDF metadata in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Enable VB.NET Users to Read, Write, Edit, Delete and Update PDF Document Metadata
acrobat pdf additional metadata; add metadata to pdf programmatically
To enhance the online slide show or multimedia presentation, Acrobat 6 sup-
ports a full-screen mode that the user can invoke with none of the screen
clutter normally associated with using Acrobat and Adobe Reader (full-screen
mode hides the menus, toolbars, scroll bars, status bar, and in Windows,
even the omnipresent Task bar). When a user views your slide show or pre-
sentation in full-screen mode, you can set it up so that Acrobat automatically
advances through each page after a set time interval, using a slide transition
of your choice.
If you normally use Microsoft PowerPoint to create your slide shows, you can
convert them into PDF files at the touch of a button. You can then use
Acrobat 6 to add any extra interactivity and then distribute them for play-
back on any computer on which the free Adobe Reader 6 is installed.
The Different Types of PDF Files
In addition to the many different uses for the Adobe Portable Document
Format described in this chapter, PDF files also give you a great deal of flexi-
bility when you want to reuse their content for other purposes. For example,
Figure 1-6:
You can play
slide shows
saved as
PDF files in
full-screen
mode.
18
Part I: Presenting Acrobat and PDF Files 
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
such as its location, zonal information, metadata, and so on. Extract image from PDF free in .NET framework with trial SDK components and online C# class source
pdf metadata editor online; pdf metadata viewer
How to C#: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF for .NET
Various PDF annotation features can be integrated into your C# project, such as XDoc.PDF for .NET supports editing PDF document metadata, like Title
clean pdf metadata; batch pdf metadata
you can use various PDF formats to distribute a graphically rich report with
lots of tables and pictures for printing or viewing on a computer monitor, and
then “repurpose” that same content for viewing in a Web page or on a hand-
held device where such graphics are prohibitive. This fabulous chameleon
act is possible because Adobe PDF files support three basic document struc-
ture types: unstructured, structured, and tagged. PDF documents that are cre-
ated from these types of documents create the following PDF files:
Unstructured PDF: These PDFs have no logical structure tree to define or
further describe the author’s content. All document information is treated
as a single unit with just the author’s text and paragraph structure recog-
nized. Basic text formatting, tables, and lists are not recognized.
Structured PDF: These PDFs recognize the author’s text and paragraph
structure but also have a logical structure tree that defines basic text
formatting, such as font attributes. Tables and lists are not recognized.
Tagged PDF:These PDFs have a logical structure tree that includes all the
attributes of structured PDFs and also includes definitions such as docu-
ment styles and stories (this allows tables and lists to be recognized) and
dependencies among various document elements that allow the text to be
reflowed. (For more information on reflowing text, see Chapter 15.)
To understand document structure types, you need to look under the hood
of your favorite word processor or page layout program. As you create your 
document, these programs can provide a logical structure tree and tags that
define how your document appears when printed or viewed on-screen. I say
can providebecause programs such as Notepad in Windows and Macintosh,
which are simple text editing programs with no formatting ability, don’t pro-
vide for a logical structure tree and so create unstructured documents. You can
get an idea of how a document structure tree works using the Document Map
feature in Microsoft Word. Open a document and choose View➪Document Map.
The program displays the document’s structure tree as hierarchies of head-
ings, paragraphs, and so on. Word then adds tags to this tree that define para-
graph styles, font types, font attributes, and allow you to use this structure
tree to navigate the document by clicking different structure elements.
The support of document structure types enables you to create unstruc-
tured, structured, and tagged PDF files with Acrobat 6. The subsequent result
is that the more structured your original document, the more you can reli-
ably reuse your content for other purposes using Adobe PDF. To find out
more about PDF file types, see “Understanding how structure types affect
flexibility” in the online Acrobat help module. To access the online help
guide, choose Help➪Complete Acrobat 6.0 Help or choose Complete Acrobat
6.0 Help on the How To Window.
19
Chapter 1: The Ins and Outs of PDF Files
VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images
Get image information, such as its location, zonal information, metadata, and so on. Extract image from PDF free in .NET framework application with trial SDK
read pdf metadata java; add metadata to pdf
C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
XDoc.PDF ›› C# PDF: Extract PDF Text. C# PDF - Extract Text from PDF in C#.NET. Best C#.NET PDF text extraction library and component for free download.
modify pdf metadata; remove pdf metadata
20
Part I: Presenting Acrobat and PDF Files 
C# PDF - Read Barcode on PDF in C#.NET
NET edit PDF bookmark, C#.NET edit PDF metadata, C#.NET edit PDF digital signatures, C#.NET edit PDF sticky note, C#.NET print PDF, C#.NET read barcodes from
pdf xmp metadata viewer; online pdf metadata viewer
C# PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file for C#
C#.NET: Edit PDF Metadata. PDF SDK for .NET allows you to read, add, edit, update, and delete PDF file metadata, like Title, Subject, Author, Creator, Producer
metadata in pdf documents; rename pdf files from metadata
C
h
a
p
t
e
r
2
A
c
c
e
s
s
i
n
g
P
D
F
F
i
l
e
s
In This Chapter
Viewing PDF files with Adobe Reader 6
Viewing PDF files with Acrobat 6
Reading PDF files with Acrobat eBook Reader
Browsing PDF files in your Web browser
A
s this chapter proves, there’s more than one way to open and read a
PDF file. You have a choice between using Adobe Reader, which comes
in two flavors; Basic and Standard (both of which are free), or if you’ve pur-
chased the full-blown Acrobat 6 (which also comes in two versions; Standard
or Professional) for creating and editing PDF files, you can, of course, use it
as well. In addition, Adobe also introduced a new product this year for the
enterprise sector called Acrobat Elements. The program allows you to view
and create, but not edit, PDF documents and must be bulk purchased in lots
of 1000. See Chapter 5 for more information on creating PDF documents with
Acrobat Elements. As if these weren’t enough browsing choices, you can also
open and view your PDF files in common Web browsers, such as Internet
Explorer and Netscape Navigator on all Windows operating systems and
Macintosh OS 9.2.2 and earlier. Note that as of this writing, in order to use the
Windows version of Acrobat 6 or Adobe Reader for in-browser viewing of PDF
documents, you must have Internet Explorer 5 or later. In-browser viewing of
PDF files is also not supported in Mac OS X. As of this writing, Adobe plans to
add that functionality in the near future for Mac OS X users. In the meantime,
you can configure Acrobat 6 or Adobe Reader as Helper applications in OS X
versions of Internet Explorer and Netscape Navigator.
Perusing PDF Files in Adobe Reader
The most common way to view PDF files is by using Adobe Reader (formerly
called Acrobat Reader). Adobe Systems offers this program as a free down-
load for a wide number of different computer platforms. As of this writing, the
VB.NET PDF: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF
XDoc.PDF for .NET supports editing PDF document metadata, like Title, Subject, Author, Creator, Producer, Keywords, Created Date, and Last Modified Date.
edit multiple pdf metadata; pdf metadata extract
C# PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net
Bookmarks. Comments, forms and multimedia. Document and metadata. All object data. File attachment. Flatten visible layers. C#.NET DLLs: Compress PDF Document.
get pdf metadata; pdf remove metadata
most current version of Adobe Reader is version 6.0. Adobe Reader coincides
with the release of Acrobat 6 and utilizes many of the same feature enhance-
ments and improvements to the User Interface (UI) that characterize the latest
version of the full-blown product. If you’re using Windows XP or Mac OS X,
Adobe Reader is automatically selected when you specify your operating
system on the Adobe download page. Note that the Macintosh version of
Adobe Reader (and also Acrobat 6 Standard and Professional versions) only
runs on the Jaguar version of Mac OS X, because the minimum system require-
ment for the Macintosh version is 10.2.2.
Adobe Reader can open and read all PDF files created with earlier versions of
Acrobat. Be aware, however, that earlier versions of Acrobat Reader cannot
open and read PDF files created with the later versions of Adobe Acrobat
unless you specify compatibility with earlier versions when you create a PDF.
Consequently, you also lose newer Acrobat functionalities when you create
backward compatible PDF files. See Chapter 4 for more information on creat-
ing PDF documents. As Table 2-1 indicates, each version of Adobe Acrobat
creates its own version of PDF files. Later versions of Acrobat can read files
created in earlier versions, but not vice versa.
Table 2-1
Versions of Acrobat and Their PDF Files
Acrobat Version
PDF File Version Created
Year Released
Acrobat 1.0
PDF 1.0
1993
Acrobat 2.0
PDF 1.1
1994
Acrobat 3.0
PDF 1.2
1996
Acrobat 4.0
PDF 1.3
1999
Acrobat 5.0
PDF 1.4
2001
Acrobat 6.0
PDF 1.5
2003
As you can see in Table 2-1, you can tell which version of Acrobat produced a
particular PDF file version because the sum of the digits in the PDF file version
equals the number of the Adobe Acrobat version that created it. For example,
you know that a PDF file in version 1.3 was likely created with Acrobat 4
because the sum of its file version numbers, 1 and 3, is 4.
When you’re viewing PDF files in Acrobat on a Windows computer, you can
tell what version of PDF file you’re dealing with by choosing File➪Document
Properties to open the Document Properties dialog box. Select Description in
22
Part I: Presenting Acrobat and PDF Files 
the list box in the PDF Information area of the Description palette and you
find the PDF version. Note that the file version listed will not always tally with
the version of Acrobat that created the file because engineering a PDF for
backward compatibility is possible.
When creating a PDF file with the Acrobat Distiller in Acrobat 6, you can make
it possible for viewers using earlier versions of Acrobat Reader to open your
files by selecting a Compatibility setting in the Adobe PDF Settings dialog box
for an earlier version of Acrobat. This setting provides compatibility with
Acrobat versions 3.0 through 6.0 and their corresponding PDF versions,
which ensures that your files will reach a wider audience.
Downloading and launching 
Adobe Reader 6
Adobe Reader 6 (formerly Acrobat Reader) is available in two flavors: Basic
and Full. The Full version gives you the added functionality of local, network,
or Internet PDF searches, Accessibility features, eBook support, and
Multimedia enhancements.
All you have to do to get the appropriate version of Adobe Reader for your
current operating system is point your Web browser to the following page on
the Adobe Systems Web site:
www.adobe.com/products/acrobat/readstep2.html
This URL takes you to the Download Adobe Reader page, where all you have
to do is make a selection from each of three drop-down lists provided in the
Step 1 of 2 dialog box:
1. Select the Language of the Adobe Reader (English in most cases).
2. Select the Platform (or operating system) that your computer uses
(that is, Windows Me, Windows NT, Windows 2000/XP, Mac 8.6,
Mac 9.x, OS X, and so on).
3. Choose a Connection speed that you use to access the Internet (dial-up
or broadband).
Note that the selections you make in Steps 2 and 3 above determine the 
version of Adobe Reader best suited for your computer system. After you
choose your Connection speed, the Step 2 of 2 dialog box appears and dis-
plays the result of your Platform and Connection speed choices. If your 
23
Chapter 2: Accessing PDF Files
current operating system is compatible with Adobe Reader 6 and you chose
dial-up as your connection speed, you are offered two choices: either the
Basic or Full version. If you chose broadband as your connection speed, only
the Full version is offered. Earlier platform/operating system choices that are
not compatible with Adobe Reader provide the appropriate version of the
older Acrobat Reader program for download.
The Basic version of Adobe Reader is 8.7MB in size and can typically take up
to 30 minutes or more to download with a 56K modem. The Full version of
Adobe Reader has enhanced features described in the Step 2 of 2 dialog box
and weighs in at a hefty 15.3MB (20.9MB for the Mac version). Downloading
the Full version is not a big deal if you have broadband Internet access, but it
may be worth considering the Basic version if you use a modem to download
from the Web.
After choosing your desired version of Adobe Reader, click the Download
button, select a download location in the Browse for Folder dialog box, and
wait until the Adobe Reader file is downloaded on your computer. Then
double-click its installer icon to decompress the Reader files and install them
on your hard drive (on the Mac, the Adobe Reader Installer actually down-
loads the Reader files and installs them when you double-click the Adobe
Reader Installer icon).
After installing Adobe Reader on your hard drive, you can launch the Reader
with or without also opening a PDF file. To launch the program without also
opening a PDF on the Windows platform, choose Start➪Programs➪Adobe
Reader (Start➪All Programs➪Adobe Reader in Windows XP).
To launch Adobe Reader on the Macintosh in OS X, follow these steps:
1. Click the Finder icon on the Dock to open the Finder and click the
Applications button on the Finder toolbar.
2. Double-click the Adobe Reader file icon in the Applications folder.
After you launch Adobe Reader , you can then open PDF files for viewing and
printing by choosing File➪Open and selecting the PDF file to open in its Open
dialog box.
In addition to simply double-clicking a PDF file icon you can also launch
Adobe Reader and open a PDF file for viewing by dragging a PDF file icon
onto an Adobe Reader shortcut on the Windows or Macintosh desktop. Note
that when you install Adobe Reader on a Windows machine, the installer
automatically creates a desktop shortcut called Adobe Reader 6.0.
24
Part I: Presenting Acrobat and PDF Files 
To create such a desktop shortcut on the Macintosh (where it’s called an
alias), click to select the Adobe Reader icon (located in the Applications
folder on your hard drive), press Ô+M to create an Adobe Reader 6.0 alias,
and then drag this alias icon onto the Macintosh desktop.
Figure 2-1 shows you how the Adobe Reader window appears on a Windows
computer when you launch the Reader and simultaneously open a PDF file
within it. Note that in this particular case, the PDF file that opens takes up the
full width of the program window up to the Navigation pane, which displays
the bookmarks in this document.
You can have more than one PDF file open at a time in Adobe Reader 6. To
open multiple files when launching Adobe Reader 6, Ctrl+click individual PDF
file icons or lasso a group of them and then drag the entire selection onto the
Adobe Reader desktop shortcut (alias). To do this from the Open dialog box,
Ctrl+click or lasso the group before you click the Open button.
Figure 2-1:
The Adobe
Reader
window
with the
open PDF
file used to
launch it.
25
Chapter 2: Accessing PDF Files
The Adobe Reader window
As you can see in Figure 2-2, the Adobe Reader window is divided into three
areas:
Menu and toolbars at the top of the screen
Document pane with scroll bars to the right and bottom and a status bar
to immediate left at the bottom
Navigation pane with tabs for its four palettes: Bookmarks, Signatures,
Layers, and Pages.
Menu bar
Navigation pane
Toolbars
Document pane
Figure 2-2:
The Adobe
Reader
window is
divided into
three areas:
menu and
toolbars
above;
Document
and
Navigation
panes
below.
26
Part I: Presenting Acrobat and PDF Files 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested