c# pdf library nuget : Delete metadata from pdf application control tool html web page wpf online Wiley%20Publishing%20-%20Adobe%20Acrobat%206%20PDF%20For%20Dummies%20%5B2003%5D34-part633

C
h
a
p
t
e
r
1
5
B
u
i
l
d
i
n
g
a
n
d
P
u
b
l
i
s
h
i
n
g
e
B
o
o
k
s
In This Chapter
Taking a look at eBook design concepts
Converting tagged PDF files to eBooks
Exploring eBook graphics
Adding hyperlinks to eBooks
Controlling text flow with tagged PDF files
Distributing eBooks
I
f you’ve browsed any of your favorite online bookstores lately, you’ve prob-
ably noticed the burgeoning presence of eBooks for sale. Like it or not,
eBooks are definitely the wave of the future, and while they’ll never replace a
nice, cuddly printed book, they do have distinct advantages that ensure their
future widespread use. Portability and ease of navigation are just two of the
many advantages eBooks have over traditional books, and as I’ve mentioned
throughout this book, these are areas where the Adobe PDF really shines.
In this chapter, you discover all the ways that Acrobat 6 allows you to build a
better eBook. You see how easy it is to design and create a PDF file specifi-
cally for the eBook market. You also find out how to add interactivity to an
eBook and create the kind of graphically rich page layouts that are only pos-
sible using Adobe PDF. More importantly, you discover how to create tagged
PDF files that allow Acrobat eBooks to at last be viewed on handheld devices
running Palm OS or Microsoft Pocket PC software. Finally, you find out how to
package and distribute your eBooks and, in the process, ready yourself to
catch the next big wave in digital publishing.
But First, a Little eBook History . . .
The origins of eBook technology are directly descended from SGML (Standard
Generalized Markup Language), the grandmother of all markup languages.
This venerable document structuring language (developed in 1986), along
Delete metadata from pdf - add, remove, update PDF metadata in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Allow C# Developers to Read, Add, Edit, Update and Delete PDF Metadata
add metadata to pdf file; batch update pdf metadata
Delete metadata from pdf - VB.NET PDF metadata library: add, remove, update PDF metadata in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Enable VB.NET Users to Read, Write, Edit, Delete and Update PDF Document Metadata
clean pdf metadata; remove metadata from pdf online
with its offspring HTML (HyperText Markup Language) and the more recent
and dynamic XML (Extensible Markup Language), are responsible for the bil-
lions of Web pages floating around the Internet today.
Markup languages like HTML use tagsto define the structure and function of
a document, in this case, a Web page that allows two remarkable features:
The document content can be reflowed,meaning the reading order of the text
is preserved no matter what screen size it is being viewed on, andit can con-
tain hyperlinks.
To see an example of reflowed text, just crank up your favorite Web browser,
visit your favorite Web site, and use the browser’s text zoom feature to shrink
or enlarge the text. Even though the text gets bigger or smaller, the reading
structure of the Web page remains the same. This is accomplished through the
use of tags that define the order of a document’s headings, paragraphs, fonts,
graphics, and other elements. The “link” tag, on the other hand, is what makes
hyperlinks possible, and the ability to click a hyperlink to navigate from one
document to the next is what makes the World Wide Web interactive.
Reflowing text and creating hyperlinks were the main reasons HTML was used
early on in the development of eBooks. These features engendered two of the
biggest advantages eBooks have over printed books. Because text could reflow,
the entire content of a book could be viewed on a screen as small as a handheld
computing device, allowing you to carry dozens of books in the palm of your
hand. The use of hyperlinks in eBooks is just as compelling. You only need to
imagine the difference between clicking a Table of Contents heading and having
the beginning of a chapter appear instantly in an eBook reader, and using the
traditional look-up-and-thumb-through-pages technique required for printed
books. The only drawback to using HTML as a development tool for eBooks is
that, like Web pages, they cannot be as graphically rich or as precisely laid out
as printed books, which from a reading experience standpoint, isan innate
expectation eBook users bring to the party.
Acrobat PDF files, on the other hand, rely on PostScript (see Chapter 1 for
more on the origins of PDF), which is a page-layout language invented by
Adobe specifically to create both electronic and printed documents that pre-
serve the look and feel of their original counterparts. In versions prior to
Acrobat 5 and 6, the problem with the standard PDF file as an eBook was that
because it emphasized page layout, reflowing text was impossible. This fact
relegated Acrobat eBook viewing to computer screens and laptops. Handheld
devices as PDF viewers were never an option in the early stages of the Adobe
Acrobat eBook development game. All that has changed with the release of
Acrobat 6. Adobe has integrated the structure and navigational advantages of
markup language with the “just like a printed book” reading experience of
PDF. Acrobat 6’s ability to create tagged PDF files offers the best of both
worlds when it comes to designing and developing an eBook.
328
Part IV:PDFs as Electronic Documents 
VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
›› VB.NET PDF: Delete PDF Page. VB.NET PDF - How to Delete PDF Document Page in VB.NET. Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in VB.NET Class.
remove pdf metadata; pdf metadata online
C# PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
Page: Delete Existing PDF Pages. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› C# PDF: Delete PDF Page. C#.NET PDF Library - Delete PDF Document Page in C#.NET.
add metadata to pdf programmatically; adding metadata to pdf
Designing eBooks for Different Devices
You design Adobe Acrobat eBooks in a word processor or page layout program
and then convert their documents to PDF. You can then perform any last-
minute tweaks in Acrobat, such as adjusting text flow or linking multimedia
objects, and then view your final product in the Adobe Acrobat eBook Reader
on your computer, laptop, or on a Palm OS or Microsoft Pocket PC handheld
device. (See Chapter 2 to find out how to use Adobe’s eBook Reader program.)
Note that Acrobat 6 and Adobe Reader 6 now support the purchase and down-
loading of eBooks. As of this writing, Adobe plans to discontinue the Acrobat
eBook Reader, though users of that program can continue to purchase and
download eBooks as long as current eBook distributors support that program.
PDF files come in three document structure flavors — unstructured, struc-
tured, and tagged. Structured PDF files enable you to convert or repurposea
PDF for another format, such as RTF (Rich Text Format), while retaining much
of the original page layout and reading structure. Tagged PDF files have the
highest degree of success in retaining their original formatting when converting
to RTF and are also able to reflow text, which is not the case with unstructured
or structured PDF files. For the purpose of creating eBooks, then, you should
always use tagged PDF files, because they offer the most flexibility when it
comes to viewing the final product on the greatest number of viewing devices.
To get more information about PDF file types, choose Help➪Complete
Acrobat 6.0 Help and see “Building flexibility into Adobe PDF files” on page
368 of the online Adobe Acrobat Help.
The following programs allow you to convert their documents to tagged PDF
files in order to build an eBook:
FrameMaker SGML 6.0 (Windows and Mac OS)
FrameMaker 7.0 (Windows and Mac OS)
PageMaker 7.0 (Windows and Mac OS)
InDesign 2.0 (Windows and Mac OS)
Microsoft Office (Windows 2000 and XP only)
Adobe Reader 6 and Acrobat 6 were developed to provide a means of viewing
PDF eBooks on a computer screen or laptop. Because of their size, computer
screens are well suited to display graphically rich page layouts that re-create
the reading experience of a printed book. For designing these types of
eBooks, page layout programs (PageMaker, InDesign, or FrameMaker) are the
best tools to use. In addition to allowing complex page layouts, their ability
to create tagged PDF files adds a higher degree of accessibility for visually
challenged users viewing PDF files in either Adobe Reader or Acrobat.
329
Chapter 15: Building and Publishing eBooks
VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
Offer professional PDF document metadata editing APIs, using which VB.NET developers can redact, delete, view and save PDF metadata. PDF Document Protection.
analyze pdf metadata; metadata in pdf documents
C# PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file for C#
PDF SDK for .NET allows you to read, add, edit, update, and delete PDF file metadata, like Title, Subject, Author, Creator, Producer, Keywords, etc.
extract pdf metadata; read pdf metadata
Graphic size and page layout are definitely restricted by the screen size of hand-
held devices, so it’s better to develop eBooks that you want to view on those
devices in Microsoft Word, which is text-based and has Acrobat 6 features built
in that enable you to create tagged PDF files with the click of a button. (See
Chapter 5 for more on creating PDF files in Microsoft Office programs.)
Here are a few considerations to take into account in order to optimize
eBooks designed for Palm OS or Microsoft Pocket PC handheld devices:
Graphics:With handheld device screen resolutions running between 320
x 320 for Palm OS devices and 320 x 240 for Pocket PC devices, graphics
must be optimized for the target screen size if they’re used at all. Note
that while the majority of Pocket PC and newer Palm devices in use have
color screens, many more older Palm devices are out there right now
without color. You could consider preparing your graphics in grayscale
(thus creating a smaller file) for this reason. For more on optimizing
graphics for eBooks, see Chapter 4 as well as the “Designing Library
andCover Graphics” section, later in this chapter.
Fonts:Use the common Base 14 system fonts that are installed on your
computer. These typefaces have been optimized for on-screen viewing
and produce the best results when viewed on a handheld device.
Paragraphs:Separate paragraphs with an additional hard carriage
return for clearer visibility on the Palm handheld screen.
Conversion settings:For grayscale Palm handheld devices, Adobe sug-
gests some slight changes to the eBook job option in the Acrobat
Distiller. You can get the specifics on creating a custom job option for
these handheld devices at:
http://studio.adobe.com/learn/tips/acr5acropalm/main.html
Adobe currently offers three free versions of Adobe Reader for hand-held
devices that support Palm OS, Pocket PC, or Symbian OS (which runs on
Nokia Communicator devices). You can get information and download these
products at:
www.adobe.com/products/acrobat/readstep2.html
The Acrobat Readers are applications that are installed on their respective
handheld devices and are designed to accommodate their specific screen char-
acteristics. In addition to the reader software, the PocketPC and Symbian OS
versions includes a Windows desktop application for preparing and transfer-
ring a PDF to a user’s handheld device. The Palm OS reader includes a desktop
application for both Macintosh and Windows and a HotSync conduit. To handle
synchronization, the Pocket PC version includes the ActiveSync filter, which
has an added feature that attempts to create tags from untagged PDF files prior
to uploading them to the Pocket PC handheld device.
330
Part IV:PDFs as Electronic Documents 
VB.NET PDF delete text library: delete, remove text from PDF file
VB.NET PDF - How to Delete Text from PDF File in VB.NET. VB.NET Programming Guide to Delete Text from PDF File Using XDoc.PDF SDK for VB.NET.
bulk edit pdf metadata; pdf xmp metadata editor
C# PDF delete text Library: delete, remove text from PDF file in
C#.NET PDF SDK - Delete Text from PDF File in C#.NET. How to Use C# Programming Demo Code to Delete Text from PDF File with .NET PDF Component.
delete metadata from pdf; remove metadata from pdf acrobat
Turning Out Tagged PDF Files
As I mention earlier in this chapter, a number of programs enable you to
create a tagged PDF file. They do this either by exporting tags during the
process of creating a PDF or, in the case of Microsoft Office programs, by 
converting them using the PDFMaker 6.0 plug-in. You can find out all about
converting Office documents to tagged PDF files in Chapter 5. Keep in mind
that if you’re designing an eBook with little or no graphics for display on a
handheld device, Microsoft Word is the tool of choice. On the other hand, if
your goal is to create a beautifully stylized eBook for viewing in Acrobat 6,
Adobe Reader 6, or Acrobat eBook Reader 2.2, then PageMaker, InDesign, or
FrameMaker is the best bet.
Perfecting your eBook in PageMaker
Authoring programs that export their tags to PDF perform a vital function
when developing Acrobat eBooks. They allow you to complete nearly all the
mechanical and structural work on your eBook before you send it upstream
to Acrobat 6. After your eBook is converted to PDF, you’ll find that Acrobat’s
functional but limited editing toolset is best suited for fine-tuning the graphic
and interactive elements of your PDF file. Take an eBook table of contents for
an example. Creating a table of contents (TOC) with more than a handful of
headings in Acrobat is a tedious proposition (to put it mildly), especially
compared to automatically generating an exportable, tagged, table of con-
tents in PageMaker. The following sections take you through the process of
preparing your eBook content so that 99 percent of your work is finished by
the time you export it, tags and all, to Acrobat 6.
Setting up your eBook document
The following list provides a number of important tips to utilize that will
ensure high-quality output when you convert your eBook to tagged PDF.
Some of the items deal with conversion settings that you specify in Acrobat
Distiller prior to exporting your eBook document to PDF. (See Chapter 4 to
find out about selecting Distiller options.)
When creating eBook content in PageMaker or any other layout program,
make sure to set up a smaller page size so that your text won’t be dis-
torted when rendered in the smaller screen area provided by your eBook
reader of choice. A 6-x-9-inch page dimension with 
1
2
- or 
3
4
-inch margins
all around translates well to desktop and laptop screen resolutions.
Target output resolution should be 300 dpi or better to ensure clear,
crisp text when the file is downsampled and compressed during the PDF
conversion process.
331
Chapter 15: Building and Publishing eBooks
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
Delete unimportant contents: Flatten form fields. Document and metadata. All object data. VB.NET Demo Code to Optimize An Exist PDF File in Visual C#.NET Project.
read pdf metadata online; preview edit pdf metadata
How to C#: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF for .NET
load, combine, and split PDF file(s), and add, create, insert, delete, re-order XDoc.PDF for .NET supports editing PDF document metadata, like Title
change pdf metadata; pdf metadata viewer online
Try to use your system’s Base 14 fonts in your eBook document.
Otherwise, choose fonts that have strong serifs and strokes. If these
fontproperties are too delicate, they’ll distort and cause reading diffi-
culty when displayed in the Adobe Reader or Acrobat. In addition, be
sure to embed those fonts you decide to use in the converted PDF. You
can experiment with the readability of a chosen font by converting a
testdocument to PDF and viewing it in Acrobat or Adobe Reader using
avariety of magnifications and CoolType settings. You might also check
for differences when viewing the eBook on a CRT or LCD computer
screen.
The minimum font size for body text should be 12 points. Use at least
2points of leading. If you want to spread out your text, select a wider
tracking value for your chosen font rather than using character kerning.
Tracking can be applied globally and produces more significant visual
enhancement than kerning, which also bulks up the size of your file.
When creating paragraph heading styles in PageMaker, make sure you
specify their inclusion in your table of contents by clicking the Include in
Table of Contents check box in the Paragraph Specifications dialog box.
You can open this dialog box by selecting the heading text in your docu-
ment and choosing Type➪Paragraph or pressing Ctrl+M (Ô+M on the
Mac). You can also access this dialog box while editing styles. Choose
Type➪Define Styles, select a heading style in the Style list box, click the
Edit button to open the Style Options dialog box, and finally, click the
Para button.
Figure 15-1 shows the first page of my eBook example using the document
setup parameters I just described. I used 
1
2
-inch margins all around with the
exception of the 
3
4
-inch margin on the bottom of the page to accommodate
page numbers. The font is 12 point Georgia, using 2.4 points of leading for
body text and up to 3 points for bulleted and numbered lists.
Generating a TOC
You can create a table of contents from those heading styles that are marked
for inclusion in your PageMaker publication. The TOC can reside in the same
document as your eBook body or in a separate publication for use with
PageMaker’s Book utility. I cover both methods in the following steps for 
creating a table of contents with hyperlink tags that can be exported to
Acrobat.
To create a table of contents in the same publication as your eBook body,
follow these steps:
1. In PageMaker, select the first page in your publication and choose
Utilities➪Create TOC.
The Table of Contents dialog box, shown in Figure 15-2, appears.
332
Part IV:PDFs as Electronic Documents 
2. Type a new title or accept the default “Table of Contents” title in the
text box provided and select one of the radio buttons in the Format area
to specify the appearance and position of page numbers in the TOC.
You can also specify a special character to appear between the entry
and the page number (a tab space is the default) here.
3. Click OK to generate your table of contents story.
A storyin PageMaker terms is an independent text object with unique
formatting that can be positioned anywhere in a page layout.
The mouse pointer changes to the story flow cursor. Now you need to
create empty pages in which to flow your TOC story.
Figure 15-2:
The Create
Table of
Contents
dialog box.
Figure 15-1:
The first
page of my
SkillBuilder
eBook body
section.
333
Chapter 15: Building and Publishing eBooks
4. Choose Layout➪Insert Pages and enter the desired number of empty
pages you want inserted, select Before the Current Page from the
drop-down list, and click the Insert button.
5. Go to the first of your newly inserted pages and click to flow your
TOC story onto the empty pages from there.
To create a table of contents in a separate publication from your eBook body,
follow these steps:
1. Create a new document from your eBook template containing the
desired number of pages for your TOC and then save and name the
publication.
2. Choose Utilities➪Book.
The Book Publication List dialog box opens, as shown in Figure 15-3.
This dialog box is used to specify the order of the publications you want
to include in your book. Your current TOC document appears in the
Book List on the right side of the dialog box.
3. In the list on the left, locate the documents you want to include and
add them to the Book List by clicking the Insert button located
between the two lists. Click OK to save your changes.
You can remove files and change the order of files in the list using the
appropriate buttons. In Figure 15-3, I’ve added the body publication to
the Book List after the TOC publication.
4. Choose Utilities➪Create TOC.
The Table of Contents dialog box opens.
5. Type a new title or accept the default “Table of Contents” title in the text
box provided and select one of the radio buttons in the Format area to
specify the appearance and position of page numbers in the TOC.
You can also specify a special character to appear between the entry
and the page number (a tab space is the default) here.
Figure 15-3:
Define the
order of
your eBook
sections in
the Book
Publication
List dialog
box.
334
Part IV:PDFs as Electronic Documents 
Note that when you’re creating a TOC from a document listed in a book
publication, the Include Book Publications check box is automatically
selected, as opposed to being grayed-out as in Figure 15-2.
6. Click OK to generate your table of contents story; then go to the first
page of your TOC publication and flow your TOC story from there.
Your brand-new table of contents contains tagged hyperlink entries that will
produce accurate bookmarks and page references in your eBook when con-
verted to PDF and viewed in Acrobat. You can check your links in PageMaker
by selecting the Hand tool on the floating toolbox. The links appear in blue
outline in Layout view, as shown in Figure 15-4, and you can click the hyper-
links in order to test their accuracy.
PageMaker inserts a text marker in front of every entry in the placed table of
contents story in order to create hyperlink tags that will function when
exported to tagged PDF. These text markers are visible only in story editor,
(PageMaker’s text editing window) and if they are removed, the links will not
operate. For this reason, if you are editing a TOC entry, be very careful not to
press the Delete key when the insertion point is directly in front of a TOC
entry or page-number reference, because this will remove the text marker
from the publication. Your only recourse in such an event is to either close
and reopen the document without saving (if you haven’t saved the changes
already) or regenerate the TOC.
Figure 15-4:
Displaying
and testing
table of
contents
links with
the Hand
tool.
335
Chapter 15: Building and Publishing eBooks
You can make text edits to your TOC entries (heeding the warning in the pre-
ceding paragraph), but if you decide to add any new entries in either the TOC
or the body of your eBook, you will have to regenerate a new TOC to create
links for those entries that will export to tagged PDF.
Using mixed page-numbering schemes
The main reason for using PageMaker’s Book utility to combine separate 
sections of your eBook is that doing so enables you to create different num-
bering schemes for those parts. A typical example is the way printed books
use Roman numerals for their front matter (copyright, title, acknowledgment,
and table of contents pages) and Arabic numerals for the body. Some books
will also use different number formats for their appendixes and index.
PageMaker allows you to renumber pages in a single publication but not
change their format, which works well for many types of publications. As an
eBook publisher, though, it’s nice to know you can add these little details to
re-create the look and feel of printed books.
To apply a different number format to one of your eBook publications, follow
these steps:
1. Open the publication you want to reformat in PageMaker.
2. Choose File➪Document Setup, and in the Document Setup dialog box,
click the Numbers button.
The Page Numbering dialog box opens, as shown in Figure 15-5.
3. Click one of the five radio buttons to select a numbering format and
then click OK.
4. Click OK to close the Document Setup dialog box and view your newly
formatted page numbers in the document.
You can apply these steps to any other eBook sections as desired. The
beauty of the PageMaker Book utility is that it compiles your eBook sections
Figure 15-5:
Choose a
page-
numbering
format 
for your
PageMaker
publication.
336
Part IV:PDFs as Electronic Documents 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested