The menu bar contains standard application menus: File through Help. To
select a menu and display its items, you click the menu name (or you can
press the Alt key plus the underlined letter in the menu name, the so-called
hot key, in the Windows version). To select a menu item, you drag down to
highlight it and then press Enter, or you click it (in the Windows version, you
can also select an item by typing its hot key). Menus on the Macintosh ver-
sion display hot keys with the cloverleaf symbol that represents the
Command key. You can select these commands simply by holding down the
Command key plus the appropriate hot key without opening the menu.
The Adobe Reader toolbars
Directly beneath the menu bar, you see a long toolbar with an almost solid
row of buttons. The toolbar may appear on two rows, depending on your
screen resolution, when you install and open Adobe Reader for the first time.
As Figure 2-3 indicates, this toolbar is actually five separate toolbars, File
through Tasks. Note the Tasks toolbar is a single button with a pop-up menu
for acquiring, opening, or accessing help on eBooks. This is one example (and
the only one you see in Adobe Reader 6) of several new single-button Tasks
toolbars. The rest are covered in the section about toolbars in Chapter 3.
The File toolbar, shown in Figure 2-3, displays buttons and labels. You can
gain more space on the upper toolbar area by hiding the File Toolbar labels.
To do so, right-click the toolbar area and choose Tool Button Labels to
remove the checkmark from the context menu.
Four of the buttons shown in the toolbars in this figure sport downward-
pointing shaded triangles. These downward-pointing triangles (formerly
titled More Tools in previous versions of Acrobat) are buttons that, when
clicked, display a pop-up menu with additional related tools or commands. In
Adobe Reader, these buttons, from left to right, are as follows:
File toolbar
Rotate View toolbar
Basic toolbar
Zoom toolbar
Tasks toolbar
Figure 2-3:
The space
below the
menu bar of
the Adobe
Reader
window
contains
five toolbars
side by side.
27
Chapter 2: Accessing PDF Files
Pdf metadata viewer - add, remove, update PDF metadata in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Allow C# Developers to Read, Add, Edit, Update and Delete PDF Metadata
pdf metadata viewer online; bulk edit pdf metadata
Pdf metadata viewer - VB.NET PDF metadata library: add, remove, update PDF metadata in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Enable VB.NET Users to Read, Write, Edit, Delete and Update PDF Document Metadata
add metadata to pdf file; change pdf metadata
The Select Text tool: Right next to the Hand tool in the Basic toolbar, its
pop-up menu button enables you to choose either Text or Image and
also the Expand This Button option to add both menu items as buttons
on the toolbar.
The Zoom In tool: The first button in the Zoom toolbar. Its pop-up menu
button enables you to select the Zoom In tool if you’re using one of the
other Zoom tools, the Zoom Out tool (Shift+Z) for zooming out on an
area, or a new Dynamic Zoom tool that enables you to dynamically
(without incremental changes) zoom in and out by clicking on a viewing
area and dragging the mouse up or down.
The Viewing button: Shows the current page magnification setting as a
percentage in the Zoom toolbar.
The Read an eBook tool: The only button on the Tasks toolbar. Its pop-
up menu lets you open an eBook in your library (called My Bookshelf)
and display an online guide to reading eBooks in the How To window.
Another similar option you may encounter on these pop-up menus is the
Show (insert name) Toolbar command that displays, by default, all the menu
commands in a floating toolbar window that can be docked anywhere in the
toolbar area. To hide this floating toolbar, click its Close button. If the toolbar
has been docked, uncheck the Show Toolbar command on the original tool-
bar button pop-up menu to hide it. The next time you select this command,
the toolbar will appear in its last displayed state, either floating or docked.
Users of Acrobat Reader 5 or earlier may notice that Adobe has consolidated
the Find and Search tools into a single Search tool button on the File Toolbar.
I find this most gratifying, because I can never remember the difference
between a Find and a Search. The Acrobat 6 Search feature is very clear. It
enables you to do fast text searches in either the current PDF document, a
PDF file on your computer or local network, and even on the Internet when
you’re using the Full version of Adobe Reader. Clicking the button opens the
Search PDF pane in the How To window, where you specify search criteria
and then click the Search button. Search results are then displayed in the
Search PDF pane. See the “Adobe Reader Document pane” section, later in
this chapter, to find out more on the new How To window.
Table 2-2 lists the buttons on each of these toolbars and describes their 
functions.
Table 2-2
The Toolbars of Adobe Reader 6
Toolbar
Icon
Name
Use It To . . .
File
Open
Display the Open dialog box.
28
Part I: Presenting Acrobat and PDF Files 
VB.NET PDF - WPF PDF Viewer for VB.NET Program
C#.NET PDF Create, C#.NET PDF Document Viewer, C#.NET PDF Windows Viewer, C#.NET search text in PDF, C#.NET edit PDF bookmark, C#.NET edit PDF metadata, C#.NET
pdf keywords metadata; extract pdf metadata
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
C#.NET PDF Create, C#.NET PDF Document Viewer, C#.NET PDF Windows Viewer, C#.NET search text in PDF, C#.NET edit PDF bookmark, C#.NET edit PDF metadata, C#.NET
pdf metadata online; batch update pdf metadata
Toolbar
Icon
Name
Use It To . . .
Save a Copy
Display the Save a Copy dialog box.
Print
Open the Print dialog box.
E-mail
Open your e-mail client and attach the
current PDF to a new e-mail.
Search
Open the Search PDF pane in the How
To window.
Basic
Hand tool (H)
Move the PDF document to different
areas of the viewing window or of the
document itself, depending on your
zoom setting; the Hand tool changes to
an arrow over menus and buttons, and
to a pointing finger over hyperlinks.
Select Text tool (V) Select text or images in the document
for copying to the Clipboard.
Snapshot tool
Select text or graphics in the docu-
ment for copying to the Clipboard
bydrawing a marquee around your
selection.
Zoom
Zoom In tool (Z)
Zoom in on the area that you point to
with the magnifying glass icon.
Actual Size
Resize the zoom magnification setting
to 100%.
Fit in Window
Resize the zoom magnification setting
so that you see the entire document.
Fit Width
Resize the zoom magnification setting
so that the width of the document fills
the entire Document pane.
Zoom Out
Decrease the magnification (to see
more of the entire document) by set
intervals of 25% or less.
Magnification Level Display the current magnification level
as a percentage of the actual size
(100%). To change the magnification,
type a number in the Magnification
Level text box or select a preset zoom
value from the pop-up menu.
(continued)
29
Chapter 2: Accessing PDF Files
How to C#: Modify Image Metadata (tag)
C#.NET PDF Create, C#.NET PDF Document Viewer, C#.NET PDF Windows Viewer, C#.NET search text in PDF, C#.NET edit PDF bookmark, C#.NET edit PDF metadata, C#.NET
google search pdf metadata; remove metadata from pdf
C# PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file for C#
RasterEdge WPF PDF Viewer provides C# users abilities to view, annotate, convert and create PDF in WPF application. C#.NET: Edit PDF Metadata.
view pdf metadata in explorer; view pdf metadata
Table 2-2 (continued)
Toolbar
Icon
Name
Use It To . . .
Zoom In
Increase the magnification (to see
more detail and less of the entire docu-
ment) by set intervals of 25% or less.
Tasks
Read an eBook
Go online to acquire eBooks.
Rotate View
Rotate Clockwise Reorient the current page by rotating it 
90 degrees to the right (clockwise).
Rotate Counter-
Reorient the current page by  
clockwise
rotating it 90 degrees to the left 
(counterclockwise).
Navigation
First Page
Jump to the beginning of a multipage
document.
Previous Page
Jump to the previous page in a multi-
page document.
Next Page
Jump to the subsequent page in a 
multipage document.
Last Page
Jump to the end of a multipage 
document.
View History
Previous View
Go to the last page you visited.
Next View
Go back to the page that was current
when you clicked the Previous View
button.
The Adobe Reader Document pane
The Adobe Reader Document pane is where your PDF files load for viewing.
How much document text and graphics appear in this pane depends upon a
number of factors:
The size of the pages in the document (displayed in the Page Size indica-
tor in the status bar at the bottom of the Document pane — see Figure 2-4)
The size of your computer monitor
The current zoom (magnification) setting in Adobe Reader (shown in the
Magnification Level button in the Viewing toolbar)
30
Part I: Presenting Acrobat and PDF Files 
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to view, annotate, convert and print PDF in
PDF Online. Convert PDF Online. WPF PDF Viewer. View PDF in Image to PDF. Image: Remove Image from PDF Page. Edit URL. Bookmark: Edit Bookmark. Metadata: Edit, Delete
pdf metadata reader; modify pdf metadata
C# TIFF: TIFF Metadata Editor, How to Write & Read TIFF Metadata
C# TIFF - Edit TIFF Metadata in C#.NET. Allow Users to Read and Edit Metadata Stored in Tiff Image in C#.NET Application. How to Get TIFF XMP Metadata in C#.NET.
delete metadata from pdf; edit multiple pdf metadata
Of these factors, you can change only the current zoom setting either with
the buttons in the Viewing toolbar (see Table 2-2) or the options on the View
menu. Zoom out to get an overview of the document’s layout. Zoom in to
make the text large enough to read.
The How To window is a new feature in both Adobe Reader and Acrobat 6 that
provides help and dialog boxes for common tasks, displays the online help
guide for both programs, and takes up a significant portion of the Document
window. To quickly display or hide the How To window in both the Windows
and Macintosh versions of Adobe Reader and Acrobat 6, press F4. See Chapter
3 to discover more about the How To window.
The best way to zoom in on some document detail (be it lines of text or a
graphic) is to click the Zoom In tool (or press Z, its hot key) and then use the
magnifying-glass pointer to draw a bounding box around the desired text or
graphic. When you release the mouse button, Adobe Reader zooms in on the
selected area so that it takes up the entire width of the Document pane.
At the bottom left of the Document pane, you find the status bar, which gives
you valuable information about the current PDF file you’re viewing. The
status bar also enables you to advance back and forth through the pages and
to change how the pages are viewed in the Document pane (the default set-
ting is a single page at a time). Figure 2-4 helps you identify the status bar
buttons.
31
Chapter 2: Accessing PDF Files
Musical toolbars
You don’t have to leave the five Adobe Reader
toolbars in the original arrangement. You can
move them to new rows or even move them out
of the top area of the screen so that they float
on top of the Navigation or Document pane. To
move a toolbar, you drag it by its separator bar
(the slightly raised vertical bar that appears
before the first button in each toolbar). As you
drag,  a  dark  outline  appears  at  the  mouse
pointer until you release the mouse button and
plunk the toolbar down in its new position. Note
that  when  you  release  the  toolbar  in  the
Navigation or Document pane area, the Adobe
Reader reshapes the toolbar so that its buttons
are no longer in a single row and gives the tool-
bar its own title bar. You can move the floating
toolbar by clicking the title bar and dragging the
window to a new location, but you can’t change
the shape of the toolbar. To close a floating tool-
bar, click its close button. To dock a floating
toolbar, drag it by its title bar until its outline
assumes a single-row shape, and then drop it in
place.  These  features  also  apply  to  the
Navigation toolbar, which is not displayed by
default in Adobe Reader or Acrobat 6.
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
PDF Online. Convert PDF Online. WPF PDF Viewer. View PDF in Image to PDF. Image: Remove Image from PDF Page. Edit URL. Bookmark: Edit Bookmark. Metadata: Edit, Delete
analyze pdf metadata; online pdf metadata viewer
VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
PDF Metadata Edit. Offer professional PDF document metadata editing APIs, using which VB.NET developers can redact, delete, view and save PDF metadata.
edit pdf metadata acrobat; clean pdf metadata
The Adobe Reader Navigation pane
The Navigation pane to the left of the Document pane contains four Tab
palettes in Adobe Reader 6:
The Bookmarks palette: Shows the overall structure of the document in
an outline form. Note, however, that not all PDF files that you open in
Adobe Reader have bookmarks because this is a feature that the author
of the document must decide to include prior to or when actually
making the PDF file. (See Chapter 4 for more on this topic.)
The Signatures palette: Displays your digital signature or any others
that exist in a PDF document signature form field. (See Chapter 11 for
more info on signing and securing PDF documents.)
The Layers palette: Enables you to view any content layers that the
author has inserted, such as headers and footers or watermarks, in the
current PDF document. (For more on this new feature, see Chapter 10.)
The Pages palette (formerly the Thumbnails palette): Shows little rep-
resentations of each page in the PDF document you’re viewing. Note that
Adobe Reader generates thumbnails for each page in a PDF document,
whether or not the author embedded them at the time when the PDF
was made.
Adobe Reader offers you several ways to open and close the Navigation pane
(which may or may not be displayed automatically when you first open the
PDF file for viewing):
If the Navigation Pane is closed, click any of the Navigation Tabs on the
left side of the document pane to open the Navigation Pane and display
that palette.
If the Navigation Pane is open, you can close it by clicking the Close
button (X) on the Options bar at the top of the pane.
Previous page
First page
Current page
Next page
Last page
Previous view
Next view
Single page
Continuous
Facing
Continuous facing
Figure 2-4:
The status
bar shows
the current
page and
lets you
control the
page’s view.
32
Part I: Presenting Acrobat and PDF Files 
Click the Navigation Pane button (the double-headed arrow) at the
beginning of the status bar in the Document pane to open or close the
Navigation Pane.
Press F6 (Windows or Mac).
Note that you can manually resize the Navigation pane to make it wider or nar-
rower. Position the Hand tool mouse pointer on its border or on the Navigation
Pane button at the beginning of the Status bar. When the tool changes to a
double-headed arrow, drag right (to make the pane wider) or left (to narrow it).
Adobe Reader remembers any width changes that you make to the Navigation
pane, so that the pane resumes the last modified size each time you use the
Reader.
You might be tempted to increase the width of the Navigation pane because it
isn’t wide enough to display all the text in the headings in the Bookmarks
palette. Rather than reduce the precious real estate allotted to the Document
pane in order to make all the headings visible, you can read a long heading by
hovering the Hand tool mouse pointer over its text. After a second or two,
Acrobat displays the entire bookmark heading in a highlighted box that
appears on top of the Navigation pane and extends as far as necessary into
the Document pane. As soon as you click the bookmark link or move the Hand
tool off the bookmark, this highlighted box disappears. You can also choose
Wrap Long Bookmarks on the Options menu at the top of the Bookmarks pane
which automatically adjusts the width of bookmark text to the current width
of the Navigation pane.
Using the Bookmarks palette
The Bookmarks palette gives you an overview of the various sections in many
PDF documents (see Figure 2-5). Adobe Reader indicates the section of the 
document that is currently being displayed in the Document pane by highlight-
ing the page icon of the corresponding bookmark in the Bookmarks palette.
In some documents you open, the Bookmarks palette will have multiple
nested levels (indicating subordinate levels in the document’s structure or
table of contents). When a Bookmarks palette contains multiple levels, you
can expand a part of the outline to display a heading’s nested levels by click-
ing the Expand button that appears in front of its name. In Windows, Expand
buttons appear as boxes containing a plus sign. On the Macintosh, Expand
buttons appear as shaded triangles pointing to the right. Note that you can
also expand the current bookmark by clicking the Expand Current Bookmark
button at the top of the Bookmark palette.
33
Chapter 2: Accessing PDF Files
When you expand a particular bookmark heading, all its subordinate topics
appear in an indented list in the Bookmarks palette, and the Expand button
becomes a Collapse button (indicated by a box with a minus sign in it in
Windows and by a downward-pointing shaded triangle on the Mac). To hide
the subordinate topics and tighten up the bookmark list, click the topic’s
Collapse button. You can also collapse all open subordinate topics by select-
ing Collapse Top-Level Bookmarks on the Options menu.
Using the Pages palette
The Pages palette shows you tiny versions of each page in the PDF document
you’re viewing in Adobe Reader (see Figure 2-6). You can use the Navigation
pane’s vertical scroll bar to scroll through these thumbnails to get an overview
of the pages in the current document, and sometimes you can even use them
to locate the particular page to which you want to go (especially if that page
contains a large, distinguishing graphic).
Expand Current Bookmark
Options menu
Figure 2-5:
The
Navigation
pane
opened
with the
Bookmarks
palette
selected.
34
Part I: Presenting Acrobat and PDF Files 
Note that Adobe Reader displays the number of each page immediately
beneath its thumbnail image in the Pages palette. The program indicates the
current page that you’re viewing by highlighting its page number underneath
the thumbnail. The program also indicates how much of the current page is
being displayed in the Document pane on the right with the use of a red out-
lining box in the current thumbnail (this box appears as just two red lines
when the box is stretched as wide as the thumbnail).
You can zoom in and out and scroll up and down through the text of the cur-
rent page by manipulating the size and position of this red box. To scroll the
current page’s text up, position the Hand tool on the bottom edge of the box
and then drag it downward (and, of course, to scroll the current page’s text
down, you drag this outline up). To zoom in on the text of the page in the
Document pane, position the Hand tool on the sizing handle located in the
lower-right corner of the red box (causing it to change to a double-headed
diagonal arrow) and then drag the corners of the box to make the box smaller
so that less is selected. To zoom out on the page, drag the corner to make the
box wider and taller. Of course, if you stretch the outline of the red box so
that it’s as tall and wide as the thumbnail of the current page, Adobe Reader
responds by displaying the entire page in the Document pane, the same as if
you selected the Fit in Window view.
Figure 2-6:
The
Navigation
pane
opened with
the Pages
palette
selected.
35
Chapter 2: Accessing PDF Files
By default, Adobe Reader displays what it considers to be large thumbnails
(large enough that they must be shown in a single column within the Pages
palette). To display more thumbnails in the Pages palette, choose Reduce
Page Thumbnails on the Options menu at the top of the Pages palette. When
you select this command, the displayed thumbnails are reduced in 33% incre-
ments. This means that if you want to reduce the thumbnail display substan-
tially, you have to repeatedly select the Reduce Page Thumbnails command.
To increase the size of the thumbnails, choose Enlarge Page Thumbnails on
the Options menu.
Using the Article palette
Acrobat 6 supports a feature called articles that enables the author or editor
to control the reading order when the PDF document is read online. This fea-
ture is useful when reading text that has been set in columns, as are many
magazine and newspaper articles, because it enables you to read the text as
it goes across columns and pages as though it were set as one continuous
column. Otherwise, you end up having to do a lot of zooming in and out and
scrolling, and you can easily lose your place.
To see if the PDF file you’re reading has any articles defined for it, choose
View➪Navigation Tabs➪Articles. Doing this opens a floating Articles palette
in its own dialog box that lists the names of all the articles defined for the
document. If this dialog box is empty, then you know that the PDF document
doesn’t use articles. Note that you can dock this palette on the Navigation
pane and add its tab beneath the one for the Pages palette by dragging the
Articles tab displayed in the dialog box and dropping it on the Navigation
pane.
To read an article listed on the Articles tab, double-click the article name in
the list or click its name in the list and then click the Read Article item on its
pop-up menu. The first part of the text defined in the article appears in fit-
width viewing mode at the Adobe Reader ‘s default maximum-fit setting, and
the mouse pointer changes to a Hand tool with a down arrow on it. After read-
ing the first section of the article, you continue to the next section either by
pressing the Enter key (Return on Mac) or by clicking the Hand tool pointer.
Adobe Reader indicates when you reach the end of the article by placing a
horizontal bar under the arrowhead of the down arrow on the Hand tool. If
you then click the Hand tool again or press Enter (or Return), Adobe Reader
returns you to the start of the article (indicated by a horizontal bar appearing
at the top of the shaft of the down arrow). To return to normal viewing mode
after reading an article, click one of the regular viewing buttons on the Zoom
toolbar — Actual Size, Fit in Window, or Fit Width — or its corresponding
menu option on the View menu (you can even use the View➪Fit Visible com-
mand, which resizes the text and graphics in the document — without page
borders — and has no comparable button).
36
Part I: Presenting Acrobat and PDF Files 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested