c# pdf library mit : Read pdf metadata online software application cloud windows winforms asp.net class wipo_pub_9461-part690

10 
Chapter 4: Basics of Patent Information 
The primary information source for Patent Landscape Reports (PLRs) is data coming from patent 
documents. Additional information is sometimes used from other sources, such as the non-patent, 
scientific literature, but patent data is used most frequently for the analysis that makes up the majority 
of the insights identified for the report.  
A general understanding of patent information is critical to producing well-researched PLRs, since raw 
patent data is notoriously difficult to work with, for a variety of reasons. In particular, the variety of 
publication policies applied by different jurisdictions which partially derive from differences in patent 
prosecution. Understanding the nuances associated with patent information will help prevent an 
analyst from misinterpreting the data and come to incorrect conclusions. 
This chapter provides background on patents as a type of intellectual property, as well as looking 
closely at the various types and parts of patent documents, especially those that are typically utilized 
in the generation of PLRs, supplementary information associated with each patent application and the 
sources of patent information (databases) that can be used to prepare a data collection to be 
analyzed
5
.  
4.1 – Why Analyze Patent Information? 
Patents are intellectual property rights for the protection of an invention in the territories of individual 
jurisdictions which may be granted in exchange for disclosure of the invention
6
. Since a granted 
patent represents a right to exclude others from making, using or selling the invention in the specified 
jurisdiction, it has a business value associated with it. Patents are sometimes referred to as a “limited 
monopoly” based on their ability to prevent competitors from entering a market or making use of a 
patented technology. Due to the potential business and legal implications, understanding which 
organizations own patents, and what technological areas they cover, can have a significant impact on 
policymaking and corporate decision-making. 
Obtaining a patent can be a reasonably expensive endeavor, costing from $10,000 on the low-end to 
five to ten times that for more complicated applications. Due to the substantial associated costs, when 
organizations pursue a patent - in particular, if in a plurality of jurisdictions - it is generally an indication 
of high interest and potentially significant investment by them in the subject. 
5
General information on patent information is included in the WIPO Handbook on Industrial Property 
Information and Documentation: http://www.wipo.int/standards/en/index.html  (henceforth called the 'WIPO 
Handbook'). 
6
The legislation of each jurisdiction usually defines the Intellectual Property rights available for the protection of 
inventions. They may include different instruments such as patents and utility models, and they may use varying 
designations for such instruments, such as “patent”, “petit patent”, “inventors’ certificate”, etc. Several 
international treaties deal with such Intellectual Property rights for the protection of inventions. They use the 
term patent as comprising all these rights irrespective of their designations in the legislation of a member states. 
Similarly, the term patent is used in these Guidelines as comprising all such instruments. For general 
information on the patent system, see http://www.wipo.int/patents/en/
;
or the WIPO Intellectual Property 
Handbook (not to be confused with the Handbook mentioned in the previous footnote): 
http://www.wipo.int/export/sites/www/freepublications/en/intproperty/489/wipo_pub_489.pdf
Read pdf metadata online - add, remove, update PDF metadata in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Allow C# Developers to Read, Add, Edit, Update and Delete PDF Metadata
pdf metadata editor online; remove metadata from pdf online
Read pdf metadata online - VB.NET PDF metadata library: add, remove, update PDF metadata in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Enable VB.NET Users to Read, Write, Edit, Delete and Update PDF Document Metadata
remove metadata from pdf file; pdf metadata
11 
Patents are also critical sources of information that may not be found anywhere else. A paper from 
1986 citing a report from 1977
7
claims that 80% of the information found in patents is not found 
elsewhere. It is extremely difficult to quantify a value like this, but it is generally agreed that due to the 
nature of novelty, associated with patents, and the general practice of most commercial organizations 
to not publish their findings in journal literature, that patent information is a source of unique content. 
While it can be difficult to work with, and misleading, if not handled correctly, patent data is critical to a 
thorough understanding of most technological areas. Jacob Schlumberger best encapsulated these 
feelings in 1966
8
when he wrote: 
“We have the choice of using patent statistics cautiously and learning what we can from them, or not 
using them and learning nothing about what they alone can teach us.”  
This statement crystalizes the essence of why patent information is analyzed. Section 4.6 below 
elaborates on different types of such analyses and their respective objectives. 
4.2 – Types of Patent Documents and Publication Policies  
The specific rules for applying for a patent and for processing patent applications, including their 
publishing, can be different and should be considered on a jurisdiction to jurisdiction basis. Patentable 
subject matter is also different between various jurisdictions. Most jurisdictions have a system in place 
with substantive examination, i.e. where the claimed technical subject matter is examined whether it 
meets certain conditions for patentability, such as novelty, inventive step and industrial applicability. In 
such systems it is customary to distinguish a pre- and a post-grant prosecution phase. The below 
distinction between different publication stages related to a single application, i.e. pre-grant, grant and 
post-grant publications, applies mostly to such systems. 
Few jurisdictions have a mere patent registration system in place, i.e. without regular substantive 
examination. Such systems are similar to utility model systems. For such systems the below 
distinction between pre-grant and post-grant publications does not apply. 
Depending on the jurisdiction, and in particular its publication policy, there are various types of patent 
documents published at various stages during the lifecycle of a patent application. All these 
publications associated with an individual application constitute a so-called domestic patent family 
(see section 4.4.5 below).  
With most patenting authorities, patent applications are published for the first time 18 months after 
their priority or filing date, even if they have not yet been granted. If they are granted another 
publication follows the first publication which includes the claims granted by the patenting authority.  
Some jurisdictions publish only granted patents. In such cases, pending applications may not be 
known to the public until the publication of the grant, and in fact may never become known if the 
application fails during examination or is withdrawn. 
Some jurisdictions do not publish all parts of an application or a granted patent, but rather a 
notification in a gazette or bulletin. In such cases, the disclosure and claims become publicly 
7
http://www.osti.gov/energycitations/product.biblio.jsp?osti_id=7162811  
8
Invention and Economic Growth, Jacob Schmookler. Cambridge, Mass., Harvard University Press, 1966
VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images
zonal information, metadata, and so on. Extract image from PDF free in .NET framework application with trial SDK components for .NET. Online source codes for
edit pdf metadata online; batch update pdf metadata
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
such as its location, zonal information, metadata, and so on. Extract image from PDF free in .NET framework with trial SDK components and online C# class source
metadata in pdf documents; edit pdf metadata acrobat
12 
accessible after the publication of the notification, e.g. through file inspection (see below) or through 
ordering a (certified) copy. 
It is important to understand the difference between the official publication of patent documents or of 
gazettes, and the making publicly available of at least parts of applications or other documents. 
Any published patent document is identified by a unique publication number and its content is usually 
fixed with the publication on the particular publication date. Subsequent publications related to the 
same application, i.e. being members of the same domestic family, are usually distinguished by kind 
codes (see below) as parts of the publication number. For some jurisdictions, these subsequent 
publications related to the same application are only distinguished by using different kind codes (e.g. 
publications of the European Patent Office). In other jurisdictions, however, these publications 
belonging to the same domestic family have distinct publication numbers, while the publication stage 
is still identified by the respective kind code (e.g. publications of the Unites States Patent Office or the 
Japan Patent Office). 
Understanding the difference in national publication policies may be important for certain analyses 
and the conclusions drawn, e.g. if data related to pending, withdrawn or lapsed applications cannot be 
researched, and if only publications of grants reflect the innovation activity. 
4.2.1 – Pre-grant Publications 
The process of generating a patent right starts with the first filing of an application with a national or 
regional patent office or with WIPO (namely, the International Bureau of the PCT). This office is 
sometimes referred to in patent analytics as the Office of First Filing (OFF).  
Often the same invention (or an improvement thereof) is filed subsequently with other patent offices to 
obtain protection in further jurisdictions, usually by claiming the priority of the first filing. These offices 
are called Offices of Second Filing (OSF). Such second filings lead to the creation of patent families 
and associated relations between patent family members, which are further explained below in 
section 4.4.5. 
Some patent authorities keep patent applications secret until they are granted, but most authorities 
publish patent applications 18 months after their filing date, or the priority date, if the office is an OSF
9
These documents are called pre-grant applications and they don’t represent a granted right in their 
present form, but may be granted in the future. They provide clues on investment and interest in a 
technological area, and how the environment around a technology may change, if the application 
goes on to grant. 
Depending on the national publication policy, pre-grant publications may also comprise separate 
publications of search reports or corrections
10
. Different such pre-grant publications related to the 
same application can usually be distinguished by their publication kind codes as part of the publication 
number. For the preparation of statistical analyses such publication policies may have to be taken into 
account. 
9
In some jurisdictions the applicant can request earlier publication; this option is often chosen for defensive 
publications. 
10
For instance, that is the case of the European Patent Office (EPO). More information available at
http://www.epo.org/applying/european/Guide-for-applicants/html/e/ga_d_iii.html 
VB.NET PDF: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF
XDoc.PDF for .NET supports editing PDF document metadata, like Title, Subject, Author, Creator, Producer, Keywords, Created Date, and Last Modified Date.
remove pdf metadata; acrobat pdf additional metadata
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
in PDF, C#.NET edit PDF bookmark, C#.NET edit PDF metadata, C#.NET PDF sticky note, C#.NET print PDF, C#.NET read barcodes from PDF, C#.NET OCR scan PDF.
clean pdf metadata; online pdf metadata viewer
13 
Publications of OSFs are often fully equivalent to the publication of the OFF and represent mere 
translations.  It should be noted however that this is only a rule of thumb, because the Paris 
Convention expressly permits additions to the disclosure of the first filing when claiming the priority 
rights of earlier filings.
11
In particular, if two or more priorities are claimed in a second filing, it is very 
likely that the claimed subject matter is somehow different from the individual priority applications. 
It is important to recognize that pre-grant applications, while potentially important indicators, are not 
granted, and in fact, may never be granted. Applications can be abandoned or withdrawn during 
prosecution for a variety of different reasons; but the primary reason is that an examiner has stated 
objections in an office action. Once an application has been abandoned any subject matter disclosed 
within it is now part of the public domain of the jurisdiction where it was abandoned and can be used 
by others, assuming that other granted patents don’t exist on the same subject. Abandoned 
applications still represent interest on the part of the applicant and can still provide valuable insights 
even if they don’t represent a property right. On the other hand, large numbers of applications that do 
not make it to grant may also be an indicator that there are incentives in place for filing applications. 
Understanding the difference between granted patents and pre-grant applications is critical for 
interpreting their impact on a field. In the development of analytics associated with PLRs it is good 
practice to separate pre-grant applications from granted patents when conducting an analysis, e.g. by 
using kind codes (see section 4.2.4 below). The implications of pre-grant applications are significantly 
different than what can be implied from a granted patent and they should be considered separately, or 
at the very least, identified as a different type of document when visualizing a result. 
Some pre-grant publications can be considered as defensive publications since they were not filed 
with the intention to obtain patent protection but rather to prevent others, e.g. competitors, from 
obtaining patents on the technical subject matter disclosed in the application
12
. With other words, the 
intention of these filings is to place their technical disclosure in the public domain for free use by 
anybody. It is however not readily possible to distinguish such pre-grant publications from others 
where the applicant seeks protection. 
4.2.1.1 – PCT Applications 
While pre-grant publications of applications are usually associated with specific jurisdictions and 
therefore may represent an indicator where innovation takes place (in case of OFFs) or where patent 
protection is sought (in case of OSFs), there is also a special type of patent application that facilitates 
the filing of applications in many jurisdictions simultaneously.  
11
Article 4 (F) provides that “No country of the Union may refuse a priority or a patent application on the ground 
that the applicant claims multiple priorities, even if they originate in different countries, or on the ground that an 
application claiming one or more priorities contains one or more elements that were not included in the 
application or applications whose priority is claimed, provided that, in both cases, there is unity of invention 
within the meaning of the law of the country.With respect to the elements not included in the application or 
applications whose priority is claimed, the filing of the subsequent application shall give rise to a right of priority 
under ordinary conditions.” 
12
Before the America Invents Act (AIA), which was signed into law on September 16, 2011, the US system 
knew the so-called Defensive Publication (DEF), and the Statutory Invention Registration (SIR) which 
replaced the Defensive Publication in 1985-86. The AIA repealed these provisions because all pending 
applications are now published 18 after filing or priority date.
How to C#: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF for .NET
XDoc.PDF for .NET supports editing PDF document metadata, like Title, Subject, Author, Creator, Producer, Keywords, Created Date, and Last Modified Date.
batch pdf metadata; search pdf metadata
VB.NET PDF - Create PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
in PDF, C#.NET edit PDF bookmark, C#.NET edit PDF metadata, C#.NET PDF sticky note, C#.NET print PDF, C#.NET read barcodes from PDF, C#.NET OCR scan PDF.
preview edit pdf metadata; pdf xmp metadata viewer
14 
The Patent Cooperation Treaty (PCT), which has effect in 148 jurisdictions (as of July 2015), provides 
for a system that  
 permits the applicant to lodge a single application with a Receiving Office of the PCT system; 
and 
 to obtain a search report and written opinion from an International Searching Authority of the 
PCT system, and eventually a Supplementary International Search and/or an International 
Preliminary Examination which assesses the patentability, and thereby 
 enables the applicant to take an informed decision if and for which countries he will seek 
protection; 
 grants the applicant a period of 30 months (in most member jurisdictions) to  seek patent 
protection in each of those jurisdictions (national phase entry); which 
 allows for more time to assess the commercial viability of the invention; and delays the 
considerable expenses associated with pursuing the patent prosecution in those jurisdictions 
(such as translation, legal representative, national fees). 
The Patent Cooperation Treaty and the related services are administered by the World Intellectual 
Property Organization (WIPO) which publishes respective PCT applications (also referred to as WO 
documents). WIPO is responsible for administering the PCT system and for ensuring that PCT 
applicants receive an initial prior art search report and a written opinion
13
regarding the potential 
patentability of the subject matter claimed in the application against prior-art from around the world. 
Based on the benefits attributed to the PCT system, WIPO is often used as an OSF on many 
applications where the idea of protection on a more global scale is being considered. To a lesser 
extent it is used as an OFF. Due to their popularity PCT applications are an important source of patent 
information for PLRs. 
If a PCT application enters a national phase, there may be subsequent pre-grant publications of these 
national phase entries (NPE), depending on the respective publication policy of each jurisdiction, 
however only with a certain delay because the NPE usually becomes effective only 30 months after 
the filing or priority date of the PCT application.  
4.2.2 – Granted Patents 
Publications of granted patents are of particular importance in comparison to publications of 
unexamined applications because the grant asserts that the invention disclosed in the application is 
indeed new and inventive over the known prior art. A grant can therefore be taken as a quality 
indicator for innovation activities. The time of grant of patents, i.e. the publication date of the grant, 
depends however very much on the pendency of patent examination and can differ considerably from 
jurisdiction to jurisdiction or also for certain areas of technology. Publications of granted patents may 
usually be identified by a specific kind code as part of the publication number (see below). 
4.2.3 – Post-Grant Documents 
13
As from July 1, 2014, the written opinion is made publicly available on PATENTSCOPE in its original 
language as of the date of publication of the international application
VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
PDF Metadata Edit. Offer professional PDF document metadata editing APIs, using which VB.NET developers can redact, delete, view and save PDF metadata.
pdf metadata online; endnote pdf metadata
VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF
Best VB.NET PDF text extraction SDK library and component for free download. Online Visual Basic .NET class source code for quick evaluation.
remove pdf metadata online; edit pdf metadata
15 
There are a number of additional patent documents that may be published after the publication of the 
grant of a patent. The most important ones are publications following reexamination or opposition 
procedures that were initiated by third parties after the publication of the grant. If, as a result of these 
procedures, the scope of protection was restricted, a new publication would be made including the 
modified claims. That is the case, for instance, for the EPO, where if the patent is maintained in an 
amended form, a new patent specification is being published.
Similarly, patent documents would be reissued if the patent owner on his own initiative wishes to 
restrict the scope of protection of the patent in order to escape an imminent reexamination or 
opposition procedure. A third, although less important, reason for post-grant publications may be the 
correction of clerical or typographical errors. 
These post-grant documents, while they may impact the scope or the term of a granted patent, are 
normally not considered when collecting a data set for PLR related analysis. If these documents are 
included in a corpus it is generally a good idea to filter them out before conducting the analysis. A 
notable exception to this is when an analysis of claim language is being conducted. In this case, 
reissue and reexamination documents can modify the original, granted claims and under these 
conditions they should replace the original patent. 
4.2.4 – Kind Codes 
It was already repeatedly mentioned that different publication stages of an application are usually 
distinguished by kind codes (e.g., A1, A2, A3, B1,..) which are part of the document publication 
numbers. 
The WIPO Handbook provides the following definition for kind codes of patent document: 
Several countries and organizations publish patent documents for various types of protection possible 
within their jurisdiction. Furthermore, according to certain laws or regulations, patent documents may 
be published at various stages of the procedure leading from the application for a given industrial 
property right to its final grant (or refusal). Thus, for certain countries and organizations, various “kinds 
of patent documents” exist, which may be characterized by the specific type of protection to which 
they refer and by the stage of the administrative procedure at which they were published.  
For more details and a complete list of the kinds of patent documents issued by each patent authority 
see Part 7.3.1 of the WIPO Handbook, and for an inventory of kind codes per issuing patent authority 
see Part 7.3.2 of the WIPO Handbook.
14
The WIPO Standard ST.16 provides for a basic standardization of kind codes. It should be noted, 
however, that patent authorities do not use kind codes in a fully standardized manner because of 
differences in their publication policies. For example, for the EPO and WIPO, the kind code 'A1' 
designates publications of patent applications with a search report; while for the USPTO, it designates 
publications of patent applications without a search report since the USPTO does not publish search 
reports. For such publications of patent applications without a search report, the EPO and WIPO 
would use the kind code 'A2'. 
It should further be noted that the kind codes used by each issuing patent authority may have 
changed over time; for example the USPTO used kind code 'A' for the publication of granted patents 
14
http://www.wipo.int/standards/en/part_07.html#7.3
16 
through December 2000, and kind codes 'B1' and 'B2' as from January 2001. These changes of the 
use of kind codes are also described for each patent authority in Section 7.3.2 of the aforementioned 
WIPO Handbook. 
4.3 – Components of Patent Documents 
While patents documents contain a good deal of raw text, they are referred to as semi-structured, 
since they have a number of sections that are found in almost every document, regardless of its 
country of origin. At a high level these sections of a patent document are represented by a Front Page 
with bibliographic data, a Description (Disclosure) and a Claims section. Within each of these high-
level sections there are subsections that provide specific information about the particular document. 
These subsections are typically segmented into individual fields when the documents are processed 
for electronic delivery or the generation of databases. 
An additional Drawings section is facultative, but often included to illustrate the description and 
facilitate the interpretation of the claims. In some jurisdictions, the publication of an application further 
includes a search report as a further section of a patent document when the search report is available 
at the time the publication is prepared. Else, the search report may be published as a separate 
document at a later time once it has been established. 
4.3.1 – Front Page and Bibliographic Data (Metadata) 
The WIPO Handbook provides the following definition of bibliographic data: 
The term “bibliographic data” denotes the various data normally appearing on the first page of a 
patent or industrial design document or in a comprehensive entry in an official gazette concerning 
granted patents, industrial design or trademark registrations or the corresponding applications. Such 
data comprise document identification data, data on the domestic filing of the application, priority data, 
publication data, classification data and other concise data relating to the technical content of the 
document or of the entry in the official gazette. 
The majority of the statistical analysis conducted on patent collections takes place using data 
collected from the bibliographic fields within them. Many of these fields contain categorized text or 
numbers and thus are readily applicable to statistical analysis (see also section 7.1 below). 
To assist with working with this data across different jurisdictions and languages, an international 
standard for bibliographic data within patent documents, called INIDs has been developed by WIPO. 
The WIPO Handbook provides the following definition of INIDs: 
INID is the acronym for Internationally agreed Numbers for the Identification of Data. The INID codes 
are numerical codes allotted to bibliographic data relating to industrial property documents and printed 
on their first page and in corresponding entries of Official Gazettes. 
INID codes are standardized by the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) in ST.9
15
which 
includes a complete list of the INID codes. A few of the bibliographic fields, used most frequently in 
the statistical analysis of patent collections, for PLRs are provided below. 
15
http://www.wipo.int/export/sites/www/standards/en/pdf/03-09-01.pdf  
17 
4.3.1.1 – Applicant/Assignee 
The WIPO Handbook provides the following definition of applicants: 
The applicant is the entity or person which or who presents (“files”) an application for the grant of an 
industrial property right (e.g., a patent application, or an application for the registration of a trademark) 
in an industrial property office, or in whose name an agent (representative) files such an application. 
In general, the applicant is the inventor, but it may also be the employee or the person to who the 
inventor assigned his/her right to the invention (assignee). Ordinarily, this will be a company or 
organization, but can be the inventors when the rights associated with the invention are not 
transferred, or assigned, to a different entity. 
In the United States, an assignment is required because, the Constitution of the United States 
provides in Article 1, Section 8, that: the "Congress shall have power . . . to promote the progress of 
science and useful arts by securing, for limited times, to authors and inventors, the exclusive right to 
their respective writings and discoveries.” In other words, the inventor, and not the organization that 
employs them receives a patent right. However, corporations can now apply for patents directly, 
without a formal re-assignment from the inventor under the American Invents Act
16
Even with the new 
statutes most patenting in the United States is still done the traditional way; the rights are granted to 
an inventor, and are then assigned to the legal owner based on the stipulations of the employment 
agreement the inventor signed when joining the organization. 
In the context of PLRs, the Applicant/Assignee represents the owner of a patent and with whom 
negotiations for the rights associated with the invention will have to be conducted. Studying them 
identifies investors within a technical area. Network analysis is frequently applied to identify 
collaborations, e.g. in certain technical fields. 
Applicant and assignee names can change over the life cycle of a patent application whenever the 
rights in the invention are transferred. Marginal changes can also occur in case of clerical corrections 
of misspellings of names. A problem that frequently occurs with any names are variations of names 
that derive from transcriptions of names from other scriptures like Chinese if varying transcription 
rules are applied. One and the same person can thus be represented by slightly different spellings of 
his or her name. 
Another frequently appearing problem in search and analysis is that subsidiaries of corporations often 
use varying names in different countries. Analyses that wish to cover complete paten portfolios need 
to take this into account and utilize various tools to tackle this, such as the so-called corporate trees. 
These gather various variations of an entity and their affiliations and group them together, in a more or 
less automated way. 
4.3.1.2 – Inventor 
The WIPO Handbook provides the following definition of an inventor: 
16
http://www.ladas.com/Patents/PatentPractice/AIA_Filing_Requirements.html 
18 
A person who is the author of an invention. According to Article 4ter of the Paris Convention, the 
inventor has the right to be mentioned as such in the patent 
The set of inventor names in the bibliographic data of an application should therefore be 
comprehensive, and unlike the names of applicants or assignees, the names of inventors usually 
don’t change over the life cycle of a patent application (except for clerical corrections of misspelled 
names). In an application claiming the priority of an earlier application, inventor names may however 
be added if additional inventive subject matter is included in the later application which involved 
further inventors. 
In the context of PLRs, the inventor represents the person or persons who are responsible for the 
intellectual effort associated with the invention. Studying information related to the inventors provides 
an idea about potential experts and leaders in an area of technology. Network analysis is frequently 
applied to identify collaborations between different inventors or groups of inventors, and institutions for 
which they work. 
4.3.1.3 – Dates 
Dates correspond to the timing of significant events in the lifecycle of a patent application. The three 
most significant patent related dates are the priority, the filing and the publication dates. 
The filing or application date is determined by the patent authority that receives the application if 
certain minimum requirements are fulfilled, which actually differ from jurisdiction to jurisdiction. The 
filing date may therefore differ from the date the applicant lodges the application with the patenting 
authority. 
The priority date (or dates if the priorities of several earlier applications are claimed) corresponds to 
the filing date of an earlier application if the applicant claims the priority of that earlier application. It is 
important because it may determine the relevant prior art if certain conditions are met.  
Another important date is the publication date, which is the date when a patent document is 
published. Patent applications are published 18 months after the filing date or the earliest priority date 
in most patent issuing authorities. 
In the case of granted patents the publication date is also referred to as the grant date. It is important 
because, in most jurisdictions, the protection provided by a patent enters into force with the 
publication of the grant. 
In the context of PLRs, the dates represent the timing associated with the development or patenting of 
an invention and are used for analyzing trends. Studying filing or priority dates provides an indication 
of when inventions were developed and how long it took for improvements, and modifications to start 
occurring. Publication dates are less useful for this pupose. In particular, the grant date is rather an 
indicator for the pendency of applications until grant. 
4.3.1.4 – Priority Data 
The WIPO Handbook provides the following definition of priority data: 
19 
The part of the bibliographic data (normally published on the first page of a patent document) 
identifying the earlier patent application(s) on the basis of which a so-called priority right has been 
claimed (usually based on Article 4 of the Paris Convention). These identification data comprise three 
elements: the application number, the filing date and the identification of the country or organization 
where the respective earlier application was filed. Priority data belong to the basic bibliographic data 
of a patent document and may serve, inter alia, for identifying patent documents published in different 
countries and languages but referring to the same invention (“Patent Family”).  
4.3.1.5 – Classifications 
The WIPO Handbook provides the following definition for patent classifications: 
In patent information and documentation matters “classification” means a specific system which  
subdivides technology into distinct units. A classification symbol is defined for each of those units. The  
classification symbol designating the unit into which the invention falls is usually printed on the first 
page of the corresponding patent document and recorded in databases as part of the bibliographic 
data. 
To “classify” a patent document means to determine that subdivision of a classification system to 
which, because of its technical nature, the invention claimed in the said document belongs and to allot 
a classification symbol to it. Sometimes, the classification relates not only to the claimed invention but 
also to other disclosures contained in the patent document. 
In the past, different national classification systems were developed and applied to the patent 
publications of each respective country. In a first attempt to harmonize these systems, the 
International Patent Classification (IPC)
17
was created in 1968 which is nowadays applied to patent 
publications of almost all jurisdictions worldwide. Each patenting authority is obliged to classify the 
applications filed in its jurisdiction. The term bibliographic IPC was coined to address these 
classifications provided by the publishing authority and presented as part of the bibliographic data on 
the front page of the official patent publications. The classification by the publishing authority does 
however not prevent other patenting authorities from reclassifying these publications when they add 
them to their search file. 
The IPC is regularly revised to include new technologies, or to divide existing classification places into 
several subunits with a more narrowly defined scope. Classification symbols are therefore usually 
accompanied by version indicators. With each revision, all patent publications belonging to the PCT 
Minimum Documentation are reclassified according to the new classification, and the updated 
classifications of documents are made available to database hosts. It is their responsibility to update 
the database accordingly. 
In October 2010, the EPO and USPTO launched a joint project to create the Cooperative Patent 
Classification
18
(CPC) in order to harmonize their proprietary patent classifications systems, the 
United States Patent Classification (USPC) and the European Classification (ECLA). Like the former 
ECLA, the CPC is based on the IPC and provides a more detailed classification scheme in order to 
meet classification requirements of the EPO and USPTO. With the entry into force of the CPC all 
17
For more information on the IPC as well as revision and reclassification procedures see 
http://www.wipo.int/classifications/ipc/en/; the 2015 version of the Guide to the IPC is available at 
http://www.wipo.int/export/sites/www/classifications/ipc/en/guide/guide_ipc.pdf .
18
http://www.cooperativepatentclassification.org/index.html  
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested