c# pdf library mit : Search pdf metadata SDK software service wpf winforms html dnn wipo_pub_9462-part694

20 
patent publications of the EPO and the USPTO previously classified according to the former ECLA 
and USPC were reclassified according to the CPC. Hence, there is no need to search these older 
publications by using the former classifications, although many databases still permit such searches.  
The CPC is also applied to patent publications of other jurisdictions either because these jurisdictions 
have opted for the CPC in addition to the IPC, or because of reclassification efforts of the EPO and 
the USPTO which complement the bibliographic IPC assigned by the publishing patent authority with 
additional relevant CPC classification codes in order to enhance the search efficiency of their 
examiners. In such cases, it should be noted that only a certain fraction of the publications of these 
jurisdictions is classified according to the CPC while all publications are classified according to the 
IPC. Since the EPO shares this CPC reclassification data with other patent database hosts, it can be 
used for searches in other database provided it was included by the host. 
In addition to the IPC and the CPC, further classifications still exist and may be useful: the 
classification system of the Japan Patent Office (JPO), comprising the File Index
19
(FI), which is 
based on the IPC, and the F-Terms, which represent a multi-dimensional keyword system 
complementing the FI; and the Derwent classification system which was developed by a commercial 
database provider. 
In the context of PLRs, the classification codes represent predefined concepts for describing the 
technical features or attributes associated with an invention. Often these concepts have a very narrow 
scope to facilitate focused prior art searches. For a broader analysis, e.g. of trends in wider areas of 
technology, documents classified by a range of classifications may need to be aggregated. For 
statistical analyses it should be borne in mind that only the IPC is applied to all patent publications of 
almost all jurisdictions, while the CPC is applied to some of them. 
It should also be noted that patent documents often have multiple classification codes assigned. In 
some jurisdictions one of them is considered as main classification that most closely describes the 
claimed subject matter and also determines the unit in charge of examination. Nevertheless, these 
main classifications are not necessarily recorded as such in databases. They are often only 
highlighted as main classification on front pages of patent publications. In databases, multiple 
classifications are often ordered alphabetically. The first code should therefore not necessarily be 
interpreted as main classification. This may also bias certain classification-based analyses if only the 
first code is selected for the analysis. 
4.2.1.6 – Citations 
During the prosecution of a patent application, an examiner will look for prior-art related to the novelty, 
obviousness, or an inventive step, associated with an invention. When references of this nature are 
discovered they are cited within the document during different publication stages. Usually within a 
search report that accompanies the document. 
In the United States, there is also a duty of “candor and good faith” that requires applicants to share 
prior-art with the USPTO during the examination of an application.
20
These documents are also 
19
http://www.jpo.go.jp/torikumi_e/searchportal_e/pdf/classification/fi_f-term.pdf  
20
37 C.F.R. 1.56   “Duty to disclose information material to patentability, of the Manual of patent examining 
procedure”  see http://www.uspto.gov/web/offices/pac/mpep/s2001.html  for the text of the provision, 
http://www.patinformatics.com/blog/all-citations-are-not-the-same-exploring-examiner-citations-from-us-patent-
documents-part-1-an-introduction/  
Search pdf metadata - add, remove, update PDF metadata in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Allow C# Developers to Read, Add, Edit, Update and Delete PDF Metadata
remove metadata from pdf file; preview edit pdf metadata
Search pdf metadata - VB.NET PDF metadata library: add, remove, update PDF metadata in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Enable VB.NET Users to Read, Write, Edit, Delete and Update PDF Document Metadata
pdf xmp metadata; get pdf metadata
21 
citations, and they appear on the front-page of granted US patents along with the prior-art identified 
by the examiner. 
Since they are associated with prior-art, or references that are potentially covering a similar topic as 
the proposed application, a citation implies a shared technological relationship between two 
documents. 
Within this context, there is the concept of forward or backward citations. Any discussion of patent 
citations begins with a root document. This is the application being applied for in the discussion 
above. The references that the root document cites or references itself are referred to as backward 
citations, since they are references, which preceded or were published before the root document. 
Conversely, going forward in time from the root document, any more recent document which 
references the root document are referred to as a forward citation for the root document. 
In the context of PLRs, the Citations represent a potential relationship between two inventions. 
Studying them provides a means for identifying seminal documents that could have had a high impact 
on the development of a technology. 
4.2.2 – Description (Disclosure) 
The WIPO Handbook provides the following definition: 
The description of the invention is one of the essential parts of certain kinds of patent documents, 
e.g., patent applications or patentsIt usually specifies the technical field to which the invention 
relates, includes a brief summary of the technical background of the invention and describes the 
essential features of the invention with reference to any accompanying drawings.  
The patent system is built on the principle that protection of an invention is granted in exchange for 
disclosure of the invention in order to spur further innovation. The disclosure of the invention has to be 
clear and sufficient enough to enable experts in the field to carry out the invention. In this respect, it is 
the complement to the claims section of a patent application (see below) that defines the scope of 
protection. The description section of a patent document is therefore sometimes simply referred to as 
the disclosure. Specification is a further synonym for this part of a patent document. 
From a patent landscaping perspective, the description section is one of the most difficult portions to 
interpret, since it contains information on the invention itself, as well as information on other inventions 
that are similar but were developed previously. From a text-mining and searching perspective this 
dichotomy within the disclosure can be misleading since it is difficult to determine whether the terms 
being searched for, or analyzed against, are referring to the invention, or the background information. 
Generally, it is not a good idea to conduct text-mining or analytics on the full-text of a patent document 
because of the ambiguity present in the disclosure. If possible, the disclosure is normally excluded in 
analysis of this type. 
4.2.3 – Claims 
The WIPO Handbook provides the following definition for claims: 
The part of a patent document which defines the matter for which protection is sought or granted. 
C# PDF Text Search Library: search text inside PDF file in C#.net
|. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› C# PDF: Search PDF Text. Support search PDF file with various search options, like whole word, ignore case, match string, etc.
read pdf metadata; edit pdf metadata acrobat
VB.NET PDF Text Search Library: search text inside PDF file in vb.
XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Search PDF Text. VB.NET PDF - Search and Find PDF Text in VB.NET. Allow to search defined PDF file page or the whole document.
pdf metadata viewer; modify pdf metadata
22 
Each patent application has to include at least one claim. The first claim, the so-called main claim, is 
supposed to include all technical features of the invention that are essential to solve the technical 
problem that led to the invention and which is supposed to be solved by the invention. 
The main claim is supposed to include only these essential features. Additional features or details that 
are not essential but provide certain benefits or additional advantages can be included in so-called 
dependent claims that refer to the main claim or any other claim. 
In most jurisdictions the application or the granted patent may also include further so-called 
independent claims in addition to the main claim, i.e. claims that do not refer to other claims. That is 
possible if the invention, for example, not only covers a device or product but also a method or 
process that are based on the same inventive concept. Further independent claims may also be 
admissible if there are alternative ways of implementing or carrying out the inventive concept and if 
they cannot be described by a single independent claim. Such further independent claims are 
however only admissible as long as the principle of unity of invention is observed. 
Claims determine the scope of each prior art search of the examiner since an examiner has to 
determine to what extent the claimed technical subject matter, i.e. the technical features of the 
invention as defined by the claims belong to the prior art. Technical features not included in claims but 
only in the description are usually not searched by the examiner. Claims may however evolve over the 
examination process, for example if an applicant adds or replaces features disclosed in the 
description part of the application to overcome objections by the examiner. The claims granted at the 
end of the examination procedure are usually much narrower than the originally filed claims that are 
included in the pre-grant publications. 
There are specific rules that attorneys need to follow, when writing claims and, as such, they are not 
written in conversational English, and can be confusing to non-practitioners who are not familiar with 
how to interpret them. The uniqueness of claim language can also pose a challenge when performing 
text-mining or analytics, since most systems are developed, or trained using standard, or journalistic 
English and not the specialized, legal language of patent claims. 
Regardless of the difficulties, understanding the scope of the claims associated with a patent 
document is an essential requirement for understanding what the patent covers and how valuable it 
could potentially be. If it can be said that, “the devil is in the details”, then the details can be found in 
the claims. 
With respect to PLRs, claim analysis is normally conducted as a follow on step, since it is sometimes 
done on a case by case basis, and only on documents that are identified as being in force, or of high 
interest based on the interpretation of the other analytics associated with the PLR. 
4.4 – Publicly Accessible Supplementary Information Associated with Patent Applications 
Besides looking at the structure of individual patent documents, it is also important to understand that 
patents exist within an infrastructure of additional information associated with the development of the 
document, what occurs with it as it matures, and how it relates to other documents that are associated 
with it. Some of this information can be incorporated into PLRs, while other details are only explored if 
additional details on a particular asset are of interest. 
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
edit, C#.NET PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C#.NET rotate PDF pages, C#.NET search text in PDF, C#.NET edit PDF bookmark, C#.NET edit PDF metadata, C#.NET
batch edit pdf metadata; change pdf metadata
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
Embedded print settings. Embedded search index. Document and metadata. All object data. VB.NET Demo Code to Optimize An Exist PDF File in Visual C#.NET Project.
edit pdf metadata; pdf keywords metadata
23 
A great deal of this supplementary data is found in the National Registers associated with the 
prosecution of a patent document in a particular jurisdiction. As an example, the European Patent 
Office (EPO) describes the European Patent Register as follows
21
The European Patent Register contains all the publicly available information on European patent 
applications as they pass through the grant procedure, including oppositions, patent attorney/EPO 
correspondence and more. This service also provides for public file inspection. 
Most patent issuing authorities keep all of this information in one place, but the United States provides 
three different databases for finding this data: 
•  Public PAIR – US Case Histories – http://portal.uspto.gov/pair/PublicPair 
•  USPTO Assignments – Re-assignments - http://assignments.uspto.gov/assignments/q?db=pat 
•  US Patent Maintenance Fees – https://ramps.uspto.gov/eram/patentMaintFees.do 
4.4.1 – File Wrappers and Prosecution History 
Patents, in the process of being examined, are prosecuted at a patent issuing authority. During the 
process, Office Actions and other procedural items take place between the patent office, or examiner, 
and the applicant with their attorneys. The documentation associated with the interaction between the 
applicant and the patent office is referred to as the prosecution history and the paper trail associated 
with it contained in a file wrapper or dossier. The case history contains details on rejections from the 
examiners, the responses from the applicants, any changes that are made to the language of the 
claims, and disclaimers and amendments, filed by the applicant, among other details. 
An example of understanding patent file histories in the United States can be found at  
http://www.tms.org/pubs/journals/JOM/matters/matters-0302.html
The file wrapper (dossier) becomes publicly accessible only after the patent application has been 
published (i.e. in most jurisdictions 18 months after the filing date oder the priority date. Not all 
jurisdictions however provide public file inspection. 
4.4.2 – Maintenance Information 
Maintenance fees or renewal fees are fees that are paid to maintain a granted patent in-force. Some 
patent laws require the payment of maintenance fees for pending patent applications. Not all patent 
laws require the payment of maintenance fees and different laws provide different regulations 
concerning not only the amount payable but also the regularity of the payments. In countries where 
maintenance fees are to be paid annually, they are sometimes called patent annuities.
22
When conducting an analysis, for inclusion in a PLR, which examines the status of a patent document 
it is usually important to sub-divide granted patents in to those that are currently in-force versus those 
that have been allowed to go abandoned, or found to be invalid after re-examination. The documents 
in the latter two categories are no longer in-force, are effectively in the public domain, and available 
for use by others. While status can be determined by looking at maintenance data, calculating term 
21
http://www.epo.org/searching/free/register.html 
22
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maintenance_fee_(patent) 
VB.NET PDF - View PDF with WPF PDF Viewer for VB.NET
edit, C#.NET PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C#.NET rotate PDF pages, C#.NET search text in PDF, C#.NET edit PDF bookmark, C#.NET edit PDF metadata, C#.NET
read pdf metadata online; analyze pdf metadata
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document in C#.NET
edit, C#.NET PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C#.NET rotate PDF pages, C#.NET search text in PDF, C#.NET edit PDF bookmark, C#.NET edit PDF metadata, C#.NET
pdf metadata extract; pdf xmp metadata viewer
24 
and searching for re-exams, it can be a complicated item to determine, and a patent attorney should 
be consulted in matters where significant investment may be involved. 
4.4.3 – Assignment Information 
An assignment involves the sale and transfer of ownership of a patent by the assignor to the 
assignee. 
The assignee is the entity that is the recipient of a transfer of a patent application, patent, trademark 
application or trademark registration from its owner on record (assignor).
23
As discussed in section 4.2.1.2 on Inventors, in the United States, one of the first assignments that 
takes place is between the inventor and the organization they are employed by, assigning the 
inventor’s rights to an invention to the organization that paid for its development. 
Since patents are a property right, they can also be sold or licensed to other entities. While disclosure 
of patent sales is not formally required in all countries, unless a patent is going to be used in litigation, 
some organizations will file a re-assignment to ensure there is a record of the change in ownership. 
Patent licenses, on the other hand, can be more difficult to keep track of, since there is often not a 
record of the license being negotiated and between which parties. In addition, licenses are often 
considered as confidential or part of business intelligence information; as a result of that, licensing 
data is difficult to retrieve and is usually not included in a PLR, unless it refers to specific competitors 
and more limited number of patents. There are even some databases including some licensing 
information, based on some publicly available information and M&As, nevertheless most of the times 
is such information incomplete. 
Patents can also be used as collateral against a loan. This type of assignment is referred to as a 
Security Agreement, and while not a formal change in ownership, this type of agreement will show up 
in databases that cover assignment data. 
Many electronic patent databases will incorporate assignment data by providing separate fields for the 
original, and current assignee, where the current assignee will reflect the impact of any changes in the 
ownership of a patent right since it was first applied for. 
PLRs will typically incorporate the current owner when an analysis of the assignees prevalent in a 
particular area is being studied. 
4.4.4 – Patent Infringement and Litigation 
Patents, by definition, are a right to exclude others from making, using, offering for sale, or selling an 
invention in the jurisdiction covered by an in-force document. After a patent has been granted and 
when the patent owner believes that an organization is performing one of these acts, with an invention 
covered by one of their patents, they can initiate litigation in the form of a patent infringement 
lawsuit
24
23
http://inventors.about.com/od/definations/g/Assignment.htm
24
Additional details can be found at WIPO Handbook - Chapter 4 - Enforcement of Intellectual Property Rights 
http://www.wipo.int/export/sites/www/about-ip/en/iprm/pdf/ch4.pdf, WIPO IP Panorama 3 – Learning Point 3 
http://www.wipo.int/export/sites/www/sme/en/documents/pdf/ip_panorama_3_learning_points.pdf 
C# PDF delete text Library: delete, remove text from PDF file in
Description: Delete specified string text that match the search option from PDF file. Parameters: Name, Description, Valid Value. matchString,
endnote pdf metadata; remove metadata from pdf online
C# PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net
Embedded print settings. Embedded search index. Bookmarks. Document and metadata. All object data. Flatten visible layers. C#.NET DLLs: Compress PDF Document.
pdf metadata online; clean pdf metadata
25 
Organizations who believe they may be sued for patent infringement, and who believe that the patents 
involved are invalid, or that their organization does not infringe them, may also initiate legal action, 
e.g. in the US in the form of a Declaratory Judgment or DJ action. The US Declaratory Judgment Act
25
provides US federal courts with the authority to "declare the rights and other legal relations of any 
interested party" where an "actual controversy" exists.  
Patent infringement and invalidation law suits are the actions most often associated with litigation 
involving patent assets. 
Litigation issues are not normally covered in the course of developing a PLR, but for organizations 
entering a new market or technological field, understanding the litigious nature of the current players 
can be a valuable competitive and strategic tool. 
Many patent databases have begun including litigation data on individual patents, as well as the 
organizations that own them. Details on the motions involved during the court proceedings can be 
downloaded from the individual courts associated with the cases. 
4.4.5 – Patent Families 
Due to the territorial character of the patent system worldwide, patents protection is sought in 
individual jurisdictions. The Paris Convention of 1883 facilitates the filing in different jurisdictions by 
claiming priority rights derived from earlier filings (at the offices of first filing - OFF). These priority 
claims lead to relations between different national patent applications, so called patent family 
relations. Since the Paris convention expressly permits the claiming of more than one priority rather 
complex family relations may exist depending on whether two applications share priorities in full, 
partially or only indirectly, i.e. through other ones. 
There is also the opportunity to file an international patent application, referred to as a PCT 
application, as discussed in section 4.2.1.1. Nevertheless, that does not lead to a patent grant, unless 
and until they enter the national phase of the individual jurisdictions of interest in order to be examined 
by them at national level. PCT applications can be filed with or without claiming priority rights of earlier 
filings. This creates a situation where a single invention might have many individual patent documents 
associated with it, depending on the number of countries the applicant sought protection in, which are 
linked to each other through a PCT application number and not necessarily through one or several 
Paris Convention priorities. 
The family becomes even more enlarged when applications, which are normally published separately 
from granted patents, and thus are discrete documents themselves, are also added to the collection. 
In order to simplify some of the dichotomy between inventions and the various patent documents that 
can be associated with them, the concept of a patent family was created. There are a variety of 
different definitions provided for patent families depending on how tightly linked the documents are 
based on priority filings. According to the WIPO Handbook, these are defined as: 
•  Domestic patent family - a patent family consisting solely of a single office’s different 
procedural publications for the same originating application. 
25
Act of June 14, 1934, Pub. L. No. 73-343, 48 Stat. 955 (1934) (current version at 
28 U.S.C. §§ 2201-2202 (2000)). 
26 
•  Simple patent family - a patent family relating to the same invention, each member of which 
has for the basis of its “priority right” exactly the same originating application or applications. 
•  Extended patent family  -  a patent family relating to one or more inventions, each member of 
which has for the basis of its priority right at least one originating application in common with at 
least one other member of the family.  
A detailed example of the different definitions of patent families can be found at the URL below: 
http://www.epo.org/searching/essentials/patent-families/definitions.html
In addition to the general concepts of simple and extended patent families, various database 
producers have created their own definitions of patent families for organizing patent documents within 
their collections, such as FamPat. The Intellogist wiki provides definitions for the major providers as 
well as additional general definitions for patent families besides simple and extended. 
http://www.intellogist.com/wiki/Patent_Families
Organizing patent collections by some form of family is an essential activity, which will have a 
significant impact on how statistics are generated for a PLR. Determining which method will be used 
and consistently applying it across an entire project will ensure that accurate comparisons can be 
made between different entities being studied. Generally speaking, using simple families will create 
larger numbers of narrowly defined collections to analyze while extended families will produce 
smaller, broader collections. Analysts must determine whether the use of an extended family will 
severely underrepresent the amount of investment made by an organization for instance when 
deciding to use that method. 
4.5 – Sources of Patent Information 
The decision on what patent information source will be used is an important one for an analyst to 
consider as they are initiating a project. The cost of acquiring data to analyze should be weighed 
against the time it will take to work with the data, and its comprehensiveness. For convenience, a list 
of database providers who offer patent information, organized by these three categories, can be found 
in section 9.2 of these guidelines. 
While only the patenting authorities themselves generate authoritative patent data (primary 
sources), there are a number of different secondary sources for patent documents and information 
that are usually used to generate PLRs because they include patent information of more than just one 
jurisdiction which they have obtained from different primary sources.  
When comparing patent information sources or databases one needs to distinguish between which 
data are searchable (search fields) and which are retrievable. Namely not all data which are included 
in a database and which can be viewed or downloaded are also searchable. For example, many 
databases do not permit keyword searches in the fulltext including claims and description. 
Sometimes, keywords can only be searched in title and abstract. Once a relevant publication is 
identified, e.g. through a search, claims can however be read.  
Due to their nature, secondary sources usually include information regarding patent family relations. 
In some databases this family information is used to perform a family reduction on the results list, i.e. 
27 
the search result list would include only one document per family that represents the patent family. 
The reduction method varies from database to database leading to different representative patent 
family members. Primary sources may also sometimes include information on national patent family 
relations, such as continuations or continuations in part.  
Since analysis is usually performed after search and by a separate set of tools, it is particularly 
important whether sources permit the download of structured data (see Section 4.5.1). 
While primary sources are usually free, secondary sources follow a continuum from free sources that 
provide basic bibliographic, text and/or image data, to for-fee sources that offer additional 
enhancements and features associated with the data, or even integrated analysis tools. 
4.5.1 – Primary Sources: Patent Authorities 
Each patent jurisdiction defines its publication policies and the authority in charge of producing the 
official patent related publications and providing access to other information like legal status data or 
the public part of the file wrapper. Many patent authorities around the world have websites with data 
services that allow the general public to search and retrieve the respective patent documents. These 
sources may be addressed as primary sources since they are the authoritative sources in comparison 
to other (secondary) databases that gather such information from many different primary sources and 
make them searchable through a single search interface. Some of the features associated with these 
primary sites include: 
•  These collections are generally available to search for no cost; very few jurisdictions permit 
access to full publications only for a fee. Basic bibliographic data are generally accessible for 
free. 
•  Some of the offices (e.g. the United States Patent Office) separate the searching of 
applications from granted patents but most allow the user to search both simultaneously. 
•  Some of the authorities maintain separate patent register databases that provide information 
on the most recent legal status of pending applications or granted patents, or permit file 
inspection, in addition to the official document publication services. 
•  Many of the primary sources allow searching in an English interface, regardless of the native 
language of the country, although data (e.g. legal status) or documents retrieved are only in 
the national language. 
•  Search syntax and functionality varies from site to site so individual search strategies need to 
be developed for each such source. 
•  Some primary sources allow for bulk downloading of patent documents discovered during a 
search, while others only allow small numbers or single documents to be downloaded. 
•  While entire documents can be downloaded, most sites do not allow individual patent data 
fields to be exported (structured data) or, if they do, the number of fields available is limited. 
Due to the limitations imposed by the National Patent Office sites, especially the inability to export 
individual data fields (structured data) and the limitation to the authority's own publications, these 
collections are not normally used for generating datasets associated with PLRs, unless the 
geographic scope of a report is only the one jurisdiction, or the national data are not included in any 
secondary source, or if certain data like legal status need to be verified. They may provide an 
28 
inexpensive means for exploring a topic area, but once that is accomplished most analysts will shift to 
other patent sources to generate the data used for analysis. 
4.5.2 – Free Secondary Sources 
A few patent authorities maintain secondary patent databases which allow searching for patents from 
several countries together. These are mainly PATENTSCOPE from WIPO, Esp@cenet from the 
European Patent Office, or DEPATISNET from the German Patent and Trademark Office. 
There are several further patent searching services online that are available for free. Their 
characteristics are similar to the offerings from the patent offices although their country coverage may 
be smaller. They offer sometimes advantages over the patent office sites since, their user interface is 
often a little more polished, and end-user friendly. They also occasionally offer additional features that 
are not normally found on the patent office sites. 
Rudimentary analytics tools can be found on a few of the sites but this functionality is normally left to 
the commercial sources. For instance, TheLens from Cambia, and PatentInspiration from CREAX, 
and PATENTSCOPE offer some statistical analysis and visualization features. 
Some of these sites have been used to generate PLRs
26
and their free nature makes them an 
attractive source for collecting data. The balance an analyst has to strike is between the low cost of 
the data versus their ability to manipulate data during subsequent analysis. In some cases, the 
features and functionality available from commercial tools justify the cost of access since they save 
time in the subsequent analysis stages. 
4.5.3 – Commercial Sources 
Commercial sources of patent information have been available for over a century. What started as 
abstracting and indexing services covering patents from a handful of countries and, on a small variety 
of topics, has developed into a large business with many significant players. Some of the 
characteristics associated with commercial patent database providers include: 
•  Enhanced content – editorial staffs create titles, abstracts and indexes that “translate” the 
legal language used in patents into standard terms familiar to practitioners. When searching, 
the addition of enhanced content has a significant impact on the comprehensiveness of a 
patent collection. 
•  A “one-stop-shop” for searching, analysis and dissemination – several of the major 
commercial providers allow an analyst to search, refine, review, analyze and share collections 
and output within the same system. Having most of the functionality on one place can be a 
significant time saver. 
•  Flexibility in exporting data – Commercial sources generally have a higher limit on the 
number of records available for export. They also, generally, have a greater variety of fields to 
choose from, providing more options for an analyst to explore. 
•  Additional tools for refining data collections – as will be discussed in subsequent sections 
of the guidelines, patent data can contain errors, such as typos in patent assignee names, or 
26
http://www.patentlens.net/daisy/patentlens/landscapes-tools.html  
29 
redundancies, such as the same invention being represented in different countries. Many 
services have mechanisms in place to assist users in dealing with these items, as opposed to 
having to do them by manually, providing significant time savings in preparing data to be 
analyzed. 
4.6 – Reports Associated with Patent Information 
Due to the critical nature of patent documents and the information associated with them, reports 
related to patent information are used in a variety of different business contexts. There are different 
reports affiliated with providing information on patent data in these different environments. These 
guidelines are focused on the use of patent information to generate Landscape Reports but the 
following definitions of additional reports that incorporate patent information are provided for 
reference. 
4.6.1 – Patent Landscape 
There is no single definition or common understanding for a patent landscape report. There are 
various approaches, some of which broader, covering even Freedom to Operate elements and other, 
non-patent related data, such as market analysis, while others much narrower, with certain 
understandings being that a patent landscape is identical to a patent map (for more information about 
that, please consult section 4.6.2). One could state that a patent landscape report provides an 
overview of the patenting activity and trends in a field of technology. A patent landscape normally 
seeks to answer specific policy or practical questions and to present complex information about this 
activity in a clear and accessible manner. Industry has long used patent landscapes to make strategic 
decisions on investments, research and development (R&D) directions, competitors' activity as well as 
on freedom to operate in introducing new products. Now, public policymakers are increasingly turning 
to landscaping to build a factual foundation before considering high-level policy matters, especially in 
fields such as health, food security and the environment. 
4.6.2 – Patent Map 
While the name patent map sounds similar to a patent landscape, a patent map generally represents 
a graphical representation of a data collection that borrows characteristics of cartography. Maps are 
usually focused on a single attribute associated with a data collection such as the classification of 
documents based on the topics covered within them. A map paradigm is used to represent similarity 
between documents or concepts since the human mind is used to and can readily understand the use 
of maps to correlate distance between two items. 
4.6.3 – Watch or Alerts 
A patent watch is a process for monitoring newly issued patents, as well as possibly pending patent 
applications, to assess whether any of these patent documents might be of interest.
27
Patent alerts 
are also performed in order to determine if patent documents of interest undergo a change in status. 
For instance, a patent application of interest may be monitored to determine if it goes on to grant. 
Organizations also set up patent watches to monitor new patent applications coming from competing 
organizations in high interest technologies. 
4.6.4 – Freedom-to-Operate / Clearance 
27
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Patent_watch  
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested