c# pdf library mit : Analyze pdf metadata SDK software service wpf winforms html dnn wipo_pub_9463-part695

30 
In this type of report, which involves an organization asking for a legal opinion on whether a product 
they are planning on shipping will infringe any existing patents before they launch.  The search 
involved is very specific since it is country specific and usually only applies to in-force granted patents 
and their claims. There is nothing offensive about this type of report since the interested party is not 
going to assert patents against anyone else, they are simply looking to make sure that they are not 
going to be infringing someone else's patents.  An analyst in this case needs to identify the critical 
components of the product in question and search jurisdiction specific claims of in-force patents to 
see if any of them cover the product components in question.  In most cases a great deal of money 
has gone into a product launch or can be involved with a successful product which is generating a 
great deal of revenue so it is important for companies to know that they will be reasonably safe from 
future litigation before they make an even larger investment. 
4.6.5 – Patentability / Prior-Art 
This type of report is usually performed in the legal context of determining if a new invention is eligible 
for patent protection and determining how broadly the claims for the new invention can be written. 
This type of report can cover both patent and non-patent literature and is typically looking for 
references that were published before the filing date of the invention in question.  In the United States 
inventors have up to a year from first public disclosure of an invention to file a patent so some 
searchers will go back an additional year with their searching to make sure they have found the best 
references. 
This report helps identify the boundaries of the known references and will help the attorneys drafting 
the claims to ask for the broadest coverage possible.  Without knowing the scope of the known 
references it is difficult for the attorney to know how broadly they can write the claims and still expect 
the examiner to grant a patent. 
4.6.6 – Validity 
Validity reports provide the results of the largest and most comprehensive of all patent searches. 
These reports are almost always associated with large sums of money and critical business decisions 
and as such need to be as comprehensive as possible.  This report shares similar characteristics to 
Patentability but is normally far more comprehensive since there is typically much more at stake when 
this sort of report is asked for.   
The object of the search involved with this report is to identify prior art references, which will allow a 
granted patent to be made invalid or revoked during a particular proceeding before the particular 
patent office of interest or during a court proceeding.  Sometimes organizations will also initiate 
validity challenges for patents that they are thinking of acquiring especially if they believe these 
patents will later be used in some type of litigation or another.  On the flip side of this an organization 
who is provided with a cease and desist notice will often want to make the patents in question go 
away by finding invalidating prior art and then entering into re-examination.  The prior art references in 
question can come from the patent or non-patent literature must be available in the public domain and 
have to have been published prior to the priority filing date of the patent in question.  In the United 
States there is a one-year grace period on patents filings so some analysts will look back an 
additional year when they search so they can be sure to avoid this type of situation. 
4.6.7 – General Statistics 
Analyze pdf metadata - add, remove, update PDF metadata in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Allow C# Developers to Read, Add, Edit, Update and Delete PDF Metadata
bulk edit pdf metadata; pdf metadata viewer online
Analyze pdf metadata - VB.NET PDF metadata library: add, remove, update PDF metadata in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Enable VB.NET Users to Read, Write, Edit, Delete and Update PDF Document Metadata
batch pdf metadata; get pdf metadata
31 
Reports of this nature are generated by patent offices
28
and other organizations to provide metrics on 
the performance and output associated with an area of interest. PriceWaterhouseCoopers for 
instance, publishes a yearly litigation study that looks at the statistics associated with patent litigation 
in the United States
29
WIPO cooperates with intellectual property (IP) offices from around the world to provide its 
stakeholders with up-to-date IP statistics
30
. Generally, these statistics are provided as raw data that 
can be used by analysts to draw conclusions based on their own interests and experimentation. 
WIPO also publishes statistical reports on worldwide IP activity and on the use of WIPO-administered 
treaties in the protection of IP rights internationally, such as the PCT Yearly Review
31
and the World 
Intellectual Property Indicators
32
. In addition, WIPO IP Statistics Data Center is an on-line service 
enabling access to WIPO’s statistical data on intellectual property (IP) activity worldwide
33
. Users can 
select from a wide range of indicators and view or download the latest available as well as historical 
data according to their needs, based on the Worldwide Patent Statistical Database (PATSTAT
34
) data, 
which is administered by the European Patent Office. Moreover, patent statistics are often paired with 
other data and indicators to provide a more holistic approach of innovation. An example of this is the 
Global Innovation Index (GII)
35
which ranks the innovation performance of 143 countries and 
economies around the world, based on 81 indicators. The GII is co-published by WIPO, Cornell 
University and INSEAD. 
28
http://www.wipo.int/ipstats/en/resources/office_stats_reports.html  
29
http://www.pwc.com/en_US/us/forensic-services/publications/assets/2014-patent-
litigation-study.pdf  
30
http://www.wipo.int/ipstats/en  
31
http://www.wipo.int/edocs/pubdocs/en/wipo_pub_901_2015.pdf  
32
http://www.wipo.int/ipstats/en/wipi/  
33
http://ipstats.wipo.int/ipstatv2/?lang=en  
34
http://www.epo.org/searching/subscription/patstat-online.html  
35
http://www.wipo.int/econ_stat/en/economics/gii/  
VB.NET TIFF: TIFF Tag Viewer SDK, Read & Edit TIFF Tag Using VB.
Therefore, if you want to analyze or diagnose one TIFF file format, you must need a of TIFF file which is used as a tool to save metadata information), we
add metadata to pdf; batch update pdf metadata
32 
Chapter 5: Objectives and Motivations for Generating Patent Landscape Reports 
Producing a Patent Landscape Report (PLR) can be a time intensive and expensive process. 
Devoting the resources necessary to generate a PLR is often tied to a business objective, e.g., where 
an organization is preparing to make a significant monetary or headcount investment in developing or 
moving into a technology area. Various types of organizations have different objectives that need to 
be explored in order to make an informed decision about the allocation of resources to a new project 
or area. For the purposes of these guidelines, the types of organizations will be either governmental 
and inter-governmental, or corporate. 
The approach taken to developing a PLR will differ depending on the business objectives that 
necessitated the ordering of the report for an individual decision cycle. Generally speaking, PLRs 
support informed decision-making. Regardless of the business objective, PLRs have developed a 
specific format, and are designed to efficiently address the concerns associated with making high 
stakes decisions in technologically advanced areas, with a maximum degree of confidence. For many 
years decision-makers operated based on personal networks and intuition. With the institution of 
patent analytics, and PLRs, it is possible for these critical decisions to be made with data-driven 
approaches that deliver informed choices, and lower risk profiles. 
5.1 – Objectives behind Patent Landscape Reports 
The issues associated with public policy decisions, initiated by government agencies, are usually 
different from the decisions that are important to corporate entities, and their stakeholders. The 
analyses of patent information, and the generation of PLRs, are increasingly required by both types of 
organizations, in order to understand a technological area. Understanding how the decisions differ 
between these two types of entities allows the analyst to tailor their report in order to most efficiently 
meet the needs of the respective audiences. In most cases, there is not much overlap between the 
objectives associated with each entity, but in the cases of using PLRs to explore technology transfer, 
and research and development questions there is substantial similarity in what both groups are 
attempting to discover for informed decision-making. 
5.1.1 – To Support Governmental Policy Discussions 
At the beginning of April 2008, the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) in cooperation 
with the Food and Agricultural Organization (FAO) organized a Symposium on Public Policy Patent 
Landscaping in the Life Sciences
36
. The stated goals for this symposium provide a succinct 
explanation of how PLRs can be used as instruments to inform public policy makers as they look to 
tackle technological issues. 
The Symposium draws together two important trends: 
•  Patent information as a tool of public policy: Policymakers who deal with innovation and 
access in the life sciences – concerned with agriculture and food security; public health and 
pharmaceuticals; and environmental issues – have increasingly focused on the patent system. 
They look for clearer, more accessible and geographically more representative information to 
support key policy processes. They seek a stronger empirical basis for their assessments on 
the role and impact of the patent system in relation to key areas of life sciences technology. 
•  Improved analytical tools and access to patent information: Rapid growth in the use of the 
patent system, and in the diversity of users, has led to an explosion of raw data on patenting 
36
http://www.wipo.int/meetings/en/2008/lifesciences/patent_landscaping  
33 
activities in the life sciences. This data is progressively being turned into useful information. 
Availability and quality of patent information have increased. Analytical tools and 
methodologies are better understood and are more widely available. And greater practical 
experience has been harvested from a range of recent patent landscaping initiatives. This 
trend opens up enormous practical potential for improved patent information resources for 
public policymakers addressing the life sciences. 
This Symposium aims to take a first step towards more systematically matching the policy needs – the 
international policy agenda on public policy issues of concern in the life sciences – with the practical 
capacities – the diverse resources that are now increasingly available to gather, analyze and extract 
key trends and findings from patent information. 
PLRs are designed to provide efficient access to a large collection of technologically focused data and 
to answer key questions about what technologies are covered, which organizations own the patents 
and in which countries they are held. Where previously, this data might only be available to the 
technologically savvy, now it can be made available to individuals at all technological knowledge 
levels. Making technological topics available to policy makers leads to better decision-making and 
additional resources devoted to critical issues. Within the context of Governmental Policy discussions, 
an examination of the activities associated with various jurisdictions can help identify the elements 
required for preparing PLRs for these agencies. 
5.1.1.1 – Global Efforts 
WIPO is involved with several global efforts to enhance the availability of information on patent 
activity. A WIPO Magazine article, Shedding Light on the Life Sciences: Patent Landscaping for 
Public Policymakers provides excellent reasons for why these international efforts are necessary for 
informed public policy discussions
37
Good quality information about patenting activity is an essential input for some of the most critical 
international policy debates today. Yet patent information is unavoidably complex, constantly evolving, 
and difficult to capture in readily accessible form for a non-specialized audience. There are real risks 
associated with making judgments on the basis of limited patent landscapes without considering the 
full technical and legal context. Thus the demand for reliable patent landscaping in the life sciences is 
strong, and there are no shortcuts to meeting that demand. 
A positive feedback loop is developing: patent informatics are delivering increasingly focused and 
accessible information products for policymakers, who in turn can sharpen and distil their demands for 
patent information, leading in turn to increasingly more relevant and useful support. Patent 
landscaping is not a substitute for the policy debates and deliberations on the key life sciences issues 
of the day. But it can inform, support and strengthen the factual basis for discussions, so assisting the 
policymakers in those fields to set future directions on health, the environment and food security. 
WHO’s Global Strategy and Plan of Action also identified the need to improve access to patent 
information to facilitate the determination of the patent status of health products. It urges stakeholders 
to: 
37
http://www.wipo.int/wipo_magazine/en/2008/04/article_0005.html  
34 
• 
Facilitate access to user-friendly global databases which contain public information on the 
administrative status of health-related patents. This includes supporting existing efforts for 
determining the patent status of health products, and to 
• 
Promote further development of such global databases including, if necessary, compiling, 
maintaining and updating such global databases. 
To date, there was no comprehensive overview of patenting activity and trends in the area of 
vaccines. In the framework of policy discussions at the World Health Assemblies on vaccine local 
manufacturing, WHO and WIPO jointly developed a patent landscape report
38
that provides an 
overview on what is being patented in terms of selected disease targets, who is doing the patenting, 
where patents are filed and on how patent policies change over time. This provided the factual 
evidence and the background to support the related policy discussions. 
WIPO has also worked with the World Health Organization (WHO) on understanding the patent 
environment associated with essential medicines from around the world. In a summary of this work
39
the following details were shared: 
For more than 30 years, the WHO has published a Model List of Essential Medicines, which is 
updated every two years. Most countries have adopted the concept and have developed their own 
national lists of essential medicines. One important question is to what extent patents protect the 
essential medicines on the WHO Model List. One of the projects presented at the symposium focused 
on assessing the patent status of the medicines that have been added to the WHO Model List in 
recent years. The study, based on data from the US Federal Drug Administration's Orange Book, 
identified relevant patent families for these medicines in countries where patent data were available. 
Access to affordable generic medicines can be achieved through licensing agreements. A new 
approach to increase access this way is the creation of a patent pool for antiretroviral medicines, 
undertaken by the Medicines Patent Pool, a United Nations-backed organization established in 
2010
40
. This requires reliable patent information, including: 
1.  Knowing what patents cover the products to be used;  
2.  What the patents exactly cover for these products;  
3.  Who holds the patents;  
4.  The countries where the patent applications have been filed and where they have bbeen 
granted; and  
5.  The current legal status of those patents. 
These are complex tasks. Many national and regional patent collections can only be consulted on-
site. Information is often not updated or incomplete, especially on the legal status. With the support of 
WIPO (among others through the preparation of two patent landscape reports on Ritonavir
41
and 
Atazanavir
42
, and information collected by WIPO with the support of national IP Offices), and a wide 
range of national and regional patent offices, the Medicines Patent Pool has identified the legal status 
38
http://www.wipo.int/patentscope/en/programs/patent_landscapes/reports/vaccines.html  
39
http://www.wipo.int/edocs/mdocs/mdocs/en/who_wipo_wto_ip_med_ge_11/who_wipo_wto_
ip_med_ge_11_www_169578.pdf  
40
http://www.medicinespatentpool.org  
41
http://www.wipo.int/edocs/pubdocs/en/patents/946/wipo_pub_946.pdf  
42
http://www.wipo.int/edocs/pubdocs/en/patents/946/wipo_pub_946_2.pdf  
35 
of key patents for selected antiretroviral medicines in low- and middle-income countries
43
.
A database 
has been launched in the meantime to allow open access to this resource and the legal status 
information related to these medicines
44
. The discussion raised the question of whether patent pooling 
could be a general solution in cases of patent thickets, i.e. situations involving overlapping patents, 
which prevent competition. 
In some cases, PLRs have also an awareness raising role on the importance of the IP aspect and 
patent information in policy discussions of various subject matters involving technology; and they can 
also have an impact. After WIPO’s collaboration with IRENA
45
, the International Renewable Energy 
Agency, and the production of a PLR on Desalination Technologies and the use of Renewable 
Energies for Desalination
46
, the importance of IP and patent information became more clear to IRENA 
and its stakeholders and some years later it even lead to the launch beginning of 2015 of IRENA’s 
Standards and Patent Information Platform
47
.  
WIPO has generated several PLRs associated with these on-going, global efforts. Additional details 
on these efforts and a list of available PLRs can be found at: 
http://www.wipo.int/patentscope/en/programs/patent_landscapes/index.html
5.1.1.2 – Regional Efforts 
The World Health Organization works regionally, specifically in developing countries, to ensure that 
access to vital medicines is available to individuals of all economic and social backgrounds. In order 
to understand the technology, and IP rights, associated with providing access to critical care, WHO 
has worked with WIPO and the World Trade Organization (WTO), and looked at the patent activity 
around vaccines. On February 18
th
2011, the three organizations organized a joint Technical 
Symposium on Access to Medicines, Patent Information and Freedom-to-Operate
48
that provides 
details on this regional effort.  
In the field of vaccines, WHO is monitoring the patenting activity to identify the extent to which 
vaccines and production technologies are protected by intellectual property. When patents apply, in 
some cases WHO supports research on alternative technologies or negotiates licenses with the right 
holders on behalf of developing country manufacturers. For most existing vaccines, patents do not 
generally prevent production by competitors, but there are some notable exceptions, including reverse 
genetic engineering, a key technology for the production of pandemic influenza vaccines and the 
human papilloma- virus vaccine. 
43
The database coverage as of June 1, 2015 can be found at 
http://www.medicinespatentpool.org/wp-content/uploads/Patent-Status-Table-1June2015.xls 
44
http://www.medicinespatentpool.org/patent-data/patent-status-of-arvs/ 
45
http://www.irena.org/   
46
http://www.wipo.int/patentscope/en/programs/patent_landscapes/reports/desalination.htm
l  
47
http://community.irena.org/t5/Innovation-for-Energy-Transition/LAUNCH-OF-IRENA-S-
STANDARDS-amp-PATENTS-INFORMATION-PLATFORM/gpm-p/2257  
48
http://www.wipo.int/meetings/en/2011/who_wipo_wto_ip_med_ge_11/program.html 
36 
A major barrier to increasing the uptake of vaccine manufacturing in developing countries is the lack 
of know-how. Thus WHO also focuses on the transfer of vaccine production technology to these 
countries. 
The Dengue Vaccine Initiative of the International Vaccine Institute presented a global freedom to 
operate analysis with different candidates for dengue vaccines. The goal was to understand how 
intellectual property may affect access to future vaccines in developing countries and to evaluate how 
free developing country developers are to market their vaccines internationally.  
The analysis revealed that the sponsors of vaccine candidates seem to have intellectual property 
required to regulatory agency approval for their candidates and to market them. However, in the 
future, problems might still arise from patent applications, which cover certain delivery mechanisms. 
WIPO is also working closely with various national institutions to support them in addressing issues of 
interest for various regions. For instance, WIPO is working in collaboration with the Malaysian 
(MyIPO), the Malaysian Palm Oil Board and the Phillipines IP Office (IPOPHIL) on a Patent 
Landscape Report on Palm Oil Production and Waste Exploitation Technologies, providing a general 
overview of related technologies globally, but also with a focus on the region whose economy is 
strongly active in the field.  
5.1.1.3 – National Efforts 
Several Intellectual Property Offices have become engaged in the field of patent analytics, e.g., the 
Intellectual Property Office of the United Kingdom (http://www.ipo.gov.uk/) initiated an informatics 
team in 2009 with the stated goal of “using patent data to mine, reveal, and inform, for government 
and for industry”
49
. To date they have twelve PLRs listed on their reports page
50
covering topics from 
stem cells to 3DTVs. They list the following national benefits to the use of patent analytics and PLRs 
to both governmental and business interests in the United Kingdom: 
•  Innovation Policy – Providing evidence of the emerging trends in technology 
•  Investment Opportunity – 
Identifying the technologies that could create a whole new 
market 
•  Competitor Intelligence –
Profiling your competitors using their patent portfolios 
•  Knowledge Transfer – 
Analyzing the flow of knowledge and collaborations 
•  Geographical Profiling – 
Comparing markets between countries and regions 
Looking at the specific objectives listed in the IPO study on the generation of energy from waste 
materials, the following rationales are given: 
The objectives as defined in the original project proposal are as follows: 
•  Provide an overall patent landscape analysis in the technology area of Energy from Waste.  
•  Provide analysis of the level of UK research in comparison to the rest of Europe and rest of the 
world.  
•  Identify key active companies and key patent applications. 
The objectives for Phase II were designed to focus on the UK energy from waste patent landscape, 
covering: 
49
http://www.ipo.gov.uk/informatics.htm 
50
http://www.ipo.gov.uk/informatics-reports 
37 
•  Specific technology fields: biogas / biohydrogen from waste  
•  Emergent technologies  
•  UK patent applicant types: commercial, academic, or government  
•  The activities of individual patent applicants and the extent to which they influence the overall 
patterns in the UK  
•  Consolidated IPC classifications to form larger groups and produce more focused results  
•  Producing and interrogating a UK patent landscape map  
The objective for Phase II, in particular demonstrates how the creation of PLRs can assist the 
development of high impact technologies within national jurisdictions. Investing in high impact 
technologies helps to establish both academic and industrial centers of excellence within a country 
that often leads to an increase in the number of organizations that will establish research and 
manufacturing facilities in the country. 
5.1.1.4 – Technology transfer and licensing 
In order to assist industries residing in their countries, several national governments have recently 
started purchasing patent assets on behalf of the organizations that manufacture products in their 
jurisdictions. A news story on this practice from Reuters
51
provides details on this practice: 
France Brevets was launched in 2011 with 100 million euros, half from the state and half from the 
Caisse des Depots, a publicly managed investor in French economic development. 
Pascal Asselot, licensing director for France Brevets, said that by assembling patent pools with 
intellectual property bought from French and foreign businesses, France Brevets aims to convince 
other companies to sign licensing deals and pay royalties. If France Brevets can show a healthy 
revenue stream, the hope is to attract sustainable private investment, Asselot said. 
Korea's Intellectual Discovery, which was started in 2010 amid government fears that domestic 
companies were losing key patents that could be used against them by foreign companies, has a 
$140 million government commitment. 
Prominent South Korean companies like Samsung Electronics Co Ltd and LG Electronics have signed 
up as "shareholders," providing Intellectual Discovery with additional revenue in exchange for a 
license to its patent portfolio. 
Intellectual Discovery chief general manager Chant Kim compares the company to San Francisco-
based RPX Corp, which acquires patents to protect its members but doesn't initiate lawsuits. 
PLRs are often used by organizations exploring technology transfer, and licensing in order to 
understand what other organizations have invested in a particular area. If another organization has 
invested in a technology, especially if the investment was made a few years earlier, there is a higher 
likelihood that they will be receptive to hearing about new developments, and potentially acquiring or 
licensing the technology. 
While government agencies have shown recent interest in this area, it has been established practice 
for many years for technology intensive corporate entities. Many examples abound, including Texas 
51
http://www.reuters.com/article/2013/03/20/patents-nations-idUSL1N0BZ10C20130320  
38 
Instruments and Tessera, of companies that originally received most of their revenue from the sales of 
physical products, but began to shift their business models to rely more heavily on revenue generated 
from licensing.  
5.1.1.5 – Research and development (R&D) decision-making 
As was seen in the UK IPO national efforts example, the use of PLRs can influence decisions around 
investments in academic and non-profit funding for the creation of economically favorable 
technologies, which can increase the Gross Domestic Product of a country. Governments use PLRs 
to ensure that investments in R&D will be directed to technologies and industries that will ensure their 
future competitiveness in high impact areas. 
Understanding patent rights also have a major impact on R&D since patents, by their nature, are a 
right to exclude, and this can have a significant impact on the ability to conduct further research in an 
area covered by them. Different countries allow for different Research Exemptions involving patent 
rights. The Wikipedia page on Research Exemptions
52
provides the following details on the 
International framework around this exemption: 
Article 30 of the WTO’s TRIPs Agreement permits this type of exception: 
“Members may provide limited exceptions to the exclusive rights conferred by a patent, provided that 
such exceptions do not unreasonably conflict with a normal exploitation of the patent and do not 
unreasonably prejudice the legitimate interests of the patent owner, taking account of the legitimate 
interests of third parties.” 
PLRs are an excellent method of determining which technologies have patents associated with them, 
and in which countries those rights are in-force. If the initiation of R&D, in a particular region, is one of 
the objectives of the report, then additional discussion of the Research Exemption law for that region 
should be included. 
Corporate entities are also subject to the same dynamics, when it comes to R&D decision-making and 
PLRs are often generated in this sector as well to support management. A particularly good example 
of this involves the so-called Safe Harbor exemptions that allow for R&D activities in association with 
the generation of generic drugs. The Wikipedia page on Research Exemptions
53
discusses this 
situation as well: 
In patent law, the research exemption or safe harbor exemption is an exemption to the rights 
conferred by patents, which is especially relevant to drugs. According to this exemption, despite the 
patent rights, performing research and tests for preparing regulatory approval, for instance by the FDA 
in the United States, does not constitute infringement for a limited term before the end of patent term. 
This exemption allows generic manufacturers to prepare generic drugs in advance of the patent 
expiration. 
In the United States, this exemption is also technically called § 271(e)(1) exemption or Hatch-
Waxman exemption. The U.S. Supreme Court recently considered the scope of the Hatch-Waxman 
exemption in Merck v. Integra. The Supreme Court held that the statute exempts from infringement all 
uses of compounds that are reasonably related to submission of information to the government under 
any law regulating the manufacture, use or distribution of drugs. 
52
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Research_exemption 
53
Ibid 
39 
In Canada, this exemption is known as the Bolar provision or Roche-Bolar provision, named after the 
case Roche Products v. Bolar Pharmaceutical. 
In the European Union, equivalent exemptions are allowed under the terms of EC Directives 
2001/82/EC (as amended by Directive 2004/28/EC) and 2001/83/EC (as amended by Directives 
2002/98/EC, 2003/63/EC, 2004/24/EC and 2004/27/EC). 
In both governmental and corporate environments PLRs are an essential tool for understanding the 
competitive environment around research areas of interest, and discovering whether groups 
interested in pursuing research initiatives have the freedom to do so. 
5.1.2 – Business or corporate uses 
While there are some overlaps between the uses of patent analytics, and PLRs for governmental 
policy decision-making, the circumstances under which these tools are used for business, or 
corporate situations can be somewhat different. The methods used to generate a PLR, under both 
circumstances, are similar, but the implications, both in the short and long term, can vary significantly. 
5.1.2.1 – Competitor monitoring 
Competition is an inherently business related concept and it is nearly impossible to find a successful 
industry in which there is not some form of competition between organizations looking to gain an 
advantage over other companies in a space. Since businesses compete against one another, 
understanding the capabilities, resources and expertise associated with a competitor becomes a key 
component of corporate strategy. 
These ideas are often associated with Sun Tzu, in The Art of War, when he said the following: 
“If you know the enemy and know yourself, you need not fear the result of a hundred battles. If you 
know yourself but not the enemy, for every victory gained you will also suffer a defeat. If you know 
neither the enemy nor yourself, you will succumb in every battle” 
This thinking is often applied to business strategy and is especially the case when looking at 
technologically focused industries. PLRs usually answer the first question in a strategy session; does 
my competitor have patent rights in any of the areas of interest? They also address the next, follow-up 
question; how many do they have and in what aspects of the technology do they have coverage? 
Patents can provide knowledge on levels of competitive expertise, timing, and investment, in addition 
to providing a right to exclude. They are even more important in technology intensive industries since 
many of the insights contained in them are only published in patents and are not described in other 
types of publications. 
5.1.2.2 – Technology monitoring 
Corporate entities usually associate themselves with specific technological areas. In the 
Pharmaceutical industry, for instance, no single company can excel in all therapeutic areas. Most 
companies tend to focus on a few areas, and concentrate their efforts on those items to the exclusion 
of others. There may be specific competitors, which the organization will monitor, but it is recognized 
that innovation can come from unexpected sources, and as long as it covers an area of interest, the 
company will be aware of these new developments regardless of their source. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested