c# pdf parser free : Online pdf metadata viewer application SDK utility azure wpf .net visual studio wtx0565720-part780

JPEG 2000 as a  
Preservation and Access Format  
for the Wellcome Trust Digital Library 
Robert Buckley 
Xerox Corporation 
Edited by Simon Tanner 
King’s Digital Consultancy Services 
King’s College London 
www.kdcs.kcl.ac.uk
Online pdf metadata viewer - add, remove, update PDF metadata in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Allow C# Developers to Read, Add, Edit, Update and Delete PDF Metadata
edit multiple pdf metadata; embed metadata in pdf
Online pdf metadata viewer - VB.NET PDF metadata library: add, remove, update PDF metadata in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Enable VB.NET Users to Read, Write, Edit, Delete and Update PDF Document Metadata
view pdf metadata; google search pdf metadata
Robert Buckley and Simon Tanner                                                     
August 2009 
© Buckley & Tanner, KCL 2009 
Contents
1.
SUMMARY OF ISSUES/QUESTIONS
................................................................................3
2.
RECOMMENDATIONS
.............................................................................................................4
3
BASIS OF RECOMMENDATIONS/REASONINGS/TESTS DONE
.............................5
3.1
C
OMPRESSION
...................................................................................................................................5
3.2
M
ULTIPLE RESOLUTION LEVELS
........................................................................................................5
3.3
M
ULTIPLE QUALITY LAYERS
...............................................................................................................6
3.4
E
XAMPLE
:
TIFF
TO 
JP2
CONVERSION
............................................................................................6
3.5
M
INIMALLY 
L
OSSY 
C
OMPRESSION
...................................................................................................7
3.6
T
ESTING REVERSIBLE AND IRREVERSIBLE COMPRESSION
..............................................................7
3.7
F
URTHER COMPRESSION FINDINGS
..................................................................................................8
4
IMPLEMENTATION SOLUTIONS / DISCUSSION
........................................................9
4.1
C
OLOR 
S
PECIFICATION
.....................................................................................................................9
4.2
C
APTURE 
R
ESOLUTION
....................................................................................................................10
4.3
M
ETADATA
.......................................................................................................................................10
4.3
S
UPPORT
..........................................................................................................................................11
5
CONCLUSION
..........................................................................................................................12
APPENDIX 1: JPEG 2000 DATASTREAM PARAMETERS
................................................13
APPENDIX 2: REVERSIBLE AND IRREVERSIBLE COMPRESSION
............................14
FIGURE 1: SAMPLE IMAGES
.....................................................................................................15
FIGURE 2: COMPARISON OF IRREVERSIBLE WITH REVERSIBLE 
COMPRESSION
...............................................................................................................................17
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
C#.NET edit PDF bookmark, C#.NET edit PDF metadata, C#.NET C#.NET read barcodes from PDF, C#.NET OCR scan PDF. C# ASP.NET Document Viewer, C# Online Dicom Viewer
rename pdf files from metadata; pdf metadata editor online
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
Create PDF Online. Convert PDF Online. WPF PDF Viewer. View Image to PDF. Image: Remove Image from PDF Page. Edit URL. Bookmark: Edit Bookmark. Metadata: Edit, Delete
pdf metadata online; pdf xmp metadata editor
Robert Buckley and Simon Tanner                                                     
August 2009 
© Buckley & Tanner, KCL 2009 
1.  Summary of Issues/questions 
The Wellcome Trust is developing a digital library over the next 5 years, 
anticipating a storage requirement for up to 30 million images. The Wellcome 
previously has used uncompressed TIFF image files as their archival storage 
image format. However, the storage requirement for many millions of images 
suggests that a better compromise is needed between the costs of secure long-
term digital storage and the image standards used. It is expected that by using 
JPEG2000, total storage requirements will be kept at a value that represents an 
acceptable compromise between economic storage and image quality.  Ideally, 
JPEG2000 could serve as both a preservation format and as an access or 
production format in a write-once-read-many type environment.   
JPEG2000 was chosen as an image preservation format due to its small size 
and because it offers intelligent compression for preservation and intelligent 
decompression for access.  If a lossy format is used to obtain a relatively high 
compression, e.g.  between 5:1 and 20:1 (in comparison to an uncompressed 
TIFF file), then the storage requirements desired are achievable. The questions 
to address are what level of compression is acceptable and delivers the desired 
balance of image quality and reduced storage footprint.  
With regard to the use of JPEG 2000, the questions posed in the brief and 
addressed in this report are: 
a. What JPEG2000 format(s) is best suited for preservation? 
b. What JPEG2000 format(s) is best suited for access?  
c. Can any single JPEG2000 format adequately serve both preservation 
and access?  
d. What models exist for the use of descriptive and/or administrative 
metadata with JPEG2000? 
e. If a JPEG2000 format is recommended for access purposes, what tools 
can be used to display/manipulate/manage it and any associated or 
embedded metadata?  
This report will describe how a unified approach can enable JPEG2000 to serve 
for both preservation and access and balance the needs for compressed image 
size, image quality and decompression performance.  
VB.NET PDF - WPF PDF Viewer for VB.NET Program
C#.NET edit PDF bookmark, C#.NET edit PDF metadata, C#.NET C#.NET read barcodes from PDF, C#.NET OCR scan PDF. C# ASP.NET Document Viewer, C# Online Dicom Viewer
pdf remove metadata; view pdf metadata in explorer
VB.NET PDF - Create PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
C#.NET edit PDF bookmark, C#.NET edit PDF metadata, C#.NET C#.NET read barcodes from PDF, C#.NET OCR scan PDF. C# ASP.NET Document Viewer, C# Online Dicom Viewer
change pdf metadata; remove pdf metadata
Robert Buckley and Simon Tanner                                                     
August 2009 
© Buckley & Tanner, KCL 2009 
2.  Recommendations 
The majority of materials that will form part of the Wellcome Digital Library are 
expected to use visually lossless JPEG 2000 compression. Although “visually 
lossless” compression is lossy, the differences it introduces between the 
original and the image reconstructed from a compressed version of it are either 
not noticeable or insignificant and do not interfere with the application and 
usefulness of the image. Because the original cannot be reconstructed from the 
compressed image, compression in this case is irreversible. JPEG compression 
in digital still cameras is a familiar example of irreversible but visually lossless 
image compression. In mass digitization projects that use JPEG2000, 
compression ratios around 40:1 have been used for basically textual content. 
When applied to printed books, it has been found that these compression ratios 
do not impair the legibility or OCR accuracy of the text.  
However, archiving and long-term preservation indicate a more conservative 
approach to compression and a different trade-off between compressed image 
size and image quality to meet current and anticipated uses. Still, given the 
volumes of material being digitized, a lossy format represents an acceptable 
compromise between quality and economic storage. A compression ratio of 4:1 
or 5:1 gives a conservative upper limit on file size and decompressed image 
quality in the preservation format for the material being digitized. However this 
material should tolerate higher compression ratios with the results remaining 
visually lossless.  
While most of the materials will use visually lossless compression, it is 
suggested that a small subset of materials (less than 5% of total) may be 
candidates for lossless or reversible compression. Reversible means that the 
original can be reconstructed exactly from the compressed image, i.e. the 
compression process is reversible.  
Nevertheless, this report recommends irreversible JPEG2000 compression for 
the preservation and access formats of single grayscale or color images. 
Initially specifying a minimally lossy datastream will result in overall 
compression ratios around 4:1; the exact value will depend on image content. 
While this is a particularly conservative compression ratio, the compression can 
be increased as new materials are captured and even applied retroactively to 
files with previously captured material. The access format will be a subset of 
the preservation format with a subset of the resolution levels and quality layers 
in the preservation format.   
In particular, the JPEG 2000 datastream should have the following properties: 
Irreversible compression using the 9-7 wavelet transform and ICT (see 
Section 3.1) with minimal loss (see Section 3.5) 
Multiple resolutions levels: the number depends on the original image size 
and the desired size of the smallest image derived from the JPEG 2000 
datastream (see Section 3.2) 
Multiple quality layers, where all layers gives minimally lossy compression 
for preservation (see Sections 3.3 and 3.5) 
Resolution-major progression order (see Section 3.4) 
Tiles for improved codec (coder-decoder) performance, although the final 
decision regarding the use of tiles and precincts depends on the codec  
Generated using Bypass mode, which creates a compressed datastream 
that takes less time to compress and decompress (see Section 3.6) 
TLM markers (see Section 3.7) 
A formal specification of the JPEG 2000 datastream for this application is given 
in Appendix 1. The datastream specified there is compatible with Part 1 of the 
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to create PDF document from other file
C#.NET edit PDF bookmark, C#.NET edit PDF metadata, C#.NET C#.NET read barcodes from PDF, C#.NET OCR scan PDF. C# ASP.NET Document Viewer, C# Online Dicom Viewer
pdf metadata extract; endnote pdf metadata
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view, annotate, create and convert PDF
This online HTML5 PDF document viewer library component offers reliable and excellent functionalities. C#.NET users and developers
clean pdf metadata; read pdf metadata java
Robert Buckley and Simon Tanner                                                     
August 2009 
© Buckley & Tanner, KCL 2009 
JPEG 2000 standard; none of the JPEG 2000 datastream extensions defined in 
Part 2 of the standard are needed.   
Further, this report recommends embedding the JPEG 2000 datastream in a 
JP2 file.  The JP2 file should contain: 
A single datastream containing a grayscale or color image whose content 
can be specified using the sRGB color space (or its grayscale or luminance-
chrominance analogue) or a restricted ICC
1
profile, as defined in the JP2 file 
format specification in Part 1 of the JPEG 2000 standard (see Section 4.1) 
A Capture Resolution value (see Section 4.2) 
Embedded metadata that describes the JPEG 2000 datastream should 
follow the ANSI/NISO Z39.87-2006 standard and be placed in a XML box 
following the FileType box in a JP2 file (see Section 4.3) 
Using the JP2 file format is sufficient as long as the requirement is for a single 
datastream whose color content can be specified using sRGB or a restricted ICC 
profile. While the JPX file format can be used if the color content of the image 
is specified by a non-sRGB color space or a general ICC profile, the use of a 
JP2-compatible file format is recommended.  
 Basis of recommendations/reasonings/tests done 
3.1 
Compression 
In general terms, the compression ratio is set for preservation and quality, and 
JPEG 2000 datastream parameters such as the number of resolution levels and 
quality layers and tile size are set for access and performance. JPEG 2000 
offers smart decompression, where only that portion of the datastream needed 
to satisfy the requested image view in terms of resolution, quality and location 
need be accessed and decompressed on demand and just in time. 
The JPEG 2000 compression offers both reversible and irreversible 
compression. Reversible compression in JPEG 2000 uses the 5-3 integer 
wavelet transform and a reversible component transform (RCT). If no 
compressed data is discarded, then the original image data is recoverable from 
the compressed datastream created using these transforms. Irreversible 
compression uses the 9-7 floating point wavelet transform and an irreversible 
component transform (ICT), both of which have round-off errors so that the 
original image data is not recoverable from the compressed datastream, even 
when no compressed data is discarded. Appendix 2 contains a more detailed 
discussion of the differences between reversible and irreversible compression in 
JPEG 2000.  
3.2 
Multiple resolution levels 
To begin with, it is recommended that JPEG 2000 be used with multiple 
resolution levels. The first two or three resolution levels facilitate compression; 
levels beyond that give little more compression but are added so that 
decompressing just the lowest resolution sub-image in the JPEG 2000 
datastream gives a thumbnail of a desired size. For example, with a 5928-by-
4872 pixel dimension original and 5 resolution levels, the smallest sub-image 
would have dimensions that would be 1/32 those of the original, in this case 
186 by 153 pixels, which is roughly QQVGA
2
sized. Accordingly, JPEG 2000 
1
International Color Consortium, an organization that develops and promotes color 
management using the ICC profile format (www.color.org) 
2
Quarter-quarter VGA (Video Graphics Array); since VGA is 640 by 480, QQVGA is 
160 by 120.  
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to view, annotate, convert and print PDF in
Create PDF Online. Convert PDF Online. WPF PDF Viewer. View Image to PDF. Image: Remove Image from PDF Page. Edit URL. Bookmark: Edit Bookmark. Metadata: Edit, Delete
edit pdf metadata online; analyze pdf metadata
VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images
zonal information, metadata, and so on. Extract image from PDF free in .NET framework application with trial SDK components for .NET. Online source codes for
pdf remove metadata; extract pdf metadata
Robert Buckley and Simon Tanner                                                     
August 2009 
© Buckley & Tanner, KCL 2009 
compression with 5 resolution levels is recommended for images of this and 
similar sizes, which are typical of the sample images provided. In practice, the 
number of resolution levels would vary with the original image size so that the 
lowest resolution sub-image has the desired dimensions.  
3.3 
Multiple quality layers 
There are two main reasons for using multiple quality layers. One is so that it is 
possible to decompress fewer layers and therefore less compressed data when 
accessing lower resolution sub-images. This speeds up decompression without 
affecting quality since the incremental quality due to the discarded layers is not 
noticeable at reduced resolutions. The second reason is that multiple quality 
layers make it possible to deliver subsets of the compressed image 
corresponding to higher compression ratios, which may be acceptable in some 
applications. This means there is less data to transmit and process, which 
improves performance and reduces access times. It also means that it is 
possible for the access format to be a subset of the preservation format, 
derived from it by discarding quality layers as the application and quality 
requirements warrant. The use of quality layers makes it possible to 
retroactively reduce the storage needs should they be revised downward by 
discarding quality layers in the preservation format and turning images 
compressed at 4:1 or 5:1 for example into images compressed at 8:1 or 
higher, depending on where the quality layer boundaries are defined.  
3.4 
Example: TIFF to JP2 conversion 
For example, the following command line uses the Kakadu
3
compress function 
(kdu_compress) to convert a TIFF image to a JP2 file that contains an 
irreversible JPEG 2000 datastream. In particular, it contains a lossy JPEG 2000 
datastream with 5 resolution levels and 8 quality layers, corresponding to 
compression ratios of 4, 8, 16, 32, 64, 128, 256 and 512 to 1 for a 24-bit color 
image. These correspond to compressed bit rates of 6, 3, 1.5, 0.75, 0.375, 
0.1875, 0.09375 and 0.046875 bits per pixel. (A compression ratio of 4 to 1 
applied to a color image that originally had 24 bits per pixel means the 
compressed image will equivalently have a compressed bit rate of 6 bits per 
pixel.) The Kakadu command line use bit rates rather than compression ratios 
to specify the amount of compression.  
kdu_compress -i in.tif -o out.jp2 -rate 
6,3,1.5,0.75,0.375,0.1875,0.09375,0.046875 Creversible=no 
Clevels=5 Stiles={1024,1024} Cblk={64,64} Corder=RPCL 
The JPEG 2000 datastream created in this example has 1024-by-1024 tiles, 64-
by-64 codeblocks and a resolution-major progressive order RPCL, so that the 
compressed data for the lowest resolution (and therefore smallest) sub-image 
occurs first in the datastream, followed by the compressed data needed to 
reconstruct the next lowest resolution sub-image and so on. This data ordering 
means that the data for a thumbnail image occurs in a contiguous block at the 
start of the datastream where it can be easily and speedily accessed. This data 
organization makes it possible to obtain a screen-resolution image quickly from 
a megabyte or gigiabyte sized image compressed using JPEG 2000. Tiles and 
codeblocks are used to partition the image for processing and make it possible 
to access portions of the datastream corresponding to sub-regions of the 
image. 
3
http://www.kakadusoftware.com/ 
Robert Buckley and Simon Tanner                                                     
August 2009 
© Buckley & Tanner, KCL 2009 
3.5 
Minimally Lossy Compression 
The JPEG 2000 coder in this example would discard transformed and 
compressed data to obtain a compressed file size corresponding to 4:1 
compression.  This needs to be compared with the performance of the the 
minimally lossy coder, where no data is discarded but which is still lossy 
because of the use of the irreversible transforms. In some cases, depending on 
the image content, as shown in Section 3.6, the minimally lossy coder can give 
higher compression ratios than 4:1. Accordingly, it is recommended that a 
minimally lossy format with multiple quality layers and multiple resolution 
levels be used for the preservation format. The access format would use 
reduced quality subsets of the preservation format optionally obtained by 
discarding layers and using reduced resolution levels.  
3.6 
Testing reversible and irreversible compression 
The reason to use irreversible compression is that it gives better compression 
than reversible compression, at the cost of introducing errors (or differences) in 
the reconstructed image. This section examines this performance tradeoff.   
Reversible and irreversible compression were applied to four images provided 
by the Wellcome Digital Library (Figure 1). A variation on irreversible 
compression was tested which used coder bypass mode, in which the coder 
skipped the compression of some of the data. This gave a little less 
compression, but made the coder (and decoder) run about 20% faster. The 
Kakadu commands used in these tests are given in Appendix 2.  
The compression ratios obtained with these three test are shown in the 
following table.  
For these particular images, the compression ratio for irreversible JPEG 2000 
was from about 40% to almost 80% better than it was for reversible, and on 
average over 30% faster (with a further 20% boost with coder bypass mode).  
The cost of irreversible compared to reversible is the error it introduces. The 
error or difference between the reversibly and irreversibly compressed images 
is about 50 dB, which means the average absolute error value was about 0.5. 
For one of the sample images, 99.99% of the green component values were 
the same after decompression as they were before, or at most two counts 
different. (For the red and blue components, the percentages were 99.79 and 
99.35.) This is within the tolerance for scanners: in other words, minimally 
lossless irreversible JPEG 2000 compression adds about as much noise to an 
image as a good scanner does.  
A region was cropped from one image so that the visual effects of this error on 
this image could be examined more closely (Figure 2). When they were, the 
differences were not perceptible on screen or on paper.  Unless being able to 
reconstruct the original scan is a requirement, legal or otherwise, then 
irreversible compression is clearly advantaged over reversible compression. 
Original 
Reversible  Irreversible  Irreversible 
w/bypass 
L0051262_Manuscript_Page 
2.25 
3.45 
3.42 
L0051320_Line_Drawing 
1.82 
2.52 
2.51 
L0051761_Painting 
2.46 
3.96 
3.90 
L0051440_Archive_Collection 
2.52 
4.47 
4.41 
Robert Buckley and Simon Tanner                                                     
August 2009 
© Buckley & Tanner, KCL 2009 
3.7 
Further compression findings 
In these tests, the compressed file sizes (and compression ratios) were image 
dependent and varied with the image content. Images with less detail or 
variation than these samples would give even higher compression ratios.  
An advantage of JPEG 2000 is that it lets the user set the compression ratio, or 
equivalently the compressed file size, to a specific target value, which the 
coder achieves by discarding compressed image data. While this feature was 
not used to set the overall compressed file size in the minimally lossy 
compression case, it can be used to set the sizes of intermediate images 
corresponding to the different quality layers. The following Kakadu command 
line generates a JP2 file with a minimally lossy irreversible JPEG 2000 
datastream that complies with the recommendation in this report:  
kdu_compress -i in.tif -o out.jp2 -rate -, 4, 2.34, 1.36, 0.797, 
0.466, 0.272, 0.159, 0.0929, 0.0543, 0.0317, 0.0185 
Creversible=no Clevels=5 Stiles={1024,1024} Cblk={64,64} 
Corder=RPCL Cmodes=BYPASS 
The JPEG 2000 datatream in this example has 5 resolution levels and 12 
quality layers. Using all 12 layers give a decompressed image with minimal 
loss. The intermediate layers boundaries are at pre-set compressed bit rates, 
starting at 4 bits per pixel, corresponding to a compression ratio of 6:1, 
assuming a 24-bit color original. Thereafter, the layer boundaries are 
distributed logarithmically up to a compression ratio of 1296:1. The exact 
values are not critical. What is important is the range of values and there being 
sufficient values to provide an adequate sampling within the range.  
When a datastream has multiple quality layers, it is possible to truncate it at 
points corresponding to the layer boundaries and obtain derivative datastreams 
that correspond to higher compression ratios (or lower compressed bit rates). 
In the previous example, discarding the topmost quality layer produces a 
datastream corresponding to a compression ratio of 6:1 (compressed bit rate of 
4 bits per pixel). Discarding the next layers produces a datastream with a 
compression ratio of 10.3:1, and so on. As noted previously, some images may 
have minimally lossy compression ratio greater than 6:1; the layer settings can 
be adjusted when this happens. 
Using layers adds overhead that increases the size of the datastream and 
therefore decreases the compression ratio. To assess this effect as well as the 
overhead due to the use of tiles, the four sample images were compressed with 
one layer and no tiles, with one layer and 1024x1024 tiles, and with 12 layers 
and no tiles. As the following table shows, adding layers and tiles did decrease 
the minimally lossy compression ratio, but the effect was only visible in the 
third place after the decimal and was therefore judged insignificant in 
comparison to the advantages of using them. 
Original 
No tiles 
1 layer 
1024x1024 tiles 
1 layer 
No tiles 
12 layers 
L0051262_Manuscript_Page 
3.452 
3.450 
3.443 
L0051320_Line_Drawing 
2.522 
2.521 
2.517 
L0051761_Painting 
3.961 
3.957 
3.948 
L0051440_Archive_Collection 4.477 
4.473 
4.461 
Besides tiles and layers, other datastream components that can improve 
performance and access within the datastream are markers, such as Tile 
Length Markers (TLM) which can aid in searching for tile boundaries in a 
datastream. Their effectiveness depends on whether or not the decoder or 
Robert Buckley and Simon Tanner                                                     
August 2009 
© Buckley & Tanner, KCL 2009 
access protocol makes use of them. As a result, recommendations regarding 
their use depend on the choice of codec.  
 Implementation solutions / discussion 
This section discusses the file format and metadata recommendations. 
One function of a file format is packaging the datastream with metadata that 
can be used to render, interpret and describe the image in the file. Besides 
defining the JPEG 2000 datastream and core decoder, Part 1 of the JPEG 2000 
standard also defines the JP2 file format which applications may use to 
encapsulate a JPEG 2000 datastream. A minimal JP2 file consists of four 
structures or “boxes”:  
1. JPEG 2000 Signature Box, which identifies the file as a member of the 
JPEG 2000 file format family 
2. File Type Box, which identifies which member of the family it is, the 
version number and the members of the family it is compatible with 
3. JP2 Header Box, which contains image parameters such as resolution 
and color specification needed for rendering the image 
4. Contiguous Codestream Box, which contains the JPEG 2000 datastream 
4.1 
Color Specification 
How an image was captured or created determines the parameters in the JP2 
Header Box, which are subsequently used to render and interpret the image. 
Among these parameters are the number of components (i.e. whether the 
image is grayscale or color), an optional resolution value for capture or display, 
and the color specification. In general the color content of an image can be 
specified in one of two ways: directly using a named color space, such as 
sRGB, Adobe RGB 98 or CIELAB, or indirectly using an ICC profile.  
The digitization process and the nature of the material being digitized, not the 
file format, drive the color specification requirements of the application. The 
issue for the file format is whether or not it supports the color encoding used 
by the digital materials. What’s significant about the JP2 file format is that it 
supports a limited set of color specifications. For example, the only color space 
it supports directly is sRGB, including its grayscale and luminance-chrominance 
analogues. This is a consequence of the JP2 file format having been originally 
designed with digital cameras in mind.  
Besides sRGB, the JP2 file format supports a restricted set of ICC profiles, 
namely gamma-matrix-style ICC profiles. This style of profile can represent the 
data encoded by RGB color spaces other than sRGB. The image data is still 
RGB; it’s just that it is specified indirectly by means of an ICC profile. This does 
not necessarily mean that non-sRGB systems must support ICC workflows; it 
does mean more sophisticated handling of the color specification in the JP2 file. 
For example, the system may recognize that the JP2 file contains the ICC 
profile for Adobe RGB 98 and use an Adobe RGB 98 workflow.  
An alternative to JP2 is the Baseline JPX file format, defined in Part 2 of the 
JPEG 2000 standard. JPX is an extended version of JP2 which, among other 
things, specifies additional named color spaces, including Adobe RGB 98 and 
ProPhoto RGB. There are some RGB spaces, such as eciRGBv2, which JPX does 
not support directly and for which ICC profiles would still be needed for them to 
be used. The best thing is to use the JP2 file format as long as possible, since it 
is more widely supported than JPX and its use avoids support for the more 
advanced features of JPX when only extended color space support is desired.  
Robert Buckley and Simon Tanner                                                     
August 2009 
10 
© Buckley & Tanner, KCL 2009 
4.2 
Capture Resolution 
The JP2 Header Box may also contain a capture or display resolutions, 
indicating the resolution at which the image was captured or the resolution at 
which it should be displayed. While the JP2 file is required to contain a color 
specification, it is not required to have either resolution values. Instead, it is up 
to the application to require it. This report recommends that the JP2 Header 
Box in the JP2 file contain a capture resolution value, indicating the resolution 
at which the image contained in the file was scanned. The JP2 file format 
specification requires that the resolution value be given in pixels per meter.  
4.3 
Metadata 
In addition to the four boxes that a JP2 is required to contain, it may optionally 
contain XML and UUID boxes. Each can contain vendor or application specific 
information, encoded in an XML box using XML or in a UUID box in a way that 
is interpreted according to the UUID code (UUID stands for Universally Unique 
Identifier). These two types of boxes are used to embed metadata in a JP2 file. 
For example, UUID boxes are used for IPTC
4
or EXIF
5
metadata. An XML box 
can be used for any XML-encoded data, such as MIX.  
While the application and system normally determine the nature and format of 
the metadata associated with an image, JPEG 2000-specific administrative or 
technical metadata is within scope for this report. While such metadata may or 
may not be embedded in a JP2 file, this reports recommends that it be 
embedded.  
JPEG 2000-specific metadata in the JP2 file should follow the ANSI/NISO 
Z39.87-2006 standard. This standard defines a data dictionary with technical 
metadata for digital still images. It lists “image/jp2” as an example of a 
formatName value and lists “JPEG2000 Lossy” and “JPEG2000 Lossless” as 
compressionScheme values. Files that implement this recommendation would 
have “JPEG 2000 Lossy” as their compressionScheme value and would also 
contain a rational compressionRatio value.  
Compression 
compressionScheme 
JPEG2000 Lossy 
compressionRatio 
<rational value> 
While “JPEG2000 Lossy” is the compressionScheme value for all files that follow 
this recommendation and the compressionRatio value can be derived from file 
size and parameters in the JP2 Header Box, it is recommended that they be 
specified explicitly. 
The Z39.87 standard also defines a SpecialFormatCharacteristics container to 
document attributes that are unique to a particular file format and datastream. 
In the case of JPEG 2000, this container has two sub-containers: one for 
CodecCompliance and the other for EncodingOptions. The elements in the 
CodecCompliance container identify by name and version the coder that 
created the datastream, the profile to which the datastream conforms (Part 1 
of the JPEG 2000 standard defines codestream or datastream profiles), and the 
class of the decoder needed to decompress the image (Part 4 of the JPEG 2000 
defines compliance classes). The elements in the EncodingOptions container 
give the size of the tiles, the number of quality layers and the number of 
resolution levels.  
4
International Press Telecommunications Council, creates standards for photo 
metadata (http://www.iptc.org/IPTC4XMP/) 
5
Exchangeable image file format, a standard file format with metadata tags for digital 
cameras (http://www.exif.org/) 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested