c# parse pdf to xml : Metadata in pdf documents Library SDK API .net asp.net web page sharepoint xmm_abc_guide5-part850

46
Figure6.4: TotaleventratefromRGS1afterGoodTimefiltering.
9.639e+07
9.64e+07
9.641e+07
9.642e+07
9.643e+07
9.644e+07
9.645e+07
TIME [s]
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
RATE [count/s]
P0134520301R1S001RATES_0000.FIT
RATE
• evselect table=PiiiiiijjkkaablllEVENLInmmm.FIT:EVENTS withhistogramset=yes
histogramset=PiiiiiijjkkaablllQKSPECnmmm.FIT histogramcolumn=M
LAMBDA
withhistoranges=yes histogrammin=5 histogrammax=40 histogrambinsize=0.0116667
expression=’region($srclst:RGS1
SRC1
SPATIAL,BETA
CORR,XDSP
CORR)&&
region($srclst:RGS1
SRC1
ORDER
1,BETA
CORR,PI)’
> table – input event table.
> withhistogramset – make a histogram table.
> histogramset – name of output histogram table.
> histogramcolumn – event column to histogram.
> withhistoranges – include only certain ranges.
> histogrammin – lower limit.
> histogrammax – upper limit.
> histogrambinsize – size of histogram bins.
> expression – filter expression. This one takes only events from inside both the spatial and 1st order
PI masks defined within the source list.
• dsplot table=PiiiiiijjkkaablllHISTOGnmmm.FIT x=M
LAMBDA y=COUNTS
The resulting histogram is provided in Figure 6.5.
6.3 PIPELINE EXAMPLES
Several examples of the flexibility of the RGS pipeline are provided below, and these address some of the
potential pitfalls for RGS users.
Metadata in pdf documents - add, remove, update PDF metadata in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Allow C# Developers to Read, Add, Edit, Update and Delete PDF Metadata
read pdf metadata online; adding metadata to pdf files
Metadata in pdf documents - VB.NET PDF metadata library: add, remove, update PDF metadata in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Enable VB.NET Users to Read, Write, Edit, Delete and Update PDF Document Metadata
change pdf metadata creation date; get pdf metadata
47
Figure 6.5: RGS1 spectrum binned on the approximate wavelength scale provided in the M
LAMBDA column.
the gap between 10 and 15
˚
Ais the missing chip CCD7. CCD4 is similarly missing in the RGS2 camera. Both
failed after space operations began.
0
10
20
30
40
M_LAMBDA [Angstrom]
0
100
200
300
400
500
600
COUNTS [count]
P0134520301R1S001QKSPEC0000.FIT
HISTO
6.3.1 A Nearby Bright Optical Source
With certain pointing angles, zeroth-order optical light may be reflected off the telescope optics and cast onto
the RGS CCD detectors. If this falls on an extraction region, the current energy calibration will require a
wavelength-dependent zero-offset. Stray light can be detected on RGS DIAGNOSTIC images taken before,
during and after the observation. This test, and the offset correction, are not performed on the data before
delivery. To check for stray light and apply the appropriate offsets use:
• rgsproc orders=’1 2’ bkgcorrect=no calcoffsets=yes withoffsethistogram=no
> orders – dispersion orders to extract
> calcoffsets – calculate pha offsets from diagnostic images
> withoffsethistogram – produce a histogram of uncalibrated excess for the user
6.3.2 A Nearby Bright X-ray Source
In the example above, it is assumed that the field around the source contains sky only. Provided a bright
background source is well-separated from the target in the cross-dispersion direction, a mask can be created
that excludes it from the background region. Here the source has been identified in the EPIC images and its
coordinates have been taken from the EPIC source list which is included among the pipeline products. The
bright neighboring object is found to be the third source listed in the sources file. The first source is the target:
• rgsproc orders=’1 2’ bkgcorrect=no withepicset=yes epicset=PiiiiiijjkkaablllEMSRLInmmm.FTZ
exclsrcsexpr=’INDEX==1&&INDEX==3’
> orders – dispersion orders to extract.
> withepicset – calculate extraction regions for the sources contained in an EPIC source list.
> epicset – name of the EPIC source list.
C# PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file for C#
NET empowers C# developers to implement fast and high quality PDF conversions to or from multiple supported images and documents. C#.NET: Edit PDF Metadata.
remove pdf metadata; delete metadata from pdf
C# PDF Print Library: Print PDF documents in C#.net, ASP.NET
view, Annotate,Convert documents online using ASPX. NET rotate PDF pages, C#.NET search text in PDF, C#.NET edit PDF bookmark, C#.NET edit PDF metadata, C#.NET
bulk edit pdf metadata; edit pdf metadata
48
> exclsrcsexpr – expression to identify which source(s) should be excluded from the background
extraction region.
Since this operation will alter only the size of the regions in the sources file, it saves time to not re-make the
event table or re-calculate the exposure map. The pipeline can be entered at five different points. In this case
one only need start from the spectral extraction stage:
• rgsproc orders=’1 2’ entrystage=spectra finalstage=fluxing bkgcorrect=no withepicset=yes
epicset=PiiiiiijjkkaablllEMSRLInmmm.FTZ exclsrcsexpr=’INDEX==1&&INDEX==3’
> orders – dispersion orders to extract.
> entrystage – entry stage to the pipeline (see Sec. 6.4).
> finalstage – exit stage for the pipeline (see Sec. 6.4).
> withepicset – calculate extraction regions for the sources contained in an EPIC source list.
> epicset – name of the EPIC source list.
> exclsrcsexpr – expression to identify which source(s) should be excluded from background extrac-
tion region.
Note that this last example will only work if one has retained the event file from a previous re-running of the
pipeline.
6.3.3 User-defined Source Coordinates
If the true coordinates of an object are not included in the EPIC source list or the science proposal, the user
can define the coordinates of a new source:
• rgsproc orders=’1 2’ bkgcorrect=no withsrc=yes srcra=81.823317 srcdec=-6.532072
> orders – dispersion orders to extract.
> withsrc – with a user-defined source.
> srcra – decimal RA of source.
> srcdec – decimal Dec of source.
These coordinates are written to the RGS source list PiiiiiijjkkaablllEMSRLInmmm.FIT with a source ID
which, in this example, will be ’3’. Creating the source file is one of the first tasks of the pipeline. If these
new coordinates correspond to the prime source then the entire pipeline must be run again in order to calculate
the correct aspect drift corrections in the dispersion direction. However, if these new coordinates refer to a
background source that should be ignored during background extraction, then the majority of pipeline processing
(drift correction, filtering etc) will remain identical to the previous examples. To save processing time one can
create a new source list by hand and then enter the pipeline at a later stage.
• rgssources filemode=create srclist=PiiiiiijjkkaablllEMSRLInmmm.FIT
atthkset=’P0iiiiiijjkkaablllATTTSRnmmm.FIT’ writeobskwds=yes writeexpkwds=yes
instexpid=’R1S001’ addusersource=yes label=’BACK
SOURCE’ ra=81.823317 dec=-6.532072
> filemode – create or modify an existing source list.
> srclist – name of resulting source list.
> atthkset – attitude history file.
> writeobskwds – write observation keywords to the source list.
> writeexpkwds – write exposure keywords to the source list.
> instexpid – instrument/exposure ID.
> addusersource – add a source to the list.
> label – label for the new source.
> changeprime – change the prime source from the proposal coordinates.
VB.NET PDF Print Library: Print PDF documents in vb.net, ASP.NET
view, Annotate,Convert documents online using ASPX. NET rotate PDF pages, C#.NET search text in PDF, C#.NET edit PDF bookmark, C#.NET edit PDF metadata, C#.NET
edit multiple pdf metadata; batch pdf metadata editor
C# PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net
compressing control is designed to offer C# developers to compress existing PDF documents in .NET Document and metadata. C#.NET DLLs: Compress PDF Document.
pdf metadata reader; adding metadata to pdf
49
> userasprime – change the prime source to the user added coordinates.
> ra – RA of user’s source.
> dec – Dec of user’s source.
• rgsproc orders=’1 2’ entrystage=spectra finalstage=fluxing
bkgcorrect=no exclsrcsexpr=’INDEX==1&&INDEX==3’
> orders – dispersion orders to extract.
> entrystage – entry stage to the pipeline (see Sec. 6.4).
> finalstage – exit stage for the pipeline (see Sec. 6.4).
> exclsrcsexpr – expression to identify which source(s) should be excluded from the background
extraction region.
6.4 PIPELINE ENTRY STAGES
There are five stages at which the user can enter or leave the pipeline:
• events – Creates attitude time series, attitude-drift and housekeeping GTI tables, pulse height offsets,
the source list, and unfiltered, combined event lists.
• angles – Corrects event coordinates for aspect drift and establishes the dispersion and cross-dispersion
coordinates.
• filter – produces filtered event lists, creates exposure maps.
• spectra – Constructs extraction regions and source and background spectra.
• fluxing – creates “fluxed” spectra for quick data inspection and response matrices.
Provided the filtered event list is retained, users can apply their own filtering by entering the pipeline at the
filter stage.
Changes in the extraction region sizes can be handled by entering at the spectra stage.
If the coordinates of the source differ from those in the original proposal, the pipeline must be run from events.
Extraction of spectra with different binning can be achieved at the spectra stage.
Recalculation of the response matrices can be done in the final fluxing stage.
6.5 COMBINING RGS1 AND RGS2 SPECTRA
While it is tempting to merge the RGS1 and RGS2 data, or data from different pointings, to provide a single
spectrum with a signal-to-noise improvement over either individual spectrum, this is strongly discouraged since
it results in data degradation.
The pointings of the two instruments are not identical, resulting in different dispersion angles and wavelength
scales. Separate response files are always required for each unit. While it is possible to merge spectra and
response files, great care must be taken to account for different exposure times, background subtractions, error
propagation, and so on. However the resulting response will always have inferior resolution to the originals. It
is therefore simpler and more accurate to keep data from the two RGS units separate and use both sets to fit
one model in tandem:
xspec
XSPEC>data 1:1 PiiiiiijjkkaablllSRSPEC1mmm.FIT 1:2 PiiiiiijjkkaablllSRSPEC2mmm.FIT
XSPEC>ignore bad
XSPEC>model phabs*mekal
etc...
VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net
VB.NET Guide and Sample Codes to Merge PDF Documents in VB.NET Project. Batch merge PDF documents in Visual Basic .NET class program.
pdf metadata; rename pdf files from metadata
VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
for .NET empowers VB.NET developers to implement fast and high quality PDF conversions to or from multiple supported images and documents. PDF Metadata Edit.
google search pdf metadata; pdf xmp metadata
50
6.6 APPROACHES TO SPECTRAL FITTING
For data sets of high signal-to-noise and low background, where counting statistics are within the Gaussian
regime, the data products above are suitable for analysis using the default fitting scheme in XSPEC, χ
2
-
minimization.
However for low count rates, in the Poisson regime, χ2-minimization is no longer suitable. With low count rates
in individual channels, the error per channel can dominate over the count rate. Since channels are weighted
by the inverse-square of the errors during χ
2
model fitting, channels with the lowest count rates are given
overly-large weights in the Poisson regime. Spectral continua are consequently often fit incorrectly – the model
lying underneath the true continuum level.
This will be a common problem with most RGS sources. Even if count rates are large, much of the flux from
these sources can be contained within emission lines, rather than continuum. Consequently even obtaining
correct equivalent widths for such sources is non-trivial. There are two approaches to fitting low signal-to-noise
RGS data, and the correct approach would normally be to use an optimization of the two.
6.6.1 Spectral Rebinning
By grouping channels in appropriately large numbers, the combined signal-to-noise of groups will jump into
the Gaussian regime. The FTOOL grppha can group channels using an algorithm which bins up consecutive
channels until a count rate threshold is reached. This method conserves the resolution in emission lines above
the threshold while improving statistics in the continuum.
• grppha
> Please enter PHA filename[] PiiiiiijjkkaablllSRSPEC1mmm.FIT
> Please enter output filename[] !PiiiiiijjkkaablllSRSPEC1mmm.FIT
> GRPPHA[] group min 30
> GRPPHA[] exit
The disadvantage of using grppha is that, although channel errors are propagated through the binning
process correctly, the errors column in the original spectrum product is not strictly accurate. The problem
arises because there is no good way to treat the errors within channels containing no counts. To allow statistical
fitting, these channels are arbitrarily given an error value of unity, which is subsequently propagated through
the binning. Consequently the errors are over-estimated in the resulting spectra.
An alternative approach is to bin the data during spectral extraction. The easiest way to do this is call the
RGS pipeline after the pipeline is complete. The following rebins the pipeline spectrum by a factor 3:
• rgsproc orders=’1 2’ rebin=3 rmfbins=4000 entrystage=spectra finalstage=fluxing
bkgcorrect=no
> orders – dispersion orders to extract.
> rebin – wavelength rebinning factor.
> rmfbins – number of bins in the response file (> 3000 is recommended by the SAS documentation).
> entrystage – entry stage to the pipeline (see Sec. 6.4).
> finalstage – exit stage for the pipeline (see Sec. 6.4).
One disadvantage of this approach is that one can only choose integer binning of the original channel size. To
change the sampling of the events the pipeline must be run from angles or earlier:
• rgsproc orders=’1 2’ nbetabins=1133 rmfbins=4000 entrystage=angles finalstage=fluxing
bkgcorrect=no
> nbetabins – number of bins in the dispersion direction. The default is 3400.
The disadvantage of using rgsproc, as opposed to grppha, is that the binning is linear across the dispersion
direction. Velocity resolution is lost in the lines; e.g., the accuracy of redshift determinations will be degraded,
transition edges will be smoothed and neighboring lines will become blended.
C# PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in C#.net, ASP.
C#.NET PDF Library - Merge PDF Documents in C#.NET. Provide NET components for batch combining PDF documents in C#.NET class. Powerful
read pdf metadata online; adding metadata to pdf files
C# TIFF: TIFF Metadata Editor, How to Write & Read TIFF Metadata
Our .NET SDKs own the most advanced & comprehensive documents and images reading and has a mature imaging utility which allows Tiff image file metadata to be
online pdf metadata viewer; view pdf metadata in explorer
51
6.6.2 Maximum-Likelihood Statistics
The second alternative is to replace the χ
2
-minimization scheme with the Cash maximum-likelihood scheme
when fitting data. This method is much better suited to data with low count rates and is a suitable option
only if one is running XSPEC v11.1.0 or later. The reason for this is that RGS spectrum files have prompted a
slight modification to the OGIP standard. Because the RGS spatial extraction mask has a spatial-width which
is a varying function of wavelength, it has become necessary to characterize the BACKSCL and AREASCL
parameters as vectors (i.e., one number for each wavelength channel), rather than scalar keywords as they are
for data from the EPIC cameras and past missions. These quantities map the size of the source extraction
region to the size of the background extraction region and are essential for accurate fits. Only XSPEC v11.1.0,
or later versions, are capable of reading these vectors, so ensure that one has an up-to-date installation at your
site.
One caveat of using the cstat option is that the scheme requires a “total” and “background” spectrum to be
loaded into XSPEC. This is in order to calculate parameter errors correctly. Consequently, be sure not to use
the “net” spectra that were created as part of product packages by SAS v5.2 or earlier. To change schemes in
XSPEC before fitting the data, type:
• XSPEC>statistic cstat
6.7 ANALYSIS OF EXTENDED SOURCES
6.7.1 Region masks for extended sources
The optics of the RGS allow spectroscopy of reasonably extended sources, up to a few arc minutes. The width
of the spatial extraction mask is defined by the fraction of total events one wishes to extract. With the default
pipeline parameter values, 90% of events are extracted, assuming a point-like source.
Altering and optimizing the mask width for a spatially-extended source may take some trial and error, and,
depending on the temperature distribution of the source, may depend on which lines one is currently interested
in. While AB Dor is not an extended source, the following example increases the width of the extraction mask
and ensures that the size of the background mask is reduced so that the two do not overlap:
• rgsproc orders=’1 2’ entrystage=spectra finalstage=fluxing bkgcorrect=no xpsfincl=99
xpsfexcl=99 pdistincl=95
> orders – dispersion orders to extract.
> xpsfincl – Include this fraction of point-source events inside the spatial source extraction mask.
> xpsfexcl – Exclude this fraction of point-source events from the spatial background extraction mask.
> pdistincl – Include this fraction of point-source events inside the pulse height extraction mask.
Observing extended sources effectively broadens the psf of the spectrum in the dispersion direction. Conse-
quently it is prudent to also increase the width of the PI masks using the pdistincl parameter in order to
prevent event losses.
6.7.2 Fitting spectral models to extended sources
RGS response matrices are consistent for point sources only. Since extended source spectra are broadened, the
simplest way to deal with this problem during spectral fitting is to reproduce the broadening function, and
convolve it across the spectral model.
XSPEC v11.2 contains the convolution model rgsxsrc. It requires two external files to perform the operation.
1. An OGIP FITS image of the source. The better the resolution of the image, the more accurate the
convolution. For example, if a Chandra image of the source is available, this will provide a more accurate
result than an EPIC image.
2. An ASCII file called, e.g. xsource.mod, containing three lines of input. It defines three environment
variables and should look like this example:
52
RGS
XSOURCE
IMAGE ./MOS1.fit
RGS
XSOURCE
BORESIGHT 23:25:19.8 -12:07:25 247.302646
RGS
XSOURCE
EXTRACTION 2.5
> RGS
XSOURCE
IMAGE – path to the source image.
> RGS
XSOURCE
BORESIGHT – RA, Dec of the center of the source and PA of the telescope.
> RGS
XSOURCE
EXTRACTION – The extent (in arcmin), centered on the source, over which you want to
construct the convolution function. You want this “aperture” to be larger than the source itself.
To set these environment variables within XSPEC execute the command:
• xset rgs
xsource
file xsource.mod
Here is an example (Note that the spectral order is always negative, e.g. −1, −2...):
xspec
XSPEC>data P0108460201R1S004SRSPEC1003.FIT
XSPEC>ignore bad
XSPEC>xset rgs
xsource
file xsource.mod
XSPEC>model rgsxsrc*wabs*mekal
rgsxsrc:order>−1
wabs:nH>1
mekal:kT>2
mekal:nH>1
mekal:Abundanc>1
mekal:Redshift>
mekal:Switch>0
mekal:norm>1
XSPEC>renorm
XSPEC>fit
XSPEC>setplot device /xs
XSPEC>setplot wave
XSPEC>setplot command window all
XSPEC>setplot command log x off
XSPEC>plot data residuals
XSPEC>exit
Do you really want to exit? (y)y
Fig. 6.6 compares a point source model with an extended source counterpart.
6.7.3 Model limitations
Users should be aware that this method assumes an isothermal source (or uniform emissivity from line to line
in the case of a non-thermal spectrum) where the spatial distributions of all the lines are identical. In reality,
however, the thermal structure of the source is likely to be more complicated. The broad-band convolution
function may bear little resemblance to the correct function for particular line transitions.
One way around this problem would be to have a temperature map of the source to define line emissivity
across the source and convolve the model spectrum accordingly. The RGS instrument team at the Columbia
Astrophysics Laboratory are developing a Monte Carlo code to perform an operation with this effect. While it
is unlikely the code will be publicly available in the near future, the team welcomes investigators who would be
interested in collaboration. Contact John Peterson <jrpeters@astro.columbia.edu>.
53
Figure 6.6: The top figure is a thin, thermal plasma at 2 keV from a point source. The lower figure is the same
spectral model, but convolved by the MOS1 0.3–2.0 keV spatial profile of a low-redshift cluster.
6.8 A MORE-OR-LESS COMPLETE EXAMPLE
The AB Doradus PV ODF data (ObsID: 0134520301 from orbit 0205) have been used for a reasonably complete
example of RGS data reduction. The script can be found at:
• ftp://heasarc.gsfc.nasa.gov/xmm/data/examples/rgs/RGS
ABC.SC
The lines of the script for setting up and running SAS are specific to installation at GSFC and so will need to
be modified as appropriate. The script uses the SAS command-line interface and goes through the following
steps:
1) Copies the raw and pipelined data from the XMM archive.
2) Initializes SAS.
3) Creates a Current Calibration file.
4) Builds an ODF summary file.
5) Constructs a GTI file based on background activity.
6) Runs the RGS pipeline.
7) Makes a few useful data inspection products.
8) Fits a model to one of the resulting spectra.
Chapter 7
First Look – OM Data
The OM is somewhat different from the other instruments on-board XMM-Newton, and not only because it
is not an X-ray instrument. Since the OM pipeline products can be used directly for most science analysis
tasks, a re-processing of the data is not needed in most cases. So in principle one can ignore the files in the
ODF directory and go directly to §7.1, which describes the files in the PPS (or PIPEPROD) directory. Users
interested in re-processing of the OM data can go directly to §7.2 which explains the pipeline processing. For
the analysis of OM data obtained in FAST or GRISM mode, however, a re-processing of data is needed, which
is explained in more detail in §7.2.2 and §7.2.3.
7.1 PIPELINE PRODUCTS
You will find a variety of OM-specific files in your data directories. The pipeline products differ slightly with
different versions of the SAS software. We give a brief description of the files produced by SAS V6, and discuss
the important differences with older pipeline products. For a complete description of all files check the pipeline
products documentation, which can be found at:
http://xmmssc-www.star.le.ac.uk/pubdocs/SSC-LUX-SP-0004.ps.gz
7.1.1 Imaging Mode
The PPS directory for the OM products contains files with the following nomenclature:
• PjjjjjjkkkkOMlmmmNNNoooo.zzz
jjjjjj – Proposal number
kkkk – Observation ID
l– S (scheduled), U (unscheduled), or X (general)
mmm – A number either of the form of 005/6 or 401/2
NNN – File ID (see Table 7.1)
oooo – Either 0000 (high res) or 1000 (low res)
zzz – File type (FTZ, PNG, PDF, HTM,..)
The pipeline produces a summed sky image for each of the filters in low resolution. The results are in files
with the nomenclature:
• PjjjjjjkkkkOMX000RSIMAGbb000.QQQ
jjjjjj – Proposal number
kkkk – Observation ID
b– Filter keyword: B, V, U, L (UVW1) and S (UVW2)
zzz – File type (e.g., PNG, FTZ)
54
55
Table 7.1: OM Pipeline Processing data files.
Group ID
File ID
Contents
File Type
View With
OIMAGE
SIMAGE
OM Sky Image
Gzipped FITS ds9, Ximage, fv
OMSLIS
SWSRLI OM Source Lists
Zipped FITS
fv
OMSRTS
TSTRTS
Tracing Star Time Series Zipped FITS
fv
For example, P0123456789OMX000RSIMAGB000.FTZ is the low-resolution final image in the B filter of
the observation 0123456789 in sky coordinates (indicated by the S before the IMAG). The letter L is used for
the UVW1 filter and S for UVW2. The keyword XPROC0 in the FITS header lists the files which have been
added to create the final image P0123456789OMX000RSIMAGB000.FTZ. The keyword looks like this:
XPROC0 = ’ommosaic imagesets=’’"product/P0123456789OMS008SIMAGE1000.FIT"&’
CONTINUE ’ "product/P0123456789OMS409SIMAGE1000.FIT" "product/P01234567&’
CONTINUE ’89OMS410SIMAGE1000.FIT" "product/P0123456789OMS411SIMAGE1000.&’
CONTINUE ’FIT" "product/P0123456789OMS412SIMAGE1000.FIT"’’ mosaicedset=’’&’
CONTINUE ’product/P0123456789OMX000RSIMAGS000.FIT’’ sampling=’’point’’ # (&’
CONTINUE ’ommosaic-1.2.1) [xmmsas_20011206_1713-no-aka]’
The identification/coupling of the files (product/P0123456789OMS410SIMAGE1000.FIT) are identical to
the ones described at the beginning of the previous section.
Table 7.2: Some of the important columns in the SWSRLI FITS file.
Column name
Contents
SRCNUM
Source number
RA
RA of the detected source
DEC
Dec of the detected source
POSERR
Positional uncertainty
RATE
extracted count rate
RATE
ERR
error estimate on the count rate
SIGNIFICANCE
Significance of the detection (in σ)
MAG
Brightness of the source in magnitude
MAGERR
uncertainty on the magnitude
Creating images with the OM products
If the observation data products do not contain any mosaic files for all the exposures but about 10 files per
filter, it means that they were processed with an older version of the pipeline. In this case we recommend a
re-processing of the OM data with SAS V6 using omichain. The omichain task automatically produces one
single final file per filter. If there are multiple OM exposures of the same field, ommosaic can be used to create
one single image covering the full field of view. One must specify which files are to be added (the program
does not do this automatically) so one must know which files were produced for which filters, and at which
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested