c# parse pdf data : Add metadata to pdf Library control class asp.net azure winforms ajax SpatialEcologyGME10-part92

Syntax
mergesampleplots(in, out, area, rule, [inzones], [outzones], [areazones], [rulezones], [raster]);
in
the input plot data source that was created using the genregionsample-
plots command (it must contain a ArSuitHab eld)
out
the new, merged, output plot data source
area
the minimum area of suitable habitat per plot (identies the plots that
will be merged)
rule
the number representing the plot merge rule: 1=Dominant Neighbour,
2=Longest Border, 3=Simple Contiguity (see fullhelp documentationfor
details)
[inzones]
the input zone data source that was created using the genregionsample-
plots command
[outzones] the new, merged, output zone data source
[areazones] the minimum area of suitable habitat per plot (identies the plots that
will be merged)
[rulezones] the number representing the zone merge rule: 1=Dominant Neighbour,
2=Longest Border, 3=Simple Contiguity (see fullhelp documentationfor
details)
[raster]
asuitability (1/0) raster that is used to characterize plots, required for
rules 2 and 3 (see help documentation for further details)
Example
mergesampleplots(in="C:ndatanplots.shp", out="C:ndatanplotsmerged.shp", area=2500,
rule=2, raster="C:ndatansuit.tif");
mergesampleplots(in="C:ndatanplots.shp", out="C:ndatanplotsmerged.shp", area=2500,
rule=1, inzones="C:ndatanzones.shp", outzones="C:ndatanzones.shp", areazones=25000,
rulezones=1);
mergesampleplots(in="C:ndatanplots.shp", out="C:ndatanplotsmerged.shp", area=2500,
rule=3, inzones="C:ndatanzones.shp", outzones="C:ndatanzones.shp", areazones=25000,
rulezones=3, raster="C:ndatansuit.tif");
3.76 movement.pathmetrics
Calculate Movement Path Metrics: Calculates movement paths metrics (turn angles,
step lengths, bearings, time intervals) for a point time series dataset.
Description
This tool calculates turn angles, step lengths, bearings, and time intervals for a point time
series dataset. The turn angle is based on the point sequence p(t-1), p(t), p(t+1); the step
lengths, bearings and time intervals are based on the sequence p(t), p(t+1). Thus, a NoData
value (-999) will be written for the rst and last turn angles in a point series, and for the
last step length, bearing and time interval records. These NoData values should obviously
not be included in subsequent analyses.
101
Add metadata to pdf - add, remove, update PDF metadata in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Allow C# Developers to Read, Add, Edit, Update and Delete PDF Metadata
remove metadata from pdf online; search pdf metadata
Add metadata to pdf - VB.NET PDF metadata library: add, remove, update PDF metadata in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Enable VB.NET Users to Read, Write, Edit, Delete and Update PDF Document Metadata
view pdf metadata in explorer; add metadata to pdf programmatically
If the optional radians parameter is set to TRUE then the turn angles and bearings are
specied in radians (the default is degrees). The step length distances are always recorded in
coordinate system units (e.g. meters for UTM). If the eld name for any of the elds is set
to NONE then that eld will not be created. If names are not provided for these three elds
then default names are used (TURNANGLE, STEPLENGTH, BEARING) and all three
elds are calculated. In order to calculate time intervals (default eld name: TIMEINTVL)
you must specify a data/time eld (datetimeeld parameter). Shapeles can be problematic
for storing date/time data, so it is recommended that you use the geodatabase format for
telemetry datasets.
The tool uses an integer order eld to sort the points into the correct order (geodatabases
are unordered collections, so must be ordered for time series analysis). Specifying an integer
order eld is compulsory as it eliminates the risk that incorrect data will be written because
the order of the points is incorrect.
If an optional integer group eld is specied then the command will sequentually process
each unique value in that eld, extracting all the points associated with that ID, sorting
them, and writing the movement path metrics. The group eld would be used when a point
dataset contains multiple animals, for instance.
Syntax
movement.pathmetrics(in, uideld, ordereld, [groupeld], [taeld], [sleld], [brgeld], [radi-
ans], [where], [datetimeeld], [intervaleld]);
in
the input point data source
uideld
the name of the unique point ID eld in the input data source
ordereld
the name of the integer order eld in the input data source
[groupeld]
the name of the integer grouping eld representing collections of points
(e.g. an animal ID eld)
[taeld]
the turn angle eld name to add (default=TURNANGLE; use NONE to
disable)
[sleld]
the step length eld name to add (default=STEPLENGTH; use NONE
to disable)
[brgeld]
thebearing eldname toadd(default=BEARING;useNONEtodisable)
[radians]
(TRUE/FALSE) species whether the turn angle and bearing are
recorded as radians rather than degrees (default=FALSE)
[where]
the selection statement that will be applied to the feature data source to
identify a subset of features to process (see full Help documentation for
further details)
[datetimeeld] theeld name ofadate/time eld(required ifyouspecify anintervaleld)
[intervaleld]
the time interval eld to add (the interval in seconds between this record
and the next; requires datetimeeld is specied)
Example
movement.pathmetrics(in="C:ndatanlocs.shp", uideld="PNTID", ordereld="ORDER");
102
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
VB.NET PDF - Add Image to PDF Page in VB.NET. Guide VB.NET Programmers How to Add Images in PDF Document Using XDoc.PDF SDK for VB.NET.
add metadata to pdf; delete metadata from pdf
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
C# Sample Code: Add Password to PDF with Permission Settings Applied in C#.NET. This example shows how to add PDF file password with access permission setting.
rename pdf files from metadata; endnote pdf metadata
movement.pathmetrics(in="C:ndatanlocs.shp", uideld="PNTID", ordereld="ORDER",
groupeld="ANIMALID", radians=TRUE);
movement.pathmetrics(in="C:ndatanlocs.shp", uideld="PNTID", ordereld="ORDER",
groupeld="ANIMALID", taeld="TURNS", sleld="STEPS", brgeld="NONE",
datetimeeld="RECDATE", intervaleld="TIMEINTVL", radians=TRUE);
3.77 movement.simplecrw
Simulate Simple Correlated Random Walk: A simple correlated random walk move-
ment path simulator, drawing from statistical or empirical distributions, with a home range
boundary constraint option.
Description
This toolis a simple correlated random walk movement path simulator. It simulates paths by
making independent random draws from a step length and turn angle distribution that you
specify. Based on a set of start locations (which can be randomly generated using other tools
in this toolset), the number of steps per path to simulate (this does not have to be a constant
value), and the number of iterations per start location, the tool willgenerate simulated paths
and write the output to a point output le (and optionally also a line output le). You may
also optionally specify a polygon that denes a re ective boundary for simulated paths (i.e.
paths will not be permitted to cross outside of this polygon). This is a  exible tool and can
be run in many dierent ways for dierent purposes, but it is called a ’simple’CRW simulator
because it does not accommodate multiple behavioural states for simulated paths (all steps
and turns are drawn from a single pair of distributions).
Step length and turn angle distributions can be specied as either empirical distributions
(which are loaded from a text le), or as statistical distributions from which random val-
ues are generated using R. Please refer to the section ’Specifying statistical and empirical
distributions’ for detailed instructions on how to specify distributions.
If you specify an empirical distribution that represents turn angles in radians then you
must also set the radians=TRUE option. If you fail to do this the values will be interpreted
as degrees and your paths will turn very little. If you specify a probability density function
for the turn angle distribution then this is always interpreted as radians and you cannot
override this setting using the ’radians’ option (it is ignored).
It is important to exercise care when using the re ective polygon boundary option. If
you specify a turn angle distribution that is too restrictive (strong directional persistence),
or a step length distribution with a mean value that is large relative to the size of the
boundary polygon, then the simulations may take a very long time to run. The risk is
that the simulated path reaches the edge of the re ective boundary and then the restrictive
movement parameters ensure that the vast majority of potential steps are rejected.
Syntax
movement.simplecrw(inpoint, uideld, tad, sld, nsteps, iterations, outpoint, [bnd], [outline],
[radians], [where]);
103
C# PDF Sticky Note Library: add, delete, update PDF note in C#.net
C#.NET PDF SDK - Add Sticky Note to PDF Page in C#.NET. Able to add notes to PDF using C# source code in Visual Studio .NET framework.
pdf remove metadata; get pdf metadata
C# PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file for C#
PDF SDK for .NET allows you to read, add, edit, update, and delete PDF file metadata, like Title, Subject, Author, Creator, Producer, Keywords, etc.
pdf metadata reader; batch pdf metadata editor
inpoint
the input start locations (a point feature source)
uideld
the name of the unique ID eld in the input data source
tad
the turn angle distribution (see full help documentation for details)
sld
the step length distribution (see full help documentation for details)
nsteps
the number of steps in the path or a eld name in the start location data
source containing these values
iterations the number of paths to generate per input point or input polygon
outpoint
the output point data source to create
[bnd]
apolygon data source containing a single polygon that denes the re ec-
tive boundary for simulated paths
[outline]
also generates the output in line format (one line per step) in this data
source
[radians] (TRUE/FALSE) species whether the turn angle distribution is in radi-
ans (default=FALSE)
[where]
the selection statement that will be applied to the feature data source to
identify a subset of features to process (see full Help documentation for
further details)
Example
movement.simplecrw(inpoint="C:ndatanstartlocs.shp", uideld="STARTID",
tad="C:ndatanturns.csv", sld="C:ndatansteps.csv", nsteps=1000, iterations=100,
outpoint="C:ndatansims.shp");
movement.simplecrw(inpoint="C:ndatanstartlocs.shp", uideld="STARTID",
tad="C:ndatanturns.csv", sld="C:ndatansteps.csv", nsteps="STEPCNT", iterations=1,
outpoint="C:ndatansims.shp", outline="C:ndatansimsline.shp",
bnd="C:ndatanparkbnd.shp", radians=TRUE);
movement.simplecrw(inpoint="C:ndatanstartlocs.shp", uideld="STARTID",
tad=c("WRAPPEDCAUCHY",0,0.3), sld=c("EXPONENTIAL",0.0015), nsteps=20000,
iterations=100, outpoint="C:ndatansims.shp", radians=TRUE);
3.78 movement.ssfsamples
Generate Step Selection Function Sample Steps: Generates step selection function
(SSF) sampled steps from telemetry locations.
Description
This tool generates sampled steps along a movement path and is designed to faciliate the
developement of step selection function (SSF) models (Fortin et al. 2005). Given an observed
movement path (e.g. using GPS telemetry collar data), an SSF model characterizes the
relative probability ofselecting astepbasedonaset ofcovariates. It is auseversus availability
design in which each observed step is compared to a sample of available steps at each point
along the movement path. A ’step’ in this context refers to the straight line that connects
two consecutive locations. The model does not assume that animals move in a straight line
104
VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
Various of PDF text and images processing features for VB.NET project. Multiple metadata types of PDF file can be easily added and processed. PDF Metadata Edit.
pdf metadata editor online; pdf xmp metadata viewer
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
C#.NET PDF SDK - Add Image to PDF Page in C#.NET. How to Insert & Add Image, Picture or Logo on PDF Page Using C#.NET. Add Image to PDF Page Using C#.NET.
pdf metadata editor; google search pdf metadata
betweenconsecutive locations, only that the environmentalcharacteristics along that line are
correlated with the likelihood of moving to that destination point.
The sampled steps are generated by drawing from an observed (or perhaps theoretical)
step length and turning angle distributions. These can either be empirical(essentially binned
frequency distributions basedon observedmovement paths), or tted statisticaldistributions
such as the wrapped Cauchy distribution for turning angles, or the gamma distribution for
step lengths. Please refer to the section ’Specifying statistical and empirical distributions’ for
detailed instructions on how to specify distributions. If you specify an empirical distribution
that represents turn angles in radians then you must also set the radians=TRUE option. If
you fail to do this the values will be interpreted as degrees and your sampled steps will turn
very little.
The unique ID eld and the order eld must currently both be integers. The order eld
is required because geodatabases can return records in a random order. So this tool sorts
the locations in ascending order based on this eld, which should therefore represent the
chronological sequence in the time series.
The ’include’ parameter controls whether the observed step is included in the output
le or not. It is suggested that you set this to TRUE, because merging the sampled and
observed steps at a later time can be tedious. Note that when TRUE, an additional eld
called ’OBSERVED’ is added to the output table to distinguish the real observed steps (1)
from the simulated sampled steps (0). This eld is needed in the statistical analysis.
References
Fortin, D., Beyer, H. L., Boyce, M. S., Smith, D. W., Duchesne, T. & Mao, J. S. 2005.
Wolves in uence elk movements: behavior shapes a trophic cascade in Yellowstone National
Park. Ecology 86: 1320-1330.
105
C# TIFF: TIFF Metadata Editor, How to Write & Read TIFF Metadata
You can also update, remove, and add metadata. List<EXIFField> exifMetadata = collection.ExifFields; You can also update, remove, and add metadata.
pdf metadata extract; batch pdf metadata
VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
VB: Add Password to PDF with Permission Settings Applied. This VB.NET example shows how to add PDF file password with access permission setting.
pdf xmp metadata editor; bulk edit pdf metadata
Syntax
movement.ssfsamples(in, uideld, order, tad, sld, nsamples,out, [include], [radians],[where]);
in
the input location time-series data (a point feature source)
uideld
the name of the unique ID eld in the input data source (unique for each
input point; must be integer)
order
the name of the chronological ordering eld in the input data source
(must be integer)
tad
the turn angle distribution (see full help documentation for details)
sld
the step length distribution (see full help documentation for details))
nsamples the number of sampled steps to generate at each observed location (see
full help documentation for details)
out
the output line data source to create
[include] (TRUE/FALSE) species whether the observed step is included in the
output (default=FALSE)
[radians] (TRUE/FALSE) species whether the turn angle distribution is in radi-
ans (default=FALSE)
[where]
the selection statement that will be applied to the point feature data
source to identify a subset of points to process (see full Help documen-
tation for further details)
Example
movement.ssfsamples(in="C:ndatantelemetry.shp", uideld="PNTUID", order="SEQID",
tad="C:ndatanturns.csv", sld="C:ndatansteps.csv", nsamples=10,
out="C:ndatanssfsamples.shp", include=TRUE, where="ANIMALID=1012");
movement.ssfsamples(in="C:ndatantelemetry.shp", uideld="PNTUID", order="SEQID",
tad="C:ndatanturns.csv", sld="C:ndatansteps.csv", nsamples=20,
out="C:ndatanssfsamples.shp", include=TRUE, where="ANIMALID=1012",
radians=TRUE);
movement.ssfsamples(in="C:ndatantelemetry.shp", uideld="PNTUID", order="SEQID",
tad=c("WRAPPEDCAUCHY",0,0.3), sld=c("EXPONENTIAL",0.0015), nsamples=20,
out="C:ndatanssfsamples.shp", radians=TRUE, where="ANIMALID=1012");
3.79 movement.ssfsim1
Simulate Step Selection Function Model: Simulates movement paths based on a step
selection function (SSF) model.
Description
This toolsimulates movement paths basedon astep selection function (SSF) model(Fortinet
al. 2005). Given an observed movement path (e.g. using GPS telemetry collar data), an SSF
model characterizes the relative probability of selecting a step based on a set of covariates.
It is a use versus availability design in which each observed step is compared to a sample
106
of available steps at each point along the movement path. A ’step’ in this context refers to
the straight line that connects two consecutive locations. The model does not assume that
animals move in a straight line between consecutive locations, only that the environmental
characteristics along that line are correlated with the likelihood of moving to that destination
point.
There are a large number of ways in which SSF models can be formulated, so writing a
generic simulation program is dicult. Various assumptions must be made regarding model
structure. This simulator is  exible, but it does assume that: 1) step lengths and turn angles
can be described by a single pair of distributions (i.e. there is only one movement state), 2)
all of the covariates can be described by spatial raster datasets, and 3) these raster datasets
are static (they do not change through time).
Themodelis specied using a’modelle’,whichdescribethe covariate raster datasets, the
model coecients, and the summary statistic used. The raster dataset is simply the path to
theraster, e.g. C:ndatandem (for agrid) or C:ndatanndvi.img(fora rasterinImagineformat).
The rasters do not have to be in the same folder, but they should be stored locally (not on a
network drive). It is highly recommended that you avoid spaces and all unusual characters
in the folder and le names associated with these raster datasets, and that the rasters are
not buried in a deep directory structure. The model coecients should be expressed to the
maximum level of precision. The summary statistic is expressed as text and can be one of
the following: MEAN, MIN, MAX, START, END, MED, SUM. ’MEAN’ refers to the length
weighted mean of the covariate along the step. If your covariate represents a dummy variable
then the mean corresponds to the proportion of the step that passes through that covariate.
’Min’ and ’max’ are the minimum or maximum values encountered along the step. ’Start’
and ’end’ are the value of the covariate at the beginning/end of the step respectively. ’MED’
refers to the median value along the step (note that this does not take into account the
length of the segment that passes through a cell: all cell values encountered along the step
contribute equally to the calculation of the median).
The format of the model le must be strictly observed. All values are separated by
commas, and each line must contain only a single covariate description. Blank lines and
other comments are not permitted. The rst line of the model le will always be ’INTER-
CEPT,value’, where value is the intercept value from the model, e.g. -13.2893934. Each sub-
sequent line will follow the format: ’raster-dataset, value, summary-statistic’, where raster-
dataset is the full path to the raster dataset, value is the model coecient, and summary-
statistic is one one of the key words described above.
Theuser is required toprepare the raster datasets representing covariates prior to running
this tool. First, all of the raster datasets must be in the same projection. The cell sizes and
alignment ofcells among the raster datasetscan bedierent. In mostcases the rasterdatasets
used toparameterize the modelwill be used in the simulations. If they are not,then you must
take care to ensure that consistent units are maintained. For instance, if a digital elevation
model (DEM) that measures elevation meters is used as a covariate in the model, then you
must ensure that the units of the DEM used in the simulations is also in meters, not in feet.
Changes in units will in uence the coecient values that are estimated by the model, hence
the need to ensure units are consistent.
You must also convert any thematic (categorical) rasters to dummy variable rasters. For
107
instance, if a raster with 5 categorical habitat types is used in the SSF model, you must
create 4 separate rasters coded as 1 or 0 to represent those variables in the simulation. (Note
that you only need to create 4 rasters even though there are 5 habitat types in the model
because one of those habitat types is the ’reference’ category and is therefore omitted).
If you have performed any transformations of variables in the model, then you must also
apply those transformations to the raster layer before running the simulation. For instance,
you might have centred and log transformed a variable prior to tting the model, in which
case you would use Raster Calculator to centre and log transform the raster dataset. Or you
might have a quadratic expression for a covariate like slope, in which case you must provide
both the slope and slope
2
rasters. The key point is that the raster you use in this simulation
must be directly related to the coecient that the SSF model has estimated.
It is also important that you specify an appropriate boundary polygon. The most impor-
tant aspect of this boundary is that it does not exceed the limits of any of the covariate raster
datasets. Often, raster datasets cover dierent extents so you must take care to ensure that
the polygon you create does not exceed the boundaries of any of these raster datasets. If you
are simulating paths within the context of a home range, then the boundary polygon would
be the home range polygon, and might only cover a small fraction of your raster datasets.
But if you are interested in more of a landscape level simulation in which the simulated paths
are not constrained to a pre-dened home range, then the polygon would be the common
minimum limit of the raster datasets. The projection of the boundary polygon must also
match the raster datasets.
Thestart locations canbe random or basedon actualanimallocations. In either case, you
must ensure that the projectionof the start locations is identicaltothat of the raster datasets
and boundary polygon. Note that there are a number of dierent strategies you can employ
with regard to start locations. For instance, if you were generating a totalof 10000 simulated
paths you might have 1) a single point that all simulated paths start from (iterations=10000),
2) a set of 100random points from which simulations start from (iterations=100), or 3) 10000
random points from which one path starts from each location (iterations=1). The strategy
you adopt will depend on the question you are interested in addressing.
This simulationtoolfunctions as follows. From thestart location, arandom initialbearing
is drawn from a uniform distribution. The code then generates a number of available steps
(the number of steps is controlled by the ’nsamples’ option), and calculates the likelihood of
each step based on the model, i.e. if we let w = exp(beta0 + beta1 * X1 + ... + betaN *
XN), then the likelihood is calculated as L=w/(1+w). All available steps must end inside
the boundary polygon (sampling continues until a full set of available steps that end inside
the boundary polygon is acquired). Of these available steps, a single step is selected as the
’used’ step where the probability of selection is proportional to the likelihood. Each of the
available steps thus has a chance of being selected (if the likelihood of the step is non-zero).
Step length and turn angle distributions can be specied as either empirical distributions
(which are loaded from a text le), or as statistical distributions from which random val-
ues are generated using R. Please refer to the section ’Specifying statistical and empirical
distributions’ for detailed instructions on how to specify distributions.
If you specify an empirical distribution that represents turn angles in radians then you
must also set the radians=TRUE option. If you fail to do this the values will be interpreted
108
as degrees and your paths will turn very little. If you specify a probability density function
for the turn angle distribution then this is always interpreted as radians and you cannot
override this setting using the ’radians’ option (it is ignored).
If you specify a turn angle distribution that is too restrictive (strong directional persis-
tence), or a step length distribution with a mean value that is large relative to the size of
the boundary polygon, then the simulations may take a very long time to run. The risk is
that the simulated path reaches the edge of the re ective boundary and then the restrictive
movement parameters ensure that the vast majority of potential steps are rejected. This will
eventually cause the simulator to fail.
It is recommended that you rst use the movement.simplecrw commandtosimulate move-
ment paths based only on the set of start locations, the step length and turn angle distribu-
tions, and the boundary polygon. This allows you to check that the distributions you have
specied are reasonable before running the more complicated SSF simulation.
References
Fortin, D., Beyer, H. L., Boyce, M. S., Smith, D. W., Duchesne, T. & Mao, J. S. 2005.
Wolves in uence elk movements: behavior shapes a trophic cascade in Yellowstone National
Park. Ecology 86: 1320-1330.
Syntax
movement.ssfsim1(model, inpoint, uideld, tad, sld, nsamples, nsteps, iterations, outpoint,
bnd, [outline], [radians], [where]);
model
the SSF model specication le (see full help documentation for details)
inpoint
the input start locations (a point feature source)
uideld
the name of the unique ID eld in the input data source
tad
the turn angle distribution (see full help documentation for details)
sld
the step length distribution (see full help documentation for details))
nsamples the number of potential steps to evaluate at each simulated step (see full
help documentation for details)
nsteps
the number of steps in the path or a eld name in the start location data
source containing these values
iterations the number of paths to generate per input point or input polygon
outpoint
the output point data source to create
bnd
apolygon data source containing a single polygon that denes the re ec-
tive boundary for simulated paths
[outline]
also generates the output in line format (one line per step) in this data
source
[radians] (TRUE/FALSE) species whether the turn angle distribution is in radi-
ans (default=FALSE)
[where]
the selection statement that will be applied to the point feature data
source to identify a subset of points to process (see full Help documen-
tation for further details)
109
Example
movement.ssfsim1(model="C:ndatanssfmodel1.txt", inpoint="C:ndatanstartlocs.shp",
uideld="STARTID", tad="C:ndatanturns.csv", sld="C:ndatansteps.csv", nsamples=20,
nsteps=1000, iterations=100, outpoint="C:ndatansims.shp",
bnd="C:ndatanparkbnd.shp");
movement.ssfsim1(model="C:ndatanssfmodel1.txt", inpoint="C:ndatanstartlocs.shp",
uideld="STARTID", tad="C:ndatanturns.csv", sld="C:ndatansteps.csv", nsamples=50,
nsteps="STEPCNT", iterations=1, outpoint="C:ndatansims.shp",
outline="C:ndatansimsline.shp", bnd="C:ndatanparkbnd.shp", radians=TRUE);
movement.ssfsim1(model="C:ndatanssfmodel1.txt", inpoint="C:ndatanstartlocs.shp",
uideld="STARTID", tad=c("WRAPPEDCAUCHY",0,0.3),
sld=c("EXPONENTIAL",0.0015), nsamples=20, nsteps=20000, iterations=100,
outpoint="C:ndatansims.shp", bnd="C:ndatanhrbnd.shp", radians=TRUE);
An example of the model le structure:
INTERCEPT, 12.3456789
C:ndatanhabforest.img, 0.987654, MEAN
C:ndatanhabmead.img, -1.234567, MEAN
C:ndatanslope, 2.9589334, MIN
C:ndatanslope2, -0.0290340, MIN
C:ndatanbiomass, 6.290384, MAX
3.80 neighbourhoodstatistics
Raster Neighbourhood Statistics: Calculates summary statistics in a circular roving
window based on raster data.
Description
This tool calculates basic summary statistics (sum, mean, minimum, maximum, standard
deviation,median)ofraster valueswithinacircular,roving analysis window. This is similarto
what is called ’zonalstatistics’in somesoftware. The input is asingleraster layerrepresenting
continuous data (it wouldnot beappropriate to use this command withthematic rasterdata),
and an analysis window radius that is dened in coordinate system units. For a cell to be
included in the calculation of the statistics the centre of the cellmust fall within the specied
distance of the centre of the target cell.
The metrics calculated at the edges of the raster are obviously based on smaller samples
than the cells inthe interior of the raster (when the analysis window extends beyond the edge
of the raster). Similarly, when NoData cells are encontered within the analysis window, they
are ignored, and the metrics are calculated on the remaining cells with data values. Although
the mean, minimum,maximum and median are probably fairly robust to this reduced sample
size issue, it is possible that the standard deviation is underestimated somewhat in these
edge cells. The sum metric is the most sensitive to the number of samples, and this metric is
adjusted to remove this bias. The observed sum is divided by: the observed number of cells
110
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested