that are delivered as separate les for each year, or XML les containing spatial data), but
are likely to be useful for a wide range of tasks. See the commands beginning with ’le’ for
further information.
Syntax
le.extractlines(le, newle, start, end);
le
the full path to the text le
newle the full path to the new text le to create
start
the line number to start reading from the input le
end
the line number to stop reading from the input le
Example
le.extractlines(le="C:ndatanroads.gml", newle="C:ndatanroads.txt", start=100,
end=250);
3.35 le.readlines
Read Lines From Text FIle: Extracts a specied range of lines from a textle and writes
them to the output window.
Description
This tool extracts a specied range of lines from a text le and writes them to the output
window in this tool. It was designed to provide a way of inspecting text les (e.g. XML or
GML les) that are so large they cannot be conveniently opened in other software. The user
species a start and end line that denes the range of lines to read. If the end line specied
is larger than the number of lines in the le the tool will read all lines from the specied start
line to the end of the le. The le.countlines tool can be used to determine the total number
of lines in the text le, which is useful if you wish to read the last lines in the le. This tool
is also useful for determining if text data les have header lines (e.g. read the rst 10 lines).
Note that this tool is similar to the le.extractlines tool but writes the lines to the output
window rather than a dierent le. The advantage of this is that it allow faster inspection
of a le, but if the le contains special characters then there is a risk it will not be displayed
properly in the output window. The le.extractlines tool is better if you want a precise
extraction whereas this tool is more useful for a quick but potentially imprecise investigation.
XML and GML les can be particularly problematic with this tool, but data les are usually
ne.
Anumber of tools have been developed to manipulate text les. They were developed to
make it more ecient to import datasets delivered in text le format (e.g. weather datasets
that are delivered as separate les for each year, or XML les containing spatial data), but
are likely to be useful for a wide range of tasks. See the commands beginning with ’le’ for
further information.
51
Pdf metadata viewer online - add, remove, update PDF metadata in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Allow C# Developers to Read, Add, Edit, Update and Delete PDF Metadata
pdf metadata reader; add metadata to pdf programmatically
Pdf metadata viewer online - VB.NET PDF metadata library: add, remove, update PDF metadata in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Enable VB.NET Users to Read, Write, Edit, Delete and Update PDF Document Metadata
acrobat pdf additional metadata; remove metadata from pdf acrobat
Syntax
le.readlines(le, start, end);
le
the full path to the text le
start the line number to start reading
end
the line number to end reading
Example
le.readlines(le="C:ndatanroads.gml", start=1, end=100);
3.36 le.split
Split Text File: Splits a text le into multiple, approximately equally sized, smaller text
les.
Description
This tool splits a text le into multiple, approximately equally sized, smaller text les. There
are two optional arguments that make this a particularly useful command in certain situ-
ations. First, the ’hdr’ option allows you to specify the number of lines that make up the
header of the le that will also be written as the header of split les (thus preserving the
header among all the les). For many data les this will just be ’hdr=1’, but for some XML
and GML le format the headers can occupy several dozen lines.
The second optional argument is ’match’, which ensures a le is only split immediately
following lines containing the match search string. In data les this will not normally be
useful (because each line represents a dierent record and it does not matter where the break
in lines occurs). But in XML or GML les a single record can occupy multiple lines, so it is
important that breaks occur only at appropriate places.
If the output folder does not exist, the tool will attempt to create it. If any of the output
les already exist, an error is generated and the tool stops.
Anumber of tools have been developed to manipulate text les. They were developed to
make it more ecient to import datasets delivered in text le format (e.g. weather datasets
that are delivered as separate les for each year, or XML les containing spatial data), but
are likely to be useful for a wide range of tasks. See the commands beginning with ’le’ for
further information.
52
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
NET edit PDF bookmark, C#.NET edit PDF metadata, C#.NET NET read barcodes from PDF, C#.NET OCR scan PDF. Viewer & Editors, C# ASP.NET Document Viewer, C# Online
remove pdf metadata; pdf remove metadata
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
PDF Online. Convert PDF Online. WPF PDF Viewer. View PDF in Image to PDF. Image: Remove Image from PDF Page. Edit URL. Bookmark: Edit Bookmark. Metadata: Edit, Delete
search pdf metadata; read pdf metadata java
Syntax
le.split(le, folder, prex, cnt, [hdr], [match]);
le
the full path to the input text le
folder
the output folder
prex
the le name prex of the output les
cnt
the number of output les to create (the input le is split between them)
[hdr]
the number of header lines from the beginning of the le to include in
each output le (default=0)
[match] breaks the le only on lines containing this string (unspecied by default)
Example
le.split(le="C:ndatanroads.gml", folder="C:ndatannewroads", prex="roads", cnt=5);
le.split(le="C:ndatanroads.gml", folder="C:ndatannewroads", prex="roads", cnt=5,
hdr=7, match="ENDOFRECORD");
3.37 for
For Loop: A programming device that facilitates iterative repetition of commands.
Description
Afor loop is a programming device that allows you to repeat a set of commands many times
with only a few lines of code. The format of the for loop in this software is similar to that
of R. The word ’for’ indicates that you are starting a loop. The next expression controls
the number of iterations: for(i in 1:100) implies that the loop is going to repeat itself 100
times. The letter ’i’ is the index variable name - it could be any simple string you wish to
use (another letter, or even a text string like ’num’). You can use this variable in subsequent
commands to construct command arguments using the paste() function.
The set of commands that are to be repeated must be contained by a set of braces f g,
and each command must end with a semi-colon to distinguish it from the next command.
Nested for loops are supported, but it is essential to use a dierent index variable for each
nested loop (e.g. i, j, k for three nested loops, for instance). For loops can be included within
scripts that you call with the ’run’ command.
If you want to iterate across anon-continuous range ofnumbers, or a sequence of arbitrary
values, then you can combine the use of a GME variable with a for loop. For example, given
alist of animal ID numbers, i.e. uid <- c(12, 14, 19, 21);, a for loop could be specied as
for(i in 1:length(uid)) f ... g, and the id numbers can be retrieved from within the loop using
uid[i] whereever needed.
An advanced problem is building the for(i in 1:100) statement using dynamic variables.
For instance, rather than specify 1 and 100, you might want to use variables you have
previously dened (see ’Strategic commands, functions and clauses’ section). This is possible,
however: you must ensure the variables are dened (and visible using the ls() command) prior
to submittingthe for loop command text. I.e. you cannot dene the variables and use them in
53
VB.NET PDF - WPF PDF Viewer for VB.NET Program
NET edit PDF bookmark, C#.NET edit PDF metadata, C#.NET NET read barcodes from PDF, C#.NET OCR scan PDF. Viewer & Editors, C# ASP.NET Document Viewer, C# Online
add metadata to pdf file; bulk edit pdf metadata
VB.NET PDF - Create PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
NET edit PDF bookmark, C#.NET edit PDF metadata, C#.NET NET read barcodes from PDF, C#.NET OCR scan PDF. Viewer & Editors, C# ASP.NET Document Viewer, C# Online
pdf metadata viewer online; read pdf metadata
afor loop in the same block of text that is submitted to GME. This is a command interpreter
limitation that I intend to resolve in a future update. This should not be a limitation to the
majority of users.
See the Automation and Batch Processing section near the beginning of the manual for
more detailed examples and explanation of how to use for loops.
See also: paste, r.eval, list.vector, list.raster
Syntax
for(i in x:y) ...commands... ;
iin x:y i is the variable name that is incremented within the for loop (it can
be any simple string), x is an integer at which the looping begins and
yis another integer (greater than or equal to x) at which the looping
ends, e.g. for(i in 1:100). The command is followed by a series of other
commands enclosed within braces and separated by semicolons that are
executed at each iteration of the loop: f ...commands... g
Example
for(i in 1:5) f
genrandompnts(poly="C:ndatanelds.shp", sample=100, out=paste("C:ndatansamples", i,
".shp"));
addxy(in=paste("C:ndatansamples", i, ".shp"), prex="COORD");
r.plotxy(in=paste("C:ndatansamples", i, ".shp", xeld="COORDX", yeld="COORDY");
g;
Results in the generation of 5 point datasets, with COORDX, COORDY elds in the
attribute table, and ve R graphs of the x, y coordinates.
3.38 gencirclesinpolys
Generate Circles In Polygons: Generates a regular arrangement of circles within the
bounds of polygons.
Description
This tool generates a regular arrangement of circles within the bounds of polygons. The
user species the radius of the circles (a constant) and the spacing between the centres of the
circles, which controls the amount of overlap in adjacent circles and the amount of interstitial
space. Only circles that are completely contained by the polygon are retained. If this tool
does not suit your purpose you may nd the ’genshapes’ command more useful - it will also
generate a regular arrangement of circles but without the constraint that the circles must
be completely contained by the polygon. Also, the genhexagonsinpolys command serves a
similar function to this tool but using hexagons instead of circles.
54
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to create PDF document from other file
NET edit PDF bookmark, C#.NET edit PDF metadata, C#.NET NET read barcodes from PDF, C#.NET OCR scan PDF. Viewer & Editors, C# ASP.NET Document Viewer, C# Online
embed metadata in pdf; get pdf metadata
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to view, annotate, convert and print PDF in
PDF Online. Convert PDF Online. WPF PDF Viewer. View PDF in Image to PDF. Image: Remove Image from PDF Page. Edit URL. Bookmark: Edit Bookmark. Metadata: Edit, Delete
modify pdf metadata; remove metadata from pdf
There is an element of randomisation built into this tool: the overall placement of the grid
of circles is determined randomly so that if you run the tool twice, you will get a dierent
result. This is important because it allows you to run the tool many times in an attempt to
nd the maximum number of circles that can t in a given polygon. This will depend on the
complex shape of the polygon and generally cannot be determined analytically.
Note the default spacing option allows just enough overlap of circles to eliminate inter-
stitial spaces between circles. If you prefer that there is no overlap between circles then set
the spacing option to two times the radius. This ensures that the circles are touching, but
there is no overlap.
One possible application of this tool might be estimating the number of viable home
ranges that an area might contain.
Syntax
gencirclesinpolys(in, uideld, out, radius, [spacing], [where]);
in
the input polygon data source
uideld
the unique ID eld of the input feature data source
out
the output polygon data source
radius
the radius of the circles (a constant specied in the coordinate system
units of the reference layer)
[spacing] the distance between adjacent circle centres (defaults to 2*ra-
dius*cos(PI/6), which is the largest possible spacing that creates no in-
terstitial spaces between circles)
[where]
the selection statement that will be applied to the feature data source to
identify a subset of features to process (see full Help documentation for
further details)
Example
gencirclesinpolys(in="C:ndatanreferencelayer.shp", out="C:ndatanmyoutput.shp",
radius=100);
gencirclesinpolys(in="C:ndatanboundaries.shp", out="C:ndatanmyoutput.shp",
radius=10.567, spacing=30);
3.39 gencondrandompnts
Generate Conditional Random Points: Generates a sample of random points around
each input point, designed for a conditional logistic regression (case controlled) style of anal-
ysis.
Description
This tool generates a sample of random points that are associated with each point in an input
point data source. The command options can be combined in a variety of ways to produce
55
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view, annotate, create and convert PDF
This online HTML5 PDF document viewer library component offers reliable and excellent functionalities. C#.NET users and developers
preview edit pdf metadata; add metadata to pdf
VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images
zonal information, metadata, and so on. Extract image from PDF free in .NET framework application with trial SDK components for .NET. Online source codes for
pdf xmp metadata editor; view pdf metadata
dierent sampling outcomes. Although this tool is therefore very  exible, care must be taken
to ensure that the parameters specied to not result in a problem that has no solution.
For each point in a point data source this tool will generate a sample of random points
based on that points spatial location and a sampling distribution you specify. The number of
points generated can be a constant or variable between points. In the latter case the number
of points to generate per polygon must be stored in a eld in the point attribute table.
Points are generated by drawing from a bivariate distribution. Two distributions are
currently supported: BVUNIFORM, and BVNORMAL. In the case of BVUNIFORM, if
you specify a single parameter this is assumed to represent the radius of the circle centred
on the source point within which uniformly distributed sample points are generated (this
distance should be specied in coordinate system units, e.g. meters for UTM). However, if
two parameters are specied then points are generated within a ’donut’ shape centred on the
source point, i.e. the rst parameter denes the radius of the circle that is the inside of the
donut, and the second value denes the radius of the circle that is the outside of the donut.
In the case of the BVNORMAL distribution the single parameter represents the standard
deviation of the distribution in both the x and y directions (assumed to be the same, with no
covariance). The ’mvrnorm’ function in the MASS library in R is used to generate these bi-
variatenormal values. To specify the distributions you would either type’c("BVUNIFORM",
value)’ or ’c("BVUNIFORM", value, value)’ or ’c("BVNORMAL", value)’, where the word
value is replaced by the radius or variance respectively.
The ’mindist’ option will ensure that all output points are this minimum distance apart.
This value should be specied in coordinate system units (e.g. meters for UTM). If this
value is too large then the problem may have no solution. For example. it is not possible
to generate 100 points in a square kilometer where the minimum distance between points is
500m.
The ’excl’ option can be used to prevent points from being generated within the polygons
of this dataset. For example, if you were to generate forest sampling points using a stand
polygon layer, you might use a second polygon layer representing a 100m buer of roads as
the exclusion layer to prevent points from occurring too close to roads. Again, there is a
risk here of creating an unsolvable problem: if the exclusion polygons cover all of the input
polygons then no random points can be generated.
56
Syntax
gencondrandompnts(in, uideld, sample, distrib, out, [mindist], [excl], [where]);
in
the input point data source
uideld
the name of the unique point ID eld in the input data source
sample
the sample size: either a number representing the constant sample size
per input point, or the eld name of eld containing the sample size for
that point
distrib
the sampling distribution, either c("BVUNIFORM", radius) or
c("BVUNIFORM", radius1, radius2) or c("BVNORMAL", variance)
(see full help documentation for details)
out
the output point data source
[mindist] if specied, points are prevented from occurring within this minimum
distance of each other (specied in coordinate system units of the refer-
ence layer); this option can be dangerous - see the help documentation
for details
[excl]
the polygon data source containing exclusion polygons: points are pre-
vented from being generated within these polygons; this option can be
dangerous - see the help documentation for details
[where]
the selection statement that will be applied to the feature data source to
identify a subset of features to process (see full Help documentation for
further details)
Example
gencondrandompnts(in="C:ndatanlocations.shp", uideld="LOCID", sample=10,
distrib=c("BVUNIFORM",100), out="C:ndatancondsamplepnts.shp");
gencondrandompnts(in="C:ndatanlocations.shp", uideld="LOCID",
sample="SAMPSIZE", distrib=c("BVNORMAL",29.6),
out="C:ndatancondsamplepnts.shp");
3.40 generalizeregions
Generalize Raster Regions: Generalizes / simplies a thematic raster dataset based on
the size of groups of contiguous pixels of the same value.
Description
This tool generalizes / simplies a thematic (categorical) raster dataset by recoding the
smallest contiguous groups of pixels of the same value with the pixel value of the largest
neighbouring group. You must run the regiongroup command before running this command
as the output of the regiongroup command serves as the input to this command.
The cell neighbourhood that is evaluated can be all eight cells that surround a cell (this is
the default option), or can be limited to only the four cardinal cells using the ’diag=FALSE’
57
option, which prevents diagonal connections being evaluated when dening region mem-
bership. You will probably want to use use the same option here that was used with the
regiongroup command.
This is an iterative command whereby the maximum allowed number of iterations is
controlled by the limit option. If your raster is simple (relatively homogeneous) then only one
or two iterations may be required. However, If portionsof the raster are highly heterogeneous,
and many small groups of pixels are mixed together, then more iterations will be required to
arrive at a solution that no longer changes. As a general rule, 20 iterations is a reasonable
starting point, but it is recommended that you inspect the raster to ensure the command has
produced consistent results. Watch the number of groups to classify decrease in the progress
bar as it processes. If it reaches 0 then it has reached an endpoint that cannot be further
improved.
Syntax
generalizeregions(in, table, limit, out, [diag]);
in
the input raster region data source
table the input table data source resulting from the regiongroup command
limit the minimum region size expressed as the minimum number of connected
raster pixels
out
the output raster data source
[diag] (TRUE/FALSE) allow cells to be diagonally connected when generalizing
regions? (default=TRUE)
Example
generalizeregions(in="C:ndatanlcovregions.img", table="C:ndatanlcovregions.dbf",
limit=10, out="C:ndatanlcovgen");
generalizeregions(in="C:ndatanlcovrg", table="C:ndatanlcovrg.dbf", limit=20,
out="C:ndatanlcovgeneralized.tif", diag=FALSE);
3.41 genhexagonsinpolys
Generate Hexagons In Polygons: Generates a regular arrangement of hexagons within
the bounds of polygons.
Description
This tool generates a regular arrangement of hexagons within the bounds of each polygon in
apolygon data source. The user species the dimension of the hexagons (a constant) and the
amount of spacing between adjacent hexagons. Only hexagons that are completely contained
by each polygon are retained. Note that if the polygons overlap, then the resulting hexagons
are also likely to overlap. If this tool does not suit your purpose you may nd the ’genshapes’
command more useful - it will also generate a regular arrangement of hexagons but without
the constraint that the hexagons must be completely contained by the polygon. Also, the
58
gencirclesinpolys command serves a similar function to this tool but using circles instead of
hexagons.
There is an element of randomisation built into this tool: the overall placement of the
hexagon grid is determined randomly so that if you run the tool twice, you will get a dierent
result. This is important because it allows you to run the tool many times in an attempt to
nd the maximum number of hexagons that can t in a given polygon. This will depend on
the complex shape of the polygon and generally cannot be determined analytically.
Note that hexagons mesh together perfectly to completely cover space with no overlap and
with no interstitial spaces between hexagons (unlike circles). However, the ’spacing’ option
does allow you to add overlap (a negative value) or increase the spacing between hexagons
(a positive value).
One possible application of this tool might be estimating the number of viable home
ranges that an area might contain.
Syntax
genhexagonsinpolys(in, uideld, out, dimension, [spacing], [where]);
in
the input polygon data source
uideld
the unique ID eld of the input feature data source
out
the output polygon data source
dimension the distance from the centre of the hexagon to the middle of one of the
six edges that dene the hexagon (a constant specied in the coordinate
system units of the reference layer)
[spacing]
the additional distance to add between hexagons (default= 0, which im-
plies no interstitial spaces between hexagons; a negative value results in
hexagon overlap)
[where]
the selection statement that will be applied to the feature data source to
identify a subset of features to process (see full Help documentation for
further details)
Example
genhexagonsinpolys(in="C:ndatanreferencelayer.shp", out="C:ndatanmyoutput.shp",
dimension=100);
genhexagonsinpolys(in="C:ndatanboundaries.shp", out="C:ndatanmyoutput.shp",
dimension=100, dimension=30);
3.42 genmcp
Generate Minimum Convex Polygons: Generates minimum convex polygons (MCP’s)
based on a set if input points.
59
Description
This tool generates minimum convex polygons (MCP) based on the set of input points spec-
ied by the user. If a unique ID eld is specied, one MCP is generated for each unique ID.
If no unique ID eld is specied, a single MCP polygon is generated based on all the points
in the input data source.
Syntax
genmcp(in, [uideld], out, [where]);
in
the input point data source
[uideld] the input unique ID eld (one MCP polygon is created for each unique
ID) - if omitted, one MCP is created for all the points in the dataset
out
the output polygon data source
[where]
the selection statement that will be applied to the feature data source to
identify a subset of features to process (see full Help documentation for
further details)
Example
genmcp(in="C:ndatansamplepnts.shp", out="C:ndatansamplemcp.shp");
genmcp(in="C:ndatantelemetry.shp", out="C:ndatantelem
mcp.shp",
uideld="ANIMALID");
3.43 genpointinpoly
Generate Points In Polygons: Generates a single point for each polygon in the input
data source.
Description
This tool generates a single point for each polygon in the input data source. The point can be
positioned using one of two settings. The LABEL setting, which is the default, generates a
point somewhere inside the boundary of the polygon. The algorithm ESRI uses to determine
the location of the label point is not published, but the point is guaranteed to be inside the
boundary of the polygon. The CENTROID position places the point in the geometric centre
of the polygon (the centre of gravity), which may not fall within the bounds of the polygon
depending upon its shape.
The attribute elds for the polygons can be copied to the new point dataset using the
’copyelds’ setting. By default the elds are not copied.
60
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested