c# pdfsharp fill pdf form : How to save editable pdf form in reader Library application class asp.net html wpf ajax HTML5-Case-Studies-full0-part1072

HTML5 Case Studies:
Case studies illustrating development 
approaches to use of HTML5 and 
related Open Web Platform standards 
in the UK Higher Education sector
Document details 
Author : 
Brian Kelly 
Date: 
16 May 2012 
Version: 
V1.0 
Rights 
This work has been published under a Creative Commons attribution-
sharealike 2.0 licence.  
About 
This document introduces the series of HTML5 case studies which have been 
funded by the JISC to provide examples of development work in use of 
HTML5 to support a range of scholarly activities. 
Acknowledgements 
UKOLN is funded by the Joint Information Systems Committee (JISC) of the Higher and Further 
Education Funding Councils, as well as by project funding from the JISC and the European 
Union. UKOLN also receives support from the University of Bath where it is based. 
How to save editable pdf form in reader - extract form data from PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WPF
Help to Read and Extract Field Data from PDF with a Convenient C# Solution
pdf data extraction to excel; pdf form save with reader
How to save editable pdf form in reader - VB.NET PDF Form Data Read library: extract form data from PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WPF
Convenient VB.NET Solution to Read and Extract Field Data from PDF
extracting data from pdf to excel; c# read pdf form fields
Table of Contents 
Introduction 
INTRO 
Case Study 1:  
CS-1 
Case Study 2  
CS-2 
Case Study 3:  
CS-3 
Case Study 4:  
CS-4 
Case Study 5:  
CS-5 
Case Study 6:  
CS-6 
Case Study 7:  
CS-7 
Case Study 9:  
CS-8 
Case Study 9:  
CS-9 
About This Document 
This document conations nine case studies which describe development approaches for the 
use of HTML5 and associated Open Web Platform standards to support a variety of use cases 
in teaching and learning and research. 
C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF
Convert multiple pages PowerPoint to fillable and editable PDF documents. Description: Convert to PDF/TIFF and save it on the disk. Parameters:
exporting pdf data to excel; how to extract data from pdf to excel
C# Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF in C#
Create fillable and editable PDF documents from Excel in both .NET WinForms and ASP.NET. Description: Convert to PDF/TIFF and save it on the disk.
extract table data from pdf; saving pdf forms in acrobat reader
INTRO: 1 
Figure 2: HTML5 APIs 
Figure 1: HTML5 logo 
Introduction to the HTML5 Case Studies 
 About This Document  
This document provides an introduction to a series of HTML5 case studies which were 
commissioned by the JISC. The document gives an introduction to HTML5 and related 
standards developed by the W3C and explains why these developments represent a significant 
development to Web standards, which is of more significance than previous incremental 
developments to HTML and CSS. 
 About HTML5 
As described in Wikipedia [1] HTML5 is a markup language for structuring 
and presenting content on the Web. HTML5 is the fifth version of the HTML 
language which was created in 1990. Since then the language has evolved 
from HTML 1, HTML 2, HTML 3.2, HTML 4 and XHTML 1.  
The core aims of HTML5 are to improve the language with support for the 
latest multimedia while keeping it easily readable by humans and 
consistently understood by computers and devices. 
HTML5 has been developed as a response to the observation that the 
HTML and XHTML standards  in common use on the Web are a mixture of 
features introduced by various specifications, along with those introduced 
by software products such as web browsers, those established by common practice, and the 
many syntax errors in existing web documents 
It is also an attempt to define a single markup language that can be written in either HTML or 
XHTML syntax. It includes detailed processing models to encourage more interoperable 
implementations; it extends, improves and rationalises the markup available for documents, and 
introduces markup and application programming interfaces (APIs) for complex web applications. 
For the same reasons, HTML5 is also a potential candidate for cross-platform mobile 
applications. Many features of HTML5 have been built with the consideration of being able to 
run on low-powered devices such as smartphones and tablets. 
In particular, HTML5 adds many new syntactical features. These include the new <video>, 
<audio> and <canvas> elements, as well as the integration of Scalable Vector Graphics (SVG) 
content that replaces the uses of generic <object> tags and MathML for mathematical formulae.  
As illustrated in Figure 2 
HTML5 is built on a series of 
related technologies, which 
are at different stages of 
standardisation (see [2]). 
These features are designed 
to make it easy to include and 
handle multimedia and 
graphical content on the web 
without having to resort to 
proprietary plugins and APIs. 
Other new elements, such as 
<section>, <article>, 
<header> and <nav>, are 
designed to enrich the 
semantic content of 
documents. New attributes 
have been introduced for the 
same purpose, while some 
elements and attributes have 
been removed. Some 
elements, such as <a>, <cite> and <menu> have been changed, redefined or standardised. The 
APIs and document object model (DOM) are no longer afterthoughts, but are fundamental parts 
C# Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in C#.
Convert multiple pages Word to fillable and editable PDF documents in both .NET WinForms and ASP.NET. Description: Convert to PDF/TIFF and save it on the
pdf data extractor; extract table data from pdf to excel
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
file. Create and save editable PDF with a blank page, bookmarks, links, signatures, etc. Create fillable PDF document with fields.
how to fill pdf form in reader; how to save fillable pdf form in reader
INTRO: 2 
of the HTML5 specification. HTML5 also defines in some detail the required processing for 
invalid documents so that syntax errors will be treated uniformly by all conforming browsers and 
other user agents. 
 The Open Web Platform 
The Open Web Platform (OWP) is the name given to a collection of Web standards which have 
been developed by the W3C [3]. The Open Web Platform has been defined as "a platform for 
innovation, consolidation and cost efficiencies" [4].  
The Open Web Platform covers Web standards such as HTML5, CSS 2.1, CSS3 (including the 
Selectors, Media Queries, Text, Backgrounds and Borders, Colors, 2D Transformations, 3D 
Transformations, Transitions, Animations, and Multi-Columns modules), CSS Namespaces, 
SVG 1.1, MathML 3, WAI-ARIA 1.0, ECMAScript 5, 2D Context, WebGL, Web Storage, Indexed 
Database API, Web Workers, WebSockets Protocol/API, Geolocation API, Server-Sent Events, 
Element Traversal, DOM Level 3 Events, Media Fragments, XMLHttpRequest, Selectors API, 
CSSOM View Module, Cross-Origin Resource Sharing, File API, RDFa, Microdata and WOFF.  
Use of the term Open Web Platform can be helpful in describing developments which make use 
of standards which complement HTML5. 
The list of Web standards covered by the term provides an indication of the significant 
developments which are currently taking place which aim to provide much greater and more 
robust support for use of the Web across a variety of platforms and for a variety of uses. 
 Importance to Higher Education 
The Web became of strategic importance to higher education in the mid 1990s primarily in its 
role as an informational resource. As the potential of Web became better understood new types 
of services were developed and the Web is now used to support the key areas of significance to 
higher educational institutions: teaching and learning and research.  
However although innovative uses of the Web have been seen in these areas, the limitations of 
Web standards made it difficult and costly to develop highly-interactive cross-platform 
applications. Such difficulties meant that significant developments in use of the Web to provide 
applications (as opposed to access to information) was being led to large global companies, 
with Google’s range of services such as Google Docs providing an example of a 
widely used 
Web-based application.   
The experiences gained in developing such Web-based applications led to the evolution of Web 
standards to support such development work. In addition the growth in popularity of mobile 
devices led to the development of standards which could be used across multiple types of 
devices, in addition to the cross-platform independence which allowed Web services to be 
accessed across desktop PCs running MS Windows, Apple Macintosh or Linux operating 
systems. 
Developments to the HTML5 standard enable multimedia resources to be embedded in HTML 
resources as a native resources. In addition developments to related standards, such as SVG 
(Scalable Vector Graphics) and MathML (the Mathematics Markup Language) together with 
developments to standards which support programmatic manipulation of objects defined in 
these markup languages will provide a rich environment for the development of new types of 
tools and services which will be value to support a range of institutional requirements. 
In addition the support for mobile devices will enable access to this new generation of 
applications to be provided across a range of mobile devices, including iPhones and iPads, 
Android devices and smart phones and tablet computers which may use operating systems 
provided by other vendors. 
In brief the development of HTML5 and the Open Web Platform can provide the following 
benefits across higher education: 
A rich environment for the development of applications which can run in a Web browser. 
A rich environment for the development of applications which can run across a range of 
platforms and suit the particular requirements of mobile devices. 
VB.NET Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file
Create and save editable PDF with a blank page, bookmarks, links, signatures, etc. Create fillable PDF document with fields in Visual Basic .NET application.
how to fill out a pdf form with reader; extract data out of pdf file
C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
Quick to remove watermark and save PDF text, image, table Create editable Word file online without email. Password protected PDF file can be printed to Word for
flatten pdf form in reader; how to save a pdf form in reader
INTRO: 3 
A rich environment for defining the structure of scholarly resources, such as research 
papers, to support more effective processing of the resources. 
A neutral and open environment based on use of open standards which can provide a 
level playing field for application development. 
 About The HTML5 Case Studies 
The HTML5 case studies have been commissioned in order to demonstrate development 
approaches taking place across the higher education sector by early adopters in order to 
support a variety of use cases which are particularly relevant in a higher education context. 
The case studies are aimed primarily at developers and technical managers who wish to gain a 
better understanding of ways in which development approaches based on use of HTML5 and 
Open Web Platform can be used.  
Whilst the examples described in the case studies are being used across a number of higher 
educational institutions we appreciate that not all institutions will wish to make use of the 
approaches described in the case studies 
in particular we recognise that institutions may not 
have the development and support expertise to emulate the approaches described in the 
following documents. However increasingly we are seeing commercial vendors making use of 
HTML5 in new versions of their products. This suggests vendor support for HTML5 may be a 
relevant factor that in the procurement of new applications. 
 Summary of the HTML5 Case Studies 
The HTML5 case studies included in this work are summarised below: 
Case Study 1: Semantics and Metadata: Machine-Understandable Documents by Sam 
Adams 
Case Study 2: CWD: The Common Web Design by Alex Bilbie 
Case Study 3:  Re-Implementation of the Maavis Assistive Technology Using HTML5 by 
Steve Lee 
Case Study 4: Visualising Embedded Metadata by Mark MacGillivray 
Case Study 5: The HTML5-Based e-Lecture Framework by Qingqi Wang 
Case Study 6: 3Dactyl: Using WebGL to Represent Human Movement in 3D by 
Stephen Gray 
Case Study 7: Challenging the Tyranny of Citation Formats: Automated Citation 
Formatting by Peter Sefton 
Case Study 8: Conventions and Guidelines for Scholarly HTML5 Documents by Peter 
Sefton 
Case Study 9: WordDown: A Word-to-HTML5 Conversion Tool by Peter Sefton 
References 
[1] HTML5, Wikipedia, <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HTML5> 
[2] Sergey's HTML5 & CSS3 Quick Reference. 2nd Edition, Sergey Mavrody, ISBN  978-0-
9833867-2-8 
[3] Open Web Platform, Wikipedia, <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Open_Web_Platform > 
[4]  Jeffe Jappe, W3C CEO quoted in 
<http://www.w3.org/2001/tag/doc/IAB_Prague_2011_slides.html> 
Annotate, Redact Image in .NET Winforms| Online Tutorials
annotations; Click "TEXT" to create editable text annotations; click"Include Annotation" to save a Document & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
make pdf form editable in reader; extract data from pdf table
Process Multipage TIFF Images in Web Image Viewer| Online
Export multi-page TIFF image to a PDF; More image viewing & displaying functions. Multipage TIFF Processing. Load, Save an Editable Multi-page TIFF.
extract data from pdf c#; export pdf form data to excel
HTML5 Case Study 1:
Semantics and Metadata: Machine
-
Understandable Documents
Document details 
Author : 
Sam Adams 
Date: 
21 May 2012 
Version: 
V1.0 
Rights 
This work has been published under a Creative Commons attribution-
sharealike 2.0 licence.  
About 
This case study is one of a series of HTML5 case studies funded by the JISC 
which provide examples of development work in use of HTML5 to support a 
range of scholarly activities. 
Acknowledgements 
UKOLN is funded by the Joint Information Systems Committee (JISC) of the Higher and Further 
Education Funding Councils, as well as by project funding from the JISC and the European 
Union. UKOLN also receives support from the University of Bath where it is based. 
C# PDF Text Box Edit Library: add, delete, update PDF text box in
Able to create a fillable and editable text box Annot_9.pdf"; // open a PDF file PDFDocument the page PDFAnnotHandler.AddAnnotation(page, annot); // save to a
how to save filled out pdf form in reader; export pdf data to excel
C# PowerPoint - PowerPoint Creating in C#.NET
library is searchable and can be fully populated with editable text and with one blank page PPTXDocument doc = PPTXDocument.Create(outputFile); // Save the new
extract data from pdf forms; how to save pdf form data in reader
Contents 
1
About This Case Study 
1
Target Audience 
1
What Is Covered 
1
What Is Not Covered 
1
2
Introduction 
2
3
Case Study: Searching and Rich Snippets 
2
Person Profiles: Linked-In 
2
Google Recipe Search 
3
4
Example Application: Researchers' Homepages 
3
5
Technical Discussions 
4
Semantic data formats 
4
Metadata available in scholarly works 
6
Evaluation of suitability 
7
Example works 
11
6
Conclusions 
12
7
Addendum 
12
References 
13
CS-1: 1 
1.  About This Case Study 
Institutions and researchers need to maintain and grow their reputations: this means increasing 
the exposure of their research outputs on the web. Embedding machine understandable 
metadata into their Web sites will do this by making them more visible, easier to discover and 
increasing their uses. 
The benefits of such approaches for institutions are: 
Increased exposure of research (and other) outputs, and the effect this will have on 
assessment metrics, and hence funding. 
The benefits for the individual include: 
Increased personal exposure and recognition. 
Standing out from the crowd in an ever increasingly competitive environment. 
Assisting their own research, making it easier and more efficient to find things. 
Increasing the usefulness of their own outputs. 
This case study reviews the current mainstream approaches to embedding machine-
understandable
1
metadata into HTML documents: microformats, RDFa and microdata 
and 
investigates their use for creating 'semantic' scholarly publications. 
Note: all references to HTML5 microdata refer to the May 25, 2011 specification [7] unless 
otherwise stated. Changes contained in the editor’s draft 
[8] have not been addressed. 
Target Audience 
This case study is primarily designed for developers and publishers interested in embedding 
machine-understandable metadata into their Web pages, those interested in extracting such 
data, and the wider community interested in the development of a semantic web. 
It is also hoped that the communities behind the various technologies and specifications used in 
the course of this case study will be interested in the feedback regarding their usability and any 
limitations encountered. 
Finally this study highlights areas where further work may help to develop standard approaches. 
What Is Covered 
This case study reviews the current state of the microformat, RDFa and microdata approaches 
to embedding semantic mark-up in HTML documents, and reports on their application to the 
encoding of semantic metadata in scholarly publications. 
What Is Not Covered 
HTML5 adds a number of new elements for describing the structure of a Web page semantically 
e.g. 
article
header
section
. These elements have been used in the course of carrying 
out this case study, but will not be discussed here. 
Further information on the semantic HTML5 elements are available in this series of case studies 
[13] 
and Mark Pilgrim’s 
Dive into HTML5 [11]. 
1
Much of the information published on the web is machine-readable, but a much smaller 
proportion is currently machine-understandable. Information is machine-readable if it is 
published in a form that can be extracted and manipulated using a computer. If information is 
published in a machine-understandable manner, software agents can interpret it and reason 
over it. Unlike humans, machines cannot infer relationships and contexts, so in order to be 
machine-understandable, data must have clearly defined semantics and structure. 
Information published using ASCII characters in an HTML page, or in a CSV file or spreadsheet 
(rather than using images and PDFs) is machine-readable. However, without clear structure and 
semantic annotations giving ‘meaning’ to each component of the information in a manner that a 
software agent can interpret, it is not machine-understandable. 
CS-1: 2 
2.  Introduction 
Originally the World Wide Web's content was designed solely for humans to read, not for 
computers to interpret in a meaningful way. Today the technologies to change this exist: by 
creating HTML with embedded semantics we can publish documents that both humans and 
machines can 'understand'. The growth in the publication of machine-understandable 
information is driving the emergence of a Semantic Web 
an extension of the current [web], in 
which information is given well-defined meaning, better enabling computers and people to work 
in cooperation
” [2].
This is creating new opportunities, allowing heterogeneous data sources to 
be integrated and making it possible for software agents to infer new insights. These can be as 
'straightforward' as helping users to discover information, or as complex as discovering new 
relationships between known disease symptoms and potential molecular targets for new drugs 
[10]. 
At the same time, it has become impractical for anyone to manually keep on top of the ever 
accelerating volume of published text and data. Increasingly the first reading (and filtering) of 
publications is done by a machine 
this is effectively what search engines do. If you're not 
providing the appropriate machine-understandable metadata 
the equivalent of writing a 
'paragraph' for the machine to review 
then the humans are unlikely to ever get to see the 
document! On the other hand, providing rich metadata will make it easier for potential users to 
discover your content, and increase the likelihood that other services will direct people to your 
pages. 
This report presents some examples showing how search engines currently exploit embedded 
semantic metadata, and demonstrates how such data can be authored. It then provides a 
broader review of the state of current technologies, before discussing some issues that remain 
to be addressed. 
3.  Case Study: Searching and Rich Snippets 
Publishing machine-understandable metadata is not 'blue skies' thinking 
organisations are 
doing it right now, and today's search engines are exploiting it to improve their listings and 
provide a richer user experience. 
Person Profiles: Linked-In 
Searches for 'sam adams cambridge ' on both Google and Bing return my LinkedIn profile high 
in their hits. LinkedIn include semantic markup of data in their profiles, and both search engines 
extract information from this to enrich their search listings. 
Google displays my photo, location and current role, in what is termed a 'Rich Snippet': 
Figure 1. Google display of author’s LinkedIn profile
While Bing highlights my field of work, recommendations and connections: 
Figure 2. Bing display of author’s LinkedIn profile.
These additions make the result stand-out from surrounding hits, increasing the likelihood that 
someone will visit the page. 
CS-1: 3 
Google Recipe Search 
When one performs a search for 
shepherds pie
” on google.com
2
, the search engine will 
present the user with rich results listings, and options to filter the results in meaningful ways: 
Figure 3. The 
google.com rich results listings for search term “shepherds pie”.
Individual search hits (e.g. red box) can include a picture of the dish and information such as the 
number of reviews and average score, and the cooking time and number of calories per serving.  
Similarly the user is given options (green box) to filter the recipes (e.g. selecting those using 
lamb, rather than beef!), or those that require less than 30 minutes cooking time. All this is 
achieved by the web sites publishing the recipes embedding appropriate semantic markup in 
their pages, allowing the search engine to 'understand' the content. 
Similar workflows could be applied to searching in the scholarly domain, if appropriate 
semantically published data is made available. If the cookery business can do this, surely 
universities can 
higher education is falling behind home-economics Web sites! 
4.  Example Application: Researchers' Homepages 
All institutions provide homepages for their academic staff, and many for other staff and 
researchers too. These can be made to appear as 'Rich Snippets' in Google results with 
addition of semantic markup for a small number of metadata elements: 
Name 
Address (locality, country) 
Job Title 
Photograph (optional) 
The original markup is given below: 
2
As of November 19, 2011, this functionality is only available on google.com, not google.co.uk. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested